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History (General/Chat)

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  • 13 Ancient Villages Discovered in Wyoming Mountains May Redraw Map of Tribal Migrations

    10/13/2015 3:56:57 PM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 6 replies
    Western Digs ^ | NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | BLAKE DE PASTINO
    Judging by the settlements’ lofty location, along with their architectural features and artifacts, archaeologists believe they were built by early Numic-speaking peoples, the mountain-dwelling ancestors of the diverse but related tribes that today include the Comanche, Ute, Shoshone and Northern Paiute. But these sites posed a new quandary: Judging by the artifacts, the newly found villages appear to date to around the heyday of High Rise Village — about 2,000 to 2,500 years ago. But this is centuries older than — and the sites are thousands of kilometers away from — the only other Numic mountain villages known to exist,...
  • Rare painting of the Saginaw River

    10/13/2015 2:38:31 PM PDT · by Utah Binger · 44 replies | Staff
    Robert Clunie was born June 29, 1895 in Renfrewshire, Scotland. He began painting outdoors in his native Scotland at the age of 13 and was accepted to the Royal Scottish Academy. However, he cancelled his enrollment choosing instead to go to America. In 1911, he and his older brother William boarded the S.S. California for New York. Upon their arrival to the United States, they joined relatives in Saginaw, Michigan. In January 1918, wanting to escape the dark cold Michigan winters, Clunie boarded a train to Pasadena, California. It was on this return train trip back to Saginaw that he...
  • Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards [They ate them!]

    10/13/2015 2:16:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies ^ | October 9, 2015 | By Mark Stevenson
    Students stand on a temple at the Zultepec-Tecoaque archeological site in Tlaxcala state, Mexico Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. New excavations here, the site of one of the Spanish conquistadors' worst defeats in Mexico, are yielding new evidence about what happened when two cultures clashed, and the native Mexicans, at least temporarily, were in control. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was one of the worst defeats in one of history's most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten. Excavations at a site just east...
  • Famous last words of 18 famous people

    10/13/2015 7:42:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 63 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/13/2015 | Elena Holodny
    People have always been fascinated by the last words of others. Perhaps they hold a touch of wisdom, or a final joke, or even confirmation of who's getting what in the will. In light of that, Business Insider put together a list of the reported last words of 18 famous historical figures. Check them out below. 1. Karl Marx, philosopher. "Last words are for fools who haven't said enough." ________________________________ 2. Richard Feynman, theoretical physicist. Nobel Prize winner. "I'd hate to die twice. It's so boring." ________________________________ 3. Archimedes, mathematician. "Stand away, fellow, from my diagram!" Archimedes was killed during...
  • Prayer Request for Safe Travels

    10/13/2015 7:26:24 AM PDT · by TheMom · 30 replies
    Today | TheMom
    This week our daughter is on vacation in Istanbul. I am excited for her to be able to travel to such a historical place, but at the same time am worried sick. I'm not going to sleep well until I hear that she has landed safely in NYC. We are keeping in touch via Whatapp (an app that lets you text from anywhere there is wifi and won't charge international rates). She is enjoying the sites, getting the hang of how to travel about the city and even sampling some "weird food". What prompted her to go to Turkey? Her...
  • ON WAR Military History Symposium 2015 [Chicago Nov. 6]

    10/13/2015 5:46:42 AM PDT · by iowamark
    The Museum & Library's third annual ON WAR symposium features a full day of programs on military history and affairs, and includes appearances by Pritzker Literature Award winners Gerhard Weinberg, Allan Millett, Antony Beevor, Rick Atkinson, and David Hackett Fischer. Presented in conjunction with the Museum & Library's annual Liberty Gala—to be held Nov. 7 at the Hilton Chicago—ON WAR 2015 includes four distinct programs with discussions by some of the world's preeminent historians and authors on subjects ranging from the infamous Battle of the Bulge to the history and heritage of the United States Marine Corps. Included in the...
  • THIS DAY IN HISTORY: OCTOBER 12, 1960 Nikita Khrushchev throws a tantrum at the United Nations

