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History (General/Chat)

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  • 2014 Veterans Day Free Meals

    10/30/2014 2:10:35 PM PDT · by PeteePie · 10 replies
    Military Benefits. info ^ | 2014 | Military Benefits
    2014 Veterans Day Free Meals, Discounts, Sales and Deals Read more: http://militarybenefits.info/veterans-day-discounts-sales-deals-free-meals/#ixzz3HfEEMUVw
  • Scary Mormon Halloween Costumes, Ranked [The OTHER WORLD Series]

    10/30/2014 9:47:14 AM PDT · by Colofornian · 33 replies
    ByCommonConsent.com ^ | Oct. 29, 2014 | Scott B.
    It’s Halloween week (though perhaps you already celebrated with a ToT), so Steve and I figured that it would only be appropriate to have a super-spooky ranking! This is some scary stuff! As always, these rankings are authoritative. 10. Cain/Bigfoot 9. BYU Honor Code Office Representative 8. Post-Manifesto Polygamist 7. Intellectual Feminist 6. Single Man Over 27 5. The Bible Dictionary 4. Non-intellectual Feminist 3. Steve Evans 2. Idolatrous God of Elkenah 1. Missionary who served, came home, and then got called back 4 years later like in that nightmare I have every 6 weeks
  • In Cold War, U.S. Spy Agencies Used 1,000 Nazis

    10/30/2014 9:09:40 AM PDT · by Theoria · 20 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 26 Oct 2014 | Eric Lichtblau
    In the decades after World War II, the C.I.A. and other United States agencies employed at least a thousand Nazis as Cold War spies and informants and, as recently as the 1990s, concealed the government’s ties to some still living in America, newly disclosed records and interviews show. At the height of the Cold War in the 1950s, law enforcement and intelligence leaders like J. Edgar Hoover at the F.B.I. and Allen Dulles at the C.I.A. aggressively recruited onetime Nazis of all ranks as secret, anti-Soviet “assets,” declassified records show. They believed the ex-Nazis’ intelligence value against the Russians outweighed...
  • Tall Tale [That's True] Rare warbirds to depart Edwards Ranch

    10/29/2014 2:18:36 PM PDT · by SZonian · 21 replies
    Hang around aircraft restorers and you’ll inevitably hear tales of priceless historical relics hidden in barns, buried in shrink wrap, or otherwise stuck in time awaiting discovery. These stories are almost always wild exaggerations or outright fiction. But if you’ve ever heard of the cache of iconic warbirds at Wilson Connell “Connie” Edwards’ west Texas ranch, it’s absolutely real. The irascible former movie pilot who made a fortune in the oil business has added to his vast inventory of mostly World War II-era fighters, seaplanes, and surplus parts for more than a half century. Now, he’s decided to sell many...
  • Let's Bring Back Mourning Clothes

    10/29/2014 6:40:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 5 replies
    The New Republic ^ | October 26, 2014 | Hillary Kelly
    When Ellen Olenska—freshly back from Europe under a pall of ambiguous disgrace—invites Newland Archer to her home for the first time in Edith Wharton’s novel The Age of Innocence, she ignores the unwritten sartorial mandates and dons “a long robe of red velvet bordered about the chin and down the front with glossy black fur.” As a little girl, Ellen appeared to exhibit a similar disregard for convention, mourning her parents in wildly inappropriate clothing: “crimson merino and amber beads.” The gossips and busybodies who recall that childhood faux pas want to imply a provocative question About Ellen: Was the...
  • The History of Liberia -- a Conservative Counterpoint [vanity]

    10/29/2014 6:16:13 AM PDT · by Arthur Wildfire! March · 5 replies
    Leftists found a way [as usual] to warp US history once again -- this time regarding Liberia of all things! Here's the real story and it won't take much time. It began as a beautiful [though imperfect] idea in England, a spanking new concept that helped revolutionize the world's view of slavery. Brits formed a FREE colony for escaped slaves called 'the Sierra Leone Province of Freedom'. This ultimately became the sovereign nation of Sierra Leone -- perhaps the first nation on earth founded on humanitarian ideals. This inspired a New Jersey Yankee to do the same -- Robert Finley...
  • 4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded

    10/29/2014 3:28:53 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 38 replies
    Clapaway ^ | October 28, 2014
    4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded October 28, 2014 Scientists have been trying to decipher the mysterious “Phaistos Disk” markings ever since the clay disk from the Second Millenium B.C. was first discovered in 1908 on the Greek island of Crete. And it seems like they’ve finally cracked the code. At 4,000 years old, the relic dates back to the Minoan civilization and features an inscription that boasts a mysterious language, with symbols on both sides in a spiral configuration, which can be read inward from the outside rim. Researchers have been studying the puzzling artifact since its discovery, and now Dr....
  • Phil Collins gives vast Alamo collection to Texas

    10/28/2014 10:11:55 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    Associated Press ^ | 6 hours ago
    British pop star Phil Collins on Tuesday handed over his vast collection of artifacts related to the Battle of the Alamo and the Texas Revolution to the state of Texas. Collins was in San Antonio to donate what's considered the world's largest private collection of Alamo artifacts. It includes a fringed leather pouch and a gun used by Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie's legendary knife and letters from garrison commander William B. Travis. "There's things in there that will make your mouth drop," Collins said. The 1980s pop artist and Genesis singer-drummer has joked that he spent all the money he...
  • The MG42 Machine Gun Was Hitler’s Buzz Saw

    10/28/2014 1:28:52 PM PDT · by C19fan · 30 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 28, 2014 | Paul Richard Huard
    During World War II, American G.I.s called the German MG42 machine gun “Hitler’s buzz saw” because of the way it cut down troops in swaths. The Soviet Red Army called it “the linoleum ripper” because of the unique tearing sound it made—a result of its extremely high rate of fire. The Germans called the MG42 Hitlersäge or “Hitler’s bone saw”—and built infantry tactics around squads of men armed with the weapon. Many military historians argue that the Maschinengewehr 42 was the best general-purpose machine gun ever. It fired up to 1,800 rounds per minute in some versions. That’s nearly twice...
  • Florida deep sea divers helping aquatic archaeologists explore ancient Mediterranean shipwreck

    10/28/2014 9:23:41 AM PDT · by dware · 4 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10.27.2014 | AP via Fox News
    GAINESVILLE, Fla. – The divers descended 410 feet into the Mediterranean off Italy, shining bright lights on a ship that sank thousands of years ago. A sea-crusted anchor rested amid piles of terra cotta jars traditionally used to carry wine, olive oil and other cargo.
  • Do you know who Barry Soetoro is? Wouldn't that be a great poll question?

    10/28/2014 8:26:55 AM PDT · by FreeAtlanta · 39 replies
    10/28/2014 | vanity
    Wouldn't that be a great poll question for the GOP or some education minded conservative group to have commissioned? How about Fox News? I would love to know the percent of eligible voters who know this name. I bet it is less than 30%.
  • Shipwreck expedition wraps up fall dive

    10/28/2014 6:15:24 AM PDT · by csvset · 6 replies
    The Daily News ^ | October 27, 2014 | Jannette Pippin
    BEAUFORT | One cannon was raised and another found as state underwater archaeologists closed out their latest dive at the Queen Anne’s Revenge shipwreck site. Crews were cleaning up Monday after a three-week fall dive expedition that focused on the large pile of artifacts molded together in a cement-like mass of iron and sand at the ship’s midsection. The plan was to bring up two small cannon at the uppermost layer, but that changed somewhat as work to free one of the guns from the mass revealed a new discovery. “We were only able to bring up one of the...
  • The "Perfect Aryan" Child Used in Nazi Propaganda was Actually Jewish

    10/27/2014 9:44:25 PM PDT · by Seeing More Clearly Now · 12 replies
    Washington Post ^ | July 7, 2014 | Terrence McCoy
    A photo of a baby that adorned a Nazi magazine for a contest to find the “perfect” Aryan baby is revealed to be a Jewish girl.The newlyweds came to Berlin as students, a pair of Latvian Jews who wanted to make it big in singing. In 1934, just after Adolf Hitler took control of Germany, the young Jewish woman became pregnant with a child who would soon become known as the “perfect Aryan.” The photo was everywhere. It first adorned a Nazi magazine that held a beauty contest to find “the perfect Aryan” and then was later splashed across postcards...
  • Legendary Suzuki violin method founder exposed as a fraud

