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History (General/Chat)

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  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

    07/21/2014 9:34:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, July 17, 2014 | unattributed
    ...the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977. “The puzzle seems now to have been solved,” says Kemp. “ It has come about through the desert GPS survey begun in 2001 and continued in subsequent years. First came the discovery of two cemeteries (clearly robbed) of what must be relatively poor graves on the flat desert not far from tomb no....
  • Romanian cave holds some of the oldest human footprints

    07/21/2014 9:29:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science News ^ | July 17, 2014 | Bruce Bower
    About 400 footprints were first discovered in the cave in 1965. Scientists initially attributed the impressions to a man, woman and child who lived 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. But radiocarbon measurements of two cave bear bones excavated just below the footprints now indicate that Homo sapiens made these tracks around 36,500 years ago, say anthropologist David Webb of Kutztown University in Pennsylvania and his colleagues. Analyses of 51 footprints that remain — cave explorers and tourists have destroyed the rest — indicate that six or seven individuals, including at least one child, entered the cave after a flood had...
  • Apollo 11 Astronauts Walked on the Moon 45 years ago Today! (Or Did They?)

    07/20/2014 3:40:37 PM PDT · by lee martell · 127 replies
    July 20 2014 | lee martell
    I vividly recall being in the living room with my family watching tv in 1969 as the American Astronauts walked on the moon. The pictures were fuzzy, black and white, somewhat indistinct. It almost resembled an Ultrasound image an expectant mother would see. We were thrilled to be part of a country, a culture so advanced as to put men on the moon and later, to bring them back safely to earth. We had completely one-upped communist Russia! Sputnik was a very important step in space exploration. Quite significant back in 1957, but that was a long time ago, back...
  • How a calamitous century helped win us our rights

    07/20/2014 3:34:22 PM PDT · by Ellendra · 11 replies
    JPFO ^ | 7-19-14 | Claire Wolfe
    When I'm in a, shall we say, mellow mood with friends, I can occasionally launch into accounts of politics in seventeenth-century England. This usually results in incredulous stares, followed by, "Oh, so sorry. Fascinating story, I'm sure. But it's really just hours past my bedtime." It's a shame anybody should feel that way, though. Because even in the hands of a dreary lecturer and deadly bore (um, not saying I am one), the story of seventeenth-century England is one of riotously awful chaos -- and the birth of modern freedom. Sit down. Have another drink. Let's talk about it.
  • Ford Pinto owners gather for annual charity drive

    07/20/2014 1:48:02 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    mlive ^ | July 18, 2014 at 8:37 AM | Michael Wayland
    Roughly 50 Ford Pinto enthusiasts are gathering today for the fourth annual "Pinto Stampede," a three-day event from Dearborn, Mich. to Hell, Mich and back to Dearborn -- the birthplace of the Ford Pinto. The caravan of Ford Pintos, produced from 1971-1980, will make several stops on their journey including a visit to the Henry Ford Museum, the Ford Product Development Center, the Ford & Mercury Restorers Club Car Show and other landmarks on their ride to 'Hell and Back.' "The Pinto Stampede enables Pinto enthusiasts to celebrate our cherished little cars while doing something meaningful for others," said Norm...
  • Why Didn't Anyone Kill Hitler?

    07/20/2014 10:25:50 AM PDT · by WXRGina · 94 replies
    History News Network ^ | July 19, 2014 | Daniel Mandel
    This week marks the 70th anniversary of a plot whose success might well have spared millions of lives, while claiming that of history’s most infamous mass-murderer, Adolf Hitler. The elaborate conspiracy centered on Claus von Stauffenberg was the most well-prepared and organized attempt to put an end to Hitler, but it was scarcely the first. The number of serious attempts on Hitler’s life would fill a book and indeed have; Roger Moorhouse’s Killing Hitler (2006), for example, covers the ground of several such attempts from the moment Hitler came to power in 1933, at which time his security detail...
  • Image found of Confederate White House housekeeper

