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History (General/Chat)

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  • The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death

    10/09/2015 5:00:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 9 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 10/6/15 | Carrie Arnold
    The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death Only a few genetic changes were enough to turn an ordinary stomach bug into the bacteria responsible for the plague. Pieter Bruegel the ElderThe Triumph of Death (1562), by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. By: Carrie ArnoldOctober 6, 2015 Comments (1) Download PDF Print Each year, 4 million people visit Yosemite National Park in California. Most bring back photos, postcards and an occasional sunburn. But two unlucky visitors this summer got a very different souvenir. They got the plague.This quintessential medieval disease, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted most often by fleabites,...
  • Archaeologists to uncover secrets of Viking fortress

    10/09/2015 1:49:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | October 9th, 2015 | Christian W
    When archaeologists found the first Viking Age fortress in Denmark for 60 years last September, it was hailed as a fantastic archaeological discovery... "With the grant, the Danish Castle Centre -- a division of Museum Southeast Denmark and Aarhus University -- has worked out a unique research project seeking to explore the secrets Borgring is hiding beneath Danish soil," the Danish Castle Centre said. "With the use of modern archaeological methods the scientists and archaeologists will investigate how the fortresses were used, how they were organised, how quickly they were built, their age and what environment, landscape and geography they...
  • Remains of Conquistador Convoy Found in Mexico

    10/09/2015 1:45:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 88 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Friday, October 09, 2015 | unattributed
    In 1520, a Spanish-led supply convoy that may have consisted of as many as 550 people, including Cubans of African and Indian descent, women, and Indian allies of the Spaniards, was captured and taken to a town inhabited by the Aztec-allied Texcocanos, or Acolhuas. The town is now known as Zultepec-Tecoaque, an archaeological site east of Mexico City. Excavations have uncovered carved clay figurines of the invaders that the Texcocanos had symbolically decapitated. Human and animal bones with cut marks have also been found, indicating that the members of the convoy and their horses were actually sacrificed and eaten. The...
  • Angela Merkel attacks east European leaders for ignoring their past over refugees

    10/09/2015 10:53:47 AM PDT · by chasio649 · 19 replies ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | Justin Huggler
    Angela Merkel has launched a withering attack on eastern European leaders for failing to learn from their memories of life behind the Iron Curtain in their handling of the refugee crisis. Calling upon her own experience of growing up in communist East Germany, Mrs Merkel criticised leaders including Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister, for building new fences in Europe despite having escaped their own isolation at the end of the Cold War. “We eastern Europeans – I'm counting myself as an eastern European – have seen that isolation doesn't help,” the German chancellor told MEPs at a meeting on...
  • 'Winter on Fire' tracks the 93 days Ukraine fought for its identity

    10/09/2015 10:38:37 AM PDT · by JPX2011 · 3 replies
    The Los Angeles Time ^ | October 9, 2015 | Jeffrey Fleishman
    Streets are scattered with stones and shell casings. Winter fog mixes with the last wisps of tear gas. The wounded and the dead have been carried away, and those who are left hunker at the barricades. Police advance. Snipers take to rooftops. Bodies fall and the Ukrainian revolution, as brutal as it is cinematic, enters a new day in the battered capital of Kiev. Evgeny Afineevsky's "Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom" is a documentary from the front lines, a visceral portrait of a nation's battle for its identity. The film tracks the 93 days — between November 2013...
  • President Theodore Roosevelt Comes to Bulloch Hall

    10/09/2015 10:05:58 AM PDT · by brothers4thID · 2 replies
    Facebook announcement ^ | 10/9/2015 | City of Roswell
    On October 14th at 7:00 PM, President Theodore Roosevelt comes to Bulloch Hall to introduce the book launch of "Mittie and Thee, an 1853 Roosevelt Romance." Connie Huddleston and Gwendolyn Koehler have compiled the love letters of Mittie Bulloch and Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. Transcribed and presented just as written, the authors allow the letters to stand on their own, with only necessary background regarding the people and places mentioned and the social mores of 1853 included. This event is FREE, but reservations are required. Please contact Janice Metzler at 770-992-1731 ext. 3.
  • Guns in School