    10/27/2014 8:20:12 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 10/27/2014
    A legendary music teacher famed for developing a world-renowned violin method and who boasted about his friendship with Albert Einstein has been been exposed as a fraud and a liar. Shinichi Suzuki founded the Suzuki method in the 1950s and it has since been used by millions across the world. The violinist died in 1998 and had claimed Einstein was his 'guardian' and that he spent eight years in the 1920s studying at Berlin Hochshule, in Germany, as a private student of top violinist Karl Klinger, The Telegraph reported. Yet it has surfaced that the musician was rejected from the...
  • America’s 60 Year-Old Nuclear Bomber Might Finally Get a New Engine

    10/27/2014 6:48:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | October 27, 2014 | Bill Sweetman
    The U.S. Air Force is taking a serious look at overhauling the nearly 60 year-old B-52 bomber—including a new engine for the ancient plane. The question is not whether it makes sense, but why it hasn’t been done before. The answers include poor planning, budgetary procedures that defied economic logic, and at least one bone-headed accounting error. The B-52 first entered service in the mid-1950s. Putting new engines on the “Buff,” or Big Ugly Fat (cough) Fella, became a possibility after 1978, when the commercial airplane business launched two modern engines, the Rolls-Royce RB.211-535 and the PW2000. Unlike the first...
  • Fire When Ready: Flamethrowers were horrific … and effective

    10/27/2014 6:00:03 AM PDT · by C19fan · 10 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 25, 2014 | Paul Richard Huard
    Between July and November of 1917, one of the greatest disasters of the Great War unfolded near the Belgian town of Ypres, where the British and their allies fought the Germans for control of some ridges running through Flanders. Better known as the Battle of Passchendaele, hundreds of thousands of men occupied trenches, dugouts and underground tunnels on the front lines. Among the British forces there were many seasoned infantrymen who could claim to have seen all the technological terrors so far gathered together on World War I battlefields—machine gun fire, poison gas, strafing and bombing by aircraft. But for...
  • To Beat Russian Tanks, the Baltic States Study the Georgia War

    10/27/2014 5:58:47 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 24, 2014 | Robert Beckhusen
    It was more than six years ago when a tank force from the Georgian army’s 42nd Mechanized Infantry Battalion fought its way overnight through Tskhinvali, South Ossetia. The tanks were in trouble. They were moving too fast, outrunning their infantry support and taking losses to South Ossetian irregulars scattered throughout the city. Only hours into a war which would last five days, they had to keep moving before Russian reinforcements could arrive to bolster the pro-Russian, breakway Georgian province.
  • Where Americans Turned the Tide in World War I

    10/26/2014 1:45:28 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    nytimes.com ^ | OCT. 24, 2014 | RICHARD RUBIN
    “Retreat? Hell, we just got here!”
  • Remembering Hoover's funeral, 50 years later

    10/26/2014 9:14:45 AM PDT · by iowamark · 14 replies
    Iowa City Press-Citizen | 10/25/2014 | Holly Hines
    Gannett paper, link only: http://www.press-citizen.com/story/news/local/2014/10/26/remembering-hoovers-funeral-years-later/17938525/
  • Mystery of 4,000-year-old ‘CD-ROM’ is solved

    10/26/2014 7:04:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 36 replies
    uk.news.yahoo.com ^ | Fri, Oct 24, 2014 | Rob Waugh –
    A mysterious symbol-covered disc which was found in Greek ruins in 1908 has finally revealed its secrets after archaeologists battled to decode it for more than a century. The Phaistos Disc - described as the ‘first Minoan CD-ROM’ is covered in 241 images, thought to be fragments of 45 mysterious symbols. The language used is unknown, and the technology behind the disc is equally mysterious. The disc was created in 1,700 BC - using pre-printed symbols to press a mysterious message into clay. The disc pre-dates the printing press by thousands of years, but uses a similar technology - which...
  • Question about submarines