    07/19/2014 4:15:19 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 31 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 19, 2014 | Fox News
    Mary O'Melia left Ireland for America as a young widow with three children before she was hired as housekeeper at the White House of the Confederacy. An intimate witness to history, she also has been much of a mystery. That was until this year, when a woman with a distinctive Irish lilt to her voice called The American Civil War Museum. The housekeeper, the woman said, was related to her late husband, and she had in her possession a necklace that Confederate first lady Varina Davis gave O'Melia. But there was more. "What really took my breath away is she...
  • More Cowbell!..Mississippi Queen, by Mountain, and the Bells of Rock

    07/19/2014 3:59:50 PM PDT · by lee martell · 48 replies
    July 19 2014 | lee martell
    Some classic rock songs from 'back then' have a distinctive sound in the intro, a rhythmic pattern that would probably make a good ringtone on our cell phones of today. One of those songs that could instantly set the mood was "Mississippi Queen, by the group Mountain, from 1970. The band consisted of four guys; Leslie West, Corky Laing, Felix Pappalardi and David Rea. This song, their most successful, reached #21 in the Billboard Hot 100 record chart of 1970. There are many other good songs with the everyday Cowbell in the intro including; #1. Moby Dick, by Led Zeppelin...
  • How Turbans Helped Some Blacks Go Incognito In The Jim Crow Era

    07/19/2014 12:33:12 PM PDT · by Theoria · 4 replies
    NPR ^ | 19 July 2014 | Tanvi Misra
    There's a weekly trial on the Internet about who may be stealing culture from whom. Earlier this week, the defendants were Iggy Azalea and white gay men. A while back, it was Macklemore and the Harlem Shakers. Now, we have come across a story from the Jim Crow era about cultural mimicry between people of color.In mid-20th century America, the turban was a tool that people of color used for "confounding the color lines," writes Manan Desai, board member of the South Asian American Digital Archive.At the time, ideas of race in America were quite literally black and white. In...
  • Must read: User @drawandstrike tweets ‘epic rant about Chappaquiddick’

    via Michelle Malkin
  • 'Italy's Ginger Gene Spread From Sicily'

    07/18/2014 1:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 32 replies
    Over the centuries, they’ve been scorned, persecuted and marginalized. But it was an example of modern-day disdain towards redheads that prompted an Italian photographer’s mission to safeguard their diversity, The Local has learned. Let’s face it, redheads get a tough time, especially in the early years of their life. I should know, because I am one. But more on that later. Marina Rosso, a 29-year-old fine art photographer and researcher from Udine, is not a redhead as the English translation of her surname might suggest. But after hearing in 2011 that flame-haired men were being rejected from the world’s largest...
  • Megyn Kelly Gets Her History Wrong

    07/18/2014 9:07:56 AM PDT · by 7thson · 48 replies
    Anyone catch Megyn Kelly last night? She led with the shot down airliner. Whem mentioning the 1983 Korean plane that was shot down, she stated "accidently shot down by the Russians." Two things wrong - One - the Reagan administration had the goods and played the recording at the UN. The Soviets knew it was a civilian aircraft and shot it down anyway. Nothing accidental about it. Two - she can't even say Soviets. President Reagan did not say Russians - he said Soviets. What is wrong with these people?
  • Texas may have it all, but they won’t get Santa Anna’s leg - (Illinois vs. Texas)

    07/18/2014 8:47:55 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 22 replies
    Illinois Watchdog ^ | June 9, 2014 | Scott Reeder
    First those Texans took our jobs. Then they took our money. Well, to be precise, Mexican Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna’s leg. A group of Illinois soldiers stole it fair and square – back in 1845. During the U.S. war with Mexico, Santa Anna skedaddled from the battle on a donkey and left his prosthetic leg behind in a carriage along with a bag of gold and a freshly cooked chicken. A group of Illinois soldiers ate the chicken, gave the Army the gold and kept the leg. One of the soldiers traveled about Illinois charging 10 cents for...
  • Soviet Fighter - Shot Down Commerical Airline KAL007 - Discovery Channel

