Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $55,972
63%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 63%!! Thank you all very much!!

History (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Human hunting weapons may not have caused the demise of the Neanderthals

    05/23/2015 12:17:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 28, 2015 | Journal of Human Evolution
    "We looked at the basic timeline revealed by similar stone points, and it shows that humans were using them in Europe before they appeared in the Levant - the opposite of what we'd expect if the innovation had led to the humans' migration from Africa to Europe," said Dr. Kadowaki. "Our new findings mean that the research community now needs to reconsider the assumption that our ancestors moved to Europe and succeeded where Neanderthals failed because of cultural and technological innovations brought from Africa or west Asia." By re-examining the evidence, the researchers showed that the comparable stone weapons appeared...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/23/2015 12:10:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 30, 2015 | National Science Foundation
    Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab of siltstone in the quarry to reveal amazingly well-preserved Triassic plant fossils, as if the leaves and stems had been freshly pressed into the rock only yesterday. "It's a mixture of plants that don't exist anymore," he says, "but we have some plants in these fossil ecosystems that we might know today, like ginkgo." On the one end are fossils from...
  • Who is interrogating the WACO MC members arrested? (Vanity)

    05/22/2015 8:46:40 AM PDT · by Tarasaramozart · 16 replies
    I am new, however, have been monitering this site and others regarding WACO. None of the pressers, blogs, news sites that I have found discuss the status of the arrested MotorCyclists. Are they all still in WACO? Have they attorneys? Have family access to them? Who are the LE's interviewing them, etc. Is it the local LEs or BATFE, FBI, or another federal agency, including military.
  • "Flag Folded Thirteen Times" (Vanity Poem)

    05/22/2015 3:37:23 AM PDT · by Vigilantcitizen · 7 replies
    May 22, 2015 | Kermit William Kuhn
    Flag Folded Thirteen Times The boy gazed curiously at the box on the wallIt's glass face held memories his grandmother recalledA medic kit, wallet, and pictures of happier timesA purple heart, bronze star, and a flag folded thirteen times The boy always wondered, but refrained to pryMany times he saw his grandma cryTears filled her eyes creased with linesIn front of the flag folded thirteen times One Memorial Day, grandma thought the boy was readyShe took a deep breath, made her heart steadyAlthough it caused her a lot of painThe boy deserved it because he shared the name “I was...
  • Global Warming Alert: Coldest Memorial Day in Ten Years (Vanity)

    05/22/2015 3:04:54 AM PDT · by 9thLife · 45 replies
    here ^ | now | me
    Calling for a low in the 40's F tonight.
  • [VANITY] I'll be traveling to Austin, Texas in the next few weeks

    05/22/2015 3:00:02 AM PDT · by lefty-lie-spy · 32 replies
    Lefty-Lie-Spy | 2015-5-23 | Lefty-Lie-Spy
    [VANITY] I'll be traveling to Austin, Texas in the near future and am looking for suggestions for fun, food, history, adventure, and heavy metal, rockabilly, punk, blues, etc.
  • Family Tree of Dogs and Wolves Is Found to Split Earlier Than Thought

    05/21/2015 10:13:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    New York Times ^ | MAY 21, 2015 | JAMES GORMAN
    The ancestors of modern wolves and dogs split into different evolutionary lineages 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, much earlier than some other research has suggested, scientists reported Thursday. The new finding is based on a bone fragment found on the Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia several years ago. When scientists studied the bone and reconstructed its genome — the first time that had been done for an ancient wolf, or any kind of ancient carnivore — they found it was a new species that lived 35,000 years ago. Based on the differences between the genome of the new species, called the...
  • In Love: A Musing on Yom Yerushalaim (Jerusalem Day 17MAY2015)

    05/21/2015 3:20:59 PM PDT · by Jack Hydrazine · 5 replies
    Email | 18MAY2015 | Rabbi David Lapin
    In Love: A Musing on Yom Yerushalaim 28 Iyar 5775, Rabbi David Lapin http://rabbilapin.com/ "The world’s growing intolerance for a Jewish State – like anti-Semitism – is an emotional issue, not a rational one. Emotion cannot be countered with reason. Emotion can only be countered with emotion." *** I left Israel for the UK on June 4th, 1967, a day before the outbreak of the Six-Day War. Barely seventeen, I arrived there a few weeks earlier to start my Yeshiva career in Kefar Hassidim, a small agricultural village eight miles south-east of Haifa and less than 40 miles from the...
  • AAA predicts largest jump in weekend travel since 2010 for Memorial Day weekend

