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  • CONTAGION: Second Ebola Case Suspected In Dallas: “This Is Real”

    10/01/2014 3:41:15 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 15 replies
    SHTF Plan ^ | 10/1/14 | Mac Slavo
    Dallas health officials are now monitoring another person who they fear may have Ebola after coming into contact with the infected man currently being treated in Dallas, Texas. “Let me be real frank to the Dallas County residents: the fact that we have one confirmed case, there may be another case that is a close associate with this particular patient,” Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson said Wednesday in an interview with local ABC affiliate WFAA. “So this is real.” “There should be a concern, but it’s contained to the specific family members and close friends at...
  • Today is National Homemade Cookie Day. Do you have a favorite Cookie? (with or without gluten)

    10/01/2014 1:21:36 PM PDT · by lee martell · 33 replies
    Oct. 1, 2014 | lee martell
    Today is National Cookie Day. Most everyone has a favorite cookie, some are homemade and other Combo-Cookies can only be made by well oiled machines. I enjoy some of everything once in a while. There are Chocolate Chips, Peanut Butter, Sugar, Sugar with White Confectioner's Powder on top, Fudge, Caramel Nut, and an entire constellation of Oatmeal recipies, some with raisins and nuts, some plain. One of my favorites is anything using that thin flaky dough found in Baklava recipies. I think that dough is called Phyllo. This is a lightweight flavor vehicle that can ride down either Sweet Street...
  • The Destruction of Mecca

    10/01/2014 6:18:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 40 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 30, 2014 | Ziauddin Sardar
    WHEN Malcolm X visited Mecca in 1964, he was enchanted. He found the city “as ancient as time itself,” and wrote that the partly constructed extension to the Sacred Mosque “will surpass the architectural beauty of India’s Taj Mahal.” Fifty years on, no one could possibly describe Mecca as ancient, or associate beauty with Islam’s holiest city. Pilgrims performing the hajj this week will search in vain for Mecca’s history. The dominant architectural site in the city is not the Sacred Mosque, where the Kaaba, the symbolic focus of Muslims everywhere, is. It is the obnoxious Makkah Royal Clock Tower...
  • Could the Black Death Actually Have Been an Ebola-like Virus?

    09/30/2014 9:04:16 PM PDT · by Marie · 63 replies
    nature.com ^ | Nov 8, 2013 | Julia Paoli
    Things seem to be looking up for rats. After more than 500 years, rats may be off the hook for causing the Black Death, the horrible plague that claimed up to 60% of the European population. In virtually every textbook the Bubonic Plague, which is spread by flea-ridden rats, is named as the culprit behind the chaos. But mounting evidence suggests that an Ebola-like virus was the actual cause of the Black Death and the sporadic outbreaks that occurred in the following 300 years. At the forefront of this theory are two researchers from the University of Liverpool, Dr. Christopher...
  • The Quotable Nathan Bedford Forrest

    09/30/2014 6:22:22 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 36 replies
    http://astore.amazon.com ^ | January 2, 2012 | Lochlainn Seabrook
    Though Nathan Bedford Forrest was not a writer, had little formal education, never authored a book, and was not a professional speaker, he did leave us with a number of witty comments, profound words, and sublime statements. Award-winning author, Southern historian, and Forrest scholar Lochlainn Seabrook has gathered together some of the more memorable and impressive of these and forged them into a small but fascinating work: "The Quotable Nathan Bedford Forrest." Among the nearly 140 footnoted quotes included here are Forrest's thoughts on warfare, military rules, West Point graduates, education, friendship, and even drinking, gambling, cussing, and morality. Seabrook,...
  • Archaeologist believes he's found 'Dracula's dungeon'

    09/30/2014 12:34:23 PM PDT · by dware · 16 replies
    Fox News ^ | 09.30.2014 | Kate Seamons
    An archaeologist who has been part of the restoration and excavation effort at Turkey's Tokat Castle believes he has uncovered the dungeons where Vlad the Impaler was once held. Ibrahim Cetin tells the Hurriyet Daily News that the two dungeons that were found were "built like a prison." And while he deems it "hard to estimate" which room the man who served as Dracula's inspiration was held in, "he was around here," he says.
  • 1954: Should Wiretapping Be Legalized? (Video)

