History (General/Chat)

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  • Downton and out: 6th series will be last as cast gather to read through the new script

    03/26/2015 2:16:09 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 40 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 3-26-15 | Katherine Rushton & Hannah Flint
    The doors to Downton Abbey are finally closing. Carnival Films and ITV have announced that there will be no return to the famous home of the Crawley family after the sixth season airs, as they want to end on a high. Downton Abbey has been a huge international success, selling to broadcasters around the world, but its ratings in Britain had started flagging. NBC Universal, which owns the production company behind the show, said in an internal note to staff that the long-running drama was ‘approaching its natural conclusion’. The internal note, seen by the Daily Mail, said: ‘Whilst we...
  • Who determines Presidential 'incapacitation'.

    03/26/2015 9:38:00 AM PDT · by Usagi_yo · 48 replies
    3/26/2015 | Self
    Who determines a presidents competency or otherwise ‘incapacity’. Could congress instigate a special form of impeachment not meant to remove from office, but force him for a psychiatric evaluation and drug testing? Then a real impeachment is an option for removal? Wouldn’t that stick to his underwear and make him feel uncomfortable.
  • Once again Comrade de Blasio reminds us of why Democrats must never be allowed to rule us

    03/26/2015 8:34:51 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 14 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 3/26/15 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    In the bad old days of New York City, the mob would decide the price of erecting a building regardless of who was planning to do it. Years after the construction of One Police Plaza, the City’s Police Headquarters, when the ceiling of the main floor started to fall down an investigation found that the mob had sold the city substandard concrete. They didn’t care who they ripped off. Hard work led by former Mayor Rudy Giuliani broke the grip of the mob on New York’s construction industry and for years afterward construction boomed because of the reduced costs of...
  • Did (Western) Allied troops rape 285,000 German women? [tr ed]

    03/26/2015 8:34:12 AM PDT · by C19fan · 82 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 26, 2015 | Guy Walters
    There was no doubt that Private Blake W. Mariano of the 191st Tank Battalion was a brave man. As part of the American Army's 45th Infantry Division, he had killed many Germans as he fought through Africa, Italy and southern France, before finally, in March 1945, he and his Sherman tank had crossed the Rhine into Germany. By April 15, 1945, Mariano had been away from his home in New Mexico for nearly three years. A father of three, the 29-year-old was divorced, although he did have a girlfriend in England.
  • Is it just me, or has there been a resurgence at FreeRepublic.

    03/25/2015 2:59:35 PM PDT · by Zeneta · 181 replies
    Me | 03/25/2015 | Zeneta
    I have noticed that there seems to be more and more posters on FR that have accounts from the 1990's or early 2000's, that are posting a lot more frequently. I can't be the only one that has noticed this. Maybe it was Ted Cruz, I don't know, but I'd like to know that I'm not alone here.
  • Maya Mural Reveals Ancient 'Photobomb' [no it doesn't]

    03/25/2015 2:24:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | February 20, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    The murals also provide information about a man buried beneath them. During an excavation, the archaeologists found the skeleton of a man dressed like the sages in the mural. It's possible the man once lived in the room, which later became his final resting place, Saturno said. Archaeologists discovered the approximately 1,250-year-old mural in the ancient city of Xultun, located in the northeastern part of present-day Guatemala. During an archaeological study of Xultun, an undergraduate student inspecting an old looters' trail noticed traces of paint on an ancient wall covered by dirt... the elements had been kind to the building...
  • Ancient Receipt Proves Egyptian Taxes Were Worse Than Yours

    03/25/2015 11:53:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 14, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    A recently translated ancient Egyptian tax receipt shows a bill that is (literally) heavier than any American taxpayer will pay this year — more than 220 lbs. (100 kilograms) of coins. Written in Greek on a piece of pottery, the receipt states that a person (the name is unreadable) and his friends paid a land-transfer tax that came to 75 "talents" (a unit of currency), with a 15-talent charge added on. The tax was paid in coins and was delivered to a public bank in a city called Diospolis Magna (also known as Luxor or Thebes). But just how much...
  • Coral Pyramids in Micronesia Date Back to Middle Ages