    10/26/2014 4:45:21 AM PDT · by LS · 109 replies
    Self | 10/26/2014 | LS
    I noticed that the US Navy commissioned the USS North Dakota, but that it was "SSN" and not an SSBN, meaning it doesn't carry ballistic missiles. When did they start applying STATE names to. SSNs, which used to have city names, since only ballistic missile subs carried state names?
  • Rare footage captures Ebola discovery in 1976 (VIDEO)

    10/25/2014 11:21:52 PM PDT · by knak · 13 replies
    rt ^ | 10/25/14
    As the largest recorded Ebola epidemic in West Africa has infected over 10,000 people, a Belgian newspaper publishes rare footage from 1976 when the deadly virus was first identified in Congo, or in Zaire as it was then known. The three videos were recently released by the Institute of Tropical Medicine and were published by the Belgian newspaper Het Laatste Nieuws on Tuesday. In 1976, a group of researchers headed by Belgian scientist Peter Piot who travelled to the remote village of Yambuku in the Republic of Zaire (currently the Democratic Republic of Congo). The scientists went to Africa to...
  • ‘My heart just broke': Achingly beautiful cartoon honors slain Canadian soldier

    10/24/2014 9:05:17 AM PDT · by C19fan · 48 replies
    Twitchy ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Yesterday, reservist Nathan Cirillo was murdered while guarding Canada’s National War Memorial. Today, Halifax Chronicle-Herald cartoonist Bruce MacKinnon paid tribute to Cirillo — in an absolutely gorgeous way:
  • SOCCER TIFOS FROM AROUND THE WORLD (Awesome ones commemorating Operation Market Garden)

    10/24/2014 9:03:57 AM PDT · by C19fan
    SI ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Here are some of the best fan banners and displays from around the world.
  • What does a 45,000-year-old femur mean for the Neanderthal in you?

    10/23/2014 9:01:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor's Science Blog ^ | October 23, 2014 | Anne Steele
    A genetic analysis of a 45,000-year-old thigh bone narrows down the time when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred.A 45,000-year-old leg bone is raising questions about just how close modern-day humans are to our thick-browed Stone Age ancestors. DNA from the femur of a Siberian man is helping to pinpoint when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred, researchers say. But what does this mean for the human connection to a species that disappeared nearly 30,000 years ago? The thigh bone, spotted six years ago on the banks of the Irtysh River in Siberia by a Russian artist who carves jewelry...
  • The M-4 Sherman Tank Was Hell on Wheels — And a Death Trap

    10/23/2014 8:09:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 91 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 23, 2014 | Paul Richard Huard
    The M-4 Sherman was the workhorse medium tank of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps during World War II. It fought in every theater of operation—North Africa, the Pacific and Europe. The Sherman was renown for its mechanical reliability, owing to its standardized parts and quality construction on the assembly line. It was roomy, easily repaired, easy to drive. It should have been the ideal tank. But the Sherman was also a death trap.
  • Federal Court ... Orders Release of Fast and Furious Documents List to Judicial Watch by October 22

    10/22/2014 5:21:53 PM PDT · by Revel · 19 replies
    (Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch announced today that on September 23, 2014, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled that by October 22, the Department of Justice (DOJ) must submit a “Vaughn index” listing Fast and Furious materials Judicial Watch sought in its June 2012 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request and subsequent September 2012 FOIA lawsuit (Judicial Watch v. Department of Justice (No. 1:12-cv-01510)). A Vaughn index must: (1) identify each document withheld; (2) state the statutory exemption claimed; and (3) explain how disclosure would damage the interests protected by the claimed exemption.
  • Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

    10/22/2014 2:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    www.centnews.com ^ | 2014-10-22 18:00:08 | Richard INGHAM
    France - Scientists said Wednesday they had unravelled the oldest DNA ever retrieved from a Homo sapiens bone, a feat that sheds light on modern humans' colonisation of the planet. A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago, they said. Teased out of collagen in the ancient bone, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals -- a cousin species who lived in Eurasia alongside H. sapiens before mysteriously disappearing. Previous research has found that Neanderthals and H. sapiens interbred, leaving a tiny Neanderthal...
  • Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie (full video 1:33:40)

    10/22/2014 12:57:05 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 31 replies
    Snag Films ^ | 10/22/2014 | Snag Films
    Video Link Here Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie is a 1995 American documentary film directed by Peter Kuran and narrated by William Shatner. Using restored archive footage, the film traces the development of nuclear weapons and their testing, from America's Trinity test of 1945 (hence the title) to the first Chinese atomic bomb test in 1964. Kuran's commentary on the DVD version claims that the DVD replaces some of the original footage with better-quality versions. There are some short special effects sequences too.
  • Can the Navy's $12 Billion Stealth Destroyer Stay Afloat?

