History (General/Chat)

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  • Churchill painting sells for record Ł1.8m: 'Extremely personal' Goldfish Pool work among collection

    12/18/2014 7:40:36 AM PST · by C19fan · 25 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 17, 2014 | Emily Kent Smith
    A painting by Sir Winston Churchill sold for Ł1.8million last night – a record price for a work of art by the former Prime Minister. The Goldfish Pool at Chartwell, labelled 'extremely personal' by auctioneers, had been estimated to be worth between Ł400,000 and Ł600,000. Of the 11 pieces of artwork sold at Sotheby's in London last night, at least five went to American buyers. Two were bought by UK buyers and a further four remained anonymous. A Sotheby's spokesman said: 'Churchill's exceptional ability as a painter was celebrated.'
  • The mystery of the magical 'Ulfberht' Viking sword - Researchers close in on the German 'supermonks'

    12/18/2014 6:55:52 AM PST · by C19fan · 37 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 18, 2014 | Mark Prigg
    It was the sword of choice for the discerning Viking - superstrong, and almost unbeatable in battle. Yet mystery surrounds a small number of Viking swords researchers have uncovered. They are all inscribed with a single word - 'Ulfberht', which experts believe may reveal their maker.
  • Cemetery with one MILLION mummies unearthed in Egypt: 1,500-year-old desert necropolis

    12/18/2014 6:00:19 AM PST · by C19fan · 13 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 18, 2014 | Richard Gray
    A cemetery containing more than a million mummified human bodies has been unearthed in central Egypt, according to archaeologists. Scientists have already excavated more than 1,700 mummies, preserved by the hot dry desert in the Faiyum region of Egypt about 60 miles (96km) south of Cairo. But those leading the work believe their could be up to a million similar bodies buried in shafts cut into the limestone rock that are at times up to 75ft (22.9 metres) deep.
  • 111 Years Ago Today: Man’s First Powered Flight.

    12/17/2014 11:49:14 AM PST · by EveningStar · 46 replies
    Alert 5 ^ | December 17, 2014 | Tom Demerly
    It is equipped with side stick controls like an F-16 Fighting Falcon. It uses an advanced, “mission adaptive” wing that has no seams at the control surfaces. The wing is so unique its design is protected under U.S. patent 821,393. The entire wing changes shape to control the roll axis of the aircraft ... And it is the first successful powered aircraft ever, the Wright Flyer. 111 years ago today Orville Wright became the first man to achieve powered flight. His first 12-second flight, covering only 120 feet, changed the course of mankind. 10:35 Local, Thursday, 17 December, 1903; Kill...
  • ‘Correction: $1 Trillion bill’? Prediction: Obama will be on the $20 bill in 50 years (Mega Hurl)

    12/17/2014 10:59:50 AM PST · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Twitchy ^ | December 17, 2014 | Staff
    President Obama still has two years left as president, but that’s not stopping some of his biggest fans from thinking about his legacy. Here’s Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic: 10 years world will long for "pragmatic" Obama. 25 years--will be considered one of America's "greatest presidents." 50 yrs on the $20 bill.
  • Second Amendment protects dirk knives and police batons

    12/17/2014 10:12:07 AM PST · by right-wing agnostic · 3 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | December 16, 2014 | Eugene Volokh
    So holds the Connecticut Supreme Court, in the just-released State v. DeCiccio. Here’s an excerpt of the reasoning as to police batons, which also applies in large measure to dirks, and which, I would argue, should apply to stun guns and Tasers (paragraph break added). (Disclosure: I represent the Association of Women Against Rape and Endangerment, as amicus curiae, in Commonwealth v. Caetano, now pending before the Massachusetts high court; that cases involves the question whether stun guns and Tasers are “arms” for Second Amendment purposes; we argue that they are.)
  • The Enduring Myth of the Fragile Battlecruiser

