History (General/Chat)

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  • Dangerous Elegance: A History of High-Heeled Shoes

    09/21/2014 4:50:52 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 63 replies
    Random History ^ | April 9, 2008 | Random History and Word origins for the Curious Mind
    The high-heeled shoe, or a shoe whose heel is higher than the toe, is a matter of contentious and heated discussion. Shoes in general have typically served as markers of gender, class, race, and ethnicity--and both the foot and the shoe have been imbued with powerful phallic and fertility symbols as evidenced in the contemporary practice of tying shoes to a newlywed couple’s car. No other shoe, however, has gestured toward leisure, sexuality, and sophistication as much as the high-heeled shoe. Fraught with contradiction, heels paradoxically inhibit movement in order to increase it, at least in appearance. Standing in heels,...
  • Vintage Mugshot PHOTO … Circa 1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog”

    09/21/2014 2:37:41 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 36 replies
    Eastern State Penitentiary ^ | circa 1924 | Eastern State Penitentiary
    1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog” Pep "The Cat-Murdering Dog" was a black Labrador Retriever admitted to Eastern State Penitentiary on August 12, 1924. Prison folklore tells us that Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot used his executive powers to sentence Pep to Life Without Parole for killing his wife’s cherished cat. Prison records support this story: Pep’s inmate number (C-2559) is skipped in prison intake logs and inmate records. The Governor told a different story. He said Pep had been sent to Eastern to act as a mascot for the prisoners. He and the Warden, Herbert “Hard-Boiled” Smith, were friends. Pep was...
  • Village from the Roman period discovered in the Carpathians

    09/21/2014 2:11:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 17, 2014 | Science and Scholarship in Poland, tr. RL
    Village from the Roman period, dating from 3rd-4th century AD, has been discovered in Lipnica Dolna near Jasło (Subcarpathia). Among approx. one thousand archaeological objects there is a large pottery kiln, in which ceramics were fired. "The kiln is two meters in length and the same in width. It stands on a small tip in the Wisłoka valley. Its location shows that the wind blowing from the river was used to maintain the temperature during the firing cycle" - said Tomasz Leszczyński, archaeologist from the Subcarpathian Museum in Krosno. He added that "such kilns are extremely rare in the Carpathians"....
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

    09/21/2014 1:20:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 15, 2014 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort) was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other evidence from the time after the fort was abandoned. An unusually large number of finds were made. This is because the Roman troops dismantled the...
  • Highlight 14: Roman enamelled cockerel figurine. The Former Bridges Garage site, Cirencester

    09/21/2014 12:47:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | retrieved September 20, 2014 | unattributed
    The find is believed to date to the middle decades of the second century AD. It came from the grave of a child aged 2–3 years. The child had been buried in a nailed wooden coffin and also accompanied by his or her shoes, of which only the iron hobnails survived, and a pottery feeding cup or ‘tettine’. Only eight finds of this type are known from the Roman world, from Britain, Germany and the Low Countries. It is believed that cockerel figurines of this type, together with other richly-enamelled bronze vessels of high workmanship, were made in northern Britain...
  • Engineers found Teutonic axes in the Forest District Wipsowo

    09/21/2014 12:27:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 2014 | tr. RL
    Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Warmia and Mazury). Historic weapons will be donated to the museum. Engineers stumbled upon the historic axes by chance, while searching the woods metal detectors. The weapons have been initially identified by an archaeologist as late-medieval Teutonic battle axes. Iron axes were close to each other, shallow underground, among the roots of trees. "It can be assumed that this is a deposit that someone left for better times. Perhaps the person...
  • French farmers torch tax office in Brittany protest

    09/21/2014 12:19:11 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 19 replies
    BBC ^ | 20 Sept. 2014 | unknown
    French vegetable farmers protesting against falling living standards have set fire to tax and insurance offices in town of Morlaix, in Brittany. The farmers used tractors and trailers to dump artichokes, cauliflowers and manure in the streets and also smashed windows, police said. Prime Minister Manuel Valls condemned protesters for preventing firefighters from dealing with the blaze. The farmers say they cannot cope with falling prices for their products. A Russian embargo on some Western goods - imposed over the Ukraine crisis - has blocked off one of their main export markets. About 100 farmers first launched an overnight attack...
  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • Millennia-old sunken ship could be world’s oldest, researchers suggest