    07/17/2014 4:57:55 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 5 replies
    Youtube ^ | 7/16/2014 | Youtube
    Video Linky Here
  • 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs found in Chhattisgarh[India]

    07/17/2014 3:56:53 PM PDT · by Theoria · 70 replies
    Times of India ^ | 15 July 2014 | Rashmi Drolia
    Chhattisgarh state department of archaeology and culture plans to seek help from Nasa and Isro for research on 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs in Charama region in Kanker district in tribal Bastar region. According to archaeologist JR Bhagat, these paintings have depicted aliens like those shown in Hollywood and Bollywood flicks. Located about 130km from Raipur, the caves come under village Chandeli and Gotitola. "The findings suggest that humans in prehistoric times may have seen or imagined beings from other planets which still create curiosity among people and researchers. Extensive research is needed for further findings. Chhattisgarh presently...
  • No Country for Old Politics (How to Define the Right in a Left World)

    07/17/2014 10:46:53 AM PDT · by mojito · 19 replies
    traditionalRight ^ | 9/18/2013 | Paul Gottfried
    The task before me is explaining with appropriate distinctions and qualifications “What is right and what is left?” For those who wish to avoid the harangue of an activist, let me assure them that I do not equate “conservative” with Republican or with the viewing habits of FOX News devotees. Being a Republican and dutifully reciting party talking points is for me no sign of being on the right; nor is a disinclination to do either indicative of being on the left. A classical or essentialist Right is hard to find in the contemporary Western world, where journalists and other...
  • Guinness: A Toast to Soldiers On the 4th (video 1:30 min)

    07/17/2014 5:57:13 AM PDT · by virgil283 · 3 replies
    "Guinness "Empty Chair" salutes the character of a community as they honor one of their own who is out of sight, but not out of mind. They remind us that a true test of character is what you do when no one's looking."
  • ICE director defends transport of illegal immigrant children as 'appropriate and legal'

    07/17/2014 4:53:23 AM PDT · by logi_cal869 · 6 replies
    Fox News ^ | Judson Berger
    The head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement defended the role of federal agents in transporting illegal immigrant children after a federal judge complained they were hand-delivering smuggled kids to parents in the United States. “While the court’s comments did not relate specifically to ICE, it is clear that the transportation of unaccompanied children (UAC) by ICE personnel is appropriate and legal,” acting Director John Sandweg wrote in a brief email obtained by FoxNews.com. The email was sent Monday and addressed to “all ICE employees.” Sandweg noted that “recent media reports” on the judge’s order had “prompted discussion about whether ICE...
  • Israeli Withdrawal From Gaza Explained (** Flashback **)

    07/16/2014 5:06:22 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 4 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 08/10/2005 | Jefferson Morley
    A brief explanation of Israel's planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip: --snip-- Why is Israel withdrawing from Gaza? In announcing the "Disengagement Plan" in December 2003, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said the withdrawal was to increase security of residents of Israel, relieve pressure on the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) and reduce friction between Israelis and Palestinians --snip-- How will the withdrawal affect the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? The Israeli government expects the withdrawal will reduce Palestinian attacks on Jewish citizens.
  • 37 Percent Of Mississippi GOPers Would Back Confederates In Civil War (82% Dems Back Union)

    07/16/2014 3:39:24 PM PDT · by equalator · 28 replies
    TPM ^ | 7-15-2014 | Daniel Strauss
    Broken down by party affiliation, 82 percent of Democrats said they would support the United States while just 9 percent said they would support the Confederate States of America. Among Republicans, 37 percent said they would support the Confederate States of America while 41 percent said they would support the United States. Another 21 percent of Republicans said they weren't sure while 9 percent of Democrats said they weren't sure.
  • Hate Crimes Against Migrants Masquerade as Reader Comments (Being Illegally in US is Fine)