    05/21/2015 12:00:37 AM PDT · by bob_denard · 3 replies
    San Gabriel Valley Tribune ^ | POSTED: 05/20/15, | By Kevin Smith,
    Southern California is expected to see its biggest jump in Memorial Day weekend travel since 2010, according to the Automobile Club of Southern California. The Auto Club’s forecast predicts that 2.76 million Southern Californians and 4.44 million residents statewide will take a long weekend getaway — a 4.6 percent increase over last year. That would be the largest number of Memorial Day travelers since 2005 when a record 3.2 million Southland residents and 5.2 million Californians took weekend trips. “That’s a pretty good indication of some health returning to the travel industry,” Auto Club spokeswoman Marie Montgomery said. Eighty-three percent...
  • Beany's Drive Thru - Long Beach, California - 1952-53

    05/20/2015 6:29:33 PM PDT · by Wiz-Nerd · 54 replies
    Vimeo ^ | 6 Months Ago | Win Edson
    What a good time in America. Video at link.
  • "Joe Steele" -- interesting read

    05/20/2015 1:48:21 PM PDT · by pabianice · 2 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 5/20/15
    The story: President Herbert Hoover has failed America. The Great Depression that rose from the ashes of the 1929 stock market crash still casts its dark shadow over the country. Despairing and desperate, the American people hope one of the potential Democratic candidates—New York governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and California congressman Joe Steele—can get the nation on the road to recovery. But fate snatches away one hope when a mansion fire claims the life of Roosevelt, leaving the Democratic party little choice but to nominate Steele, son of a Russian immigrant laborer who identifies more with the common man than...
  • Maybe Christianity In America Is Dying Because It’s Boring Everyone To Death []

    05/20/2015 11:52:50 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 38 replies
    The Blaze ^ | 5/13/2015 | Matt Walsh
    I recently attended a service that might help solve the riddle of the fantastic decline of American Christianity. It was a different church from the one I normally go to. Let me set the scene, perhaps it will sound familiar: I walked in and immediately realized that IÂ’d inadvertently stumbled upon a totally relaxed, convenient, comfortable brand of church. The first hint was the choir members dressed in shorts and flip flops. Sweet, bro. So chill. There were a bunch of acoustic guitars and drums and tambourines and a keyboard. Before the service/concert began, some guy came out to rev...
  • How Government Inaction Ended the Depression of 1921

    05/20/2015 7:42:14 AM PDT · by all the best · 4 replies
    Mises Institute ^ | May 20, 2015 | Llewellyn Rockwell
    As the financial crisis of 2008 took shape, the policy recommendations were not slow in coming: why, economic stability and American prosperity demand fiscal and monetary stimulus to jump-start the sick economy back to life. And so we got fiscal stimulus, as well as a program of monetary expansion without precedent in US history. David Stockman recently noted that we have in effect had fifteen solid years of stimulus — not just the high-profile programs like the $700 billion TARP and the $800 billion in fiscal stimulus, but also $4 trillion of money printing and 165 out of 180 months...
  • A Specialist in the American South: Eugene Genovese

    05/20/2015 6:49:59 AM PDT · by don-o · 8 replies
    The Imaginative Conservative ^ | July 3, 2012 | Sean Busick
    Eugene Genovese is one of the foremost American historians. A former Marxist, he is often branded a conservative—”a label applied to me frequently these days by people who understand nothing,” he wrote in 1994. Though he may eschew being labeled a conservative Genovese admits to having always admired much in conservative thought while being a longtime friend and frequent ally of conservatives. A specialist in the American South, Genovese is the author or editor of more than a score of books and countless articles. Among his most important books are The Political Economy of Slavery; Roll, Jordan, Roll; The Slaveholders’...
  • How the Civil War Changed the World

    05/19/2015 10:33:26 PM PDT · by iowamark · 226 replies
    New York Times Disunion ^ | May 19, 2015 | Don Doyle
    Even while the Civil War raged, slaves in Cuba could be heard singing, “Avanza, Lincoln, avanza! Tu eres nuestra esperanza!” (Onward, Lincoln, Onward! You are our hope!) – as if they knew, even before the soldiers fighting the war far to the North and long before most politicians understood, that the war in America would change their lives, and the world. The secession crisis of 1860-1861 threatened to be a major setback to the world antislavery movement, and it imperiled the whole experiment in democracy. If slavery was allowed to exist, and if the world’s leading democracy could fall apart...
  • Saving The Sweetest Watermelon The South Has Ever Known