    03/25/2015 11:41:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 13, 2015 | Megan Gannon
    On a remote Pacific island not much bigger than Manhattan, there are ancient pyramids built out of living coral. New evidence reveals that these tombs could be up to 700 years old — much older than experts had previously thought. The royal tombs are tucked away in an artificially built ancient city called Leluh just off the mainland of Kosrae, a Micronesian island. Leluh was home to Kosraean high chiefs (as well as some lower chiefs and commoners, too) from about 1250 until the mid-1800s, when foreign whalers, traders and missionaries started to arrive on the island. With impressive canals...
  • Why Two Mommies Cannot Replace Daddy

    03/25/2015 7:24:29 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 3/24/2015 | Judi McLeod
    Orlando, FL - Heather Barwick, who was raised by two lesbians, shared her compelling story and why she opposes same-sex marriage. Married to a man and raising four children, Heather has come to realize why same-sex marriage is wrong and why it harms children. In her powerful story, Heather wrote in The Federalist: “Growing up, and even into my 20s, I supported and advocated for gay marriage. It’s only with some time and distance from my childhood that I’m able to reflect on my experiences and recognize the long-term consequences that same-sex parenting had on me. And it’s only now,...
  • Meet the futuristic robot that mimics humans

    03/25/2015 2:17:13 AM PDT · by 9thLife · 16 replies
    Indian Express ^ | Published on:March 24, 2015 1:20 pm | Aleesha Matharu | New Delhi
    Would you want your consciousness to live on, long after your physical body is exhausted? Or have a ‘mind clone’ sit in on meetings as you take the day off? Is that even possible? Meet Bina48, the robot who can tell jokes, recite poetry and mimic humans. One of the most sophisticated robots ever built, capable of independent thought, emotion, Bina48 is modelled on Bina Aspen, wife of Martine Rothblatt — the CEO of biotech outfit United Therapeutics. A vision of a future where we all have such “mind clones” is what futurist 60-year-old Rothblatt shared on March 15 with...
  • TURN, the new characters are introduced -- 4-13-15

    03/24/2015 5:54:25 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 13 replies
    New characters to appear in the upcoming season of TURN are introduced tonight on the TURN AMC website. Series starts Monday, April 13, 9 Eastern, 8 central.
  • Can you read me? Boy Scouts send a message with a new merit badge.

    03/24/2015 3:42:16 PM PDT · by Daffynition · 35 replies
    WaPo ^ | March 23, 2015 | John Kelly
    Eventually, everything comes back. Young men are wearing beards again, just as they did in Victorian times. Vinyl albums — thought to have been killed by CDs and MP3s — are so trendy that record-pressing plants are working round-the-clock to satisfy hungry hipsters. Coffee used to be bad for you. Now it’s touted for its miracle properties. I wouldn’t be surprised if doctors start promoting cigarettes for “lung health.” John Kelly writes "John Kelly's Washington," a daily look at Washington's less-famous side. Born in Washington, John started at The Post in 1989 as deputy editor in the Weekend section. The...
  • Airbus A320 plane crashes

    03/24/2015 7:32:17 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    The following numbered events involve the death of at least one airline passenger where the aircraft flight had a direct or indirect role, and where at least one of the dead passengers was not a stowaway, hijacker, or saboteur. The events that are not numbered are listed because they meet the criteria of a significant event as defined by AirSafe.com 1.26 June 1988; Air France A320; Flight 296Q; near Mulhouse-Habsheim Airport, France: The aircraft crashed into trees during an air show maneuver when the aircraft failed to gain height during a low pass with the gear extended. Three of the...
  • Did a volcanic cataclysm 40,000 years ago trigger the final demise of the Neanderthals?

