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History (General/Chat)

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  • ‘My heart just broke': Achingly beautiful cartoon honors slain Canadian soldier

    10/24/2014 9:05:17 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    Twitchy ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Yesterday, reservist Nathan Cirillo was murdered while guarding Canada’s National War Memorial. Today, Halifax Chronicle-Herald cartoonist Bruce MacKinnon paid tribute to Cirillo — in an absolutely gorgeous way:
  • SOCCER TIFOS FROM AROUND THE WORLD (Awesome ones commemorating Operation Market Garden)

    10/24/2014 9:03:57 AM PDT · by C19fan
    SI ^ | October 23, 2014 | Staff
    Here are some of the best fan banners and displays from around the world.
  • What does a 45,000-year-old femur mean for the Neanderthal in you?

    10/23/2014 9:01:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor's Science Blog ^ | October 23, 2014 | Anne Steele
    A genetic analysis of a 45,000-year-old thigh bone narrows down the time when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred.A 45,000-year-old leg bone is raising questions about just how close modern-day humans are to our thick-browed Stone Age ancestors. DNA from the femur of a Siberian man is helping to pinpoint when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred, researchers say. But what does this mean for the human connection to a species that disappeared nearly 30,000 years ago? The thigh bone, spotted six years ago on the banks of the Irtysh River in Siberia by a Russian artist who carves jewelry...
  • The M-4 Sherman Tank Was Hell on Wheels — And a Death Trap

    10/23/2014 8:09:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 86 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 23, 2014 | Paul Richard Huard
    The M-4 Sherman was the workhorse medium tank of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps during World War II. It fought in every theater of operation—North Africa, the Pacific and Europe. The Sherman was renown for its mechanical reliability, owing to its standardized parts and quality construction on the assembly line. It was roomy, easily repaired, easy to drive. It should have been the ideal tank. But the Sherman was also a death trap.
  • Federal Court ... Orders Release of Fast and Furious Documents List to Judicial Watch by October 22

    10/22/2014 5:21:53 PM PDT · by Revel · 19 replies
    (Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch announced today that on September 23, 2014, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled that by October 22, the Department of Justice (DOJ) must submit a “Vaughn index” listing Fast and Furious materials Judicial Watch sought in its June 2012 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request and subsequent September 2012 FOIA lawsuit (Judicial Watch v. Department of Justice (No. 1:12-cv-01510)). A Vaughn index must: (1) identify each document withheld; (2) state the statutory exemption claimed; and (3) explain how disclosure would damage the interests protected by the claimed exemption.
  • Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

    10/22/2014 2:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    www.centnews.com ^ | 2014-10-22 18:00:08 | Richard INGHAM
    France - Scientists said Wednesday they had unravelled the oldest DNA ever retrieved from a Homo sapiens bone, a feat that sheds light on modern humans' colonisation of the planet. A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago, they said. Teased out of collagen in the ancient bone, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals -- a cousin species who lived in Eurasia alongside H. sapiens before mysteriously disappearing. Previous research has found that Neanderthals and H. sapiens interbred, leaving a tiny Neanderthal...
  • Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie (full video 1:33:40)

    10/22/2014 12:57:05 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 31 replies
    Snag Films ^ | 10/22/2014 | Snag Films
    Video Link Here Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie is a 1995 American documentary film directed by Peter Kuran and narrated by William Shatner. Using restored archive footage, the film traces the development of nuclear weapons and their testing, from America's Trinity test of 1945 (hence the title) to the first Chinese atomic bomb test in 1964. Kuran's commentary on the DVD version claims that the DVD replaces some of the original footage with better-quality versions. There are some short special effects sequences too.
  • Can the Navy's $12 Billion Stealth Destroyer Stay Afloat?

