History (General/Chat)

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  • Decline and Fall

    09/02/2014 8:11:52 PM PDT · by Pelham · 18 replies
    Chronicles Magazine ^ | AUGUST 01, 2014 | Clyde Wilson
    am very far from original in noticing similarities in the histories of Rome and America—republics that became empires. The decline and fall of the former has often been thought to foretell the fate of the latter. A Frenchman some years ago wrote a fairly convincing book called The Coming Caesars. Such analogies are interesting and suggestive but should not be put forward too dogmatically. History does repeat itself because human nature remains the same and because civilized people build institutions that then perpetuate themselves for their own sake rather than for the purpose for which they were established. Power-seeking, luxury,...
  • 'Our Enemy Is Not Terrorism'

    09/02/2014 1:29:38 PM PDT · by Retain Mike · 35 replies
    U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings ^ | May 2004 | John Lehman
    The subject here is naval history and the naval history to come. This is particularly relevant, given the subjects I've been immersed in over the last year—the so-called war on terrorism and the attacks of 9/11, what went wrong, and what we should do to fix it. I have learned that what these two institutions—the U.S. Naval Institute and the U.S. Naval Academy—stand for are at the center of what we face as a nation going forward. The Naval Institute is one of the great intellectual institutions in this country. I first joined when I was an undergraduate in college,...
  • Deep Frieze Meaning: What is the Parthenon telling us?

    09/02/2014 11:54:52 AM PDT · by mojito · 11 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | 9/8/2014 | A. E. STALLINGS
    The Parthenon represents, for many, a golden age in human achievement: the 5th-century b.c. Greek flowering of democracy, sciences, and the arts. But what if its chief ornament, the Parthenon frieze, turned out to be not an embodiment of reason and proportion—of stillness at the heart of motion, quiet piety, and enlightened civic responsibility—but (or, rather, also) something darker, more primitive: a representation of the critical moment in an ancient story of a king at war, a human sacrifice, and a goddess’s demand for virgin blood? That’s the argument at the heart of The Parthenon Engima. The plot involves not...
  • 1,500-year-old 'magical' papyrus is first to refer to Last Supper

    09/02/2014 10:11:49 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 70 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 2 September 2014 | Sarah Griffiths for
    It has laid largely unstudied in a university library for more than 100 years. But now a 1,500-year-old papyrus has been identified as one of the world’s earliest surviving Christian charms. The ‘remarkable’ document contains some of the earliest documented references to The Last Supper and sheds new light on early Christian practices, experts say.
  • Mysteries set in stone

    09/02/2014 10:25:42 AM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    Capital Journal ^ | 22 Aug 2014 | David Rookhuyzen
    They are mystery stories, written large as life in mineral ink on the pages of the northern plains. A 360-foot snake – reportedly once with a blazing red tongue – slithering along a grassy slope. A long-tailed turtle lying next to woman near an earthen mound. A large grid spread across the spur of a hill. All created from lines of small boulders. Hundreds of these stone effigies or alignments, ranging from animal forms to mosaics can be found across the seven Midwestern states and parts of Canada, including more than a hundred such figures in South Dakota. The mystery...
  • Behind the Sinking of the Lusitania

    09/02/2014 8:11:44 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | September 2, 2014 | Pat Buchanan
    About how America became involved in certain wars, many conspiracy theories have been advanced -- and some have been proved correct. When James K. Polk got his declaration of war as Mexico had "shed American blood upon the American soil," Rep. Abraham Lincoln demanded to know the exact spot where it had happened. And did the Spanish really blow up the battleship Maine in Havana Harbor, the casus belli for the Spanish-American War? The Gulf of Tonkin Incident, involving U.S. destroyers Maddox and C. Turner Joy, remains in dispute. But charges that North Vietnamese patrol boats had attacked U.S. warships...
  • The Pee-Chee Folder: Illustrated by the Most Interesting Man in the World