    03/24/2015 7:28:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Geological Society of America
    In their climate simulations, Black and colleagues found that the largest temperature decreases after the eruption occurred in Eastern Europe and Asia and sidestepped the areas where the final Neanderthal populations were living (Western Europe). Therefore, the authors conclude that the eruption was probably insufficient to trigger Neanderthal extinction. However, the abrupt cold spell that followed the eruption would still have significantly impacted day-to-day life for Neanderthals and early humans in Europe. Black and colleagues point out that temperatures in Western Europe would have decreased by an average of 2 to 4 degrees Celsius during the year following the eruption....
  • The most complete ancient crossbow unearthed with terracotta army

    03/24/2015 7:21:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    chinadaily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Web Editor: Si Huan
    Archaeologists have recently discovered the most complete ancient crossbow to date in the terracotta army pit one in Xi'an, Shaanxi province. Among hundreds of pieces of crossbows unearthed in the past, this one is said to be the best-preserved in general, with a 145cm arch and a 130cm bow string. The bow string has a smooth surface which experts believe to be made from animal tendon instead of fabric and the trigger mechanism is made of bronze, according to Shen Maosheng, head of the archaeological team. Shen also points out that this new discovery sheds light on how Qing, two...
  • Forgotten monuments of Northern Sweden

    03/24/2015 7:15:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 22, 2015 | Carl L. Thunberg
    The vast majority of the cairns appear to have been built as monuments to the dead, mainly during the southern Scandinavian Bronze Age; circa 1800-500 BC. They occupy prominent positions overlooking the surrounding area, and some researchers speculate that they had a function as tribal markers for family group territories... Unlike the cairns from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age which appear to contain cremation burials, the Early Bronze Age examples like one of the Spir Mountain cairns (RAÄ Grundsunda 109:1), have internal burial chambers with cists containing skeletal remains, accompanied by various grave goods. In some cases...
  • Snoop Dogg: Ronald Reagan to Blame For L.A. Gang Violence (SXSW Keynote speech)

    03/23/2015 11:48:31 PM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 34 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | 03.20.15 | Ryan Bort
    ...The Doggfather’s latest venture, it was announced for the first time, will be an HBO show he is developing with Menace II Society director Allen Hughes and Boondocks writer Rodney Barnes about life on the West Coast during the ‘80s, when gang violence first began to dominate the region’s inner cities, particularly in Snoop’s home of East L.A. “Early in the ‘70s and toward the latter part of the ‘70s everything was beautiful because we had ways to have fun and communicate, and those who were underprivileged, the low economic side of life, the government would provide for us, which...
  • Hitler flower painting to be auctioned for $30,000

    03/23/2015 9:51:39 PM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 76 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 4:33PM GMT 23 Mar 2015 | Kat Brown
    The still-life watercolour was painted when Adolf Hitler was in his mid-twenties, and sold by his Jewish art dealer Samuel Morgenstern, who was later sent to the Lodz Ghetto... ...The Telegraph's art critic Alastair Smart says of the piece, "The work is of no intrinsic, artistic worth whatsoever. The only vague point of interest might be that, unlike the iffy watercolours of Vienna city we associate with Hitler the painter, this rarity is an iffy watercolour of a pitcher of azalias."... ...Hitler moved to Munich in 1913, having been unable to make a living as a painter. The Nazis later...
  • The men who uncovered Assyria

    03/23/2015 7:27:08 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | 22 March 2015 | Daniel Silas Adamson
    Two of the ancient cities now being destroyed by Islamic State lay buried for 2,500 years, it was only 170 years ago that they began to be dug up and stripped of their treasures. The excavations arguably paved the way for IS to smash what remained - but also ensured that some of the riches of a lost civilisation were saved. In 1872, in a backroom of the British Museum, a man called George Smith spent the darkening days of November bent over a broken clay tablet. It was one of thousands of fragments from recent excavations in northern Iraq,...
  • The Magic in Schubert’s Songs