    05/19/2015 6:51:40 PM PDT · by Theoria · 35 replies
    NPR ^ | 19 May 2015 | Jill Neimark
    The most luscious watermelon the Deep South has ever produced was once so coveted, 19th-century growers used poison or electrocuting wires to thwart potential thieves, or simply stood guard with guns in the thick of night. The legendary Bradford was delectable — but the melon didn't ship well, and it all but disappeared by the 1920s. Now, eight generations later, a great-great-great-grandson of its creator is bringing it back. The story of the Bradford begins on a prison ship during the American Revolutionary War. It was 1783, and the British had captured an American soldier named John Franklin Lawson and...
  • Soldiers Deck of Cards

    05/19/2015 12:12:58 PM PDT · by Paul46360 · 10 replies
    Has to be watched..BTW have a tissue ready
  • Kerry's "setback" remark: Think how far Islamists would be if he had won in 2004!

    05/19/2015 5:56:10 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 7 replies
    npr.org/sff ^ | 5/19/15 | sff
    ...Obama administration downplays the self-proclaimed Islamic State takeover of the important Iraqi city of Ramadi as Iraq emerges again.... John Kerry says the battle against ISIS or Daesh, its Arabic acronym, will be a long one with many setbacks.
  • Diary of a Nazi

    05/18/2015 10:49:33 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | May 15, 2015 | ROGER MOORHOUSE
    Goebbels was a frustrated intellectual and brittle womanizer: “I need women . . . like a balm on a wound.”In the autumn of 1923, a melancholy young man in the German Rhineland began keeping a diary. A frustrated writer and occasional journalist, he had a Ph.D. in literature and a moody disposition. He had been given the diary by a girlfriend as a way of assuaging the crisis into which he believed his life had spiraled. He recorded his gratitude on the opening page: “My dear, kind love!” he wrote in the first entry. “You raise me up and g
  • Maurie Berman, founder of Chicago's iconic Superdawg, dies at 89

    05/18/2015 6:54:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 10 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | May 18, 2015 | Meredith Rodriguez
    Several veterans opened food stands to supplement their student incomes on the GI Bill after World War II, but Maurie Berman wanted something different. "He wanted to open something more noteworthy," said his son, Scott Berman, 64. "A building, a tower, something with some identity." So was born the friendly, family-run Northwest Side vintage drive-in Superdawg, with its order booth that looks like an airport control tower and its two 12-foot-tall papier-mache hot dogs designed in 1948 that stand on its roof. Mr. Berman died Sunday, May 17, of heart problems at 89, his son said.
  • 250 Year-Old Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum

    05/18/2015 6:26:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 49 replies
    The Spirits Business ^ | 18th May, 2015 | Annie Hayes
    Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum • Sunken British warship the Lord Clive could hold “treasure worth millions”, including “vast stocks” of 250-year-old rum which will be recovered later this year. The wreck, which sunk off the coast of Uruguay, was discovered in 2004, but the Uruguyan government has only given permission for its recovery this year. Salvage of the ship, which was sunk by Spanish cannons in 1763, will require cranes, excavators and around 80 workers and is expected to begin within two months. The ship, which was constructed in Hull for the Royal Navy and was...
  • When Tchaikovsky came to Philadelphia

    05/18/2015 5:00:02 PM PDT · by Borges · 20 replies
    Broadstreet Review ^ | 5/17/2015 | David M Perkins
    On May 18, 1891, a lovely spring day, at 3 o’clock, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky arrived in Philadelphia without fanfare. There was to be a concert of his music that evening, the last he would conduct in the United States. The dervish tour had begun on April 26 in New York City, where he had been invited by Walter Damrosch, director of the New York Symphony for the grand opening of what was then called “Music Hall” (later to be formally designated as Carnegie Hall). That invitation was supported by no less a luminary than Andrew Carnegie himself. In New York,...
  • Suppose you're wealthy. Do you feel SAFER knowing most people are dopes?