    07/16/2014 3:25:05 PM PDT · by equalator · 11 replies
    NewsMax ^ | 7-15-2014 | Joe Schaeffer
    A University of Arizona professor says reader commenters of newspaper articles and letters-to-the-editor writers are using a posture of opposing illegal immigration to promote violence against people of Mexican ancestry, and are thus committing hate crimes. "The vast majority [of undocumented immigrants] are not criminals. They confuse being a migrant with being a criminal," Rodriguez says in the interview. "[T]hese are people not being charged with violence. They're not being charged with drug running. None of that. The crime is simply entry and re-entry."
  • Ancient Chinese town’s Ming dynasty buildings under water

    07/16/2014 8:01:23 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10:06AM BST 16 Jul 2014 | (AFP)
    One of ChinaÂ’s renowned ancient towns was under water on Wednesday as heavy rain hit the centre of the country, with tens of thousands of people evacuated from the area. The old town district of Fenghuang nestles on the banks of a winding river in a picturesque, mountainous part of Hunan province, and boasts stunning Qing and Ming dynasty architecture dating back hundreds of years. [Â…] According to ChinaÂ’s official Xinhua news agency, the Tuojiang river in the town had reached 1.1 meters above its previous highest recorded level, and several bridges had been damaged or destroyed. Â…
  • Chalcolithic catastrophe on the Mondsee

    07/15/2014 4:22:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Saturday, July 5, 2014 | Alexander Binsteiner
    This is what may have happened around 3,200 BC on the Lake of Mondsee (Lake Constance), resulting in the exodus of a metalworking community that lived there. When the site of this particular settlement was excavated in the 19th century, 595 stone axes and studded battleaxes, 451 arrowheads along with 12 copper axes and six daggers were discovered. These items represented highly sought-after status symbols, and would never have been left behind intentionally, unless of course the settlement had been abandoned as the result of a disaster. Well preserved foods such as charred hazelnuts, grain and pieces of apples were...
  • Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman...

    07/15/2014 3:34:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    PLOSone ^ | July 02, 2014 | Cristina Olivieri et al (see below)
    Abstract -- In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or...
  • Native Americans KILLED AND ATE DUMBO, say archaeologists

    07/15/2014 1:27:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 15 Jul 2014 | Lewis Page,
    The primitive folk assessed by many archaeologists as being the original native Americans – that is, the Clovis people – killed and ate the lovable prehistoric elephants that inhabited the continent alongside them, scientists say. The proto-dumbo species in question is known as the gomphothere. Until recently, it had been thought that gomphotheres had disappeared from North America well before human beings showed up, but new fossil evidence appears to show that at least one cuddly tusker was brutally killed by Clovis people around 13,400 years ago. The luckless pachyderm was then scoffed by its peckish assailants. "This is the...
  • WWII photographic database

    07/15/2014 6:33:56 AM PDT · by School of Rational Thought · 11 replies
    vanity
    looking for photographic collections of wwII and wwI There have been some good ones posted in the past, but my bookmarks have all been lost with computer crashes. Sorry for the personal use of the forum.
  • Alice Coachman Davis, 1st black woman to win Olympic gold, dies

    07/14/2014 8:18:02 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 7 replies
    WSFA 12 ^ | July 14, 2014 | WALB News Team
    ALBANY, GA (WALB) - Alice Coachman Davis, the first black female to win Olympic gold, died Monday. She was 90 years old. Coachman Davis suffered a stroke in April, and died at an Albany hospital Monday morning.
  • The Book that Caused the French Revolution