    10/22/2014 6:38:16 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | October 22, 2014 | Dave Majumdar
    The U.S. Navy is slowly preparing the first of its massive, 15,500-ton Zumwalt-class stealth destroyers for sea next year. But questions remain about many of the technologies onboard the new ships. First and foremost: can the thing even stay afloat? The vessel—which is the largest American surface warship since the 1950s--brings a new untried “tumblehome” hull design, new power systems and gun technology that have not been used on a modern warship before. The ship is highly automated with a crew of just 142 -- compared to older ships that have a complement of about 300. But despite its massive...
  • Rare Roman inscription unearthed in Jerusalem

    10/21/2014 1:35:20 PM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    AFP via Yahoo! News ^ | 10.21.2014 | AFP via Yahoo! News
    Jerusalem (AFP) - Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled a 2,000-year-old commemorative stone inscription dedicated to Roman Emperor Hadrian, which researchers say sheds light on the Jewish revolt against the ancient empire.
  • Roman gladiators' diet probably not what you'd expect, researchers find

    10/21/2014 12:59:30 PM PDT · by dware · 40 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 10.21.2014 | Jenn Gidman
    You'd figure a typical Roman gladiator to be a real meat-and-potatoes guy, right? You'd be figuring wrong—at least if you were talking about gladiators from the city of Ephesus.
  • The Best-Dressed Way to Say Goodbye

    10/21/2014 10:46:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | October 21, 2014 | Justin Jones
    All-black attire hasn’t always been reserved for coffee shop poets and champagne-sipping fashionistas. Up until the turn of the 20th century, it was almost exclusively a sign of mourning: women publicly showing respect for the loss of a loved one. But, somewhere between the fury of the industrial revolution and women’s liberation, the tradition itself died out, leaving only a brief implication that lingers in graveyards and funeral services with fleeting significance. Now, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is revisiting the trend, taking visitors back to black with the debut of the Anna Wintour Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in...
  • Message to Kay Hagen: GET YOUR FACTS STRAIGHT ON RACISM

    How long do we have to put with the extreme hypocrisy of the left? Maybe we should start with the historical TRUTH everytime a democrat tries to twist and lie about it.
  • Life Story with David Attenborough

    10/20/2014 6:36:32 PM PDT · by goldstategop · 9 replies
    BBC News ^ | 10/20/2014 | BBC News
    Sir David Attenborough's new series Life Story tells the remarkable and often perilous story of the journey through life. Every animal on earth is in pursuit of nature's greatest prize - the continuation of its own bloodline through its offspring. The odds may be stacked against any individual succeeding, but each is born with a relentless instinct to overcome the odds. An animal must triumph again and again, over every challenge, if its life is to culminate in success. Life Story captures stories and unique behaviour from around the globe, from Australia and South East Asia to Africa and the...
  • Obamanesia: polls reveal people can't remember voting for Obama

    10/20/2014 4:04:57 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 13 replies
    American Thinker ^ | October 20, 2014 | Thomas Lifson
    Buyer’s remorse for twice electing Barack Obama is taking hold. The first stage of grief is denial, after all, according to Kubler-Ross. USA Today has just conducted some revealing polls in six states with competitive Senate races: Now USA TODAY/Suffolk University polls in a half-dozen states with key Senate races underscore just how much times and political fortunes have changed for the president. In five of the six states, the percentage of likely voters who say they voted for Obama in 2012 has dipped from the actual results. Of those who say they did vote for him, as many as...
  • Monica Lewinsky gives speech, joins Twitter

    10/20/2014 12:02:15 PM PDT · by McGruff · 90 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 10/20/2014
    Monica Lewinsky, the former White House intern whose affair with Bill Clinton led to his impeachment, returned to public life on Monday, giving her first speech in 13 years and joining Twitter...
  • The REAL face of King Tut: Pharaoh had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth according to

    10/20/2014 10:07:52 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 19, 2014 | Mario Ledwith and Francesco Infante
    With strong features cast in burnished gold, Tutankhamun’s burial mask projects an image of majestic beauty and royal power. But in the flesh, King Tut had buck teeth, a club foot and girlish hips, according to the most detailed examination ever of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh’s remains. And rather than being a boy king with a love of chariot racing, Tut relied on walking sticks to get around during his rule in the 14th century BC, researchers said.
  • How Ayn Rand Captured The Magic Of American Life