    05/18/2015 5:19:51 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 16 replies
    Religion.rantrave ^ | April 27, 2015 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    More and more, I see that this is the essential question. There are definitely people at the top of this society working together so that the average person is kept illiterate and ignorant. Why? Obama talks about students being made career-ready and college-ready. This is laughable. We have millions of students who are being made welfare-ready. The statistics show that half the kids in eighth grade are not reading at a "proficient" level. In other words, they can read a McDonald's menu and that's about it. Ask yourself the obvious question. If the school system were serious about educating children,...
  • 'Eternal flames' of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists

    05/18/2015 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Provided by Springer
    Seeps from which gas and oil escape were formative to many ancient cultures and societies. They gave rise to legends surrounding the Delphi Oracle, Chimaera fires and "eternal flames" that were central to ancient religious practices - from Indonesia and Iran to Italy and Azerbaijan. Modern geologists and oil and gas explorers can learn much by delving into the geomythological stories about the religious and social practices of the Ancient World, writes Guiseppe Etiope of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy. His research is published in the new Springer book Natural Gas Seepage. "Knowing present-day gas fluxes...
  • CBS To Air 2 Newly Colorized ‘I Love Lucy’ Episodes Sunday

    05/17/2015 3:38:20 PM PDT · by SMGFan · 43 replies
    Inquisitir ^ | May 17, 2015
    Here’s your chance to see the Ricardo’s and the Mertzes like never before. Fans of I Love Lucy will be treated to another colorized presentation of two classic episodes on CBS tonight. The I Love Lucy Superstar Special may just be an elaborate repackaging of two 60-year-old black-and-white sitcom episodes, now meticulously colorized and shown back-to-back without a pause. But anything Lucy related remains a gold mine for CBS, even six decades later, and the May 17 special will probably not be an exception as reported by Movie Fone. Both episodes will be the debut of their colorized versions. At...
  • Ok this may sound dumb, and I do on occasion...

    05/17/2015 12:55:38 PM PDT · by waterhill · 32 replies
    today | me
    Michael Berry. I only get to listen to up here in DFW on Saturdays: He was playing the best theme songs for westerns (movies and tv shows). He played a long version of Ecstasy of Gold from Good,Bad, and Ugly. It took a long while to build up to the diva, I cannot find it on anything on the net. Just wondering if there is a CD available. It was longer than what I have found on the net. It is stuck in my head like an arrow, I dislike mysteries. Help me.
  • "The Kinkajou" Knickerbockers (Ben Selvin ensemble) Johnny Marvin (1927) [From "Rio Rita"]

    05/17/2015 12:52:23 PM PDT · by Arthur McGowan · 15 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1927 | Ben Selvin
    VIDEO
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • When Revolvers Ruled (Historical Gun Porn)

    05/16/2015 2:54:18 PM PDT · by Tijeras_Slim · 78 replies
    Self | 5/16/2015 | Self
    A selection of .38 Special revolvers from their "Golden Age"1930's Vintage Smith & Wesson M&P1930's Smith & Wesson M&P Target, serial number only a few hundred off the one Ed McGivern used to set several speed shooting records.1920's Vintage Colt Army Special1920's vintage Colt Officer's Model.
  • ‘Incredibly disrespectful’: Under Armour’s ‘Band of Ballers’ t-shirt ‘not cool at all’

    05/16/2015 9:36:35 AM PDT · by goodwithagun · 21 replies
    Twitchy ^ | May 16, 2015 | Twitchy staff
    The Joe Rosenthal photograph of the raising of the American flag on Mount Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima in 1945 is one of the most iconic pictures taken during World War II. Under Armour is (or was) selling a basketball version on a t-shirt:
  • When Soviet nuclear warning system showed a US missile strike, he just waited - and saved the world

    05/16/2015 6:09:02 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 20 replies
    National Post ^ | May 15, 2015 | Colin Freeman
    LONDON — Kevin Costner has done it, as has Robert De Niro and a delegation at the UN. But should you, too, feel like thanking the Man Who Saved the World in person, beware: it can be a difficult task. First, travel to Moscow and drive to a grimy village in the southern suburbs. Then, leaving nothing valuable in your car, head up the urine-stained stairwells of a crumbling, Soviet-era apartment block and look for a grouchy, stubbly pensioner. This is Lt. Col. Stanislav Petrov, who, at the height of the Cold War in the 1980s, was in charge of...
  • Alabama’s Gold Rush: A Tiny Town Once Worth Millions

    05/15/2015 3:05:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    WAIT ^ | May 12, 2015 | Stephen Hauck
    It’s a town most people in Alabama don’t even know exists. But, that’s not the way things have always been, as this tiny Tallapoosa County community was once one of the largest cities in Alabama. The reason can be found deep beneath the woods near the main road that runs through town. James “Coy” Powell, whose ancestors have lived in Goldville for generations, said he hopes the history of this town doesn’t fade away like the population has. “It’s a sacred spot that I can go back and I can tell people like you, you know this wasn’t easy back...
  • Ex-major league and Snohomish star Earl Averill Jr. dies