    03/23/2015 4:53:40 PM PDT · by mojito · 26 replies
    New York Review of Books ^ | April 2, 2015 | Ian Bostridge
    “Truly,” Beethoven remarked in 1827, “in Schubert there dwells a divine spark.” Franz Schubert himself worshiped the older composer and was a torchbearer at his funeral. In the following year, he asked for one of Beethoven’s string quartets to be played at his own sickbed, days, if not hours, before he died at the age of thirty-one. Many of Schubert’s works contain homages to Beethoven: the Fate theme of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is the animating motif of Schubert’s terrifying song “Der Zwerg” (The Dwarf). His “Auf dem Strom” (On the River, for voice, piano, and horn) takes up the theme...
  • Hidden in the depths of the Argentine jungle, secret Nazi bolthole for fleeing war criminals...

    03/23/2015 2:50:32 PM PDT · by virgil283 · 28 replies
    dailymail.co ^ | 04:24 EST, 23 March 2015 | Amanda Williams, Allan Hall
    Argentina : "The group of stone structures still hold piles of German coins from the late 1930s, porcelain bearing the 'Made in Germany' stamp, and Nazi insignia is scrawled across the walls.".....Any one notice a problem here ?
  • Argentine archaeologists find secret Nazi lair in jungle

    03/23/2015 2:50:22 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 16 replies
    Telegrapher ^ | 3/23/15 | Harriet Alexander
    A team of Argentine archaeologists investigating a series of ruins in the jungle, close to the border with Paraguay, believe they have discovered a secret Nazi lair. The cluster of stone structures, now covered by thick vines and accessible only when using a machete to cut through the undergrowth, contain stashes of German coins from the late 1930s, fragments of "Made in Germany" porcelain, and Nazi symbols on the walls. "We can find no other explanation as to why anyone would build these structures, at such great effort and expense, in a site which at that time was totally inaccessible,...
  • Send in the Calgary! ~ Vanity

    03/23/2015 2:37:23 PM PDT · by GraceG · 7 replies
    GraceG
    I did some checking and we all know that Ted Cruz was Born in Calgary Alberta Canada. But do you know who ELSE has ties to Calgary? Current Conservative Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper! He was educated in Calgary! So I thought it was interesting!
  • Picasso's electrician ordered to return 271 stolen paintings

    03/23/2015 1:01:30 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 11:05AM GMT 21 Mar 2015 | Staff
    French court gives a former electrician and his wife a two-year suspended sentence for stealing artworks worth over £40 million A French court has convicted a retired electrician and his wife of concealing 271 stolen artworks by Picasso, and ordered the couple to give them back to the artist's family. The verdict on Friday in the southern city of Grasse wraps up an unusual case centering around works that were unknown to the public for decades and have an estimated worth 60-100 million euros (£43-72 million).
  • Book: Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II ___ by Arthur Herman.

    03/23/2015 11:59:54 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 2 replies
    John Batchelor Show ^ | 21 March 2015 | John Batchelor interviews author Arthur Herrman
    Audio interview 39:48
  • Night at The Museum 3

    03/23/2015 11:22:13 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 7 replies
    today | Me
    Watched the movie over the weekend and it is a very GOOD example of what libs think the world would be if they could have it their way.
  • Ted Cruz, 2016 Campaign Slogans (please submit)

    03/23/2015 11:19:14 AM PDT · by Zeneta · 82 replies
    Me | 03/23/2015 | Me
    I'm hoping to tap into the creative, talented and passionate people here at FreeRepublic. Please submit your ideas for campaign slogans, Bumper Stickers, Yard signs, T-shirts etc Slogans that you, me or others including the "Cruz for President" campaign may actually use.
  • Madagascar marvel: Divers find fossils of extinct giant lemurs