    09/30/2014 12:04:41 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 5 replies
    Youtube ^ | 1954 | Washington Spotlight
    American television show, "Washington Spotlight", debating the topic of private telephone wiretapping. Guests are two United States Congressmen: Senator Wayne Morse (Independent, formerly both Republican and Democrat) of Oregon, and Representative Kenneth Keating (Republican) from New York. The ideas of national security and communist infiltration are brought up, of course. This during the Presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower, and the debate continues today with President Barack Obama, especially after the revelations from Edward Snowden & Glenn Greenwald. Video Link
  • Serbia is a homeland of vampires, not Romania, claims American journalist

    09/30/2014 7:08:02 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    romaniantimes.at ^ | 05. 11. 13. - 13:00 | romaniantimes.at
    An American journalist has revealed the homeland of vampires is Serbia, not Romania.
  • Book Review: 'God Traitors' by Jessie Childs

    09/30/2014 2:50:39 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 3 replies
    wsj.com ^ | Sept. 28, 2014 | Henrik Bering
    Persecuted Catholic clergymen in Elizabethan England hid in 'priest holes' built into the stately homes of sympathetic nobles.
  • White House fence-jumper made it far deeper into building than previously known

    09/29/2014 5:26:36 PM PDT · by Usagi_yo · 26 replies
    Washington Post ^ | September 29, 2014 | Carol D. Leonnig
    The man who jumped the White House fence this month and sprinted through the front door made it much farther into the building than previously known, overpowering one Secret Service officer and running through much of the main floor, according to three people familiar with the incident.
  • World's Largest Passenger Plane Lands at DFW (Video)

    09/29/2014 4:28:48 PM PDT · by OL Hickory · 33 replies
    5 NBCDFW.com ^ | Monday, Sep 29, 2014 | Brian Curtis and Frank Heinz
    The largest passenger jet in the world, the Airbus A380, landed Monday at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, completing the longest currently flown nonstop route in the world.
  • The Aircraft That Inspired the A-10

    09/29/2014 7:29:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 32 replies
    Real Clear Defense ^ | September 29, 2014 | Michael Peck
    It’s a good thing that the Air Force generals who want to retire the beloved A-10 Warthog were not around 70 years ago. If they were, Josef Stalin might have had them shot. The Soviet dictator loved the A-10 of his day, otherwise known as the Ilyushin Il-2 Sturmovik. “They are as essential to the Red Army as bread and water,” he said. It is the Sturmovik, along with the German Ju-87 Stuka dive bomber, that fathered the A-10. “The World War II close air support successes of both the Stuka and the Sturmovik had a major—and inspiring—influence in convincing...
  • Choral music not heard since era of Henry VIII has been played for first time in 500 years

    09/29/2014 7:06:41 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 15 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 9-29-14 | Hannah Furness
    Choral music not heard since the time of Henry VIII has been brought to life for the first time in 500 years, as an academic unearths an untouched manuscript and shows it to a modern choir. The manuscript, a book of 34 religious songs, was given to Henry VIII as a lavish gift from a French diplomat in his early reign. Containing songs referencing Henry and his then-bride Catherine of Aragon, it is considered the most "luxurious" surviving diplomatic gift of its kind. It remained in the Royal Collection after the king's death, and was later given to the nation...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon

    09/28/2014 12:07:57 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 5 replies
    Internet Archive ^ | 1942 | Leo McCarey
  • Russia's War on Ukraine

    09/27/2014 11:44:03 PM PDT · by Jacob Kell · 14 replies
    Accuracy in Media ^ | Mar. 5 2014 | Victor Rud
    Which of the following are statements by Vladimir Putin, his Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov or other Kremlin spokesmen, and which are by Western media, academics, politicians and commentators: “Ukraine and Russia share deep historical and cultural roots,” “Russia traces its 1,000 year history to its beginnings in Kiev,” “Ukraine is really ‘Little Russia,’” “the Russian Orthodox Church originated in Kiev,” “thousand years of Russian Christianity,” “Ukraine is a part of Russia,” “Russia and Ukraine are not separate countries,” “Russia is a thousand-year-old state,” “Kievan Russia was the beginning of the modern Russia,” and “Ukrainians and Russians are brotherly nations?” There...
  • Italian-Spanish archeologists to launch dig into Luxor tomb

    09/27/2014 10:00:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | September 26, 2014 | Claudio Accogli
    An Italian-Spanish archeological team on Friday prepared to launch a dig in an extraordinary tomb whose discovery was announced six months ago. The tomb belongs to May, an important government officer of the XVIII dynasty, an era ruled by pharoahs such as Tutankhamon and the "heretic" pharoah Akhenaton, who established a sun cult dedicated to the sun disk Aton, among others... The team came upon the tomb of May through a horizontal tunnel located within the Min, which was also visited two centuries ago by the legendary Jean Francois Champollion, considered the father of Egyptology... The few images available show...
  • Did Marco Polo "Discover" America?