    12/17/2014 7:42:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 28 replies
    Information Dissemination ^ | December 16, 2014 | Staff
    The repetition of the myth of the fragile battlecruiser continues even as the greatest victory of the class is now just over 100 years in the past. This particular capital ship has been on the receiving end of the naval world’s harshest criticism since three of their British number met untimely ends at the May 31-June 1, 1916 Battle of Jutland. In fact, the battlecruiser was a hybrid, cost saving platform designed specifically to support a mature British strategic concept of seapower. Its heavy losses at Jutland were more to do with early 20th century capital ship design and poor...
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    12/17/2014 7:39:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Dawn Peters
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D. Researchers reporting in the journal Geoarchaeology discovered that the interior of the container, which was found at an archaeological site on southern Baffin Island, contains fragments of bronze as well as small spherules of glass that form when rock is heated to high temperatures. The object is a crucible for melting bronze, likely in order to cast it into small tools or ornaments. Indigenous peoples of northern...
  • Holy Moses, Batman! [God depicted as a petulant child in Exodus: Gods and Kings]

    12/17/2014 6:48:56 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 12/17/2014 | By Arnold Cusmariu
    English director Ridley Scott is evidently fond of what Hollywood calls “period pieces.” He has had little trouble getting funding for such unlike other directors, no doubt because of his track record with Alien (1979), the cult classic Blade Runner (1982), and Thelma and Louise (1991). The suits felt sufficiently rewarded after they let Scott get into the time machine to make Gladiator (2000), Kingdom of Heaven (2005), and Robin Hood (2010) to let him try again. However, for Exodus: Gods and Kings, now playing at your neighborhood multiplex, Scott had to travel quite a bit farther back. If...
  • Office Christmas Party: 1925

    12/17/2014 6:21:25 AM PST · by Phillyred · 25 replies
    It's the week before Christmas, which means it's time for a hallowed holiday tradition here at Shorpy: The Office Xmas Party! Which has been going on for close to 90 years now. Will Clarence in Sales ever get up the nerve to ask out Hermione from Accounting? Washington, D.C., 1925. "Western Electric Co. group." There are enough little dramas playing out here to keep the forensic partyologists busy until Ground Hog Day. National Photo Company Collection glass negative.
  • In 1944 Battle of the Bulge, Albert Darago, then 19, took on a German tank by himself

    12/16/2014 10:26:37 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 24 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | December 15, 2014 | Michael E. Ruane
    Albert Darago had never fired a bazooka before. He was an “ack-ack” guy, a fuse-cutter on a 90mm antiaircraft gun. But on Dec. 19, 1944, the brass was looking for volunteers to go after some German tanks. And Darago said sure. He was a 19-year-old, color-blind draftee, a native of Baltimore’s Little Italy and a musician who played piano and clarinet. He was no hero, he said. But when Adolf Hitler launched the massive attack that began World War II’s bloody Battle of the Bulge, he had not reckoned on GIs like Darago.
  • On this day in 1773..

    12/16/2014 7:03:33 AM PST · by LouAvul · 14 replies
    ..American colonists boarded a British ship and dumped more than 300 chests of tea into Boston Harbor to protest tea taxes.
  • Greenpeace 'is refusing' to hand over names of activists who caused 'irreparable' damage to Nazca

    12/16/2014 6:59:03 AM PST · by C19fan · 30 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 16, 2014 | Corey Charlton
    The environmental group Greenpeace has not given Peru the names of the activists accused of damaging the world-renowned Nazca lines during a publicity stunt, Peruvian officials claim. The government has threatened extradition for the activists involved and said it would seek charges for 'attacking archaeological monuments' - a crime punishable by up to six years in prison. During a protest at the U.N. World Heritage site in Peru's coastal desert, activists laid a message promoting clean energy beside the famed figure of a hummingbird comprised of black rocks on a white background.
  • ISIS using bombs containing live SCORPIONS in effort to spread panic

    12/16/2014 6:50:37 AM PST · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 16, 2014 | Annabel Grossman
    Militants fighting for the Islamic State in Iraq have unveiled their latest terror tactic - bombs containing hundreds of live scorpions designed to spread fear among their enemies. Canisters packed with poisonous varieties of scorpion are being blasted into towns and villages, which explode on impact - scattering the scorpions and causing panic among the innocent local population.
  • The tiny urban island of downtown Detroit, lost in the wide open spaces of a depopulated city