    In one of the most surreal moments in the history of the Cold War, Russian leader Nikita Khrushchev removes his shoe and pounds a table with it in protest against a speech critical of Soviet policy in Eastern Europe. During a debate over a Russian resolution decrying colonialism, a representative of the government of the Philippines charged the Soviets with employing a double standard, pointing to their domination of Eastern Europe as an example of the colonialism they were criticizing in their resolution. In response, Khrushchev took off one of his shoes and began to furiously pound the table. The...
  • On Your Mark: The Chicago Cubs will win the World Series, per Marty McFly

    10/12/2015 1:11:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies ^ | October 12, 2015 | By Jeff Nowak
    It’s beginning to seem like Marty McFly may have been onto something. The Cubs sure are an interesting team to watch. Nothing demonstrates that point more effectively than mad-hatter manager Joe Maddon calling for two suicide squeezes in the second inning on Saturday, en route to a 6-3 win over the St. Louis Cardinals. Now, if you’re like me, you wonder why this isn’t always the play with a runner on third and fewer than two outs. I’ve almost never seen it played correctly by opposing defenses, and isn’t it more reliable than a fly ball to the outfield? But...
  • From a very old skeleton, new insights on ancient migrations

    10/12/2015 11:07:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies ^ | October 9, 2015 | Provided by: National Science Foundation
    In Mota cave, located in the Gamo highlands of Ethiopia, a group of NSF-supported researchers excavation a rock cairn. They discovered under it a burial site containing the remains of a 4,500-year skeleton. Credit: Kathryn and John Arthur ================================================================================================================= Three years ago, a group of researchers found a cave in Ethiopia with a secret: it held the 4,500-year-old remains of a man, with his head resting on a rock pillow, his hands folded under his face, and stone flake tools surrounding him. The team named the man "Bayira," which means "firstborn" in the Gamo language, a common name in the...
  • What are white holes?

    10/12/2015 8:35:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies ^ | October 9, 2015 | by Fraser Cain, Universe Today
    White Hole. Credit: =================================================================================================================== Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole? It's imagination day, and we're going to talk about fantasy creatures. Like unicorns, but even rarer. Like leprechauns, but even more fantastical! Today, we're going to talk about white holes. Before we talk about white holes, let's talk about black holes. And before we talk about Black Holes, what's is this thing you have with holes exactly? Black holes are places in the universe where matter and energy are compacted so densely together that their...
  • True and False Guilt [Attack on Columbus Day is an attack on God Sovereignty and Christianity]

    10/12/2015 6:07:00 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 8 replies ^ | 10/12/2010 | Bill Randles
    Another Columbus day has come and gone and those who resent Western Civilisation have used the occasion to try to shame us into a state of collective guilt for being happy about the discovery of the New World. Tongue in cheek indeed, they mockingly say that the way to celebrate the day Columbus set foot on an island in the Caribbean, would be to take someone else’s house, or to give them a case of smallpox. There are many who are even calling for October 11 to become a national day of mourning for what Europeans have done to indigenous...
  • Newly Discovered Billy the Kid Photograph Authenticated

    10/12/2015 3:21:46 AM PDT · by lowbridge · 95 replies ^ | october 5, 2015
    Western Americana and Rare Coin experts, Kagin’s, Inc., announced that the firm has authenticated and will be the exclusive seller of a newly discovered photograph featuring several of the Lincoln County Regulators, including legendary gunman, Billy the Kid. The photograph was purchased for $2 as a part of a miscellaneous lot at a Fresno junk shop in 2010, and will be the subject of a two-hour documentary airing Sunday, October 18th at 9/8c on National Geographic Channel. “I love handling great treasure finds!” exclaimed Dr. Donald Kagin, president of Kagin’s, Inc. “This iconic, lively and fun artifact is history in...
  • Dean Chance, Angels' first Cy Young winner, dies at age 74