    09/21/2014 11:49:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Friday, September 5 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Underwater excavations led by Ankara UniversityÂ’s Research Center for Maritime Archaeology (ANKĂśSAM) have uncovered sunken ships ranging from the second century B.C. to the Ottoman period in Ä°zmirÂ’s Urla district. A recent excavation uncovered a ship estimated to date back 4,000 years, which experts say would make it the oldest sunken ship to have been discovered in the Mediterranean. Urla Port is one of TurkeyÂ’s rare underwater excavation sites. Professor Hayat Erkanal, the head of Limantepe excavations for the underwater ancient city of Klozemenai and director of ANKĂśSAM, said the port dates back to the seventh century B.C. Klozemenai, he...
  • Pharaoh-Branded Amulet Found at Ancient Copper Mine in Jordan

    09/21/2014 11:21:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 19, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    ...The tiny artifact could attest to the fabled military campaign that Sheshonq I waged in the region nearly 3,000 years ago, researchers say... The site, which was discovered during excavations in 2002, was home to intense metal production during the Early Bronze Age, between about 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C. But there is also evidence of more recent smelting activities at Khirbat Hamra Ifdan during the Iron Age, from about 1000 B.C. to 900 B.C. The hieroglyphic sequence on the scarab reads: "bright is the manifestation of Re, chosen of Amun/Re." That moniker corresponds to the throne name of Sheshonq...
  • China: Ancient Tomb of First Emperor Qin Shi Huang's Grandmother Discovered in Xi'an

    09/21/2014 10:33:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Mary-Ann Russon | September 11, 2014
    According to China.org.cn, the tomb complex covers an area measuring 173,325 square metres, stretching 550m in length and 310 meters in width, and is the second largest tomb to have ever been discovered in the country... Qin Shi Huang (260-210BC) was the first emperor to unify China and enact major economic and political reforms across the country. China had previously consisted of a multitude of warring states and kingdoms, each under the control of feudal overlords, leading to much instability... After the death of Qin Shi Huang's father, he took the throne at the age of 13. His mother took...
  • The Star-Spangled Banner: Family Keepsake

    09/21/2014 8:38:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | retrieved 2014 | unattributed
    While Francis Scott Key's song was known to most Americans by the end of the Civil War, the flag that inspired it remained an Armistead family keepsake. It was exhibited occasionally at patriotic gatherings in Baltimore but largely unknown outside of that city until the 1870s. The flag remained the private property of Lieutenant Colonel Armistead's widow, Louisa Armistead, his daughter Georgiana Armistead Appleton, and his grandson Eben Appleton for 90 years. During that time, the increasing popularity of Key's anthem and the American public's developing sense of national heritage transformed the Star-Spangled Banner from a family keepsake into a...
  • The Most Important American You May Not Know

    09/21/2014 6:18:40 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 23 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | September 21, 2014 | Bruce Bialosky
    If you live in New York you may have heard of him, but outside the area his name may be a mystery. Robert Caro, famed author of four books on Lyndon Johnson, wrote his first book about him for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. The book was later named one of the one hundred greatest non-fiction books of the 20th century. The man is Robert Moses and the book is The Power Broker. The book was written in 1974 (celebrating its 40th anniversary.) I have owned it for about ten years and finally tackled it on my recent vacation....
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 8 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • Italian Diva Sophia Loren celebrates 80th Birthday in Mexico with Carlos Slim

    09/20/2014 8:28:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    The Yucatan Times ^ | September 20, 2014
    The Italian diva celebrates her 80th birthday with an exhibition of some of her dresses, jewelry, photographs and awards at the Soumaya Museum. The Sophia Loren exhibition opened today at the Soumaya Museum. It displays pieces owned by the actress. “The best of all is under the same roof,” said the Italian diva at a press conference. Dresses she wore in films, international awards including the Golden Globe and Oscar, as well as photographs and jewelry are displayed.
  • Beer we go: Germany's Oktoberfest to host millions

    09/20/2014 1:25:18 PM PDT · by mikrofon · 72 replies
    CTV News ^ | Saturday, September 20, 2014 10:12AM | AP
    <p>MUNICH (AFP) -- Germany's world-famous Oktoberfest kicked off Saturday with the traditional tapping of the first barrel of beer, as millions of revellers are set to soak up the frothy atmosphere in the 16-day annual extravaganza.</p> <p>With the cry of "O'zapft is" ("The keg is tapped"), the amber fluid officially began to flow at noon after Munich's mayor, Dieter Reiter, with due pomp and ceremony, took a mallet and in four swings breached the 200-litre barrel.</p>
  • Dio - Rainbow In The Dark

    09/20/2014 10:11:53 AM PDT · by SkyPilot · 46 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1984 | ronnie james dio
    The cheer you up in the era of Obama.....a flashback to the 1970s/80's. Ronnie James Dio - Rainbow In The Dark
  • Who are the Real Liberals?