    09/27/2014 8:41:05 PM PDT · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | Oct 2014 | Ariel Sabar
    For a guy who claimed to spend 17 years in China as a confidant of Kublai Khan, Marco Polo left a surprisingly skimpy paper trail. No Asian sources mention the footloose Italian. The only record of his 13th-century odyssey through the Far East is the hot air of his own Travels, which was actually an “as told to” penned by a writer of romances. But a set of 14 parchments, now collected and exhaustively studied for the first time, give us a raft of new stories about Polo’s journeys and something notably missing from his own account: maps. If genuine,...
  • Water On Earth Is Older Than The Sun

    09/27/2014 4:51:07 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | 09/27/2014
    It's no surprise that water was crucial to the formation of life on Earth. What may surprise you is that water on earth is older than the sun itself. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments came into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. A new paper in Science says that much of our Solar System's water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space. Water is found throughout the Solar System, not just on Earth; on icy comets and moons, and in the shadowed basins of...
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Home owner discovers ancient underground city beneath his house in Anatolia

    09/27/2014 2:17:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | August 25, 2014 | April Holloway
    A home owner living in the Melikgazi district of Kayseri province in Anatolia made a surprising discovery while clearing out an area under his house – a subterranean city, of which 4,000 square metres have been excavated so far, according to a report in Hurriyet Daily News. The region of Anatolia in Turkey is famous for its underground cities, particularly in the region of Cappadocia where more than 40 complete underground cities and 200 underground villages and tunnel towns complete with hidden passages, secret rooms, and ancient temples have been found. Mustafa Bozdemir, 50, was bequeathed a house in Melikgazi...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • Dispelled Myths of Soviet Subs

    09/27/2014 3:43:09 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    RusNavy.com. ^ | 01.06.10 | Igor Kozyr
    In the era of Cold War the Western information space was full of numerous fantastic stories about Soviet submarines. Having taken shape in books and websites, those tales still keep Americans and Europeans on the trot. RusNavy.com tries to demolish the foremost fables of Western "folklore" of 1950-80's.
  • GOCE reveals gravity dip from ice loss (w/ Video)

    09/26/2014 11:36:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 09-26-2014 | Provided by European Space Agency
    Although not designed to map changes in Earth's gravity over time, ESA's extraordinary satellite has shown that the ice lost from West Antarctica over the last few years has left its signature. More than doubling its planned life in orbit, GOCE spent four years measuring Earth's gravity in unprecedented detail. Scientists are now armed with the most accurate gravity model ever produced. This is leading to a much better understanding of many facets of our planet – from the boundary between Earth's crust and upper mantle to the density of the upper atmosphere. The strength of gravity at Earth's surface...
  • Time for an Immigration Moratorium

    09/25/2014 10:45:13 PM PDT · by Pelham · 12 replies
    Chronicles Magazine ^ | September 25, 2014 | Tom Piatak
    The Center for Immigration Studies reports this morning that the number of immigrants, both legal and illegal, in the United States is now 41.3 million, the highest it has ever been. Even as the American economy continues to sputter and many Americans face unemployment or underemployment, an additional 1.4 million immigrants entered the country between 2010 and 2013. During that same period, the countries seeing the greatest increase in the number of their citizens becoming immigrants to America were India, China, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and Iraq. In percentage terms, 13.1% of all those living...
  • A Farce at Forty: Reexamining Watergate, amid the continuing media outbursts

    09/25/2014 8:23:56 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 13 replies
    National Review ^ | 09/25/2014 | Conrad Black
    Over the summer, the 40th anniversary of the resignation of President Richard Nixon and President Gerald FordÂ’s pardon of him passed, not, unfortunately, without the usual clangorous outburst of self-righteous claptrap and exercises in pseudo-historical mind-reading and amateur psychoanalysis. Many years ago, I happened to have dinner with the former president a few days after the New York Times had run another speculation about his psychological make-up and, when I volunteered that he probably didnÂ’t enjoy these pieces, though he must by then have been used to them, he replied that the first such published insight into his psyche was...
  • Decision Making in Survival Situations: (shortened)