    07/14/2014 6:16:20 PM PDT · by matthewrobertolson · 6 replies
    Catholic Analysis ^ | 14 July 2014 | Matthew Olson
    In recognition of Bastille Day, I, in this special Monday episode, discuss "the book that caused the French Revolution": Les Liaisons Dangereuses (The Dangerous Liaisons), written by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos. The book -- perhaps somewhat unintentionally -- set off pious sentiment against the Ancien Regime, and its influence carries on today. WATCH ON YOUTUBE(Alternative link, via Vimeo.) Summary:I start off the show with a brief primer on Bastille Day and immediately begin a summary of the characters and events in this novel, breaking down its story of lust and love. I then cite some of its distinctively Catholic elements....
  • The Foul Tornado: On the centenary of World War I (Outstanding Read)

    07/14/2014 12:17:39 PM PDT · by mojito · 43 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | July/August 2014 | Peter Hitchens
    To say that that the First World War was the greatest cataclysm in human history since the fall of the Roman Empire is to put it mildly. The war destroyed so many good things and killed so many good people that civilization has not recovered and probably never will. Long after it officially ended, it continued to cause millions of deaths and tragedies, most obviously during its encore performance of 1939-45. But it did not stop even then. Many of its worst consequences came during official periods of peace and are unknown or forgotten, or remain unconnected with it in...
  • VANITY - Lifelong Baltimorean in Praise of Cleveland

    07/14/2014 8:27:56 AM PDT · by scouter · 23 replies
    Vanity | 7/14/2014 | Matthew Collins
    I posted this as a response in another thread, but thought I'd also post it as a vanity, in case someone else might see it and decide to look beyond the reputation of the city to see what it might really have to offer. I've lived in Baltimore almost my whole life. And despite its problems, I love it. Those who don't know it will knock it, but it really is a great place to live, politics notwithstanding. But Cleveland was a complete unknown to me until I forced my daughter to consider attending Case Western Reserve University for nursing...
  • Learn from History: Israel Is the Victim of Mohammed’s War Against the Jews

    07/14/2014 7:27:10 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    FrontPage Mag ^ | 07/14/2014 | Daniel Greenfield
    Hamas isnÂ’t shooting rockets at the Jews because of persecution, isolation or occupation. The Sunni Islamic terrorist group is doing it for the same reason that Sunnis and Shiites are killing each other in Iraq and Syria. And why its Muslim Brotherhood core group is killing Christians in Egypt. To understand why, letÂ’s step into a time machine and go back to the spring of 632. The Byzantine Emperor Heraclius is engaged in the first of a series of wars with MohammedÂ’s maddened followers. England is divided into seven quarreling kingdoms. Across the water, the Merovingians are killing each other...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "Once Upon A Time In The West"(1968)

    07/13/2014 12:39:04 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 22 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1968 | Sergio Leone
  • Things That Go Boom!

    07/13/2014 10:36:43 AM PDT · by carriage_hill · 16 replies
    CNN ^ | 7/13/2014 | N/A
    12 film clips of bridges, buildings, power plants etc being demo'd. They all blowed-up real good. Except for the one spectator who got a chunk of metal in his leg...
  • Obama's Foreign Invasion 2014 : TREASON using Illegal Children as "Trojan Horse" MILTARY WEAPONS

    07/13/2014 8:38:51 AM PDT · by Patton@Bastogne · 9 replies
    Patton@Bastogne ^ | 2014-07-13 | Patton@Bastogne
    . Sunday : July 13, 2014 Obama's Foreign Invasion 2014 : Act of TREASON using Illegal Children as "Trojan Horse" MILTARY WEAPONS ===================================================== It's my prediction that President (King) Obama's strategic agenda is to allow the INVASION of a MILLION disease-ridden "children" and Drug Cartel Criminals as the "shock troops" for the ultimate destruction of the United States Republic ... ... an unstoppable action, unless a genuine miracle occurs. Even if the sodomite "King" Obama were impeached and removed from office, then President Biden would double-down on Obama's strategic goals, and allow an additional five million Illegals to this MILITARY...
  • Dorothy Gray – Radioactive Cold Cream