    09/20/2014 4:04:23 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 8 replies
    American Thinker ^ | September 20, 2014 | Benjamin Aguda
    A few hundred years ago, humanity went through a remarkable period of transformation, the Enlightenment. A number of different developments enabled this transformation to take place, and the impact of the Enlightenment has been tremendous. One area where the Enlightenment had particularly strong influence was in political theory. Before the Enlightenment, it was common knowledge that all men were natural slaves. We were slaves to our parents and slaves to our rulers in the same way that we were naturally slaves to God. This ancient doctrine justified the despotic political systems that had existed in one form or another throughout...
  • eating popcorn reading all these headlines

    09/19/2014 7:49:06 PM PDT · by jyro · 80 replies
    you really wonder just how screwed up this world can get.
  • Decision Making in Survival Situations

    09/19/2014 3:49:37 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 31 replies
    SHTF School ^ | 9/18/14 | Selo
    We all usually keep forgetting that when SHTF things will be different in many ways. We talk about lack of food, clean water, coffee, or simply lack of hygiene. And we say that people gonna die because of that and because of lots of violence. Based on my experience, all above is correct, but we also usually forget one simple fact: pressure! Guy from my street worked before SHTF as a computer technician. Those years here were time when computers were started to be widely used in big companies. He was something like famous in that field, so he had...
  • How to Spell the Rebel Yell

    09/19/2014 7:00:00 AM PDT · by condi2008 · 11 replies
    Longreads ^ | 09/11/2014 | Elena Passarello
    First Manassas. In the 90-degree heat, the Union fords Bull Run and then busts through line after line of Confederate troops, aiming for the railroad to Richmond. Under the grassy shield of Henry House Hill’s western slope, the Confederates scramble for reinforcements. Somebody overhears General Bee comparing Colonel Jackson to a “stone wall.” This either compliments Jackson’s steadfastness or jeers the corporal’s languor. No one will ever know for certain, since Bee is shot dead shortly after the quip leaves his lips.
  • Social Security as a means relieve unemployment (FDR's words...not the popular meme)

    There was an open call-in on the radio this morning on Social Security. It got my blood boiling. On a whim, I went looking for 1933 news on the reality of Social Security before it was passed and the current meme posited by libs & the media. First, I found this:George Will says Social Security was created in the 1930s 'as a way of getting people to quit working' The pundits at Politifact wrote, "We’d always believed Social Security stemmed from a desire help keep the elderly out of poverty... George Will asserted:"People forget Social Security was advocated ... in...
  • Agent ‘Fifi’: The stunning British spy who seduced secrets of war from her ‘prey’

    09/18/2014 3:53:12 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 18 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 9-18-14 | Terrance McCoy
    It was a late March day when notice arrived that Fifi’s services would be required. She would have two days to prepare — two days to travel from her London apartment to Liverpool, two days to memorize the physical details of her “prey.” His name was Quinaux. He was 28. Black hair. Brown eyes. Dimpled chin. He would be waiting at the State Cafe. And she was to charm every secret she could out of him. Of course, Quinaux didn’t know this. He was training to be a British spy and, according to a letters dated March 22, 1943, he...
  • Annenberg Public Policy Center survey provides new evidence of widespread political ignorance

    09/18/2014 1:46:15 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 4 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | September 18, 2014 | Ilya Somin
    A recently released Annenberg Public Policy Center survey provides new evidence of widespread political ignorance. Fellow Washington Post-affiliated blogger Reid Wilson lists some of the more striking results: Wednesday marked national Constitution Day, the 227th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. But only 36 percent of Americans can actually name the three branches of government the Constitution created. That’s according to a new survey from the Annenberg Public Policy Center, and it shows a huge percentage of Americans might need to take a civics refresher course. Only 38 percent of Americans knew the Republican Party controls the U.S....
  • Historic 'Ghost Ships' Discovered Near Golden Gate Bridge