    10/22/2014 6:38:16 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | October 22, 2014 | Dave Majumdar
    The U.S. Navy is slowly preparing the first of its massive, 15,500-ton Zumwalt-class stealth destroyers for sea next year. But questions remain about many of the technologies onboard the new ships. First and foremost: can the thing even stay afloat? The vessel—which is the largest American surface warship since the 1950s--brings a new untried “tumblehome” hull design, new power systems and gun technology that have not been used on a modern warship before. The ship is highly automated with a crew of just 142 -- compared to older ships that have a complement of about 300. But despite its massive...
  • Rare Roman inscription unearthed in Jerusalem

    10/21/2014 1:35:20 PM PDT · by dware · 12 replies
    AFP via Yahoo! News ^ | 10.21.2014 | AFP via Yahoo! News
    Jerusalem (AFP) - Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled a 2,000-year-old commemorative stone inscription dedicated to Roman Emperor Hadrian, which researchers say sheds light on the Jewish revolt against the ancient empire.
  • Roman gladiators' diet probably not what you'd expect, researchers find

    10/21/2014 12:59:30 PM PDT · by dware · 42 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 10.21.2014 | Jenn Gidman
    You'd figure a typical Roman gladiator to be a real meat-and-potatoes guy, right? You'd be figuring wrong—at least if you were talking about gladiators from the city of Ephesus.
  • The Best-Dressed Way to Say Goodbye

    10/21/2014 10:46:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | October 21, 2014 | Justin Jones
    All-black attire hasn’t always been reserved for coffee shop poets and champagne-sipping fashionistas. Up until the turn of the 20th century, it was almost exclusively a sign of mourning: women publicly showing respect for the loss of a loved one. But, somewhere between the fury of the industrial revolution and women’s liberation, the tradition itself died out, leaving only a brief implication that lingers in graveyards and funeral services with fleeting significance. Now, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is revisiting the trend, taking visitors back to black with the debut of the Anna Wintour Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in...
  • Message to Kay Hagen: GET YOUR FACTS STRAIGHT ON RACISM

    How long do we have to put with the extreme hypocrisy of the left? Maybe we should start with the historical TRUTH everytime a democrat tries to twist and lie about it.
  • Life Story with David Attenborough

    10/20/2014 6:36:32 PM PDT · by goldstategop · 9 replies
    BBC News ^ | 10/20/2014 | BBC News
    Sir David Attenborough's new series Life Story tells the remarkable and often perilous story of the journey through life. Every animal on earth is in pursuit of nature's greatest prize - the continuation of its own bloodline through its offspring. The odds may be stacked against any individual succeeding, but each is born with a relentless instinct to overcome the odds. An animal must triumph again and again, over every challenge, if its life is to culminate in success. Life Story captures stories and unique behaviour from around the globe, from Australia and South East Asia to Africa and the...
  • Obamanesia: polls reveal people can't remember voting for Obama

    10/20/2014 4:04:57 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 13 replies
    American Thinker ^ | October 20, 2014 | Thomas Lifson
    Buyer’s remorse for twice electing Barack Obama is taking hold. The first stage of grief is denial, after all, according to Kubler-Ross. USA Today has just conducted some revealing polls in six states with competitive Senate races: Now USA TODAY/Suffolk University polls in a half-dozen states with key Senate races underscore just how much times and political fortunes have changed for the president. In five of the six states, the percentage of likely voters who say they voted for Obama in 2012 has dipped from the actual results. Of those who say they did vote for him, as many as...
  • Monica Lewinsky gives speech, joins Twitter

    10/20/2014 12:02:15 PM PDT · by McGruff · 90 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 10/20/2014
    Monica Lewinsky, the former White House intern whose affair with Bill Clinton led to his impeachment, returned to public life on Monday, giving her first speech in 13 years and joining Twitter...
  • The REAL face of King Tut: Pharaoh had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth according to