    09/02/2014 2:38:46 AM PDT · by beaversmom · 55 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | September 19, 2012 | Sarah C. Rich
    A Pee-Chee folder art hack—afros, hairy legs, and frying eggs(image: Greg Narvas, Flickr) Growing up in Denver, I called sugary, carbonated beverages “pop.” When I moved to California for college and all the coastal kids called it “soda,” I realized just how much geography defines even the most quotidien bits of our lives (I now call it “soda,” too.). I had that realization all over again recently while reminiscing about Pee-Chee folders, encountering a completely blank stare from a New York-native friend who had never heard of them. And here I’d thought the pulpy paper pockets had been a part...
  • What the United Nations Doesn’t Want You to Know

    09/01/2014 6:58:19 PM PDT · by wtd · 16 replies
    TrevorLoudon.com ^ | Sept 1, 2014 | Trevor Loudon's
    Not too long ago I posted a video produced in the mid-nineties concerning a U.S. Army soldier, SPC Michael New, who refused to wear the UN insignia and uniform, or accept orders from a foreign commander under the auspices of the United Nations. New’s reasoning was simple: he pledged an oath to defend the United States and the U.S. Constitution, not the United Nations and its Charter. The Michael New case received very little press coverage at the time. New was threatened with court-martial, but he decided to fight the charges. Unfortunately, Michael New lost the case and eventually received...
  • Education: the media are afraid to tell the truth

    09/01/2014 6:24:21 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 22 replies
    rantRave.com ^ | August 15, 2014 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    Local newspapers in the US don't cover education in any depth. Maybe they'll tell you superficial and trivial stuff (for example, that a superintendent was hired or fired, that there will be a meeting next month of the school board). But you won't find anything about the nuts and bolts that determine whether you child learns to read, or learns anything at all. At first glance, this non-coverage can seem to be a mystery. Everybody's interested in education, especially parents and grandparents with kids in K-12. Probably one of the most valuable things that you could tell these people is...
  • On the 75th Anniversary of WW2 Realize How Circumstances Today Do Not Augur Well For Our Future

    09/01/2014 3:04:47 PM PDT · by lbryce · 6 replies
    Sept 1 2014
    On the Anniversary of World War 2, September 1, 1939 Seventy Five Years Ago Today, We Must Bear in Mind That Our own Circumstances Do Not Augur Well For The Future. The political circumstances in which we find ourselves today, is as treacherous and dangerous time as any. On so many fronts, perspectives, danger lurks within to exponential capacity for the greatest destruction the world has ever seen. So many various, varied circumstances, of nations brimming with hate, enmity, having acquired or in the process of acquiring weapons of mass destruction, imperialistic design, and more, much more, does not bode...
  • 75 years ago today - World War II

    09/01/2014 1:18:01 PM PDT · by nesnah · 9 replies
    On this day, 75 years ago, World War II began. It was started by some European megalomaniac who was trying to regain some of the land areas that his country had previously lost, but he felt those lands should be part of his country permanently again. And, we have James Earl Obama and Neville Kerry in charge of foreign affairs. Food for thought....
  • History's 'Houdini': What the Critics Are Saying

    09/01/2014 11:29:18 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 59 replies
    The Hollywood Reporter ^ | September 1, 2014 | Ashley Lee
    History Channel's magical miniseries Houdini begins tonight, starring Adrien Brody as the death-defying escape artist in a TV event that traces the arc of Houdini's life from desperate poverty to worldwide fame. The Lionsgate/A&E Studios four-hour event also stars Kristen Connolly (House of Cards) as Bess, Harry Houdini's stage assistant and wife. Oscar nominee Uli Edel directed the project, adapted by Nicholas Meyer from the 1976 book Houdini: A Mind in Chains — A Psychoanalytic Portrait (written by his father, Bernard C. Meyer).Read what top critics are saying about Houdini:
  • Relics discovered from various eras