    09/18/2014 9:22:35 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    The waters just west of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge hide a graveyard of sunken ships. By some estimates, there are 300 wrecks in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area alone. But only a fraction of them have been seen by scientists. Marine archaeologists and researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have set out to document those lost vessels. Over the course of a five-day survey that just ended yesterday (Sept. 15), the team discovered the sites of at least four wrecks: the 1910 SS Selja shipwreck, the...
  • Murray signals support for Scottish independence

    09/18/2014 7:12:19 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 28 replies
    tennis.com ^ | September 18, 2014 | ap
    After carefully avoiding taking a side on the issue, former Wimbledon champion Andy Murray changed course Thursday and signaled his support for Scottish independence on the day of the historic vote. The Scottish player sent out a post on Twitter early Thursday, just hours ahead of the polls opening on the referendum to break away from the United Kingdom. Murray indicated that negative campaigning by the anti-independence side had made up his mind in favor of secession. He tweeted to his 2.7 million followers: ''Huge day for Scotland today! no campaign negativity last few days totally swayed my view on...
  • U.S. Submarines: Run Silent, Run Deep...On Diesel Engines?

    09/18/2014 7:11:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 22 replies
    National Interest ^ | September 18, 2014 | James Holmes
    "Underway on nuclear power", radioed the skipper of USS Nautilus in 1955, after taking history's first nuclear-powered attack submarine to sea for the first time. Nautilus's maiden cruise left an indelible imprint on the navy. Her success, cheered on by the likes of Admiral Hyman Rickover, the godfather of naval nuclear propulsion, helped encode the supremacy of atomic power in the submarine force's cultural DNA.
  • Myths about Roe v. Wade

    09/17/2014 10:43:47 PM PDT · by Morgana · 18 replies
    LIVE ACTION ^ | Deanna Wallace
    As both an active member of the pro-life movement and a law student, I am frequently confronted with the fact that the vast majority of activists on both sides of the abortion debate have many misconceptions about what Roe v. Wade actually says about the legality of abortion. Most of this arises from the fact that they have not read the case themselves, or if they did read it, they were unable to understand it due to a lack of legal training. My goal is to attempt to clear up four of the most common myths surrounding Roe v. Wade,...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:19:24 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    BBC News Science and Environment ^ | 09/17/2014 | By Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. Multiple lines of evidence suggested this new way...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:17:18 AM PDT · by Natufian · 28 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/17/2014 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans.
  • Ancient 'moon god' monument unearthed in Israel

    09/17/2014 11:02:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:55PM BST 17 Sep 2014 | By Inna Lazareva, Tel Aviv
    A structure once believed to form part of an ancient town is identified as a 5,000 year old monument believed to have been used to honour the Mesopotamian moon god 'Sin' A stone monument in the shape of a crescent moon found in northern Israel is more than 5,000 years old, archaeologists have said. The structure, known as Rujum en-Nabi Shua'ayb or Jethro Cairn, is located near the Sea of Galilee and predates the construction of Stonehenge, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, as well as the writing of the Bible. It was initially discovered in the early part of the...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • Europe goes back to the Middle Ages: Map shows how patchwork continent would look if every

    09/17/2014 6:42:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 17, 2014 | Sam Webb
    This map shows how Europe would look if every separatist movement was granted its dream of independence. With the Scottish referendum just days away, the issue of regions breaking away from their traditional rulers is looming large over the continent. The map features well-known separatist movements, such as the powerful and vocal Basque Nationalist movement in northern Spain and southwestern France, as well as the more obscure, such as the Savoyan League, which supports the independence of the Savoy region of France, which has a population of around 405,500.
  • Britons gather stones at Scotland-England border to support the union before vote

    09/16/2014 11:28:05 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 44 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Sept 16, 2014 | Griff Witte
    ... “When a relationship breaks, when one part of your country is trying to get a divorce, it doesn’t work to just say, ‘You’re never going to be able to survive on your own. You’re going to be too poor. You’re going to come running back,’ ” said Rory Stewart, a Parliament member who represents the English side of the border. He helped to lay the first stone in July and has overseen the cairn’s construction ever since. “You have to say, ‘I love you.’ ”
  • 10 Lessons From Real-Life Revolutions That Fictional Dystopias Ignore