    09/24/2014 3:22:13 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 10 replies
    SHTF Plan ^ | 9/24/14 | Selco
    He monitored how telephone lines went out, electricity and water too. Later he was trying to „catch“ some news over his radio that he used before for football (soccer) games broadcasts. His son later told us that they ate a lot of some old jam because they had eaten everything else. And then one day he simply was forced to go out, they delayed that moment as much as they could, but when you watch your kid and wife go hungry it is very hard to just do nothing. You see those who are close to you slowly get worse...
  • Boston time capsule believed found in lion statue

    09/24/2014 1:22:24 PM PDT · by dware · 20 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 09.24.2014 | BOB SALSBERG
    BOSTON (AP) — What appears to be a window to Boston's past has turned up in a rather unusual place: the head of a lion's statue on the building that once served as the seat of Massachusetts government.
  • Ronald Reagan Sums Up What He Thinks of the Democrat Platform with an Off-Color Joke

    09/24/2014 10:55:41 AM PDT · by Twotone · 22 replies
    IJReview.com ^ | Unknown | Ronald Reagan
    Ronald Reagan showed why he was legendary on the campaign trail with a humdinger he told before the Republican Governors Club Dinner on October 4, 1988. “Former Congressman Prentiss Walker dropped in on a farm and introduced himself as a Republican candidate,” Reagan began his joke...
  • Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General

    09/24/2014 7:27:56 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 69 replies
    http://www.amazon.com ^ | September 23, 2014 | Bill O'Reilly and Margin Dugard
    Readers around the world have thrilled to Killing Lincoln, Killing Kennedy, and Killing Jesus--riveting works of nonfiction that journey into the heart of the most famous murders in history. Now from Bill O’Reilly, anchor of The O’Reilly Factor, comes the most epic book of all in this multimillion-selling series: Killing Patton. General George S. Patton, Jr. died under mysterious circumstances in the months following the end of World War II. For almost seventy years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident--and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton takes readers inside the...
  • China Thinks It Can Defeat America in Battle

    09/24/2014 6:52:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 36 replies
    Real Clear Defense ^ | September 24, 2014 | David Axe
    The bad news first. The People’s Republic of China now believes it can successfully prevent the United States from intervening in the event of a Chinese invasion of Taiwan or some other military assault by Beijing. Now the good news. China is wrong—and for one major reason. It apparently disregards the decisive power of America’s nuclear-powered submarines. Moreover, for economic and demographic reasons Beijing has a narrow historical window in which to use its military to alter the world’s power structure. If China doesn’t make a major military move in the next couple decades, it probably never will. The U.S....
  • Chicago 8 trial opens in Chicago (This Day in History)

    09/23/2014 4:31:01 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 2 replies
    History.com ^ | 09/23/2014 | staff
    The trial for eight antiwar activists charged with the responsibility for the violent demonstrations at the August 1968 Democratic National Convention opens in Chicago. The defendants included David Dellinger of the National Mobilization Committee (NMC); Rennie Davis and Thomas Hayden of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS); Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, founders of the Youth International Party ("Yippies"); Bobby Seale of the Black Panthers; and two lesser known activists, Lee Weiner and John Froines.
  • Targeting the Constitution

    09/23/2014 1:16:12 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 9 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | September 23, 2014 | Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz
    It is now well known that the IRS targeted tea party organizations. What is less well known, but perhaps even more scandalous, is that the IRS also targeted those who would educate their fellow citizens about the United States Constitution. According to the inspector general’s report (pp. 30 & 38), this particular IRS targeting commenced on Jan. 25, 2012 — the beginning of the election year for President Obama’s second campaign. On that date: “the BOLO [‘be on the lookout’] criteria were again updated.” The revised criteria included “political action type organizations involved in … educating on the Constitution and...
  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • Dangerous Elegance: A History of High-Heeled Shoes