    10/20/2014 10:07:52 AM PDT · by C19fan · 38 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 19, 2014 | Mario Ledwith and Francesco Infante
    With strong features cast in burnished gold, Tutankhamun’s burial mask projects an image of majestic beauty and royal power. But in the flesh, King Tut had buck teeth, a club foot and girlish hips, according to the most detailed examination ever of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh’s remains. And rather than being a boy king with a love of chariot racing, Tut relied on walking sticks to get around during his rule in the 14th century BC, researchers said.
  • How Ayn Rand Captured The Magic Of American Life

    10/20/2014 9:26:39 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 36 replies
    The Federalist ^ | October 16, 2014 | Charles Murray
    In 1991, the book-of-the-month club conducted a survey asking people what book had most influenced their lives. The Bible ranked number one and Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” was number two. In 1998, the Modern Library released two lists of the top 100 books of the twentieth century. One was compiled from the votes of the Modern Library’s Board, consisting of luminaries such as Joyce Carol Oates, Maya Angelou, Edmund Morris, and Salman Rushdie. The two top-ranked books on the Board’s list were “Ulysses” and “The Great Gatsby.” The other list was based on more than 200,000 votes cast online by...
  • Does Justice Thomas support the Supreme Court’s notorious Korematsu decision?

    10/20/2014 8:43:26 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 25 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | October 20, 2014 | Ilya Somin
    In an interesting recent article, and a post at Prawfsblawg, legal scholar Mark Kende argues that Justice Clarence Thomas approves of Korematsu v. United States, the notorious 1944 Supreme Court decision that upheld the internment of over 100,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II. Here is the article abstract: The U.S. Supreme Court’s infamous decision in Korematsu v. United States, 323 U.S. 214 (1944) has been in the news recently as some scholars and advocates, such as Peter Irons, have asked the Court to formally repudiate the decision. This essay breaks new ground by demonstrating that Justice Clarence Thomas’s jurisprudence on...
  • The Unsavory History of Gun Control

    10/20/2014 7:10:49 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 3 replies
    TownhallFinance.com ^ | October 20, 2014 | Daniel J. Mitchell
    I’ve written extensively about gun control, but mostly because of practical and moral objections to the notion that government should have the power to disarm law-abiding people. But I hadn’t realized that some of the earliest gun control initiatives were designed to oppress blacks. As Dave Kopel explains in Reason, the white power structure in many post-Civil War states was very anxious to disarm former slaves.
  • Remembering the Deadly London Beer Flood of 1814

    10/19/2014 4:14:23 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 45 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | October 17, 2014 | Nick Greene
    200 years ago today, one of history's most bizarre disasters befell London when a 15-foot wave of beer flooded an entire neighborhood and left eight people dead.The Horse Shoe Brewery on Tottenham Court Road in London boasted a massive 22-foot-tall vat that held some 160,000 gallons of dark porter. On October 17, 1814, one of the metal hoops meant to secure it snapped, and the wooden vat succumbed to the immense pressure of all that fermenting brew. The gushing beer smashed open the brewery's other vats, resulting in a raging sea of beer that burst forth from the building.Over one...
  • Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt: The Complete History of Presidential Drinking

    10/19/2014 3:57:28 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 24 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 10/19/2014 | Mark Will-Weber
    “Far too often, what passes for history is nothing more than rehashed, undocumented folklore and myth, and this is especially true with ‘cocktail history.’ Not so with this fine book, Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt. It is well-researched and documented, while also immensely enjoyable to read.” —Philip Greene, vice president, co-founder, and legal counsel of the Museum of the American Cocktail and author of To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion “This charming and erudite book is full of surprises. I never dreamed that the presidents were such boozers! Pour yourself a toddy and ponder a vexing question:...
  • Citizenfour review – Edward Snowden documentary is utterly engrossing