    12/16/2014 6:27:56 AM PST · by C19fan · 32 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 16, 2014 | Wills Robinson
    n 1950, Detroit was America's fifth largest city and one of the most prosperous on the back of its booming motor industry. It prompted the construction of skyscrapers on the banks of the river and the development of vast suburban housing projects in the surrounding areas. But almost 55 years on, a dwindling motor industry and a dramatic fall in blue collar jobs has caused people to leave the Michigan city, abandoning their homes and businesses. These aerial photos reveal the tiny urban island that is left - a clutter of high-rises surrounded by empty housing plots now covered in...
  • Siberia’s Whale Bone Alley: Stonehenge’s Eerie Russian Cousin

    12/15/2014 9:10:06 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    mysteriousuniverse.org ^ | December 12, 2014 | Martin J. Clemens
    Upon closer inspection, you would find that this is no random collection of bones, but rather is a deliberately constructed roadway delineated by the towering rib bones (some in excess of five metres high and weighing 300 kg), and dotted with huge whale skulls and large square pits dug into the permafrost. It would be a perplexing sight indeed.
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • 120-114 BC: The Cimbrian flood and the following Cimbrian war 113-101 BC

    12/14/2014 12:59:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    climate4you ^ | before 2014 | unattributed
    The Cimbrian flood (or Cymbrian flood) was a large-scale incursion of the North Sea in the region of the Jutland peninsula (Denmark) in the period 120 to 114 BC, resulting in a permanent change of coastline with much land lost. The flood was caused by one or several very strong storm(s). A high number of people living in the affected area of Jutland drowned, and the flooding apparently set off a migration of the Cimbri tribes previously settled there (Lamb 1991)... The Cimbri were a tribe from Northern Europe, who, together with the Proto-Germanic Teutones and the Ambrones threatened the...
  • Former General Zinni

    12/14/2014 9:00:07 AM PST · by 7thson · 22 replies
    Good morning everyone. A short post to get Freeper opinion. I saw former General Zinni on Fox News this morning and he came out in favor of the report released this week by Diane Feinstein. What is the word on Zinni? Was he a good commander? Was he anti Bush, pro Obama?
  • Quileute Tribe celebrates discovery of historic rock carving

    12/13/2014 6:51:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | December 11, 2014 | Joseph O'Sullivan
    A fisherman stumbled upon a rock carving that appears to show a legendary battle in Quileute mythology... An old petroglyph found by a fisherman in the Calawah River was celebrated with a ceremony by a group of Quileute tribal members before it was moved to the tribal headquarters in La Push. State archaeologists authenticated the carving and think it may date to around or before the mid-1700s... The rock they stumbled upon appears to be a carving that depicts a legendary battle in Quileute mythology, according to tribal and state officials... The rock -- which could weigh up to 1,000...
  • Israel: 7,500-year-old lost Neolithic village discovered off coast of Haifa

    12/13/2014 6:43:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    IBTimes ^ | December 10, 2014 | Sanskrity Sinha
    A prehistoric water well hinting at the existence of a thriving Neolithic settlement has been excavated under water at Israel's East Mediterranean coast. The 7,500-year-old water well, currently under five metres of water, was submerged following prehistoric rise in sea level. Maritime archaeologist Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority led the excavation at Kfar Samir site in collaboration with experts at Flinders University in South Australia and University of Haifa in Israel. Archaeologists said that the well which was a source of fresh water for the village dwellers was abandoned as the sea level rose. "Water wells are valuable...
  • Israeli cave offers clues about when humans mastered fire

    12/13/2014 6:40:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science ^ | 12 December 2014 | Nala Rogers
    In layers older than roughly 350,000 years, almost none of the flints are burned. But in every layer after that, many flints show signs of exposure to fire: red or black coloration, cracking, and small round depressions where fragments known as pot lids flaked off from the stone. Wildfires are rare in caves, so the fires that burned the Tabun flints were probably controlled by ancestral humans, according to the authors. The scientists argue that the jump in the frequency of burnt flints represents the time when ancestral humans learned to control fire, either by kindling it or by keeping...
  • The Origin of the Number Zero