    09/21/2014 4:50:52 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 63 replies
    Random History ^ | April 9, 2008 | Random History and Word origins for the Curious Mind
    The high-heeled shoe, or a shoe whose heel is higher than the toe, is a matter of contentious and heated discussion. Shoes in general have typically served as markers of gender, class, race, and ethnicity--and both the foot and the shoe have been imbued with powerful phallic and fertility symbols as evidenced in the contemporary practice of tying shoes to a newlywed couple’s car. No other shoe, however, has gestured toward leisure, sexuality, and sophistication as much as the high-heeled shoe. Fraught with contradiction, heels paradoxically inhibit movement in order to increase it, at least in appearance. Standing in heels,...
  • Vintage Mugshot PHOTO … Circa 1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog”

    09/21/2014 2:37:41 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 38 replies
    Eastern State Penitentiary ^ | circa 1924 | Eastern State Penitentiary
    1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog” Pep "The Cat-Murdering Dog" was a black Labrador Retriever admitted to Eastern State Penitentiary on August 12, 1924. Prison folklore tells us that Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot used his executive powers to sentence Pep to Life Without Parole for killing his wife’s cherished cat. Prison records support this story: Pep’s inmate number (C-2559) is skipped in prison intake logs and inmate records. The Governor told a different story. He said Pep had been sent to Eastern to act as a mascot for the prisoners. He and the Warden, Herbert “Hard-Boiled” Smith, were friends. Pep was...
  • Village from the Roman period discovered in the Carpathians

    09/21/2014 2:11:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 17, 2014 | Science and Scholarship in Poland, tr. RL
    Village from the Roman period, dating from 3rd-4th century AD, has been discovered in Lipnica Dolna near Jasło (Subcarpathia). Among approx. one thousand archaeological objects there is a large pottery kiln, in which ceramics were fired. "The kiln is two meters in length and the same in width. It stands on a small tip in the Wisłoka valley. Its location shows that the wind blowing from the river was used to maintain the temperature during the firing cycle" - said Tomasz Leszczyński, archaeologist from the Subcarpathian Museum in Krosno. He added that "such kilns are extremely rare in the Carpathians"....
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

    09/21/2014 1:20:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 15, 2014 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort) was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other evidence from the time after the fort was abandoned. An unusually large number of finds were made. This is because the Roman troops dismantled the...
  • Highlight 14: Roman enamelled cockerel figurine. The Former Bridges Garage site, Cirencester

    09/21/2014 12:47:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | retrieved September 20, 2014 | unattributed
    The find is believed to date to the middle decades of the second century AD. It came from the grave of a child aged 2–3 years. The child had been buried in a nailed wooden coffin and also accompanied by his or her shoes, of which only the iron hobnails survived, and a pottery feeding cup or ‘tettine’. Only eight finds of this type are known from the Roman world, from Britain, Germany and the Low Countries. It is believed that cockerel figurines of this type, together with other richly-enamelled bronze vessels of high workmanship, were made in northern Britain...
  • Engineers found Teutonic axes in the Forest District Wipsowo

    09/21/2014 12:27:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 2014 | tr. RL
    Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Warmia and Mazury). Historic weapons will be donated to the museum. Engineers stumbled upon the historic axes by chance, while searching the woods metal detectors. The weapons have been initially identified by an archaeologist as late-medieval Teutonic battle axes. Iron axes were close to each other, shallow underground, among the roots of trees. "It can be assumed that this is a deposit that someone left for better times. Perhaps the person...
  • French farmers torch tax office in Brittany protest

    09/21/2014 12:19:11 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 20 replies
    BBC ^ | 20 Sept. 2014 | unknown
    French vegetable farmers protesting against falling living standards have set fire to tax and insurance offices in town of Morlaix, in Brittany. The farmers used tractors and trailers to dump artichokes, cauliflowers and manure in the streets and also smashed windows, police said. Prime Minister Manuel Valls condemned protesters for preventing firefighters from dealing with the blaze. The farmers say they cannot cope with falling prices for their products. A Russian embargo on some Western goods - imposed over the Ukraine crisis - has blocked off one of their main export markets. About 100 farmers first launched an overnight attack...
  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • Millennia-old sunken ship could be world’s oldest, researchers suggest