    09/16/2014 8:05:57 AM PDT · by ctdonath2 · 14 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/16/14 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    Today's genre books are full of future dystopias, which only have one weakness: teenagers. And everybody knows that most dystopias are kind of contrived. But here are 10 lessons from real-life rebellions against repressive regimes, that we wish the creators of fictional dystopias would pay attention to. 10. The Enemy of Your Enemy Is Not Your Friend [snip] 9. The Top Guy Isn't Always the Problem [snip] 8. Sometimes Making Concessions Leads To Rebellion [snip] 7. Two Downtrodden Groups Will Usually Be Fighting Each Other [snip] 6. Never Neglect the Practicalities [snip] 5. New Regimes Come With Crazy Ideology [snip]...
  • Book Review: 'Robert the Bruce' by Michael Penman

    09/16/2014 2:10:48 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 27 replies
    wsj.com ^ | Sept. 12, 2014 | Barton Swaim
    It is one of the tragedies of recent cultural history that, thanks to Mel Gibson's preposterous movie "Braveheart," the world knows more about William Wallace's short-lived Scottish rebellion of 1296-97 than about Robert the Bruce. For it was Bruce who, after 18 years of plotting and war making, finally threw off the yoke of the English king and consolidated a sense of Scottish identity. "Never will we on any conditions be subjected to the lordship of the English," said the Declaration of Arbroath, a diplomatic letter commissioned by Bruce in 1320. "It is in truth not for glory, nor riches,...
  • Vietnam soldiers to receive Medal of Honor

    09/15/2014 12:30:27 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 9 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 9/15/14 | DARLENE SUPERVILLE
    Congress granted an exemption so Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and Army Spc. Donald P. Sloat could receive the medal, because recommendations typically must be made within two years of the act of heroism, and the medal presented within three. A soldier who fought in the Civil War was expected to receive the Medal of Honor posthumously at a later date. First Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing died in July 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg. Adkins, who served 22 years and lives in Opelika, Alabama, planned to attend the Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House. Adkins...
  • Is the UN Fair to Israel? (video)

    09/15/2014 9:04:52 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 7 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | 9-15-2014 | PragerUniversity
    Israel is a vibrant democracy with full rights for women and gays, a free press and independent judiciary. You would think that the United Nations would celebrate such a country. Instead, the UN condemns Israel at every turn to the point of obsession. How did this happen? Anne Bayefsky, director of the Touro Institute on Human Rights, explains in five eye-opening minutes.
  • Francis Scott Key's Fourth Stanza

    09/15/2014 8:46:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 09/15/2014 | Thomas McGinley
    Two hundred years ago today, it was the unlikely convergence of a physician and a lawyer that produced the most recited poem in American history. Its inspiration occurred just a few miles from Fort McHenry, located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, the site of one of our nation’s most important military conflicts. [SNIP] Key, not surprisingly gloats over the failure of the British in the third stanza which was mostly dropped after they became our allies in the 20th century. But the poem/song’s most powerful stanza is its last.  In the fourth stanza Key proclaims the primary reason for the republic’s...
  • Everybody Loved Their Browning Hi-Powers Back in the Day

    09/15/2014 8:06:42 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    War is Boring ^ | September 15, 2014 | Paul Huard
    From the 1940s until recent times, if a soldier carried a nine-millimeter pistol into battle as part of his weaponry there was a good chance it was a Browning Hi-Power. The Hi-Power was a part of nearly every world conflict of the 20th century. On both sides. Saddam Hussein carried one—and liked to fire it into the air to rile up his supporters. Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi owned a customized, gold-plated Hi-Power with an image of his face etched in the grips.
  • Star Trek’s U.S.S. Enterprise to Boldly Go Back to the Workshop

    09/15/2014 2:53:43 AM PDT · by markomalley · 33 replies
    Air & Space Magazine ^ | 9/11/2014 | Christopher Klimek
    Paramount Pictures didn’t know what they were giving up 40 years ago when they donated the 135-inch studio model of the U.S.S. Enterprise—the fictional, 23rd century starship at the center of the groundbreaking science fiction series Star Trek—to the Smithsonian. Star Trek had been canceled after three seasons five years earlier; the first of the now 12 Trek motion pictures was still five years away. Though the first Star Trek convention had taken place in 1972, there was little reason to suspect the beloved but low-rated TV show—unique for its optimistic vision of a future where men and women of...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "5 Fingers"(1952)