    10/11/2015 6:24:33 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 14 replies
    Orange County Register ^ | October 11, 2015 | Jeff Fletcher
    Dean Chance, the 1964 Cy Young winner and a recently inducted member of the Angels Hall of Fame, has died. He was 74 ... In 1964, Chance was 20-9 with a 1.65 ERA, winning the Cy Young Award at a time when there was only one winner, rather than one for each league. At the time, the 23-year-old Chance was the youngest pitcher ever to win the Cy Young, a distinction he held until Dwight Gooden won the award at age 20 in 1985 ...
  • How America Became Italian

    10/11/2015 5:23:17 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 25 replies
    Washington ^ | October 9, 2015 | Vincent J. Cannato
    When baseball legend Yogi Berra passed away last month, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred called the late Yankees catcher “a beacon of Americana.” Sportswriter Frank Deford had employed the same theme a decade earlier, calling Berra “the ultimate in athletic Americana.” That is quite a testament to a man born Lorenzo Pietro Berra to Italian immigrant parents and raised in the Italian enclave of St. Louis known as the Hill. There, he developed the outsize personality that would color the American experience with Italian wit. Traditionally, when we think of Americana, we recall Grant Wood’s “American Gothic” or Betsy Ross sewing...
  • Digitising Yorkshire's savannah past

    10/11/2015 3:47:43 AM PDT · by moose07 · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | 10 October 2015 | Victoria Gill
    Ancient bones from a North Yorkshire cave, including the remains of rhinos, bears and hyenas, are to go on display in a "virtual museum" more than a century after they were excavated. Some of the bones, found in Victoria Cave in the dales, date back more than one hundred thousand years. At that time, such beasts were common in northern England. A team of archaeologists from the organisation DigVentures has set out digitise the site's unique collection. The cave was discovered in 1837 when a man noticed his dog disappear through an opening in the hill, and reappear through another....
  • "Hylton Stomp" is played by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra (1932)

    10/10/2015 4:55:48 PM PDT · by Arthur McGowan · 7 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1932 | Billy Ternent
    "Hylton Stomp" is played by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra. This was composed by Billy Ternent, who also did arrangements for Hylton. Recorded in London on October 12, 1932. Jack Hylton is the director. Musicians here are Philippe Brun, Jack Reine, Les Carew, Eric Breeze, Johnny Raitz, Noel "Chappie" D'Amato, Abe Romaine, Dave Shand, Billy Ternent, Johnny Rosen, Maurice Loban, Dick Williams, Billy Munn, Sonny Farrar, Harry Chapman, Clem Lawton, Spike Hughes, Max Abrams, and Gilbert Webster.
  • Relatives have ‘proof’ Alcatraz escapees are still alive

    10/10/2015 11:56:29 AM PDT · by lowbridge · 22 replies ^ | october 10, 2015 | tim donnelly
    The evidence is offered up by the Anglins’ nephews David, 48, and Ken Widner, 54, who are featured in “Alcatraz: Search for the Truth,” a History Channel special airing Monday. The evidence has pumped life into the cold case, and has investigators lining up new interviews and planning to search South America for signs of America’s most notorious escapees. “This is absolutely the best actionable lead we’ve had,” Art Roderick, the retired US marshal who was lead investigator on the case for 20 years, tells The Post. The Anglin family sat on those leads for years because, they say, they were spied on and...
  • The Pitcher Time Forgot (Dan Bankhead)

    10/10/2015 10:35:46 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 5 replies
    The New York Times ^ | October 9, 2015 | Michael Beschloss
    This month in 1947 was the first time African-Americans played in the World Series. The two men were Brooklyn Dodgers. You probably know one of their names but not the other. Jackie Robinson would go on to win his place as a courageous American pathbreaker, but his teammate, Dan Bankhead, the first black major league pitcher in modern baseball, has been almost forgotten.
  • First Law Against Slavery