    09/01/2014 7:28:34 AM PDT · by csvset · 6 replies
    Korea JoongAng Daily ^ | Sept 01,2014 | KIM HYUNG-EUN
    As is often the case with archeological findings in Korea, local researchers have come across a host of treasures in a place where a city development project is underway. The site is Chungju, North Chungcheong, and the discovery was made by the Foundation of East Asia Cultural Properties Institute. The relics go back to as early as 75,000 years ago, ranging from the Paleolithic Era; the Three Kingdoms era (57 BC-AD 668); the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392); and the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Among them, however, the most intensive academic attention is being garnered for the seals found in Goryeo-period tombs, which...
  • Villanova professor's quest reveals LBJ vendetta against George Hamilton

    09/01/2014 1:29:26 AM PDT · by gusopol3 · 29 replies
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | August 31, 2014 | Jeremy Roebuck, Alison Steele
    For a few months in 1966, the budding romance between film star George Hamilton and Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of the 36th president, was the talk of Washington....But a previously confidential FBI file - which a Philadelphia judge last week outlined in an opinion and ordered to be released - shows for the first time how far Johnson went to protect his daughter and his presidency
  • The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition: A New History of the Great Depression

    08/31/2014 12:54:32 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 11 replies
    amazon ^ | Amity Shlaes
    An illustrated edition of Amity Shlaes’s #1 New York Times bestseller, featuring vivid black-and-white illustrations that capture this dark period in American history and the men and women, from all walks of life, whose character and ideas helped them persevere. This imaginative illustrated edition brings to life one of the most devastating periods in our nation’s history—the Great Depression—through the lives of American people, from politicians and workers to businessmen, farmers, and ordinary citizens. Smart and stylish, black-and-white art from acclaimed illustrator Paul Rivoche provides an utterly original vision of the coexistence of despair and hope that characterized Depression-era America....
  • Which Roman emperor does Obama most resemble, with respect to conduct and actions?

    08/31/2014 7:05:07 AM PDT · by grumpygresh · 110 replies
    In the West, Imperial Rome begins in 27BC with the reign of Augustus and ends in 476 with Romulus Augustulus. Throughout this period, we can find good, mediocre and horrible rulers. America has often been compared to Rome, and today, like Rome, we see the transformation of our country from a republic to something closer to a dictatorship or autocracy. I know that many Freepers are Roman history bufffs, so we should come up with a pretty convincing consensus view.
  • Neolithic site dating back 5,000 yrs discovered in C China

    08/30/2014 2:37:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    China Daily ^ | Friday, August 29, 2014 | Xinhua
    Archaeologists in Central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square meters and sits along a river in Zhengzhou, capital of Henan, dating 5,000 to 6,000 years back to the Yangshao culture, which was widely known for its advanced pottery-making technology. The site features two defensive moats surrounding three sides. Researchers have found relics of three large houses as well as 39 tombs, the large number suggesting several generations resided there, archaeologist Gao Zanling, a member of the Zhengzhou Administration of Cultural Heritage, said....
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    08/30/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | August 28, 2014 | Uppsala University
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication... The domestication of animals and plants, a prerequisite for the development of agriculture, is one of the most important technological revolutions during human history. Domestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years...
  • Back on the bombing run: One of the last two flying Lancasters pays tribute

    08/30/2014 7:41:20 AM PDT · by GreyFriar · 19 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | August 30, 2014 | Carol Driver
    Back on the bombing run: One of the last two flying Lancasters pays tribute to the 55,000 Bomber Boys who never returned with flight on the route thousands of sorties took to target the Nazis MailOnline was granted exclusive access to film while flying alongside the Canadian Lancaster bomber Stunning footage shows the iconic aircraft soaring above the UK in what will be one of its final ever flights Video was shot while flying in a small aircraft just feet away from the world's second only airworthy Lancaster
  • Shipwreck off Malta yields 700 B.C. cargo; some of oldest finds of Phoenician times ever

    08/30/2014 6:12:37 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    FOX News ^ | August 25, 2014 | ·Associated Press
    VALLETTA, Malta – Divers near a Maltese island have found an ancient ship's cargo that experts say is yielding what could be some of the oldest Phoenician artifacts.
  • President Obama needs to focus on how the United States can meet global challenges