    10/20/2014 9:26:39 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 36 replies
    The Federalist ^ | October 16, 2014 | Charles Murray
    In 1991, the book-of-the-month club conducted a survey asking people what book had most influenced their lives. The Bible ranked number one and Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” was number two. In 1998, the Modern Library released two lists of the top 100 books of the twentieth century. One was compiled from the votes of the Modern Library’s Board, consisting of luminaries such as Joyce Carol Oates, Maya Angelou, Edmund Morris, and Salman Rushdie. The two top-ranked books on the Board’s list were “Ulysses” and “The Great Gatsby.” The other list was based on more than 200,000 votes cast online by...
  • Does Justice Thomas support the Supreme Court’s notorious Korematsu decision?

    10/20/2014 8:43:26 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 25 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | October 20, 2014 | Ilya Somin
    In an interesting recent article, and a post at Prawfsblawg, legal scholar Mark Kende argues that Justice Clarence Thomas approves of Korematsu v. United States, the notorious 1944 Supreme Court decision that upheld the internment of over 100,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II. Here is the article abstract: The U.S. Supreme Court’s infamous decision in Korematsu v. United States, 323 U.S. 214 (1944) has been in the news recently as some scholars and advocates, such as Peter Irons, have asked the Court to formally repudiate the decision. This essay breaks new ground by demonstrating that Justice Clarence Thomas’s jurisprudence on...
  • The Unsavory History of Gun Control

    10/20/2014 7:10:49 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 3 replies
    TownhallFinance.com ^ | October 20, 2014 | Daniel J. Mitchell
    I’ve written extensively about gun control, but mostly because of practical and moral objections to the notion that government should have the power to disarm law-abiding people. But I hadn’t realized that some of the earliest gun control initiatives were designed to oppress blacks. As Dave Kopel explains in Reason, the white power structure in many post-Civil War states was very anxious to disarm former slaves.
  • Remembering the Deadly London Beer Flood of 1814

    10/19/2014 4:14:23 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 45 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | October 17, 2014 | Nick Greene
    200 years ago today, one of history's most bizarre disasters befell London when a 15-foot wave of beer flooded an entire neighborhood and left eight people dead.The Horse Shoe Brewery on Tottenham Court Road in London boasted a massive 22-foot-tall vat that held some 160,000 gallons of dark porter. On October 17, 1814, one of the metal hoops meant to secure it snapped, and the wooden vat succumbed to the immense pressure of all that fermenting brew. The gushing beer smashed open the brewery's other vats, resulting in a raging sea of beer that burst forth from the building.Over one...
  • Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt: The Complete History of Presidential Drinking

    10/19/2014 3:57:28 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 24 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | 10/19/2014 | Mark Will-Weber
    “Far too often, what passes for history is nothing more than rehashed, undocumented folklore and myth, and this is especially true with ‘cocktail history.’ Not so with this fine book, Mint Juleps with Teddy Roosevelt. It is well-researched and documented, while also immensely enjoyable to read.” —Philip Greene, vice president, co-founder, and legal counsel of the Museum of the American Cocktail and author of To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion “This charming and erudite book is full of surprises. I never dreamed that the presidents were such boozers! Pour yourself a toddy and ponder a vexing question:...
  • Citizenfour review – Edward Snowden documentary is utterly engrossing

    10/19/2014 2:28:39 PM PDT · by Zuben Elgenubi · 16 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 18 October 2014 | Mark Kermode, Observer film critic
    Last year, UK cinemagoers were treated to two competing accounts of the story of Julian Assange: Bill Condon’s oddly inert drama The Fifth Estate, and Alex Gibney’s more pointedly dramatic documentary We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks. Although very different in form, content and, indeed, success (Gibney’s film was Bafta-nominated, Condon’s was hailed as one of the year’s biggest flops), both movies wrestled with the conundrum of separating the cult of Assange’s divisive personality from the significance of the information that he helped to publish – for better or worse.
  • An A to Z of Noah Webster's Finest Forgotten Words