    09/14/2014 11:21:08 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 11 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1952 | Joseph L Mankiewicz
  • Obama’s ship is sinking

    09/14/2014 10:15:18 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 35 replies
    New York Post ^ | September 14, 2014 | Michael Goodwin
    The rising clamor over the beheading of two Americans, and rapidly sinking polls, forced President Obama to reassure the nation last week he had a plan to deal with the Islamic State. He did some of what he had to do, but only some, and so most military analysts believe the expanded airstrikes will not be a sufficient match for the size and weaponry of the terrorist army. They miss the point. The disjointed speech wasn’t really about terrorism and launching a new war. It was about saving Obama’s presidency. He is sinking fast and could soon pass the point...
  • COLUMN: Historic ship found in Canadian arctic

    09/13/2014 10:59:28 PM PDT · by roses of sharon · 10 replies
    Statesville Record ^ | Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:00 am | O.C. Stonestreet
    Historically valuable items are continually being lost or destroyed or being found. For example, most R&L readers likely missed a two-paragraph item in the middle of page 10A of last Wednesday's edition. The title of the article was "Canada Finds One of Two Explorers Ships Lost in Arctic." I feel this discovery warrants more coverage. The two vessels were the HMS Erebus and the HMS Terror, both lost during an expedition to determine the feasibility of traversing the "Northwest Passage," a route over the top of North America to link the Atlantic Ocean and Europe to the Pacific Ocean and...
  • [2006] Assad Under Siege

    09/13/2014 10:34:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Washington Times via FrontPage ^ | Tuesday, May 16, 2006 | Nir Boms and Daveed Gartenstein-Ross
    "Iran and Syria are in the same boat," said former Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani during a visit to Damascus on April 12. In likening the two countries' predicaments, Mr. Rafsanjani continued, "The enemies of Syria are trying to increase the pressure, but the resistance of the Syrian people will continue." He is right: The Syrian people are resisting more than ever before. But the new wave of resistance isn't what Mr. Rafsanjani had in mind. Two weeks before Mr. Rafsanjani's visit, Syrian military intelligence arrested 51-year-old Internet journalist and human-rights activist Mohammed Ghanem, most likely because of his work at...
  • Fight over World War II-era tank goes to court

    09/13/2014 4:05:00 PM PDT · by BBell · 33 replies
    REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (AP) - A company headed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has filed a lawsuit in the San Francisco Bay Area over a World War II-era German tank it says it paid $2.5 million for but never received. The Panzer IV tank was part of a fleet of military vehicles amassed by Stanford University-trained engineer Jacques Littlefield, who kept them on his family estate up a winding, forested road above Silicon Valley. After his death, his family turned them over to the Massachusetts-based Collings Foundation, which put some of them up for auction in Portola Valley in July
  • The 21 Sikhs of Saragarhi

    09/13/2014 11:09:31 AM PDT · by cold start · 5 replies
    Business Standard ^ | 13 September 2014 | Jaisal Singh
    A small body of Sikhs defended a vital North-West Frontier post against 10,000 Afridi and Orakzai attackers. Yesterday was the 117th anniversary of their heroic effort Britain’s Parliament interrupted proceedings and rose to give a standing ovation on September 12, 1897 to 21 valorous soldiers — all of them Indians, all of them Sikhs — for what was undoubtedly a tremendous act of collective bravery, and one of the greatest ‘last-stands’ in military history, the Battle of Saragarhi. The North-West Frontier of undivided India, now a part of Pakistan known as Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, is a harsh place. Embroiled even today in...
  • ‘The Roosevelts’: Once you finish all 14 hours, you’re sorry to see them go

    09/13/2014 8:10:16 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 102 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 9-12-14 | Hank Stuever
    Let’s start with the end. When it’s over — when you make it through the marathon that is Ken Burns’s beautiful, seven-part documentary “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History,” which begins Sunday night on PBS — you may find yourself with a lingering, nebulous grief. You’re sorry it’s over. You’re sorry they’re over. You’re sorry a certain expression of American ideals is, or often appears to be, completely over. My study habits haven’t improved since college; like an idiot, I put off watching all 14 hours of “The Roosevelts” until I absolutely had to watch them on a deadline binge this...