    12/13/2014 6:32:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | December 2014 | Amir Aczel
    Of all the numerals, "0" -- alone in green on the roulette wheel -- is most significant. Unique in representing absolute nothingness, its role as a placeholder gives our number system its power. It enables the numerals to cycle, acquiring different meanings in different locations (compare 3,000,000 and 30). With the exception of the Mayan system, whose zero glyph never left the Americas, ours is the only one known to have a numeral for zero. Babylonians had a mark for nothingness, say some accounts, but treated it primarily as punctuation. Romans and Egyptians had no such numeral either... Found on...
  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Affluence Explains Rise of Moralizing Religions, Suggests Study

    The ascetic and moralizing movements that spawned the world's major religious traditions -- Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Christianity -- all arose around the same time in three different regions... The emergence of world religions, they say, was triggered by the rising standards of living in the great civilizations of Eurasia... It seems almost self-evident today that religion is on the side of spiritual and moral concerns, but that was not always so, Baumard explains. In hunter-gatherer societies and early chiefdoms, for instance, religious tradition focused on rituals, sacrificial offerings, and taboos designed to ward off misfortune and evil. That...
  • Scientists reveal parchment's hidden stories

    12/13/2014 5:59:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, December 8th, 2014 | Thomas Deane, Trinity College Dublin
    The new technique of analyzing DNA found in ancient parchments can shine a focused light on the development of agriculture across the centuries. Millions of documents stored in archives could provide scientists with the key to tracing agricultural development across the centuries... Amazingly, thanks to increasingly progressive genetic sequencing techniques, the all-important historical tales these documents tell are no longer confined to their texts; now, vital information also comes from the DNA of the parchment on which they are written. Researchers used these state-of-the-art scientific techniques to extract ancient DNA and protein from tiny samples of parchment from documents from...
  • Planned Arizona copper mine would put a hole in Apache archaeology

    12/13/2014 5:43:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Science ^ | 10 December 2014 | Zach Zorich
    A site on Apache Mountain, where Apache warriors plunged to their deaths to avoid the U.S. cavalry, may soon overlook a copper mine. Archaeologists and Native American tribes are protesting language in a Senate bill that would approve a controversial land exchange between the federal government and a copper mining company -- a swap that may put Native American archaeological sites at risk. The bill is needed to fund the U.S. military and is considered likely to pass the Senate as early as today. The company Resolution Copper Mining hopes to exploit rich copper deposits beneath 980 hectares of Arizona's...
  • TALL TALE [ that’s true ]

    12/13/2014 6:54:12 AM PST · by virgil283 · 6 replies
    aopa.org ^ | July 31, 2014 | ByDave Hirschman
    "Rare warbirds to depart Edwards Ranch......inside Texan Wilson "Connie" Edwards' 100,000+ square foot hangar complex and its remarkable treasure trove of iconic warbirds......" scroll down for video .....HA-1112 Buchon
  • Angelina Jolie’s new movie ‘Unbroken’ provokes Japanese outrage

    12/13/2014 5:00:31 AM PST · by Hostage · 105 replies
    LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL ^ | December 12, 2014 | YURI KAGEYAMA ASSOCIATED PRESS
    TOKYO — Angelina Jolie’s new movie “Unbroken” has not been released in Japan yet, but it has already struck a nerve in a country still wrestling over its wartime past. The buzz on social networks and in online chatter is decidedly negative over the film, which depicts a U.S. Olympic runner who endures torture at a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. Some people are calling for a boycott of the movie, although there is no release date in Japan yet. It hits theaters in the U.S. on Dec. 25. Others want the ban extended to Jolie, the director...
  • Marco Polo Brings Mongol Empire To Netflix (Netflix New Original Series Alert)

    12/12/2014 5:43:23 PM PST · by goldstategop · 35 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12/12/2014 | Genevieve Hassan
    Following on from the success of its original dramas House of Cards and Orange is the New Black, Netflix is banking on its next series, Marco Polo, being a similar hit. The adventures of famed explorer Marco Polo in 13th Century China are being told in a new series for Netflix. Set in Mongolian emperor Kublai Khan's court and with a rumoured $90m (Ł57m) budget, its epic nature, battle scenes and sexual content has inevitably drawn comparisons to Game of Thrones - although creator John Fusco points out Polo's books came first. Starring British actor Benedict Wong as Kublai and...
  • Paul Revere's 1795 time capsule unearthed