    10/18/2014 9:51:40 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 20 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | 10/16/2014 | Paul Anthony Jones
    October 16 is World Dictionary Day, marking the birthday of the great American lexicographer Noah Webster. Born in Connecticut in 1758, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, in 1806, but it was his two-volume American Dictionary of the English Language published in 1828 (when he was 70 years old) that earned him his place in history as the foremost lexicographer of American English. The statistics alone speak for themselves: Webster's American Dictionary took him 28 years to complete. In preparation he learned 26 languages, including Old English, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit. The final...
  • St. Mary's doctors determine 2,100-year-old "Mummy Girl" died of appendicitis

    10/17/2014 7:10:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    WPTV ^ | October 17, 2014 | Marisa Gottesman, Sun Sentinel
    Doctors didn't have much of a medical history to help them unwrap the cause of death of their oldest patient, a 2,100-year-old female mummy... Doctors performed a CT scan on the mummy Oct. 10 to come up with the working diagnosis. Relying on the scans, they reviewed her bone structure, size and teeth. They compared their findings to X-rays that were taken of the mummy more than 40 years ago. The older scans had initially led doctors to believe the mummy was somewhere between the age of 4 and 9, and that she had died of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis had been...
  • The beginning of the people's Web: 20 years of Netscape

    10/17/2014 5:03:18 PM PDT · by sopwith · 31 replies
    ZDNET ^ | October 14, 2014 | By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols
    I was the first writer to cover the Web for a popular audience, and it did prove popular. I mean, it must have had hundreds of thousands of users in 1993! Today, Facebook alone has over a billion users. What's Hot on ZDNet Apple releases OS X Yosemite for Mac for free; iWork updated iOS 8.1 available October 20 for iPhones, iPads Apple Pay ready for lift-off and Google 'trying to get it right' Microsoft to 'Connect' with developers at November event in New York You see the problem was that it was really, really hard to use the Web...
  • Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

    10/17/2014 3:37:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    University of Birmingham via EurekAlert! ^ | October 9, 2014 | Stuart Gillespie
    Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon analyses. While historical chronologies traditionally place the end of the Greek Bronze Age at around 1025 BCE, this latest research suggests a date 70 to 100 years earlier. Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham selected 60 samples of animal bones, plant remains and building timbers, excavated at Assiros in northern Greece, to be radiocarbon dated and correlated with 95.4% accuracy using Bayesian statistical methodology at the University of Oxford and the Akademie der Wissenschaften Heidelberg, Germany. 'Until very recently...
  • Giant sphinx from 'Ten Commandments' film unearthed 91 years later

    10/17/2014 3:21:54 PM PDT · by dware · 59 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.17.2014 | Laura Geggel
    Hidden for more than 90 years beneath the rolling sand dunes of Guadalupe, California, an enormous, plaster sphinx from the 1923 blockbuster movie "The Ten Commandments" has been rediscovered and is now above ground. The public will be able to see the sphinx on display as early as next year, once it has been reconstructed a necessity since it became weather-beaten during its stint beneath the sand, said Doug Jenzen, the executive director of the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, who oversaw the recent excavation.
  • Ancient Rome’s German, Swiss legacy preserved

    10/17/2014 10:37:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    U-T San Diego ^ | October 10, 2014 | Carl H. Larsen
    More than 1,500 years after its demise, the Roman Empire remains a vibrant part of modern-day Trier. Near the borders of France, Luxembourg and Belgium, today’s city of 105,000 was once the administrative capital of the Western Roman Empire and with its monolithic architecture became known as Roma Segunda — the Second Rome. The Romans brought to Trier a high standard of living, exquisite artwork and their famed architectural and engineering skills. In northern Europe, on an arc from the Alps to the North Sea, in what was once called northeast Gaul and Upper Germania, the remnants of Roman civilization...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • Archeologists unearth 3,300 year old complex in Israel

    10/17/2014 9:02:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 16, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    Initial examination of the ruins suggests the site was an ancient cult complex—a rather large one at that with side walls measuring up to 52x52 feet. Thus far arch[a]eologists have uncovered mask fragments (parts that covered the nose), connected cups (their purpose has yet to be discovered), scarabs (stone representations of the beetle typically used as an amulet) and very large vessels known as pithoi. The relics suggest the site was use as a cult complex, likely dedicated to the worship of a god, though the researchers can't say with any certainty which one that might have been. The most...
  • Archeologists unearth 3,300 year old complex in Israel