    10/09/2015 6:14:59 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 20 replies
  • How the Korean War Prevented a Nuclear World War III

    10/09/2015 6:14:44 AM PDT · by C19fan · 2 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 8, 2015 | Matthew Gault
    Many companies and business publish internal newsletters or magazines, and America’s intelligence services are no different. The CIA runs the pulpy fount of weirdness that is Studies in Intelligence while the NSA puts out the Cryptologic Quarterly. The agencies often declassify and digitize back issues of these magazines for the public. The articles are a wealth of weird, wonderful and fascinating takes on historic and current events written by people who have access to secret information not privy to the public. A recently declassified article from a 2000 issue of Cryptologic Quarterly is a doozy.
  • Hall of Fame basketball player Harry Gallatin dies

    10/08/2015 3:02:13 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 6 replies
    AP ^ | October 7, 2015
    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) -- Harry Gallatin, the Hall of Fame basketball player who was a seven-time All-Star forward for the New York Knicks in the 1950s, died Wednesday. He was 88. The Knicks and Southern Illinois-Edwardsville, where Gallatin was a former coach and athletic director, confirmed the death through Gallatin's family. He died in Edwardsville.
  • Mysterious Archaeological Site with Rock Carved Animal Heads Found near Bulgaria’s Sliven

    10/08/2015 2:24:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | October 5, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    A mysterious archaeological site dubbed "The Rock Herd" which consists of rock carvings of animal heads made by an unknown sculptor in an unknown time period has been found near the eastern Bulgarian city of Sliven... The mysterious archaeological monument consists of a semi-circular rock niche whose edge has been decorated with animal head carvings and reliefs fashioned out of the natural rock material. These carved animal heads themselves forming a semi-circle appear to be diverse in style and craftsmanship. Most of them appear to be cattle, goat and capricorn heads but there are also reliefs of wild animals and...
  • Pigs Unearth Hunter-Gatherer Civilization

    10/08/2015 2:15:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Discovery News ^ | October 7, 2015 | Jennifer Viegas
    Pigs foraging along a Scottish coastline have unwittingly uprooted the earliest evidence for a remote population of hunter-gatherers. The uprooted items, stone tools that have been dated to around 12,000 years ago, are described in the latest issue of British Archaeology. The tools were discovered on the east coast of the Isle of Islay, Scotland, and include sharp points -- likely used for hunting big game -- scrapers and more. Archaeologists Steven Mithen and Karen Wicks of the University of Reading explained to Discovery News that a gamekeeper had previously released the pigs at a local port on Islay to...
  • First Ancient African DNA Sequenced

    10/08/2015 2:10:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, October 08, 2015 | unattributed
    Science reports that the first prehistoric genome from Africa has been sequenced. The DNA was obtained from the inner ear bones of a 4,500-year-old skeleton discovered in Mota Cave by John and Kathryn Arthur of the University of South Florida. Located in the highlands of Ethiopia, Mota Cave’s cool temperatures helped to preserve the hunter-gatherer’s rare genetic material. Andrea Manica and Marcos Gallego Llorente of the University of Cambridge found that the man, who has been dubbed “Mota,” had brown eyes, dark skin, and three gene variants associated with living at high altitudes. Mota’s genome was compared with samples from...
  • Experiential Archaeology Class Recreates Ancient Ceramics

    10/08/2015 2:01:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, October 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Johns Hopkins University has released Mysteries of the Kylix, a film that follows 13 undergraduate students who worked with a conservator and two potters to recreate the red-figure pottery drinking bowls crafted by Greek artisans between the sixth and fourth centuries B.C. The students practiced throwing pots, decorated them with images and slip, and fired the clay in a kiln that they constructed. They then examined their pottery under a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument. "The idea is to be thoughtful at every stage. To look at clay, make shapes, to choose images and paint, to go through the fire and...
  • Otago Researchers Sequence Kuri Dog Genomes