    08/30/2014 4:25:57 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 25 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | August 29, 2014 | Washing Post Editorial Staff
    PRESIDENT OBAMA’S acknowledgment that “we don’t have a strategy yet” in Syria understandably attracted the most attention after his perplexing meeting with reporters Thursday. But his restatement of the obvious was not the most dismaying aspect of his remarks. The president’s goal, to the extent he had one, seemed to be to tamp down all the assessments of gathering dangers that his own team had been issuing over the previous days. This argument with his own administration is alarming on three levels. The first has to do with simple competence. One can only imagine the whiplash that foreign leaders must...
  • 40 Of The Most Bad-As*, ... Quotes Of All Time

    08/29/2014 8:22:37 PM PDT · by virgil283 · 168 replies
    rightwingnews ^ | John Hawkins
    "You may all go to Hell, and I will go to Texas....You’ll never get a Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me....Come on, you sons of b*tches! Do you want to live forever?.... Before we’re through with them, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell.....I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man......" .....;
  • Ninth Circuit Considers Guam's Racially Discriminatory Plebiscite Registration Law

    08/29/2014 12:58:15 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 4 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | August 28, 2014 | Paul Mirengoff
    The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard oral argument yesterday in the case of Davis v. Guam. The hearing occurred in Guam, the first time the Ninth Circuit has sat there since 2002. Mr. Davis, a resident of Guam, attempted to register to vote in a plebiscite on Guam’s relationship to the United States. He was denied permission to register because he could not trace his ancestry to a native inhabitant of Guam. Guam law allows only those with correct ancestry to vote in the future status plebiscite. According to a report by Davis’ expert, nearly...
  • Senator Harlan Statue Returns to Iowa

    08/29/2014 2:51:16 AM PDT · by iowamark · 4 replies
    WHO TV ^ | 8/28/2014 | Roger Riley
    MOUNT PLEASANT, Iowa – After being in the United States Capitol since the year 1910, the statue of former Iowa senator James Harlan has returned home. The Harlan Statue had been on display at the National Statuary Hall Collection until it was replaced with a statue of the late Norman Borlaug. “Senator Harlan was a true statesman and a public servant,” said Governor Terry Branstad in a news release. Ceremonies to unveil the statue outdoors had to be hastily moved indoors after the Senator’s likeness was revealed. Rain and wind caused a change in plans. Branstad credited the Borlaug Committee...
  • Scientists Reveal the Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic Peoples

    08/28/2014 6:29:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014 | unattributed
    Paleo-Eskimo people occupied the Arctic for more than 4,000 years, say researchers... Maanasa Raghaven of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues have tested this scenario by conducting genomic sequencing on extractions of 169 ancient human bone, teeth and hair samples from Arctic Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. They compared them to the same from two present-day Greenlandic Inuit, two Nivkhs, one Aleutian Islander, and two Athabascans. What they found provides a new picture of the population history of the North American Arctic. Their analyses supports the model of the arrival of Paleo-Eskimos into North America as a separate migration from...
  • American Indian Oral Traditions and Ohio's Earthworks

    08/28/2014 6:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brad Lepper
    ...So, while my Journal of Ohio Archaeology paper concludes rather pessimistically that there are no documented early American Indian traditions that speak reliably to the original purpose and meaning of the ancient earthworks, there is no reason to believe that traditional stories of contemporary tribes with historic roots in the eastern Woodlands could not include themes and elements that echo, if faintly, traditions of the Hopewell culture. And if that’s conceivable, and I think it is, then it would be worthwhile to look for them... One reason why it’s important to take seriously what American Indians have had to say...
  • Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists [1K-2K]

    08/28/2014 6:13:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 25, 2014 | Mary-Ann Muffoletto
    "The most accepted hypotheses pointed to the age of these paintings as 2,000 to 4,000 years old or perhaps even 7,000 to 8,000 years old," says Pederson, associate professor in USU's Department of Geology and lead author on the paper. "Our findings reveal these paintings were likely made between 1,000 to 2,000 years ago." The USU-led team's findings strike a key point about the art's creators: They may have co-existed with the Fremont people, who are credited with carving distinctly different pictographs found in the same region. "Previous ideas suggested a people different from the Fremont created the paintings because...
  • Hadrian's Wall dig unearths 2,000-year-old toilet seat