    10/10/2015 6:53:25 AM PDT · by ProgressingAmerica · 8 replies
    First Law Against Slavery The following document is said to be the first act of any government designed to prevent enslaving the negroes. It was recently copied by the venerable Moses Brown, of Providence, from the records of the colony of Rhode Island, and inserted in a Providence paper. It does great credit to Rhode Island. “At a general court held at Warwick, the 18th of May, 1652. “Whereas there is a common course practised among Englishmen, to buy negroes to that end they may have them for service or slaves forever; for the preventing of such practices among us,...
  • Horace Walpole laments forcing slavery upon American Colonies

    10/10/2015 6:38:01 AM PDT · by ProgressingAmerica · 7 replies
    1840 | Horace Walpole
    In The letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford: including numerous letters now first published from the original manuscripts, Volume 2, (1840): (page 322) We have been sitting this fortnight on the African Company: we, the British Senate, that temple of liberty, and bulwark of Protestant Christianity, have this fortnight been pondering methods to make more effectual that horrid traffic of selling negroes. It has appeared to us that six-and-forty thousand of these wretches are sold every year to our plantations alone! -it chills one's blood. I would not have to say that I voted in it for the continent...
  • Virginian Petition against Slavery - April 1, 1772

    10/10/2015 6:19:58 AM PDT · by ProgressingAmerica · 8 replies
    1772 | Several
    VIRGINIAN PETITION Extracts from the Minutes of the House of Burgesses in Virginia, Wednesday, April 1, 1772. Most gracious Sovereign, We, your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, the Burgesses of Virginia, now met in General Assembly, beg leave with all humility to approach your Royal Presence. The many instances of your Majesty's benevolent intentions and most gracious disposition to promote the prosperity and happiness of your subjects in the colonies, encourage us to look up to the Throne, and implore your Majesty's paternal assistance in averting a calamity of a most alarming nature. The importation of slaves into the colonies...
  • The Middle East in 2015 Is a Lot Like Europe in 1914

    10/09/2015 9:12:59 PM PDT · by traumer · 6 replies
    Watching the events cascading in Syria makes it eerily easy to see how the political elites of 1914 stumbled into World War I while believing they were pursuing a sensible set of national interests. The parallels are far from precise. The alliances bonding the players in today’s Middle East aren’t as interlocking as those in early 20th-century Europe. The war-mobilizing machinery isn’t as rigid. And, of course, today’s leaders have the precautionary example of World War I to rivet their attention: They know the pitfalls of escalation and the tragic consequences of unbounded warfare—though people don’t always heed the lessons...
  • The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death

    10/09/2015 5:00:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 10/6/15 | Carrie Arnold
    The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death Only a few genetic changes were enough to turn an ordinary stomach bug into the bacteria responsible for the plague. Pieter Bruegel the ElderThe Triumph of Death (1562), by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. By: Carrie ArnoldOctober 6, 2015 Comments (1) Download PDF Print Each year, 4 million people visit Yosemite National Park in California. Most bring back photos, postcards and an occasional sunburn. But two unlucky visitors this summer got a very different souvenir. They got the plague.This quintessential medieval disease, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted most often by fleabites,...
  • Archaeologists to uncover secrets of Viking fortress

    10/09/2015 1:49:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | October 9th, 2015 | Christian W
    When archaeologists found the first Viking Age fortress in Denmark for 60 years last September, it was hailed as a fantastic archaeological discovery... "With the grant, the Danish Castle Centre -- a division of Museum Southeast Denmark and Aarhus University -- has worked out a unique research project seeking to explore the secrets Borgring is hiding beneath Danish soil," the Danish Castle Centre said. "With the use of modern archaeological methods the scientists and archaeologists will investigate how the fortresses were used, how they were organised, how quickly they were built, their age and what environment, landscape and geography they...
  • Remains of Conquistador Convoy Found in Mexico