    10/08/2015 1:55:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Thursday, October 8, 2015 | Ms Karen Greig
    The genetic heritage of New Zealand's first dog, the now extinct kuri, is being unravelled by University of Otago scientists using state-of-the-art ancient DNA analysis. University of Otago PhD student Karen Greig has sequenced the complete, or near complete, mitochondrial genomes of 14 kuri represented by bones recovered from Wairau Bar, one on New Zealand's earliest and most important archaeological sites. Kuri were smallish dogs about the size of cocker spaniels and were brought to New Zealand from East Polynesia in the colonising canoes that arrived in the early fourteenth century AD. They were the only domesticated animal to be...
  • Study: Eurasian Farmers Migrated to Africa 3,000 Years Ago

    10/08/2015 1:15:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    AP ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | AP
    Scientists say they have extracted ancient DNA from the skull of a man buried in the highlands of Ethiopia 4,500 years ago that supports the theory that Eurasian farmers migrated into Africa some 3,000 years ago. This Stone Age resettlement had previously been theorized, but the rare find allowed scientists to see what DNA looked like well before the time the migration would have taken place. A comparison with modern populations around the world allowed them to see that the migrants left their genetic mark in the furthest corners of Africa. "This is the first ancient human genome found in...
  • ICE ON PLUTO: Now frozen water and BLUE SKY found on dwarf planet giving more hope of life

    10/08/2015 11:20:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 76 replies ^ | UBLISHED: 16:40, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | UPDATED: 18:01, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | By Jon Austin
    NASA has discovered frozen water and earth-like blue skies on Pluto in another historic development in the search for extraterrestrial life. Just 10 days after confirming that liquid water has been found on Mars, the US space agency revealed the amazing dwarf-planet has both ice and a 'gorgeous' blue sky. A Nasa spokesman said: "New Horizons has detected numerous small, exposed regions of water ice on Pluto. "The discovery was made from data collected by the Ralph spectral composition mapper on New Horizons." There has been repeated speculation Pluto may have a liquid sea under its surface, and confirmation of...
  • I Think You're The Father of One of My Kids...'

    10/08/2015 8:37:00 AM PDT · by VA Voter · 9 replies
    I Think You're The Father of One of My Kids...' A guy goes to the supermarket and notices a very attractive woman waving at him. She says, 'Hello.' He's rather taken aback because he can't place where he knows her from. So he asks, 'Do you know me?' To which she replies, 'I think you're the father of one of my kids.' Now his mind travels back to the only time he has ever been unfaithful to his wife. So he asks, 'Are you the stripper from the bachelor party that I made love to on the pool table, with...
  • Are Mideast Muslims Dying for a Myth?

    10/08/2015 7:33:47 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/08/2015 | Mike Konrad
    Given the way the Mideast is headed, things are so unpredictable that this present Jerusalem flare-up could run the gamut from burning itself out in a few days to inciting a war against Israel, eventually bringing in Iran, the Muslim world, and then the whole world. The Arabs claim it is an Intifada, the Arabic word for resistance – but what is enormously troubling is the fallacy behind it. Fueling much of this Arab fury is a renewed Jewish presence on the al-Aqsa Mosque compound. Over the past two years, Jews have started to gather outside al-Aqsa, and the Muslims...
  • Chimpanzees Shed Light on Origins of Human Walking

    10/07/2015 1:27:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The torso (the part of the body that includes the ribcage, belly and pelvis) of chimpanzees has long been thought to be a rigid block, best suited for a life of tree climbing. Humans, on the other hand, have long and flexible torsos that aid in walking by allowing us to rotate our upper body in the opposite direction of our lower body. The findings from the paper, titled "Surprising trunk rotational capabilities in chimpanzees and implications for bipedal walking proficiency in early humans," changes the evolutionary view of how early human ancestors walked and what they were able to...
  • A Neolithic causewayed enclosure and other exciting discoveries at Thame, Oxfordshire

    10/07/2015 1:18:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | unattributed
    At the end of August, Oxford Cotswold Archaeology (a joint venture between Oxford Archaeology and Cotswold Archaeology) completed the excavation of a site on the edge of Thame in Oxfordshire. The work was carried out in advance of new housing being built by Bloor Homes... Later in the Neolithic, a small henge monument was constructed within the causewayed enclosure. A second, smaller, ring-ditch was located close to the henge and this may also be of later Neolithic date. During the Bronze Age, the site saw virtually no activity or, at least, no activity which left a mark in the archaeological...
  • Renoir haters picket outside Museum of Fine Arts (Boston)

    10/07/2015 11:05:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 56 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | October 5, 2015 | Mark Shanahan
    It’s nothing personal, says Ben Ewen-Campen, he just doesn’t think French impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir is much of a painter. Monday, the Harvard postdoc joined some like-minded aesthetes for a playful protest outside the Museum of Fine Arts. The rally, which mostly bewildered passersby, was organized by Max Geller, creator of the Instagram account Renoir Sucks at Painting, who wants the MFA to take its Renoirs off the walls and replace them with something better.