    08/28/2014 6:07:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 27, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old, perfectly preserved wooden toilet seat at a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland. Experts at Vindolanda believe it is the only find of its kind and dates from the 2nd Century. The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. The seat was discovered in a muddy trench, which was previously filled with rubbish. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at Vindolanda, said: "We know a lot about Roman toilets from previous excavations at the site and from the wider Roman world, which have included...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on Arctic's Earliest People

    08/28/2014 4:40:35 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8-28-14 | Heather Pringle
    The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for millennia before vanishing around 700 years ago, a new genetic analysis shows. The study, published online Thursday, also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. Inuit hunters in the Canadian Arctic have long told stories about a mysterious ancient people known as the Tunit, who once inhabited the far north. Tunit men, they recalled, possessed powerful magic and were strong enough to crush the neck of a walrus and singlehandedly haul the massive...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • "Slaves' Hill" Was Home to High-Status Craftsmen

    08/28/2014 3:44:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014
    New information from excavations in southern Israel’s Timna Valley by Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University suggests that the laborers who smelted copper at the site 3,000 years ago were skilled craftsmen of high social status. Since the 1930s, it has been thought that the Iron Age camp was inhabited by slaves because of the massive barrier that had been unearthed and the harsh conditions created by the furnaces and desert conditions. The well-preserved bones, seeds, fruits, and fabric that have been recently recovered tell a different story, however. “The copper smelters were given the better cuts...
  • Maria Von Trapp, RIP

    08/28/2014 9:17:31 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 43 replies
    Townhall ^ | 08/28/2014 | Jerry Newcombe
    Earlier this year, an event happened that did not receive wide notice. The last of the Von Trapp Family Singers, the last of the children---the real ones---died. Her name was Maria---not to be confused with the lady played by Julie Andrews, Maria Augusta Trapp, who died in 1987. Maria Von Trapp’s death in February 2014 marks the end of an era. The Sound of Music deserves its accolades as the Movie of the Year (1965) and one of the finest films ever made. Even my one-year-old granddaughter is mesmerized by the puppet scene. As a film it is an icon....
  • The Extreme Partisanship of John Roberts's Supreme Court

    08/28/2014 7:57:15 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 10 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | August 27, 2014 | Garrett Epps
    “Politics are closely divided,” John Roberts told scholar Jeffrey Rosen after his first term as chief justice. “The same with the Congress. There ought to be some sense of some stability, if the government is not going to polarize completely. It’s a high priority to keep any kind of partisan divide out of the judiciary as well.” No one who observes the chief justice would doubt he was sincere in his wish for greater unanimity, greater judicial modesty, a widely respected Supreme Court quietly calling “balls and strikes.” But human beings are capable of wishing for mutually incompatible things—commitment and...
  • The Kennewick Man Finally Freed to Share His Secrets

    08/27/2014 4:29:21 PM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 27 replies
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | SEPTEMBER 2014 | By Douglas Preston
    Instapundit: "The Army Corps of Engineers sure didnÂ’t want this researched, and continues to interfere today. Why? " Why? It blows the native "indians" narrative of 'we were here first' out of the water. Land claims and free money is g-o-n-e gone: As work progressed, a portrait of Kennewick Man emerged. He does not belong to any living human population. Who, then, are his closest living relatives? Judging from the shape of his skull and bones, his closest living relatives appear to be the Moriori people of the Chatham Islands, a remote archipelago 420 miles southeast of New Zealand, as...
  • Introducing Antonio Gramsci