    10/09/2015 1:45:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 108 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Friday, October 09, 2015 | unattributed
    In 1520, a Spanish-led supply convoy that may have consisted of as many as 550 people, including Cubans of African and Indian descent, women, and Indian allies of the Spaniards, was captured and taken to a town inhabited by the Aztec-allied Texcocanos, or Acolhuas. The town is now known as Zultepec-Tecoaque, an archaeological site east of Mexico City. Excavations have uncovered carved clay figurines of the invaders that the Texcocanos had symbolically decapitated. Human and animal bones with cut marks have also been found, indicating that the members of the convoy and their horses were actually sacrificed and eaten. The...
  • Angela Merkel attacks east European leaders for ignoring their past over refugees

    10/09/2015 10:53:47 AM PDT · by chasio649 · 19 replies ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | Justin Huggler
    Angela Merkel has launched a withering attack on eastern European leaders for failing to learn from their memories of life behind the Iron Curtain in their handling of the refugee crisis. Calling upon her own experience of growing up in communist East Germany, Mrs Merkel criticised leaders including Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister, for building new fences in Europe despite having escaped their own isolation at the end of the Cold War. “We eastern Europeans – I'm counting myself as an eastern European – have seen that isolation doesn't help,” the German chancellor told MEPs at a meeting on...
  • 'Winter on Fire' tracks the 93 days Ukraine fought for its identity

    10/09/2015 10:38:37 AM PDT · by JPX2011 · 3 replies
    The Los Angeles Time ^ | October 9, 2015 | Jeffrey Fleishman
    Streets are scattered with stones and shell casings. Winter fog mixes with the last wisps of tear gas. The wounded and the dead have been carried away, and those who are left hunker at the barricades. Police advance. Snipers take to rooftops. Bodies fall and the Ukrainian revolution, as brutal as it is cinematic, enters a new day in the battered capital of Kiev. Evgeny Afineevsky's "Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom" is a documentary from the front lines, a visceral portrait of a nation's battle for its identity. The film tracks the 93 days — between November 2013...
  • President Theodore Roosevelt Comes to Bulloch Hall

    10/09/2015 10:05:58 AM PDT · by brothers4thID · 2 replies
    Facebook announcement ^ | 10/9/2015 | City of Roswell
    On October 14th at 7:00 PM, President Theodore Roosevelt comes to Bulloch Hall to introduce the book launch of "Mittie and Thee, an 1853 Roosevelt Romance." Connie Huddleston and Gwendolyn Koehler have compiled the love letters of Mittie Bulloch and Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. Transcribed and presented just as written, the authors allow the letters to stand on their own, with only necessary background regarding the people and places mentioned and the social mores of 1853 included. This event is FREE, but reservations are required. Please contact Janice Metzler at 770-992-1731 ext. 3.
  • Guns in School

    10/09/2015 6:14:59 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 22 replies
  • How the Korean War Prevented a Nuclear World War III

    10/09/2015 6:14:44 AM PDT · by C19fan · 2 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 8, 2015 | Matthew Gault
    Many companies and business publish internal newsletters or magazines, and America’s intelligence services are no different. The CIA runs the pulpy fount of weirdness that is Studies in Intelligence while the NSA puts out the Cryptologic Quarterly. The agencies often declassify and digitize back issues of these magazines for the public. The articles are a wealth of weird, wonderful and fascinating takes on historic and current events written by people who have access to secret information not privy to the public. A recently declassified article from a 2000 issue of Cryptologic Quarterly is a doozy.
  • Hall of Fame basketball player Harry Gallatin dies

    10/08/2015 3:02:13 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 6 replies
    AP ^ | October 7, 2015
    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) -- Harry Gallatin, the Hall of Fame basketball player who was a seven-time All-Star forward for the New York Knicks in the 1950s, died Wednesday. He was 88. The Knicks and Southern Illinois-Edwardsville, where Gallatin was a former coach and athletic director, confirmed the death through Gallatin's family. He died in Edwardsville.
  • Mysterious Archaeological Site with Rock Carved Animal Heads Found near Bulgaria’s Sliven