    03/23/2015 10:27:01 AM PDT · by McGruff · 11 replies
    CNN ^ | March 23, 2015 | Daisy Carrington
    Around 5,000 years ago, the island of Madagascar would have resembled a Sci-Fi novel. Strange, prickly forests, gorilla-sized lemurs, pygmy hippopotamuses, horned crocodile and elephant birds whose eggs were 180 times the size of what you'd find in your fridge today, all called the African island home -- that was until the humans arrived.
  • White Slaves in Colonial America

    03/23/2015 9:28:55 AM PDT · by Ben Mugged · 68 replies
    My Research | March 23 2015 | Me
    I am certain we never heard this in school. The Irish slave trade began when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. His Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves. Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white....
  • Colonial Statue Triggers Race Debate in South Africa

    03/22/2015 9:26:36 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 21.03.2015 | Eva Wulke
    University of Cape Town students have called for the removal of a statue of British colonialist Cecil John Rhodes from university grounds. The event reveals deeper discontent with South Africa's state of affairs.Controversy has erupted at the University of Cape Town (UCT) following vandalism of a statue of Cecil John Rhodes - a British-born mining magnate and South African politician active in the late 19th century. A group of students threw a bucket of excrement over the statue and later wrapped it in garbage bags. They also staged a protest on campus. The demonstrators are calling for the statue's removal...
  • Why ancient myths about volcanoes are often true

    03/22/2015 6:17:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | March 18, 2015 | Jane Palmer
    Story has it that many hundreds of years ago, Tanovo, chief of the Fijian island Ono, was very partial to a late afternoon stroll. Each day he would walk along the beach, watch the sun go down and undoubtedly contemplate this paradise on Earth. But one day Tanovo's rival, chief of the volcano Nabukelevu, pushed his mountain up and blocked Tanovo's view of the sunset. Enraged at this, and robbed of the pacifying effects of his daily meditation, Tanovo wove giant coconut-fibre baskets and began to remove earth from the mountain. His rival, however, caught Tanovo and chased him away....
  • Bernice Steadman, aviation pioneer once picked for short-lived female astronaut program, dies

    03/22/2015 4:13:58 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Bernice Steadman was a member of the so-called "Mercury 13." NASA dropped the program, and it was 22 more years before a U.S. woman went to space. Robert Steadman says his wife died Wednesday in Traverse City.
  • The Rivals: RMS Mauretania vs. RMS Olympic (Travel in a world gone bye)

    03/22/2015 4:02:04 PM PDT · by NRx · 14 replies
    YouTube ^ | 06-04-2013 | OlympicWS
    A glimpse with rare video and photos of how people traveled in a bygone era. If the Olympic looks familiar, it is because she was the nearly identical sister ship of the Titanic.
  • Confederate Flag License Plate Battle Reaches Supreme Court

    03/22/2015 8:11:04 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 86 replies
    chronicle bulletin ^ | 22 Mar 2015 | unknown
    The nine justices will hear a one particular-hour oral argument in a case that raises the situation of how states can let or reject politically divisive messages on license plates with out violating absolutely free speech rights. States can generate revenue...
  • Medieval Ages and The Roots of Modern Science

    03/21/2015 11:41:27 PM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 29 replies
    How the Medieval Ages paved the way for modern scienceScientific Development in the Medieval AgesNow we get into the medieval foundation of modern scientific thought. Contrary to common opinion, science was not “suppressed” as is the common understanding of this time period. Modern scholarship has brought about the reality that contrary to the common opinion, the Middle Ages actually is actually the root of modern scientific thought.Some of the most compelling arguments came from the medieval times. For example prior to the start of Christianity, and definitely from the time of the Middle Ages, there was a popular scientific consensus...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • 39 Years Ago Today, Patty Hearst Was Convicted Of Armed Robbery

    03/21/2015 2:29:02 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    SFist ^ | Mar 20, 2015 | Eve Batey
    How does one celebrate the 39th anniversary of the day one was convicted of armed robbery and use of a firearm to commit a felony? Long walk with your prize-winning dog? A cake? A shot and a beer? I'm sure that whatever Patty Hearst does today, it'll be done in style, for it's her conviction about which I'm talking. Yup, it was this day in 1976 when a jury of her peers (as much as anyone can be the peer of a wealthy socialite) came back from 12 hours of deliberation and delivered that verdict. You know her story, of...
  • Shelby Steele’s Thankless Task