    10/07/2015 8:39:23 AM PDT · by JoeDetweiler · 7 replies
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | Oct 7, 2015 | Tim Blair
    "Yale University has published 170,000 Library of Congress photos taken in the US between 1935 and 1945. Just click on this map and keep clicking. To Yale’s credit, they’ve used captions written at the time. Some may be jarring to modern sensibilities, but they assist in providing the era’s feel. A quick batch of highlights: " The Map....
  • Wildlife is thriving around Chernobyl since the people left

    10/07/2015 7:00:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10/07/2015
    Wolves are seven times as common in the Chernobyl area than they were (Image: Sergey Gashchak) The site of the world’s worst nuclear accident is now a wildlife haven. The abundance of large animals around Chernobyl, such as deer, elk and wild boar, matches that of nature reserves in the region – and wolves are seven times as common. Some 116,000 people fled the radioactive fallout from the reactor after it exploded in 1986, and another 220,000 were resettled after that, vacating a zone covering some 4200 square kilometres split equally between Belarus and Ukraine. “Whatever negative effects there are...
  • Former President Carter mediating dispute between Martin Luther King heirs

    10/07/2015 6:33:58 AM PDT · by fungoking · 10 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 10/07/15 | David Beasley
    Former President Jimmy Carter is helping settle a dispute between Martin Luther King Jr.'s children over whether to sell King's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal and the Bible he carried during the civil rights movement. King's sons, Martin Luther King III and Dexter King, want to sell their father's possessions, while the late civil rights leader's surviving daughter, Bernice King, opposes the sale, calling the items "sacred." Earlier this year, a judge in Georgia approved mediation to resolve the legal fight after attorneys in the case said they were close to an agreement and that a mediator would help finish...
  • On This Day in 1571

    10/06/2015 10:57:42 PM PDT · by John Locke · 8 replies
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton
    Lepanto White founts falling in the courts of the sun, And the Soldan of Byzantium is smiling as they run; There is laughter like the fountains in that face of all men feared, It stirs the forest darkness, the darkness of his beard, It curls the blood-red crescent, the crescent of his lips, For the inmost sea of all the earth is shaken with his ships. They have dared the white republics up the capes of Italy, They have dashed the Adriatic round the Lion of the Sea, And the Pope has cast his arms abroad for agony and loss,...
  • The U.S. Military and the Influenza Pandemic of 1918–1919

    10/06/2015 11:21:43 PM PDT · by beaversmom · 9 replies
    SYNOPSIS The American military experience in World War I and the influenza pandemic were closely intertwined. The war fostered influenza in the crowded conditions of military camps in the United States and in the trenches of the Western Front in Europe. The virus traveled with military personnel from camp to camp and across the Atlantic, and at the height of the American military involvement in the war, September through November 1918, influenza and pneumonia sickened 20% to 40% of U.S. Army and Navy personnel. These high morbidity rates interfered with induction and training schedules in the United States and rendered...

    10/06/2015 11:05:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Historic Scotland ^ | 29 September 2015 | unattributed (Alan Bannon, Media & PR Officer)
    Archaeologists in Orkney have uncovered the remains of over 30 buildings dating from around 4000 BC to 1000 BC, together with field systems, middens and cemeteries. The find includes a very rare Bronze Age building which experts believed could have been a sauna or steam house, which may have been built for ritual purposes. EASE Archaeology recently made the exciting discovery on the periphery of the prehistoric Links of Noltland, on the island of Westray in Orkney, next to where the famous ‘Westray Wife’ was found in 2009, which is believed to be the earliest depiction of a human face...
  • Ruins of ancient Egyptian temple unearthed under modern Cairo