    07/13/2014 3:21:06 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 15 replies
    Best Old Commercials ^ | current | Dorothy Gray Ltd.
    Ah, the 1950′s. Scares of Commies, Atomic bombs, and blacks. However, we weren’t so scared of radiation, even rubbing it right into our skin. Dorothy Gray was the best cold cream at cleaning your face because it was imbued with the power of radiation, which would melt the dirty right out of your pores. Hilarious they even test the cold cream on the model’s face by reading it with a Geiger Counter. I’d call this product “Snake Oil” except I’m pretty convinced that it actually did work. Radioactive products in the 1940s and 1950s were considered modern, powerful, wave-of-the-future type...
  • They’re Dropping Like Middle Initials

    07/12/2014 10:53:55 PM PDT · by jocon307 · 30 replies
    In 1991, I was preparing to publish my first book, about a year I spent teaching junior high school in Japan. Stephen Birmingham, the author of “Our Crowd” and an acquaintance of my parents, offered to give me a blurb but recommended one change: that I drop the middle initial from my name on the cover. As a 26-year-old, baby-faced writer, I was eager to appear older and more sophisticated, so I ignored him. I’ve regretted it ever since. I thought of that incident this spring when the actress Ann B. Davis from “The Brady Bunch” died at 88. Her...
  • The Early Life and Career of Babe Ruth, in His Own Words

    07/12/2014 11:24:39 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 14 replies
    http://mentalfloss.com ^ | July 11, 2014 | Hannah Keyser
    100 years ago today, the most iconic baseball player who ever lived made his Major League debut. The 19-year-old pitcher got the win for Boston, giving up three runs — two earned — over six-plus innings against Cleveland. In that first game, he failed to display the sort of power at the plate for which he would become famous, going 0-for-2. The rest of the season was equally unremarkable — he appeared in just three more games with the Red Sox before being sent back to the minors. But it didn't take long for Babe Ruth to become a sensation....
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • The Open-Borders Conspiracy (Flashback !!!)

    07/11/2014 5:37:51 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen
    Frontpage Magazine ^ | 07/15/2002 | Robert Locke
    If I could choose to have my readers learn one and only one thing from what I write, it would be that America's problems are not the result of blind, much less inevitable, forces, but are the consequences of deliberate political action by motivated individuals and groups. Nowhere is this clearer than in the case of our ongoing immigration crisis. Let's trace the lines of influence in the open-borders conspiracy, a word I use despite its connotations of grassy knollology because in this case it is factually appropriate. Given who has been pushing mass immigration in America and how open...
  • Was George Washington A Domestic Terrorist?

    07/11/2014 11:58:42 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 41 replies
    Townhall ^ | 07/11/2014 | John Nantz
    “…the American revolution was violent and it was illegal.” - Bill Ayers, Co-Founder of Weather Underground. Radicals compare themselves to America’s Founding Fathers. However, it’s hard to envision George Washington cowering behind a bush while pressing a detonator. In battle, Washington rode on horseback, completely exposed, leading his army of citizen soldiers into leaden clouds of heavy musket balls fired from sneering, massed English troops bent on dealing death and mayhem. But, Washington was no stranger to valor. Prior to the War for Independence, Washington displayed the heroism which was to become his hallmark when, during the Battle of Monongahela,...
  • Cursed Warship Revealed With Treasure Onboard

    07/10/2014 10:31:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 7, 2014 | Jane J. Lee
    It was the largest and fiercest warship in the world, named the Mars for the Roman god of war, but it went up in a ball of flames in a brutal naval battle in 1564, consigning 800 to 900 Swedish and German sailors and a fortune in gold and silver coins to the bottom of the Baltic Sea. Now, a few years after the ship's discovery, researchers have concluded that the one-of-a-kind ship is also the best preserved ship of its kind, representing the first generation of Europe's big, three-masted warships. Naval historians know a lot about 17th-century ships, but...
  • What Rome's Arch-Enemies Wore Into Battle