    08/27/2014 4:49:25 PM PDT · by crusher · 9 replies
    The Steve Deace Show ^ | 8/13/2014 | Steve Deace
    I have long posited that the most important political/social theorist and tactician of the past century was the Italian communist Antonio Gramsci, who singlehandedly formulated the path to the malevolent political culture that has defeated liberty and under whose heel we suffer. The lineage is clear: Marx inspired Gramsci, Gramsci inspired Alinsky, and Alinsky inspired Hillary and Soetero. It is by Gramsci's design that collectivist central planners have captured every single social institution. If you do not understand Gamsci you cannot fully understand Alinsky and the appeal of fascism to the American Ruling Class. Broadcaster Steve Deace recently presented an...
  • Civil War hero who died at Gettysburg to be awarded Medal Civil-War-officer-receive-Medal-Honor

    08/27/2014 7:10:27 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 28 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 27 Aug 2014 | OLLIE GILLMAN FOR MAILONLINE
    1st Lieutenant Alonzo Hersford Cushing to be awarded Medal of Honor Lt Cushing was killed in the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863 He stood his ground and fought on despite a bullet wound to the head Congress grant special exemption to give Lt Cushing the medal 151 years on Relatives and admirers had campaigned since 1980s for proper recognition Two Vietnam War veterans will also receive medal in ceremony next month
  • Democratic convention besieged by protesters(This Day in History 1968)

    08/26/2014 3:30:05 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 9 replies
    History.com ^ | 08/26/2014 | staff
    As the Democratic National Convention gets underway in Chicago, thousands of antiwar demonstrators take to Chicago's streets to protest the Vietnam War and its support by the top Democratic presidential candidate, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. During the four-day convention, the most violent in U.S. history, police and National Guardsmen clashed with protesters outside the International Amphitheater, and hundreds of people, including innocent bystanders, were beaten by the Chicago police. The violence even spilled into the convention hall, as guards roughed up delegates and members of the press, including CBS News correspondent Mike Wallace, who was punched in the face. On...
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Why was Stonehenge built? 'Groundbreaking' discovery of 15 new monuments suggests the answer...

    08/26/2014 10:21:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 13:41 EST, 22 August 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Archaeologist Vince Gaffney, of the University of Birmingham, is involved in the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project – a four-year collaboration with the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria. The team has conducted the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, covering around four square miles (6km), journalist Ed Caesar reported for Smithsonian. They discovered evidence of 15 unknown and poorly-understood late Neolithic monuments, including other henges, barrows, pits and ditches, which could all harbour valuable information about the prehistoric site. ... Historians are not sure what purpose the Curcus served and Professor Gaffney...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • The Madness of 2008: The Perfect Storm That Gave Us Obama

    08/26/2014 5:47:07 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 45 replies
    National Review ^ | 08/27/2014 | Victor Davis Hanson
    <p>America is suddenly angry at the laxity, incompetence, and polarizing politics of the Obama administration, the bad optics of the president putting about in his bright golf clothes while the world burns. Certainly, no recent president has failed on so many fronts — honesty, transparency, truthfulness, the economy, foreign policy, the duties of the commander-in-chief, executive responsibilities, and spiritual leadership.</p>
  • The story of the A-10 and why the F-35 cannot replace it. (video)

    08/26/2014 4:58:24 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 46 replies
    wimp.com ^ | 8-26-2014 | wimp.com
    Pierre Sprey is one of the original designers of the A-10 Warthog during the 1970s. He provides insight into why the aircraft is so loved by ground troops in the military, and why its recent retirement from Air Force operations is so hotly debated.
  • Goodbye to Another of the "Greatest Generation"

    08/26/2014 3:58:22 AM PDT · by beachn4fun · 43 replies
    August 26, 2014 | me
    Although Jennes Christian Nelson, Jr. was not a FReeper, I hope you will join me in giving him a spiritual send off. Jennes (JC) was born in 1927 and passed into Heaven on August 20th, 2014. He was the father of my oldest brother-in-law (we grew up with him and his sisters). At 17, as soon as he graduated high school in 1944, JC enlisted in the Army Air Corps as an Air Cadet during WWII. He served with forces in the Philippines for two years, finishing with the Reserves in 1948 ( I do not know what his rank...
  • Alfred Kinsey was a pervert and a sex criminal