    10/06/2015 9:58:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | October 05, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The shrine belonged to the 30th Dynasty Pharaoh Nectanebo I (379 B.C.-360 B.C.,)” said Damaty. The mission also unearthed remains of limestone colonnade and a “well-preserved” ceiling that are strongly believed to have been a part of an ancient Egyptian temple, Damaty said, adding that ruins of the mud brick outer enclosure wall surrounded the temple, along with royal bust belonged to the New Kingdom (1580 B.C.-1080 B.C.) Pharaoh Merenptah, were also excavated in the area. Nectanebo I was the founder of the 30th Dynasty: the last native Egyptian royal family to rule ancient Egypt before Alexander the Great conquered...
  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • Preble Co. historical society theft case ‘ball of yarn’

    09/29/2015 12:39:44 PM PDT · by robowombat · 14 replies
    WHIO ^ | Updated: 5:44 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015 | Posted: 9:48 a.m. - | Breaking News Staff
    <p>The Ohio Auditor of State’s Office issued a statement indicating the indictment against Lightner is the result of a collaboration among the Auditor of State, Preble County Sheriff Mike Simpson and Preble County Prosecutor Martin Votel.</p> <p>Ohio Auditor Dave Yost said in a prepared statement the case against Lightner was like “a ball of yarn that just kept unraveling.” “She stole from taxpayers, the Preble County Historical Society, and even worse, she took advantage of an elderly donor,” Yost’s statement reads. Sheriff’ Simpson said in a prepared statement that they worked to identify potential victims and to “have a complete picture of what was occurring.” The state auditor reports the Preble County Historical Society did not employ a bookkeeper after 2006 and in 2014, the society’s trustees found Lightner had “misappropriated” approximately $14,000 in grant money from OCFC.</p>
  • Titanic's Last Lunch Menu Sells for $88,000 at Auction

    10/05/2015 7:07:14 PM PDT · by Gamecock · 49 replies
    Live Science ^ | 10,5,2015 | Elizabeth Palermo
    A piece of paper that sailed aboard the Titanic was recently sold at auction for the price of a fancy sports car. The yellowed document — a luncheon menu for the first-class dining room — is dated April 14, 1912. This means that it details the last-ever gourmet lunch served aboard the ill-fated luxury ocean liner. The menu reveals that, the day before the boat sank to the bottom of the icy North Atlantic Ocean, wealthy passengers dined on "grilled mutton chops," soused herring and a variety of other delicacies.
  • Noel Coward "There Are Bad Times Just Around The Corner" (1952) from "The Globe Revue"

    10/05/2015 7:06:59 PM PDT · by Arthur McGowan · 10 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1952 | Noel Coward
    Noel Coward sings "There Are Bad Times Just Around The Corner" from "The Globe Revue" on Columbia D.B.3107 (1952).
  • A State-by-State Map of Where Immigrants Came From

    10/04/2015 7:24:35 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 30 replies
    citylab ^ | 10-1-15 | Tanvi Misra
    U.S. migration patterns changed plenty from 1850 to 2013. A nifty interactive map, created by the Pew Research Center, visualizes these shifts by showing the origin of the dominant immigrant group in each state for every decade during this time period.
  • Scientists discover huge mega tsunami 73,000 years ago. Could it happen again?

    10/04/2015 7:00:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 10/04/2015 | By Story Hinckley
    Waves the size of the Chrysler building may seem like they belong in a movie trailer, but scientists have recently found that megatsunamis are all too real. Scientists say that 73,000 years ago, a large flank (or slope) from the volcanic island Fogo in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of Africa fell into the ocean and triggered a tsunami that could – quite literally – move mountains. “You’re displacing a huge mass, which must generate movement of water,” Ricardo Ramalho, the lead researcher behind the study, told The Washington Post. “And in the case of volcanic flank collapses...
  • Obama’s trash talk