    07/10/2014 10:15:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Forbes ^ | July 8, 2014 | Paul Rodgers
    Naval archaeologists think they’ve found the only example of armor from Carthage to survive the destruction of the city-state by Rome in 146BC. The helmet, recovered from the site of the Battle of the Egadi Islands, northwest of Sicily, is dramatically different from the Celtic style worn across Europe, popularly known as a Roman helmet. It appears to have a nose guard, a broad brim protecting the back of the neck from ear to ear, and a high, narrow crest, said Dr Jeff Royal, director of archaeology at the RPM Nautical Foundation in Florida. Roman helmets, called montefortinos, are easily...
  • Mesolithic shamanistic meteorite talisman unearthed

    07/10/2014 10:08:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Monday, July 7, 2014 | PAP – Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology (IAE) in Szczecin, Poland, have discovered a meteorite fragment inside the remains of a hut dating back more than 9,000 years at BolkĂłw by Lake Ĺšwidwie in Western Pomerania... The archaeologists also excavated a rich assemblage of objects with a spiritual association: an amulet, a bone spear tip with engraved decoration and so-called magic wand made of antler, decorated with geometric motifs. In addition to the remains of the hut, which contained the meteorite, archaeologists discovered a second, almost identical structure. In both of them, within the peat layer, were the preserved...
  • 11,000 years old elk bones shrouded in mystery

    07/10/2014 10:03:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | July 1, 2014 | Anne Marie Lykkegaard
    Someone put elk bones in a bog several thousand years ago -- but archaeologists have no clue who it was... when the bones of several elks were excavated from Lundby bog in south Zealand in 1999, the archaeologists dated some of the animal remains back to sometime between 9,400 and 9,300 BC. Recently, however, the archaeologists did a new carbon 14 dating on some of the bones which revealed that they dated back to between 9,873 and 9,676 BC. These elk bones were clearly not buried in the bog over a short period, as originally thought, but were placed there...
  • Forestry officials unearth stone spearheads in northern Lapland

    07/10/2014 9:58:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    YLE ^ | July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Finland are celebrating the discovery of a number of artefacts in Lapland, northern Finland. A series of surveys by the forestry watchdog Metsähallitus has unearthed hundreds of hunting pits, several prehistoric habitations, pottery shards and a stone spearhead. The most exceptional part of the archaeological find was a stone spear tip or a possible prehistoric knife, which was discovered close to the Norwegian border. The stone implement has been uncovered by high winds as it lay in a sand pit. Experts estimate that the rough blade had been used during the Stone Age or the early metal age,...
  • Articles of Impeachment

    07/10/2014 8:29:00 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 12 replies
    Articles of Impeachment adopted by House Judiciary Committee on July 27-30, 1974 RESOLVED, That Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States, is impeached for high crimes and misdemeanours, and that the following articles of impeachment to be exhibited to the Senate: ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT EXHIBITED BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN THE NAME OF ITSELF AND OF ALL OF THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AGAINST RICHARD M. NIXON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, IN MAINTENANCE AND SUPPORT OF ITS IMPEACHMENT AGAINST HIM FOR HIGH CRIMES AND MISDEMEANOURS. Article...
  • Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

    07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas
    Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a...
  • Dinesh's "America" now the #1 bestseller on Amazon for all books.

    07/10/2014 8:26:28 AM PDT · by smartyaz · 30 replies
    Any thoughts why?
  • The awesome (and chilling) genius of the Germans: From soccer to supermarkets,

    07/10/2014 6:51:05 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 10, 2014 | Max Hastings
    Our forefathers knew the feeling. One minute there you are, like Brazil’s football team on Tuesday, settling down to start a long campaign. The next minute, bewilderingly, it is all over: Germany is master of the field, counting prisoners or — in this case — an unprecedented 7-1 triumph in the World Cup semi-final, executed with chilling discipline and precision. What is it about the Germans? Yes, yes, I know we are not meant to mention the war, or rather wars. But how can we not do so, when for centuries the world paid tribute to Germany’s prowess on the...