    10/08/2015 2:24:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | October 5, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    A mysterious archaeological site dubbed "The Rock Herd" which consists of rock carvings of animal heads made by an unknown sculptor in an unknown time period has been found near the eastern Bulgarian city of Sliven... The mysterious archaeological monument consists of a semi-circular rock niche whose edge has been decorated with animal head carvings and reliefs fashioned out of the natural rock material. These carved animal heads themselves forming a semi-circle appear to be diverse in style and craftsmanship. Most of them appear to be cattle, goat and capricorn heads but there are also reliefs of wild animals and...
  • Pigs Unearth Hunter-Gatherer Civilization

    10/08/2015 2:15:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Discovery News ^ | October 7, 2015 | Jennifer Viegas
    Pigs foraging along a Scottish coastline have unwittingly uprooted the earliest evidence for a remote population of hunter-gatherers. The uprooted items, stone tools that have been dated to around 12,000 years ago, are described in the latest issue of British Archaeology. The tools were discovered on the east coast of the Isle of Islay, Scotland, and include sharp points -- likely used for hunting big game -- scrapers and more. Archaeologists Steven Mithen and Karen Wicks of the University of Reading explained to Discovery News that a gamekeeper had previously released the pigs at a local port on Islay to...
  • First Ancient African DNA Sequenced

    10/08/2015 2:10:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, October 08, 2015 | unattributed
    Science reports that the first prehistoric genome from Africa has been sequenced. The DNA was obtained from the inner ear bones of a 4,500-year-old skeleton discovered in Mota Cave by John and Kathryn Arthur of the University of South Florida. Located in the highlands of Ethiopia, Mota Cave’s cool temperatures helped to preserve the hunter-gatherer’s rare genetic material. Andrea Manica and Marcos Gallego Llorente of the University of Cambridge found that the man, who has been dubbed “Mota,” had brown eyes, dark skin, and three gene variants associated with living at high altitudes. Mota’s genome was compared with samples from...
  • Experiential Archaeology Class Recreates Ancient Ceramics

    10/08/2015 2:01:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, October 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Johns Hopkins University has released Mysteries of the Kylix, a film that follows 13 undergraduate students who worked with a conservator and two potters to recreate the red-figure pottery drinking bowls crafted by Greek artisans between the sixth and fourth centuries B.C. The students practiced throwing pots, decorated them with images and slip, and fired the clay in a kiln that they constructed. They then examined their pottery under a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument. "The idea is to be thoughtful at every stage. To look at clay, make shapes, to choose images and paint, to go through the fire and...
  • Otago Researchers Sequence Kuri Dog Genomes

    10/08/2015 1:55:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Thursday, October 8, 2015 | Ms Karen Greig
    The genetic heritage of New Zealand's first dog, the now extinct kuri, is being unravelled by University of Otago scientists using state-of-the-art ancient DNA analysis. University of Otago PhD student Karen Greig has sequenced the complete, or near complete, mitochondrial genomes of 14 kuri represented by bones recovered from Wairau Bar, one on New Zealand's earliest and most important archaeological sites. Kuri were smallish dogs about the size of cocker spaniels and were brought to New Zealand from East Polynesia in the colonising canoes that arrived in the early fourteenth century AD. They were the only domesticated animal to be...
  • Study: Eurasian Farmers Migrated to Africa 3,000 Years Ago

    10/08/2015 1:15:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    AP ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | AP
    Scientists say they have extracted ancient DNA from the skull of a man buried in the highlands of Ethiopia 4,500 years ago that supports the theory that Eurasian farmers migrated into Africa some 3,000 years ago. This Stone Age resettlement had previously been theorized, but the rare find allowed scientists to see what DNA looked like well before the time the migration would have taken place. A comparison with modern populations around the world allowed them to see that the migrants left their genetic mark in the furthest corners of Africa. "This is the first ancient human genome found in...
  • ICE ON PLUTO: Now frozen water and BLUE SKY found on dwarf planet giving more hope of life