    10/17/2014 8:17:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 10/16/2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of archeologists working in Israel's Tel Burna dig site have unearthed the remains of a large stone complex dating back approximately 3,300 years. Information about the finding was presented at the recent European Association of Archaeologists' meeting held in Istanbul. Initial examination of the ruins suggests the site was an ancient cult complex—a rather large one at that with side walls measuring up to 52x52 feet. Thus far archeologists have uncovered mask fragments (parts that covered the nose), connected cups (their purpose has yet to be discovered), scarabs (stone representations of the beetle typically used as an amulet)...
  • The German Army Is Getting a New Machine Gun

    10/17/2014 7:08:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 106 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 17, 2014 | Joseph Trevithick
    Last year, the German armed forces announced they would purchase Heckler and Koch’s MG-5 machine gun to finally replace a World War II-era weapon. The new machine gun should put the Bundeswehr’s existing weapons to shame—and make up for past failures. “Its main feature is that it is much more accurate than its predecessor,” German army colonel Christian Brandes told U.S. Army reporters at Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona during testing of the new gun on Oct. 14. The predecessor Brandes was referring to is the MG-3. That aging weapon is essentially just an upgrade of a machine gun Adolf...
  • The Death of Taney

    10/16/2014 9:05:49 PM PDT · by iowamark · 61 replies
    On Oct. 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln must have breathed a bit easier. Not because the war was over — it would last another six months. Not because he had been re-elected — the election remained nearly a month away. And not because Gen. William T. Sherman had begun his decisive march through Georgia — the general was still holding Atlanta. While much remained unsettled, Lincoln’s achievements as president seemed more secure that autumn day because the president learned that his old nemesis Roger B. Taney, the Maryland-born chief justice of the Supreme Court, had died. Ever since Taney had...
  • Lockheed Martin makes fusion breakthrough

    Hidden away in the secret depths of the Skunk Works, a Lockheed Martin research team has been working quietly on a nuclear energy concept they believe has the potential to meet, if not eventually decrease, the world’s insatiable demand for power. Dubbed the compact fusion reactor (CFR), the device is conceptually safer, cleaner and more powerful than much larger, current nuclear systems that rely on fission, the process of splitting atoms to release energy. Crucially, by being “compact,” Lockheed believes its scalable concept will also be small and practical enough for applications ranging from interplanetary spacecraft and commercial ships to...
  • October 15th in history 1781 Siege of Yorktown & more

    10/15/2014 8:15:28 AM PDT · by Prophet2520 · 10 replies
    [the fighting raged on at Yorktown] "On the night of October 15-16, Cornwallis ordered an attack against the second line. This was launched, 350 strong, under Lt. Col. Robert Abercrombie at a point near the center of the line. It was a gallant sortie, yet it accomplished little, for, within a few hours, the guns which had been spiked by the British were again firing upon Yorktown." The articles of capitulation were signed four days later. Cornwallis' British men were declared prisoners of war,...Americans captured 8,000 troops, 214 artillery pieces, thousands of muskets, 24 transport ships, wagons and horses.
  • Gibbon, the Muses, and the Decline of Rome: The great historian still has much to teach us

    10/15/2014 7:55:15 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    National Review ^ | 10/15/2014 | Michael Auslin
    Rome — I am sitting on the steps of the Capitoline Hill, as close as I can approximate the spot where, exactly 250 years ago today, on October 15, 1764, the 27-year old Edward Gibbon was struck by the muses, leading to perhaps the greatest work of historical scholarship in the English language. Though the anecdote in his biography recalling the moment has been called into question, it is both sufficiently famous and sufficiently inspiring to anyone with a historical bent to warrant retelling. Gibbon’s recollects the moment: It was at Rome, on the fifteenth of October, 1764, as...
  • The Burp Gun Was Ugly—But Damn Did It Spray Lead (Soviet PPSh-41)