    10/04/2015 6:21:04 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 25 replies
    Politico ^ | Oct 2, 2015 | EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE
    It’s not just the fourth quarter. It’s trash talk time. President Barack Obama’s never done a good job hiding his disdain for the people he doesn’t like—a long list that includes reporters, Republicans, pretty much every member of Congress, the foreign leaders he considers petty and childish (Vladimir Putin and Benjamin Netanyanu most of all). Everyone would see things his way, he tends to project, if only they were a little smarter and thought it through as thoroughly as he has. Story Continued Below Usually when he’s explaining why the world’s wrong and he’s right, he’s looking down his nose...
  • What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

    10/04/2015 10:29:43 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 54 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | October 4, 2015 | Ana Swanson
    There are few things as fascinating as seeing what people in the past dreamed about the future. "France in the Year 2000" is one example. The series of paintings, made by Jean-Marc Côté and other French artists in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910, shows artist depictions of what life might look like in the year 2000. The first series of images were printed and enclosed in cigarette and cigar boxes around the time of the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris, according to the Public Domain Review, then later turned into postcards.
  • "Lady, Play Your Mandolin" Lloyd Keating & Elmer Feldkamp 1930

    10/03/2015 6:34:59 PM PDT · by Arthur McGowan · 9 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1930 | Lloyd Keating
    Lloyd Keating & His Music (Ted Wallace ensemble) plays "Lady, Play Your Mandolin" (1930). Elmer Feldkamp is vocalist.
  • Dean Martin Asks The Duke What He Wants For His Baby Daughter (Watch You’ll Understand Why Faceboo

    10/03/2015 1:11:51 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 9 replies
    YouTube copied by blogger Conciously Enlightened ^ | Uploaded on September 22, 2008 blogger retitled it and copied/pasted it on blog: 9/31 | wesawthat You Tube account copied by blogger "The Giver
    The Duke gave an answer to a question that was as “old fashioned” then as it is now, but it’s one every American needs to hear!
  • O.J. Simpson acquitted (20 year anniversary)

    10/03/2015 8:08:55 AM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 64 replies
    At the end of a sensational trial, former football star O.J. Simpson is acquitted of the brutal 1994 double murder of his estranged wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman. In the epic 252-day trial, Simpson’s “dream team” of lawyers employed creative and controversial methods to convince jurors that Simpson’s guilt had not been proved “beyond a reasonable doubt,” thus surmounting what the prosecution called a “mountain of evidence” implicating him as the murderer.
  • James Madison's argument against wealth redistribution

    Its not uncommon for a progressive to rattle off the phrase "The Founders could not have foreseen" - and fill in the blank. The Founders couldn't have forseen x, they couldn't have foreseen y, and so it goes. Well, Mr. Progressive they did foresee you and your tyrannical schemes. This is illustrated by James Madison himself, at the Convention on June 26th, 1787: We cannot however be regarded even at this time, as one homogeneous mass, in which every thing that affects a part will affect in the same manner the whole. In framing a system which we wish to...
  • Medieval Apocalypse The Black Death...(Nat Geo documentary via You Tube)

    10/03/2015 3:47:17 AM PDT · by beaversmom · 1 replies
    You Tube ^ | September 25, 2014 | Documentary Hd
    Link to video...despite time shown at link, it is just over 48 minutes long: Medieval Apocalypse The Black Death
  • Farmer digs up woolly mammoth bones in Michigan soy field

    10/03/2015 12:37:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 2, 2015 | Rachel Feltman
    James Bristle of Lima Township was digging in a soybean field Monday when he and his friend pulled up what they first thought was a bent, muddy old fence post. But it was actually the rib bone of an ancient woolly mammoth... University of Michigan professor Daniel Fisher... believes that the mammoth died between 11,000 and 15,000 years ago. Most mammoths were gone by 10,000 years ago... “We get calls once or twice a year about new specimens like this,” Fisher told The Washington Post. But they’re usually mastodons. It’s a bit more unusual to find a mammoth, the group...
  • The Iceman Cameth [Solutreans, Pre-Clovis]