    10/08/2015 11:20:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 76 replies ^ | UBLISHED: 16:40, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | UPDATED: 18:01, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | By Jon Austin
    NASA has discovered frozen water and earth-like blue skies on Pluto in another historic development in the search for extraterrestrial life. Just 10 days after confirming that liquid water has been found on Mars, the US space agency revealed the amazing dwarf-planet has both ice and a 'gorgeous' blue sky. A Nasa spokesman said: "New Horizons has detected numerous small, exposed regions of water ice on Pluto. "The discovery was made from data collected by the Ralph spectral composition mapper on New Horizons." There has been repeated speculation Pluto may have a liquid sea under its surface, and confirmation of...
  • I Think You're The Father of One of My Kids...'

    10/08/2015 8:37:00 AM PDT · by VA Voter · 9 replies
    I Think You're The Father of One of My Kids...' A guy goes to the supermarket and notices a very attractive woman waving at him. She says, 'Hello.' He's rather taken aback because he can't place where he knows her from. So he asks, 'Do you know me?' To which she replies, 'I think you're the father of one of my kids.' Now his mind travels back to the only time he has ever been unfaithful to his wife. So he asks, 'Are you the stripper from the bachelor party that I made love to on the pool table, with...
  • Are Mideast Muslims Dying for a Myth?

    10/08/2015 7:33:47 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/08/2015 | Mike Konrad
    Given the way the Mideast is headed, things are so unpredictable that this present Jerusalem flare-up could run the gamut from burning itself out in a few days to inciting a war against Israel, eventually bringing in Iran, the Muslim world, and then the whole world. The Arabs claim it is an Intifada, the Arabic word for resistance – but what is enormously troubling is the fallacy behind it. Fueling much of this Arab fury is a renewed Jewish presence on the al-Aqsa Mosque compound. Over the past two years, Jews have started to gather outside al-Aqsa, and the Muslims...
  • Chimpanzees Shed Light on Origins of Human Walking

    10/07/2015 1:27:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The torso (the part of the body that includes the ribcage, belly and pelvis) of chimpanzees has long been thought to be a rigid block, best suited for a life of tree climbing. Humans, on the other hand, have long and flexible torsos that aid in walking by allowing us to rotate our upper body in the opposite direction of our lower body. The findings from the paper, titled "Surprising trunk rotational capabilities in chimpanzees and implications for bipedal walking proficiency in early humans," changes the evolutionary view of how early human ancestors walked and what they were able to...
  • A Neolithic causewayed enclosure and other exciting discoveries at Thame, Oxfordshire

    10/07/2015 1:18:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | unattributed
    At the end of August, Oxford Cotswold Archaeology (a joint venture between Oxford Archaeology and Cotswold Archaeology) completed the excavation of a site on the edge of Thame in Oxfordshire. The work was carried out in advance of new housing being built by Bloor Homes... Later in the Neolithic, a small henge monument was constructed within the causewayed enclosure. A second, smaller, ring-ditch was located close to the henge and this may also be of later Neolithic date. During the Bronze Age, the site saw virtually no activity or, at least, no activity which left a mark in the archaeological...
  • Renoir haters picket outside Museum of Fine Arts (Boston)

    10/07/2015 11:05:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 56 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | October 5, 2015 | Mark Shanahan
    It’s nothing personal, says Ben Ewen-Campen, he just doesn’t think French impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir is much of a painter. Monday, the Harvard postdoc joined some like-minded aesthetes for a playful protest outside the Museum of Fine Arts. The rally, which mostly bewildered passersby, was organized by Max Geller, creator of the Instagram account Renoir Sucks at Painting, who wants the MFA to take its Renoirs off the walls and replace them with something better.