    03/21/2015 2:26:54 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 17 replies
    The wall Street Journal ^ | March 20, 2015 | JOSEPH EPSTEIN
    What distinguishes him is his openly stated belief that blacks in America have been sold out by the very liberals who ardently claim to wish them most good. He regrets that affirmative action, multiculturalism and most welfare programs purportedly put in place to show racial preference, far from liberating black Americans, have failed to advance their fortunes... “Liberalism in the twenty-first century,” Mr. Steele writes, “is, for the most part, a moral manipulation that exaggerates inequity and unfairness in American life in order to justify overreaching public policies and programs.”... Speaking out about the false bargain that blacks have made...
  • U.S. veterans return to Iwo Jima for 70th anniversary

    03/21/2015 12:54:38 PM PDT · by jessduntno · 18 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | Today | Eric Talmadge
    IOTO, Japan — Dozens of aging U.S. veterans, many in their early 90s and some in wheelchairs, gathered on the tiny, barren island of Iwo Jima on Saturday to mark the 70th anniversary of one of the bloodiest and most iconic battles of World War II. More than 30 veterans flown in from the U.S. island territory of Guam toured the black sand beaches where they invaded the deeply dug-in forces of the island’s Japanese defenders in early 1945. They were bused to the top of Mount Suribachi, an active volcano, where an Associated Press photo of the raising of...
  • The Not "So" Dark Ages

    03/21/2015 10:09:27 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 28 replies
    A Reassessment of the Medieval TimesThe Medieval era is perhaps one, if not the most misunderstood times in history. Ask people what they know of the medieval times, and most will tell you that they were a time of mere superstition, rampant barbarism and wars, oppression of women and minorities, scientific ignorance, totalitarianism, and a host of many other things.Nothing could be further from the truth, not in an era were reasonable thinking with scholasticism and Thomism were present, or the development of education, including that of the university system. An era were scientific development was starting out, and were...
  • Medieval Education and the University

    03/21/2015 10:07:12 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 5 replies
    The foundation of Education and the University during the Middle AgesAnti Catholic HistoryIt is the main point of this section to point out some of the contributions which the Catholic Church made specifically in regards to education and the University in the Middle Ages. Before I start this section I think it would be good to point out two simple facts regarding this time period. The first one is simply the fact that much of the history regarding this time period (at least until recent scholarship) was vehemently anti-Catholic which Hilaire Belloc points out in his book Europe and the...
  • 10,000-Year-Old Stone Tool Site Discovered in Suburban Seattle

    03/21/2015 2:29:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Western Digs ^ | March 18, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    The find includes thousands of stone flakes, an array of bifaces, scrapers, and hammerstones, plus several projectile points, some of which were fashioned in a style that experts describe as “completely new” for this region and period in its history... And in the layer with the artifacts were burned bits of willow, poplar, and pine, which were themselves dated between 10,000 and 12,500 years ago... While other sites in Washington’s lowlands have produced animal remains from the end of the last Ice Age, this is the first discovery of stone tools that date back more than 10,000 years, according to...
  • THIS is why we're screwed

    03/20/2015 10:22:58 AM PDT · by knarf · 37 replies
    FaceBook ^ | March 20, 2015 | knarf
    Found this frightening clip, and considering the rebellious and dangerous obama administration ...
  • Two Shades of Dismay: The Perverse Bondage Wrought by Liberalism and Islam