    12/12/2014 5:16:35 PM PST · by DJ MacWoW · 30 replies
    CNN ^ | Todd Leopold and Kevin Conlon
    (CNN) -- A time capsule buried by patriots Samuel Adams and Paul Revere more than two centuries ago was unearthed Thursday in Boston. The box-shaped capsule was placed by the Revolutionary-era duo, along with Massachusetts developer William Scollay, in a cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House in 1795, the year construction began on the building, CNN affiliate WBZ reported. At the time, Adams was the Massachusetts governor.
  • 5 Special Things Black People Lost When Schools Were Integrated . . .

    12/12/2014 10:03:34 AM PST · by Fester Chugabrew · 53 replies
    Atlanta Black Star ^ | November 25, 2014 | Nick Chiles
    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, that state laws establishing separate public schools for Black and white students were unconstitutional, violating the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The 9-0 decision was hailed as a major victory for the civil rights of African-Americans, paving the way for the integration of the nation’s schools. But in retrospect, while there was reason to celebrate the court decision, there were also many things the Black community lost after the Brown decision.
  • Hollywood Finds Religion But Should Moviegoers Embrace “Exodus?”

    12/12/2014 9:50:34 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 42 replies
    Townhall ^ | 12/11/2014 | John Hanlon
    In 2014, Hollywood has embraced telling religious stories on film. No longer, it seems, are religious viewers denied the opportunity to see biblical stories onscreen. In February of this year, Roma Downey and Mark Burnett brought Jesus’ story to the big screen in Son of God. In March, director Darren Aronofsky presented Noah , which— in spite of its narrative flaws— worked as an epic tale. This weekend, Ridley Scott— the newest high-profile director to embrace this trend— offers up a version of Moses’ story in the new drama Exodus: Gods and Kings. Regardless of your religious beliefs, this biblical...
  • Canceling the DDG-1000 Destroyer Program Was a Mistake

    12/12/2014 9:24:49 AM PST · by C19fan · 1 replies
    National Defense ^ | December 12, 2014 | Ben Freeman
    The U.S. Navy’s DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class destroyers are extraordinarily expensive. Since 2009, the cost of the ships has increased 34.4 percent, according to the Congressional Research Service. Each of the three Zumwalt’s being built will cost taxpayers around $3.4 billion. And, that’s on top of the more than $9 billion in research and design funding that has gone into this program. Are they worth the price? The Navy didn’t think so in 2009 when Secretary of Defense Robert Gates announced the program would end with the procurement of just three ships, down from the 32 ships the Navy had initially planned...
  • Humans [America] Last Landed On The Moon 42 Years Ago Today

    12/11/2014 2:52:45 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on December 11, 2014 | by Elizabeth Howell
    The last lunar landing was Apollo 17, which took place on Dec. 11, 1972. Commander Eugene Cernan and lunar module pilot Harrison Schmitt did three moonwalks in the Taurus-Littrow valley, scoping out the highlands to try to get a geologic sense of the area. Among their more memorable findings are orange soil.
  • Here's The Rise Of ISIS In One Short Animated Video

    12/11/2014 1:52:34 PM PST · by wtd
    The Business Insider ^ | Dec. 11, 2014, 4:39 PM | Jeremy Bender
    BusinessInsider: Here's The Rise Of ISIS In One Short Animated Video"Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, leader of ISIS's predecessor. ISIS's blitz across Iraq left many stunned this past summer, especially after the jihadist group captured Mosul, the country's second-largest city in …"
  • Jihadist Killings Equal to a 9/11 Pentagon Attack Every Day for a Month

    12/11/2014 1:38:57 PM PST · by wtd · 8 replies
    ABC News ^ | 12/11/2014 1 hour ago | Terry Moran
    Jihadist Killings Equal to a 9/11 Pentagon Attack Every Day for a Month ABC News 1 hour ago "That is the toll jihadist violence took around the world in just 30 days, from Nov. 1 to Nov. 30, 2014. There were 664 jihadist attacks in 14 countries across the world last month, according to a detailed study done by …"
  • Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer at 50