    10/15/2014 6:54:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 15, 2014 | Paul Huard
    For nearly 30 years, soldiers heard an unforgettable sound coming from a weapon firing from behind the rubble in Stalingrad. Or echoing in the frozen hills of the Korean Peninsula during human-wave attacks. Or even rattling the jungles of Vietnam during firefights with the Viet Cong. BRRAP-PAP-PAP-PAP-PAP-PAP-PAP-PAP-PAP! Before the AK-47 became the symbol of Soviet armed forces, there was the “burp gun”—officially, the PPSh-41. It’s an ugly gun that makes an ugly sound during extended fire. Looks aside, the burp gun sure did work.
  • Shot in the Chest 100 Years Ago, Teddy Roosevelt Kept on Talking

    10/14/2014 5:44:19 PM PDT · by iowamark · 24 replies
    History Channel ^ | October 12, 2014 | Christopher Klein
    On October 14, 1912, an unemployed saloonkeeper shot former president and Progressive Party candidate Theodore Roosevelt outside a Milwaukee hotel. Rather than being rushed to the hospital, Roosevelt insisted on delivering his scheduled 90-minute speech. By slowing the bullet, those lengthy prepared remarks may actually have saved his life. Theodore Roosevelt’s opening line was hardly remarkable for a presidential campaign speech: “Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible.” His second line, however, was a bombshell. “I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot.” Clearly, Roosevelt had buried the lede. The horrified...
  • Excavated Iron Age Chariot Pieces Are 'Find of a Lifetime'

    10/14/2014 1:43:10 PM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    NBC News ^ | 10.14.2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    More than 2,000 years ago, pieces of an Iron Age chariot were burnt and buried, perhaps as a religious offering. Now, archaeologists have discovered the bronze remains of this sacrifice. The remains were discovered at the Burrough Hill Iron Age Hillfort, a fortified hilltop structure that was once surrounded by farms and settlements, used most heavily between about 100 B.C. and A.D. 50.
  • Here Are Amazing Photos Of Russia Dismantling An Outdated Nuclear Submarine

    10/14/2014 12:11:09 PM PDT · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies
    Business Insider (Australia) ^ | Oct 10 2014, 3:29 PM | Pierre Bienaimé
    Russia is currently in the process of expanding and modernizing its navy. This might have something to do with Moscow’s apparent appetite for military conquest — although Russia also has a few nuclear submarines that are dangerously past their prime, considering the fissile materials that are still stored onboard. In 2009, one rusted behemoth was transported to a factory in the far eastern port city of Vladivostok, close to the Korean peninsula, for decommissioning. With the vessel fully out of water, the pictures offer an amazing perspective on how massive and complex even an outdated class of nuclear submarine really...
  • Storm god worship: Ancient cult complex discovered in Israel

    10/14/2014 10:58:37 AM PDT · by dware · 15 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.14.2014 | Owen Jarus
    A massive cult complex, dating back about 3,300 years, has been discovered at the site of Tel Burna in Israel. While archaeologists have not fully excavated the cult complex, they can tell it was quite large, as the courtyard alone was 52 by 52 feet. Inside the complex, researchers discovered three connected cups, fragments of facemasks, massive jars that are almost as big as a person and burnt animal bones that may indicate sacrificial rituals.
  • Is Ebola the Same Virus as the Black Death? Historical Similarities are Striking

    10/14/2014 9:26:42 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 42 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/14/2014 | Chriss Street
    Most people assume that the fourteenth-century Black Death that quickly ravaged the western world was a bacterial bubonic plague epidemic caused by flea bites and spread by rats. But the Black Death killed a high proportion of Scandinavians where it was too cold for fleas to survive. Biology of Plagues. Evidence from Historical Populations published by Cambridge University Press, analyzed 2,500 years of plagues and concluded that the Black Death was caused by a viral hemorrhagic fever pandemic similar to Ebola. If this is correct, the future medical and economic impacts from Ebola have been vastly underestimated.  Authors Dr. Susan Scott, a demographer,...
  • WWII "Flying Coffin" found in Italy