    10/07/2015 8:39:23 AM PDT · by JoeDetweiler · 7 replies
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | Oct 7, 2015 | Tim Blair
    "Yale University has published 170,000 Library of Congress photos taken in the US between 1935 and 1945. Just click on this map and keep clicking. To Yale’s credit, they’ve used captions written at the time. Some may be jarring to modern sensibilities, but they assist in providing the era’s feel. A quick batch of highlights: " The Map....
  • Wildlife is thriving around Chernobyl since the people left

    10/07/2015 7:00:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10/07/2015
    Wolves are seven times as common in the Chernobyl area than they were (Image: Sergey Gashchak) The site of the world’s worst nuclear accident is now a wildlife haven. The abundance of large animals around Chernobyl, such as deer, elk and wild boar, matches that of nature reserves in the region – and wolves are seven times as common. Some 116,000 people fled the radioactive fallout from the reactor after it exploded in 1986, and another 220,000 were resettled after that, vacating a zone covering some 4200 square kilometres split equally between Belarus and Ukraine. “Whatever negative effects there are...
  • Former President Carter mediating dispute between Martin Luther King heirs

    10/07/2015 6:33:58 AM PDT · by fungoking · 10 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 10/07/15 | David Beasley
    Former President Jimmy Carter is helping settle a dispute between Martin Luther King Jr.'s children over whether to sell King's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal and the Bible he carried during the civil rights movement. King's sons, Martin Luther King III and Dexter King, want to sell their father's possessions, while the late civil rights leader's surviving daughter, Bernice King, opposes the sale, calling the items "sacred." Earlier this year, a judge in Georgia approved mediation to resolve the legal fight after attorneys in the case said they were close to an agreement and that a mediator would help finish...
  • On This Day in 1571

    10/06/2015 10:57:42 PM PDT · by John Locke · 8 replies
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton
    Lepanto White founts falling in the courts of the sun, And the Soldan of Byzantium is smiling as they run; There is laughter like the fountains in that face of all men feared, It stirs the forest darkness, the darkness of his beard, It curls the blood-red crescent, the crescent of his lips, For the inmost sea of all the earth is shaken with his ships. They have dared the white republics up the capes of Italy, They have dashed the Adriatic round the Lion of the Sea, And the Pope has cast his arms abroad for agony and loss,...
  • The U.S. Military and the Influenza Pandemic of 1918–1919

    10/06/2015 11:21:43 PM PDT · by beaversmom · 9 replies
    SYNOPSIS The American military experience in World War I and the influenza pandemic were closely intertwined. The war fostered influenza in the crowded conditions of military camps in the United States and in the trenches of the Western Front in Europe. The virus traveled with military personnel from camp to camp and across the Atlantic, and at the height of the American military involvement in the war, September through November 1918, influenza and pneumonia sickened 20% to 40% of U.S. Army and Navy personnel. These high morbidity rates interfered with induction and training schedules in the United States and rendered...

    10/06/2015 11:05:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Historic Scotland ^ | 29 September 2015 | unattributed (Alan Bannon, Media & PR Officer)
    Archaeologists in Orkney have uncovered the remains of over 30 buildings dating from around 4000 BC to 1000 BC, together with field systems, middens and cemeteries. The find includes a very rare Bronze Age building which experts believed could have been a sauna or steam house, which may have been built for ritual purposes. EASE Archaeology recently made the exciting discovery on the periphery of the prehistoric Links of Noltland, on the island of Westray in Orkney, next to where the famous ‘Westray Wife’ was found in 2009, which is believed to be the earliest depiction of a human face...
  • Ruins of ancient Egyptian temple unearthed under modern Cairo

    10/06/2015 9:58:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | October 05, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The shrine belonged to the 30th Dynasty Pharaoh Nectanebo I (379 B.C.-360 B.C.,)” said Damaty. The mission also unearthed remains of limestone colonnade and a “well-preserved” ceiling that are strongly believed to have been a part of an ancient Egyptian temple, Damaty said, adding that ruins of the mud brick outer enclosure wall surrounded the temple, along with royal bust belonged to the New Kingdom (1580 B.C.-1080 B.C.) Pharaoh Merenptah, were also excavated in the area. Nectanebo I was the founder of the 30th Dynasty: the last native Egyptian royal family to rule ancient Egypt before Alexander the Great conquered...