    12/11/2014 7:49:51 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 84 replies
    National Review ^ | 12/11/2014 | James Lileks
    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer special. For those remembering how they stared with wonder and awe at the jerky stop-motion animation and shivered with delicious fear at the perils faced by the plucky buck with the incandescent schnoz, the notion that this program occurred a half century ago would be a marvelous testament to the enduring power of the show’s appeal . . . if it didn’t make you feel so damned old. If it does, that is. For young kids today it’s a cultural artifact from a time so remote it...
  • How a Greenpeace stunt in Peru drives home the global climate divide

    12/11/2014 6:40:06 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 36 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 12-10-2014 | Nick Miroff
    When the stunt-planners at Greenpeace sent teams of activists to trespass this week at Peru's Nazca archeological site, they must have thought their bumper-sticker messaging would look good on a Facebook page next to the 2,000-year-old geodesic drawings. After all, the group is known for stringing banners from bridges and skyscrapers to draw attention to its environmental campaigns, and with U.N. climate talks taking place in Lima this week, the activists clearly wanted to make an impact. And so they have. The impact of their footprints on the fragile desert site, in fact, will last "hundreds or thousands of years,"...
  • Rosetta Instrument Reignites Debate on Earth's Oceans

    12/11/2014 2:15:28 AM PST · by iowamark · 25 replies
    NASA ^ | 12/10/14
    The question about the origin of oceans on Earth is one of the most important questions with respect to the formation of our planet and the origin of life. The most popular theory is that water was brought by impacts of comets and asteroids. Data from the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) instrument aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft indicate that terrestrial water did not come from comets like 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The findings were published today in the journal Science. Researchers agree that water must have been delivered to Earth by small bodies at a later...
  • Can the Left Launch its Own Tea Party? (barf alert)

    12/10/2014 8:05:13 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 46 replies
    Politico ^ | December 8, 2014 | BILL SCHER
    Even as they publicly condemn Tea Party Republicans as hostage-taking legislative thugs, the truth is that some Democrats are quietly jealous of them. Think of it: The Tea Party gang gets to intimidate party leaders, threaten legislation, block nominees, shut down the government and default on the debt if they don’t get their way. They cause major trouble. Boy, does that sound good. The extreme right has power, and that’s something the left hasn’t had much of for a long time. But in the aftermath of the party’s disastrous midterm performance, it’s very possible that the Democratic Party leadership will...
  • Undivided Power, Undivided Tyranny

    12/10/2014 7:00:01 AM PST · by Jacquerie · 3 replies
    “No nation ever continued happy, whose chief magistrate was its absolute master; and no nation miserable, whose supreme power was properly checked and divided.” These words were written by Thomas Gordon in 1722. Perhaps he picked them up from John Locke’s 1689 Two Treatises of Government. In any event, our framing generation certainly understood what to do with power in a republic, for their design “properly checked and divided” powers. They first divided it vertically between member republics and the government created by those republics. Second, authority was carefully parceled out horizontally among three branches. This past month, depending on...
  • Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt

    12/09/2014 5:22:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | December 8, 2014 | Jeanette Varberg, Flemming Kaul, Bernard Gratuze, tr by Michael de Laine
    ...The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC... Globalisation in the Bronze Age Twenty-three glass beads from Denmark were analysed using plasma-spectrometry. Without destroying the fragile beads, this technique makes it possible to compare the chemical composition of trace elements in the beads with reference material from Amarna in Egypt and Nippur in Mesopotamia, about 50 km south east of Baghdad in Iraq. The comparison showed that the chemical composition of the two sets of trace...
  • Discoveries of Polish archaeologists in Armenia [Urartu]

    12/09/2014 5:13:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | December 8, 2014 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw discovered evidence of destruction and capture of the ancient city of Metsamor, one of the most famous archaeological sites in the vicinity of Yerevan. "In the entire area of research we found layers of burning and ash. The city was probably captured by the army of Argishti I, the ruler of Urartu," told PAP Krzysztof Jakubiak, head of the project. Argishti I was the king of Urartu, the biblical Kingdom of Ararat in the Armenian Highlands. During his reign, the boundaries of the state expanded to the Caucasus, the area of...
  • Possible Neanderthal rock engraving in Gorham's Cave