    10/14/2014 9:23:00 AM PDT · by dware · 42 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10.14.2014 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    The World War II-era B-24 aircraft was so stiff, heavy, and hard to control that its American crews dubbed it the "flying coffin." Not only was its only exit hard to reach at the tail—leaving many trapped before being able to parachute out—but it was intended to drop bombs on bridges, train stations, and airports run by the Germans, thus living up to its name for those below it as well.
  • The World War II Sten Gun Was Cheap and Dirty

    10/14/2014 7:11:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    War is Boring ^ | October 14, 2014 | Paul Huard
    Few weapons in the modern era ever had a poem penned its honor. But few weapons were ever like the Sten gun. Hastily contrived in the early, desperate days of World War II, it looked like a last-ditch effort to arm British troops—and it was. Terrified Britons knew they did not have enough weapons to repel a German invasion force. The British lost thousands of small arms that were destroyed or simply abandoned after the devastating rout at Dunkirk.
  • 1000-year old Viking treasure hoard found in Scotland

    10/13/2014 12:12:29 PM PDT · by dware · 25 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 10.13.2014 | Reuters via Yahoo!
    LONDON (Reuters) - A hoard of Viking gold and silver artifacts dating back over 1,000 years has been discovered by a treasure hunter with a metal detector in Scotland, in a find hailed by experts as one of the country's most significant.
  • Burnt Magna Carta read for first time in 283 Years

    10/13/2014 11:52:17 AM PDT · by dware · 18 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.13.2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    More than 280 years after it was damaged in a fire, one of the original copies of the Magna Carta is legible again. Written in 1215, the Magna Carta required the king of England King John to cede absolute power. Today, the Magna Carta is seen as a first step toward constitutional law rather than the hereditary power of royalty. There were four copies of the document created at the time. One, held by the British Library, was badly damaged in a fire in 1731.
  • Wartime diary: Confederate officer gossiped in code about wives, including Jefferson Davis'

    10/13/2014 11:41:11 AM PDT · by dware · 13 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10.13.2014 | AP via Fox News
    SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. – A century and a half after Confederate officer James Malbone wrote his Civil War diary partly in code, a couple of Yankees have figured out why he took the precaution: He liked to gossip.
  • Large mosaic in ancient tomb uncovered in Greece [Amphipolis update]

    10/13/2014 11:11:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/12/2014 | by Demetris Nellas
    Archaeologists digging through a vast ancient tomb in Amphipolis in northern Greece have uncovered a floor mosaic that covers the whole area of a room seen as the antechamber to the main burial ground. The mosaic, 3 meters (10 feet) long and 4.5 meters (15 feet) wide, depicts a horseman with a laurel wreath driving a chariot drawn by two horses and preceded by the god Hermes. According to a Culture Ministry announcement on Sunday, Hermes is depicted here as the conductor of souls to the afterlife. The mosaic is made up of pebbles in many colors: white, black, gray,...
  • Glenn Gould, gone 32 years, is now as popular as ever

    10/11/2014 7:57:28 PM PDT · by Squawk 8888 · 18 replies
    National Post ^ | October 11, 2014 | Rex Murphy
    The warmest place in Toronto, whether in the high heat of summer, or on the bleakest chill of endless February, is a couple of feet in front of the CBC building on downtown Front Street, about the length of 20 Steinway grands from the landmark CN Tower. It is the bronze bench which forms one element of the wonderful memorial statue of Glenn Gould, situated right in front of the centre named after the pianist. Going into host Cross Country Checkup every Sunday afternoon, I’ve seen it over and over again: People walking, tourists or Torontonians, catch a glimpse of...
  • Presidential speeches have lowered in sophistication over time

    10/12/2014 9:39:51 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 34 replies
    UPI ^ | October 12, 2014
    NEW YORK, Oct. 12 (UPI) -- Vocativ recently decided to do a study of the sophistication of presidential speeches, from George Washington to Barack Obama, and found they've become less sophisticated over time. They analyzed over 600 speeches using the Flesch-Kincaid readability test, which judges speech by assigning it to a grade level. All of their conclusions were analyzed by former Bill Clinton speech writer Jeff Shesol.