    10/02/2015 11:41:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 2, 2015 | Patrick Hahn
    All early American ancestors hailed from East Asia and Siberia? Not so fast, says a prominent scientist... Stanford shows me some other artifacts. In addition to bifacial spear points, there are bone points, spear throwers, bow drills, hammerstones, scrapers, and flat stones that still retain traces of birch sap, which may have been used to apply waterproof seals to their boats. “Everything the Solutreans had, they have here,” Stanford explains. “Of course, that’s just coincidence.” Then he laughs that infectious laugh of his... Stanford opens another drawer and shows some spear points recovered from Tennessee. The points are over 14,000...
  • Mass Grave Found in California Reveals Prehistoric Violence Against ‘Outsiders’

    10/02/2015 11:34:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Western Digs ^ | September 28, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    ...Now, chemical analysis has revealed that the men were far from home when they were killed, up to several days’ journey from where they were born and raised. The discovery is only the most recent example of violence among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in the region, anthropologists say. But it bears important lessons about the nature of conflict and warfare in pre-contact California... The grave was unearthed in 2012 during the construction of a shopping center in the town of Pleasanton, in the Amador Valley just east of Oakland... One of the men suffered a severe blow above the left eye, causing...
  • Could Cramond hold the secret of Scotland during Dark Ages?

    10/02/2015 11:26:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    City of Edinburgh ^ | Thursday, 1st October 2015 | unattributed
    The mass burial in Cramond, believed to be the oldest occupied village in Scotland, was uncovered in 1975 during an excavation of a Roman Bathhouse found at the site of a car park. Forty years later, a team led by the City of Edinburgh Council has embraced modern science to examine the remains of nine individuals found in the grave with fascinating results. The evidence has disproved an early theory that the bodies were victims of the bubonic plague, instead dating the individuals back another 800 years to the 6th Century AD. Thanks to state-of-the-art computer programming, researchers were able...
  • Signs of ancient megatsunami could portend modern hazard

    10/02/2015 2:34:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies ^ | 10-02-2015 | Provided by: Columbia University
    Geologists think that the eastern slope of Fogo volcano crashed into the sea some 65,000 to 124,000 years ago, leaving a giant scar where a new volcano can be seen growing in this satellite image. Credit: NASA ========================================================================================================================================= Scientists working off west Africa in the Cape Verde Islands have found evidence that the sudden collapse of a volcano there tens of thousands of years ago generated an ocean tsunami that dwarfed anything ever seen by humans. The researchers say an 800-foot wave engulfed an island more than 30 miles away. The study could revive a simmering controversy over whether sudden...
  • Obama pulls Kerry and Power from audience of Netanyahu's powerful UN speech

    10/02/2015 8:28:48 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    American Thinker ^ | Oct 2, 2015 | Thomas Lifson
    n another slap in the face for Israel and its Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, President Obama pulled Secretary of State Kerry and U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power out of the General Assembly during Netanyahu’s powerful address. A large number of delegations walked out of the General Assembly for the speech,
  • The Cult of Le Corbusier

    10/02/2015 7:44:33 AM PDT · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Quadrant ^ | September 27, 2015 | Anthony Daniels
    French fascism is alive and well, and its current headquarters (as I write this) are not in the offices of the Front National but, appropriately enough, in the ugliest building in the world in the most beautiful capital city in the world, the Centre Pompidou in Paris. It is here that has been held the completely uncritical exhibition to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Le Corbusier, the fascist architect, under the title Le Corbusier, Mesures de l’homme.
  • Mummification was commonplace in Bronze Age Britain

    10/02/2015 1:12:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    University of Sheffield ^ | 1 October 2015 | Sean Barton
    Building on a previous study conducted at a single Bronze Age burial site in the Outer Hebrides, Dr Booth used microscopic analysis to compare the bacterial bioerosion of skeletons from various sites across the UK with the bones of the mummified bodies from Yemen and Ireland. Archaeologists widely agree that the damp British climate is not favourable to organic materials and all prehistoric mummified bodies that may be located in the UK will have lost their preserved tissue if buried outside of a preservative environment such as a bog. Dr Booth, who is now based at the Department of Earth...
  • "So Beats My Heart for You" Buckingham String Players

    10/01/2015 7:47:29 PM PDT · by Arthur McGowan · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1930 | Van Phillips
    "So Beats My Heart For You" is played by the Buckingham String Players (directed by Van Phillips) on Columbia CB-148, recorded on October 10, 1930. Lou Aberlado is the vocalist.