    03/20/2015 9:58:26 AM PDT · by DWW1990 · 6 replies
    TrevorGrantThomas.com ^ | 3-17-15 | Trevor Thomas
    In opposing the godless and bloody French Revolution, Edmund Burke, the father of modern conservatism, concluded that, “I should therefore suspend my congratulations on the new liberty of France, until I was informed how it had been combined with government; with public force; with the discipline and obedience of armies;…with morality and religion;…with peace and order; with civil and social manners. All these (in their way) are good things too; and, without them, liberty is not a benefit whilst it lasts, and is not likely to continue long. The effect of liberty to individuals is, that they may do what...
  • ISIS destroy 4th Century Mar Benham monastery in Iraq [ed]

    03/20/2015 7:08:53 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 19, 2015 | John Hall
    Barbaric Islamic State militants have dealt yet another blow to Christian history in Iraq by using explosives to destroy the 4th Century Mar Benham monastery. The ancient building, built by Assyrian king Senchareb 1,600 years ago, stood in the Christian-dominated town of Bakhdida, just 20 miles south east of oil rich ISIS stronghold Mosul. Locals took to social media to share images of the massive blast, which reduced the ancient monastery to little more than vast piles of rubble. The attack was later confirmed by Kurdish journalists familiar with developments in the city.
  • Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

    03/19/2015 7:56:10 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 19, 2015 | Matt Kennard and Claire Provost
    Driving through Naypyidaw, the purpose-built capital of Burma, it could be easy to forget that you’re in the middle of one of south-east Asia’s poorest countries. On either side of the street, a seemingly endless series of giant detached buildings, villa-style hotels and shopping malls look like they have fallen from the sky, all painted in soft pastel colours: light pink, baby blue, beige. The roads are newly paved and lined with flowers and carefully pruned shrubbery. Meticulously landscaped roundabouts boast large sculptures of flowers. The scale of this surreal city is difficult to describe: it extends an estimated 4,800...
  • What Was Lee Harvey Oswald Doing in Mexico?

    03/19/2015 3:48:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 77 replies
    Politico ^ | March 18, 20 | Philip Shenon
    Much about his trip—weeks before the assassination—remains unexamined. Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/03/jfk-assassination-lee-harvey-oswald-mexico-116195.html#ixzz3Uy93moexWhhat if the answers to the many, persistent questions surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy lie not in Dallas or Washington, D.C., but in the streets of a foreign capital that most Americans have never associated with the president’s murder? Mexico City. Only hours after shots rang out in Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963, U.S. Ambassador Thomas C. Mann told colleagues in the American embassy in Mexico that he was certain Lee Harvey Oswald had not acted alone in killing JFK. Oswald had visited Mexico City several...
  • Report: Christianity Most Persecuted Faith Worldwide

    03/19/2015 11:51:13 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | March 19, 2015 - 11:27 AM | Doug Bandow
    Americans take religious liberty for granted. It is the First Freedom, guaranteed by the First Amendment. But four of five people around the world lack the freedom to worship and live faithfully. And the percentage of the world’s population lacking religious liberty recently edged upward. Attacks on Jews hit a recent peak. Even Americans cannot afford to take their freedoms for granted. The Pew Research Center, with Peter Henne as lead researcher, recently issued its latest study on religious liberty. The report makes for a sad read. Many organizations address religious persecution, which occurs in virtually every Muslim and authoritarian...
  • Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry

    03/19/2015 8:18:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 53 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 18, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed. The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the country’s genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.
  • The Scientist Who Wanted To Bring A Death Row Inmate Back From The Dead

    03/18/2015 9:53:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 12 replies
    IO9 ^ | March 18, 2015 | Lauren Davis
    The Scientist Who Wanted To Bring A Death Row Inmate Back From The Dead Dr. Robert E. Cornish is probably best known for his 1930s revivification experiments with dogs, in which he claimed to bring dogs back from clinical death. He wanted to try a similar procedure on humans — and when a death row inmate volunteered, Cornish petitioned the state of California to let him play re-animator. Cornish's dog experiments would make most dog lovers cringe. Cornish would suffocate the dogs until they were clinically dead, and then he would place the bodies on a teeter board, rocking the...