    05/15/2015 2:30:38 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 7 replies
    The Seattle Times ^ | May 14, 2015 | Adam Jude
    Earl Averill Jr., a Snohomish High School graduate and a seven-year major league veteran, died Wednesday in Tacoma. He was 83. The Mariners scheduled a moment of silence in Averill’s honor just before the start of Thursday’s game against the Red Sox. Averill is the son of Baseball Hall of Famer Earl Averill.
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • The South and the West, Part 2

    05/15/2015 6:45:26 AM PDT · by SeeSharp · 12 replies
    Abbeville Institute ^ | May 13, 2015 | Clyde Wilson
    It seems my mission here is to bring to your attention unfamiliar and unfashionable truths about American history. Let me give you another one. The American West, the frontier, was NOT conquered and settled by a “Nation of Immigrants.” George Washington was already the fifth generation of his family in Virginia, as were most of his neighbours. There was a wave of Scots-Irish immigration before the Revolution. Thereafter, for almost a century, there was a trickle of immigrants but no wave. Not until the late 1840s, with the Irish potato famine and the Continental revolutions of 1848, was there another...
  • Fears for Palmyra, the archaeological jewel of the Middle East which Islamists want to [tr]

    05/15/2015 6:30:27 AM PDT · by C19fan · 8 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 15, 2015 | Ted Thornhill
    Islamic State terrorists advanced to the gates of ancient Palmyra on Thursday, raising fears the Syrian world heritage site could face destruction of the kind the jihadists have already wreaked in Iraq. As it overran nearby villages, IS executed 26 civilians - 10 of whom were beheaded - for 'collaborating with the regime,' the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Irina Bokova, head of the UN's cultural body UNESCO, called on Syrian troops and extremists to spare Palmyra, saying it 'represents an irreplaceable treasure for the Syrian people, and the world.'
  • Mark Twain & Helen Keller’s Special Friendship: He Treated Me Not as a Freak, But...

    05/15/2015 1:08:06 AM PDT · by 9thLife · 24 replies
    "Open Culture" ^ | 5/13/15 | "Josh Jones"
    Mark Twain & Helen Keller’s Special Friendship: He Treated Me Not as a Freak, But as a Person Dealing with Great Difficulties Sometimes it can seem as though the more we think we know a historical figure, the less we actually do. Helen Keller? We’ve all seen (or think we’ve seen) some version of The Miracle Worker, right?—even if we haven’t actually read Keller’s autobiography. And Mark Twain? He can seem like an old family friend. But I find people are often surprised to learn that Keller was a radical socialist firebrand, in sympathy with workers’ movements worldwide. In a...
  • Civil War Historical Marker Ceremony To Be Held In June In Cleveland

    05/14/2015 3:16:55 PM PDT · by Tennessee Nana · 5 replies
    TheChattanoogan ^ | May 14,2015 | Staff
    The latest Civil War-related historical roadside marker will be dedicated during a special ceremony next month in Cleveland. The marker commemorates the difficult time during the Civil War when much of Bradley County lay between Union and Confederate lines. During this period, homes and businesses were vandalized and robbed by both pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces who took advantage of the prevailing lawlessness. This marker also commemorates the courageous actions of War of 1812 veteran Joseph Lusk II, who at 73, defended his home with determination against a group of outlaws attempting to steal his mules. He shot and killed one...
  • The Vatican Against the Jews [Numbers 23]

    05/14/2015 11:19:44 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 23 replies
    Israel National News ^ | 5/14/2015 | Giulio Meotti
    It is since 2012 that the Vatican, under Pope Benedict XVI, spoke of the “State of Palestine” in its official documents. So the decision of the Holy See to recognize this non-existent state should not be a surprise. But the treaty is the first legal and bilateral document in which the Vatican speaks of the “State of Palestine” and no more of the “Organization for the Liberation of Palestine” (PLO): it is, in fact, an official recognition. A symbolic and historic breakthrough. When the Vatican recognized Israel, at the beginning of the Nineties, it happened within the framework of Oslo...
  • Did Black People Own Slaves? (42% of Freed Slaves did)