    12/09/2014 5:04:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | September 3, 2014 | Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    A study of a rock engraving discovered within Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar finds that the cross-hatched impression was likely created by Neanderthals and excluding the possibility of an unintentional or utilitarian origin, would represent Neanderthals' capacity for abstract expression. Previously-discovered cave art has been exclusively attributed to modern humans, who arrived in Western Europe around 40,000 years ago. In July 2012, researchers discovered the abstract pattern engraved in the rock of Gorham's Cave which is located on the southeast face of the Rock of Gibraltar. The cross-hatched pattern was overlain by undisturbed sediment in which Neanderthal artefacts had previously been...
  • Antiquity thieves caught at Cave of Skulls searching for Dead Sea artefacts

    12/09/2014 5:00:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 7, 2014 | unattributed
    Members of the Arad Rescue Unit, undergoing early morning routine training, noticed suspicious activity in the northern cliff of Nahal Ze'elim, in the region of the Leopard's Ascent (Judean Desert). After alerting the authorities a group of antiquity thieves searching for Dead Sea scrolls and other potentially valuable artefacts, were caught red-handed. The "The Cave of the Skulls", which is located in the side of a cliff, can only be reached on foot via a narrow goat path on top of rock fall, that passes upright bedrock walls and is extremely precarious. The robbers, who had used climbing gear to...
  • Policeman Daniel Faulkner found dead (33 Year Anniversary of Murder)

    12/09/2014 4:12:13 PM PST · by Kid Shelleen · 23 replies
    The History Channel ^ | 12/09/2014 | staff
    Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner is found dead on the street with Mumia Abu-Jamal, a well-known activist and freelance journalist, lying severely wounded nearby. In 1982, Abu-Jamal was tried for and convicted of Faulkner's murder, but because of the murky circumstances surrounding the incident and a trial that many believe was unfair, activists have since protested Abu-Jamal's imprisonment. Reportedly, Abu-Jamal, a journalist who had been fired by National Public Radio for his outspokenness, was driving a cab at around 4 a.m., when he saw his brother engaged in an altercation with Faulkner on the street. Evidence used in the trial...
  • Pearl Harbor survivor brings Vikings fans to their feet

    12/08/2014 7:21:16 AM PST · by TurboZamboni · 8 replies
    pioneer press ^ | 12-7-14 | Brian Murphy
    Richard Thill survived Pearl Harbor and waited 73 years for an ovation many of his comrades would never hear. So a stubbornly long New York Jets drive and icy wind at TCF Bank Stadium could not ruin his moment. The Vikings salute military veterans during the first television timeout of the second quarter each home game. Thill was a special honoree Sunday, Dec. 7 -- a solemn anniversary in U.S. history, one he hopes never fades from memory. The 91-year-old St. Paul native was introduced with a video tribute that included an interview and familiar black-and-white newsreels that showed the...
  • 13 Complete Soldier's Kits From The Armies Of 1066 Until 2014. Wow.

    12/08/2014 12:03:39 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 74 replies
    The Anglo-Saxon warrior at Hastings is perhaps not so very different from the British “Tommy” in the trenches,’ photographer Thom Atkinson says. At the Battle of Hastings, soldiers' choice of weaponary was extensive. ..... Re-enactment groups, collectors, historians and serving soldiers helped photographer Thom Atkinson assemble the components for each shot. ‘It was hard to track down knowledgeable people with the correct equipment,’ he says. ‘The pictures are really the product of their knowledge and experience.’
  • Fury after luxury building puts up fence on balcony used by rent-controlled tenants

    12/08/2014 4:48:28 AM PST · by dennisw · 28 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 7 December 2014 | MailOnline Reporter
    Rent-controlled tenants say they were lured to the luxury tower by a wrap-around balcony but were shocked to discover a 6-foot fence during move in Erin McFadzen and her boyfriend Erik Clancy now claim the wiring is so market-rate paying tenants, who have smaller balconies, don't get jealous The developer of the Q41 building in Queens, Queensboro Development, says the fence is there as a staging area for window washers A luxurious New York City building is prohibiting its rent-controlled tenants from enjoying their terrace so market rate-paying residents — who have smaller balconies — don't get jealous, claims a...