    10/19/2014 2:28:39 PM PDT · by Zuben Elgenubi · 16 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 18 October 2014 | Mark Kermode, Observer film critic
    Last year, UK cinemagoers were treated to two competing accounts of the story of Julian Assange: Bill Condon’s oddly inert drama The Fifth Estate, and Alex Gibney’s more pointedly dramatic documentary We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks. Although very different in form, content and, indeed, success (Gibney’s film was Bafta-nominated, Condon’s was hailed as one of the year’s biggest flops), both movies wrestled with the conundrum of separating the cult of Assange’s divisive personality from the significance of the information that he helped to publish – for better or worse.
  • An A to Z of Noah Webster's Finest Forgotten Words

    10/18/2014 9:51:40 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 20 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | 10/16/2014 | Paul Anthony Jones
    October 16 is World Dictionary Day, marking the birthday of the great American lexicographer Noah Webster. Born in Connecticut in 1758, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, in 1806, but it was his two-volume American Dictionary of the English Language published in 1828 (when he was 70 years old) that earned him his place in history as the foremost lexicographer of American English. The statistics alone speak for themselves: Webster's American Dictionary took him 28 years to complete. In preparation he learned 26 languages, including Old English, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit. The final...
  • St. Mary's doctors determine 2,100-year-old "Mummy Girl" died of appendicitis

    10/17/2014 7:10:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    WPTV ^ | October 17, 2014 | Marisa Gottesman, Sun Sentinel
    Doctors didn't have much of a medical history to help them unwrap the cause of death of their oldest patient, a 2,100-year-old female mummy... Doctors performed a CT scan on the mummy Oct. 10 to come up with the working diagnosis. Relying on the scans, they reviewed her bone structure, size and teeth. They compared their findings to X-rays that were taken of the mummy more than 40 years ago. The older scans had initially led doctors to believe the mummy was somewhere between the age of 4 and 9, and that she had died of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis had been...
  • The beginning of the people's Web: 20 years of Netscape

    10/17/2014 5:03:18 PM PDT · by sopwith · 31 replies
    ZDNET ^ | October 14, 2014 | By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols
    I was the first writer to cover the Web for a popular audience, and it did prove popular. I mean, it must have had hundreds of thousands of users in 1993! Today, Facebook alone has over a billion users. What's Hot on ZDNet Apple releases OS X Yosemite for Mac for free; iWork updated iOS 8.1 available October 20 for iPhones, iPads Apple Pay ready for lift-off and Google 'trying to get it right' Microsoft to 'Connect' with developers at November event in New York You see the problem was that it was really, really hard to use the Web...
  • Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

    10/17/2014 3:37:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    University of Birmingham via EurekAlert! ^ | October 9, 2014 | Stuart Gillespie
    Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon analyses. While historical chronologies traditionally place the end of the Greek Bronze Age at around 1025 BCE, this latest research suggests a date 70 to 100 years earlier. Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham selected 60 samples of animal bones, plant remains and building timbers, excavated at Assiros in northern Greece, to be radiocarbon dated and correlated with 95.4% accuracy using Bayesian statistical methodology at the University of Oxford and the Akademie der Wissenschaften Heidelberg, Germany. 'Until very recently...
  • Giant sphinx from 'Ten Commandments' film unearthed 91 years later

    10/17/2014 3:21:54 PM PDT · by dware · 59 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.17.2014 | Laura Geggel
    Hidden for more than 90 years beneath the rolling sand dunes of Guadalupe, California, an enormous, plaster sphinx from the 1923 blockbuster movie "The Ten Commandments" has been rediscovered and is now above ground. The public will be able to see the sphinx on display as early as next year, once it has been reconstructed a necessity since it became weather-beaten during its stint beneath the sand, said Doug Jenzen, the executive director of the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, who oversaw the recent excavation.
  • Ancient Rome’s German, Swiss legacy preserved

    10/17/2014 10:37:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    U-T San Diego ^ | October 10, 2014 | Carl H. Larsen
    More than 1,500 years after its demise, the Roman Empire remains a vibrant part of modern-day Trier. Near the borders of France, Luxembourg and Belgium, today’s city of 105,000 was once the administrative capital of the Western Roman Empire and with its monolithic architecture became known as Roma Segunda — the Second Rome. The Romans brought to Trier a high standard of living, exquisite artwork and their famed architectural and engineering skills. In northern Europe, on an arc from the Alps to the North Sea, in what was once called northeast Gaul and Upper Germania, the remnants of Roman civilization...