    05/14/2015 12:24:55 AM PDT · by Dallas59 · 50 replies
    the root ^ | March 4 2013 | Henry Louis Gates Jr.
    William Ellison's fascinating story is told by Michael Johnson and James L. Roark in their book, Black Masters: A Free Family of Color in the Old South. At his death on the eve of the Civil War, Ellison was wealthier than nine out of 10 white people in South Carolina. He was born in 1790 as a slave on a plantation in the Fairfield District of the state, far up country from Charleston. In 1816, at the age of 26, he bought his own freedom, and soon bought his wife and their child. In 1822, he opened his own cotton...
  • On His Knees.... Reagan

    05/13/2015 2:43:30 PM PDT · by boxlunch · 30 replies
    YouTube ^ | Feb, 2011 | Bel Air Presbyterian Church
    I just thought this was beautiful and thought it would do us good to remember what a good man Reagan was.
  • Classical Mythology Now Too Much for Sensitive College Students

    05/13/2015 12:33:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 41 replies
    American Prowler ^ | 5.13.15 | Emily Zanotti
    The good news for my generation is that we finally make up a controlling portion of the working population. The bad news is, that there probably aren't enough blankies and nap rooms to accomodate all of us as we graduate into the real world. At least, as some of us graduate into the real world. Others of us have too many things to do to take time out of our day to cuddle stuffed animals and gripe to each other about the cultural appropriation and microagressions typically associated with the Patriarchy. Thankfully, college students have no such demands on their...
  • Yankees legend Yogi Berra celebrates 90th birthday

    05/13/2015 8:43:25 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    New York Daily News ^ | 05/13/2015 | BY ERIC BARROW
    Yogi Berra may not be uttering his famous “Yogi-isms” anymore, but the Yankee icon summed up this day best years ago when he said, “I want to thank you for making this day necessary.” Lawrence Peter Berra, best known as Yogi — or Yog by his close friends — celebrated his 90th birthday on Tuesday at the New Jersey museum that bears his name, surrounded by close family and such New York baseball luminaries as Joe Torre, Ralph Branca, Willie Randolph and Mickey Rivers, to name a few. And he even received a call from former mayor Rudy Giuliani wishing...
  • GOP Elephant Pin

    05/13/2015 7:54:46 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 23 replies
    ETSY ^ | 5-13-15 | me
  • No God but Allah

  • Will Harriet Tubman Be the First Woman on the $20 Bill?

    05/12/2015 4:35:08 PM PDT · by SMGFan · 55 replies
    NBC News ^ | May 12, 2015
    The people have spoken — at least, the people who cast ballots in an unofficial "Women on 20s" campaign — and more than 100,000 voters want to see Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill instead of Andrew Jackson. Tubman, the abolitionist who helped free slaves on the Underground Railroad, on Tuesday was declared the winner of an online poll, part of a petition aimed at convincing the Treasury Department to put a new face on the $20 — and specifically a female one.
  • Political Cartoons and Public Debates [History]

    05/12/2015 10:18:21 AM PDT · by donna · 1 replies
    Library of Congress ^ | May 12, 2015 | Teacher's Guide
    For over two hundred years, whenever a debate has broken out in the United States, political cartoons have been there to take part in the argument—and sometimes to push it to its limits. Beginning in 1754, when Benjamin Franklin’s “Join or Die” cartoon appeared in the Pennsylvania Gazette, political cartoonists have long used their skills to praise, attack, caricature, lampoon, and otherwise express their opinions on the most urgent political issues of the day. Political cartoons began as a street-level phenomenon. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, they were often posted on walls or passed from person to...
  • Newton's Telescope and Hubble - Objectivity #16 (VIDEO)

    05/12/2015 7:44:59 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 6 replies
    Youtube.com ^ | 4-20-2015 | Objectivity
    With the 25th anniversary of The Hubble Space Telescope fast approaching, Brady and Keith look at a priceless artefact - Sir Isaac Newton's very own reflecting telescope.
  • Exactly a Yard - Objectivity #19 (VIDEO)

    05/12/2015 7:25:55 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 2 replies
    Youtube.com ^ | 5-12-2015 | Objectivity
    Brady and Keith look at some of The Royal Society's collection of standard weights and measures - including a particularly special one that even Keith had never unpacked before!
  • VE Day: 92-year-old Second World War veteran flies Spitfire for first time in 70 years

    05/12/2015 3:13:27 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 5 replies
    The Independent ^ | May 12, 2015 | Heather Saul
    Link only due to copyright. WWII vet flies Spitefire for first time in 70 years