    08/25/2014 8:40:39 PM PDT · by Morgana · 34 replies
    LIFE SITE ^ | Jonathon van Maren
    He is known as “The Father of the Sexual Revolution,” and if you’ve ever taken a university course on 20th century history, you’ll have heard his name: Alfred Kinsey. Kinsey was not only the “father” of the Sexual Revolution, he set the stage for the massive social and cultural upheaval of the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s with his 1948 Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and his 1953 Sexual Behavior in the Human Female. These books revealed to a shocked and somewhat titillated population things they had never known about themselves: That between 30-45% of men had affairs, 85% of...
  • The Horrifying American Roots of Nazi Eugenics

    08/24/2014 2:00:49 PM PDT · by TigerClaws · 50 replies
    Hitler and his henchmen victimized an entire continent and exterminated millions in his quest for a co-called "Master Race." But the concept of a white, blond-haired, blue-eyed master Nordic race didn't originate with Hitler. The idea was created in the United States, and cultivated in California, decades before Hitler came to power. California eugenicists played an important, although little known, role in the American eugenics movement's campaign for ethnic cleansing. - See more at: http://hnn.us/article/1796#sthash.2W5ntE2W.dpuf
  • The Ghost Hotels of the Catskills

    08/25/2014 9:42:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brandon Presser
    Phones on desks, linens on beds, catalog cards spilling out of the filing cabinets—all covered with a fine patina of dust. Neglected for years, and abandoned in seconds, it’s like a modern-day Pompeii in which the earth suddenly reclaimed its souls as they went about their daily business. But this isn’t fodder for the next Dean Koontz thriller; it’s real, and its 100 miles north of New York City. Sullivan County once boasted 538 hotels and over 50,000 bungalows, but today practically nothing remains of this illustrious, vacationing era, save crumbling towers and abandoned estates. Walking through the haunting wreckage—thirsty...
  • The End of Tanning?

    08/25/2014 9:25:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | August 25, 2014 | Olga Khazan
    Ryan Baker, a director of operations for Palm Beach Tan, ushers me through the narrow, pastel hallways of one of the chain's salons in Washington, D.C. It's a tiny place, squeezed into a strip mall between a Chipotle and a beauty parlor. But in a pinch, some see it as a mini-vacation—a dose of artificial sunshine when life’s too busy, or the outside world too cloudy, for the real thing. ....................................................... And that's the next big challenge for health agencies. Despite how rapidly the warnings and taxes and regulations have beat back the sunbed industry, there’s still something a little...
  • Fire Stone: First Fire-Scorched Petrified Wood Found

    08/24/2014 6:27:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    LiveScience ^ | August 12, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    After serving nearly 30 years as a doorstop for a nuclear physicist, a hunk of petrified wood from Arizona has finally been recognized as a one-of-a-kind find. The 210-million-year-old piece of wood contains the first fossilized fire scar ever discovered... Evidence for ancient forest fires predates the dinosaurs, but the clues come from charcoal, not from marks on fossilized trees. Charcoal remains of Earth's oldest fires date back more than 400 million years. No one has ever spotted a fire scar on petrified wood before, said lead study author Bruce Byers, a natural resources consultant from Falls Church, Virginia. That's...
  • VICTORIA (a pretty good read IMHO. Free to read at the site)

    08/24/2014 5:36:06 PM PDT · by dynachrome · 6 replies
    TraditionalRight.com ^ | 2014 | “Thomas Hobbes"
    Was the dissolution of the United States inevitable? Probably, once all the “diversity” and “multiculturalism” crap got started. Right up to the end the coins carried the motto, E Pluribus Unum, just as the last dreadnought of the Imperial and Royal Austro-Hungarian Navy was the Viribus Unitis. But the reality for both was Ex Uno, Plura. It’s odd how clearly the American century is marked: 1865 to 1965. As the 20th century historian Shelby Foote noted, the first Civil War made us one nation. In 1860, we wrote, “the United States are.” By the end of the war, the verb...