    09/21/2014 11:49:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Friday, September 5 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Underwater excavations led by Ankara UniversityÂ’s Research Center for Maritime Archaeology (ANKÃœSAM) have uncovered sunken ships ranging from the second century B.C. to the Ottoman period in Ä°zmirÂ’s Urla district. A recent excavation uncovered a ship estimated to date back 4,000 years, which experts say would make it the oldest sunken ship to have been discovered in the Mediterranean. Urla Port is one of TurkeyÂ’s rare underwater excavation sites. Professor Hayat Erkanal, the head of Limantepe excavations for the underwater ancient city of Klozemenai and director of ANKÃœSAM, said the port dates back to the seventh century B.C. Klozemenai, he...
  • Pharaoh-Branded Amulet Found at Ancient Copper Mine in Jordan

    09/21/2014 11:21:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 19, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    ...The tiny artifact could attest to the fabled military campaign that Sheshonq I waged in the region nearly 3,000 years ago, researchers say... The site, which was discovered during excavations in 2002, was home to intense metal production during the Early Bronze Age, between about 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C. But there is also evidence of more recent smelting activities at Khirbat Hamra Ifdan during the Iron Age, from about 1000 B.C. to 900 B.C. The hieroglyphic sequence on the scarab reads: "bright is the manifestation of Re, chosen of Amun/Re." That moniker corresponds to the throne name of Sheshonq...
  • China: Ancient Tomb of First Emperor Qin Shi Huang's Grandmother Discovered in Xi'an

    09/21/2014 10:33:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Mary-Ann Russon | September 11, 2014
    According to China.org.cn, the tomb complex covers an area measuring 173,325 square metres, stretching 550m in length and 310 meters in width, and is the second largest tomb to have ever been discovered in the country... Qin Shi Huang (260-210BC) was the first emperor to unify China and enact major economic and political reforms across the country. China had previously consisted of a multitude of warring states and kingdoms, each under the control of feudal overlords, leading to much instability... After the death of Qin Shi Huang's father, he took the throne at the age of 13. His mother took...
  • The Star-Spangled Banner: Family Keepsake

    09/21/2014 8:38:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | retrieved 2014 | unattributed
    While Francis Scott Key's song was known to most Americans by the end of the Civil War, the flag that inspired it remained an Armistead family keepsake. It was exhibited occasionally at patriotic gatherings in Baltimore but largely unknown outside of that city until the 1870s. The flag remained the private property of Lieutenant Colonel Armistead's widow, Louisa Armistead, his daughter Georgiana Armistead Appleton, and his grandson Eben Appleton for 90 years. During that time, the increasing popularity of Key's anthem and the American public's developing sense of national heritage transformed the Star-Spangled Banner from a family keepsake into a...
  • The Most Important American You May Not Know

    09/21/2014 6:18:40 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 23 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | September 21, 2014 | Bruce Bialosky
    If you live in New York you may have heard of him, but outside the area his name may be a mystery. Robert Caro, famed author of four books on Lyndon Johnson, wrote his first book about him for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. The book was later named one of the one hundred greatest non-fiction books of the 20th century. The man is Robert Moses and the book is The Power Broker. The book was written in 1974 (celebrating its 40th anniversary.) I have owned it for about ten years and finally tackled it on my recent vacation....
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 9 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • Italian Diva Sophia Loren celebrates 80th Birthday in Mexico with Carlos Slim

    09/20/2014 8:28:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    The Yucatan Times ^ | September 20, 2014
    The Italian diva celebrates her 80th birthday with an exhibition of some of her dresses, jewelry, photographs and awards at the Soumaya Museum. The Sophia Loren exhibition opened today at the Soumaya Museum. It displays pieces owned by the actress. “The best of all is under the same roof,” said the Italian diva at a press conference. Dresses she wore in films, international awards including the Golden Globe and Oscar, as well as photographs and jewelry are displayed.
  • Beer we go: Germany's Oktoberfest to host millions

    09/20/2014 1:25:18 PM PDT · by mikrofon · 72 replies
    CTV News ^ | Saturday, September 20, 2014 10:12AM | AP
    <p>MUNICH (AFP) -- Germany's world-famous Oktoberfest kicked off Saturday with the traditional tapping of the first barrel of beer, as millions of revellers are set to soak up the frothy atmosphere in the 16-day annual extravaganza.</p> <p>With the cry of "O'zapft is" ("The keg is tapped"), the amber fluid officially began to flow at noon after Munich's mayor, Dieter Reiter, with due pomp and ceremony, took a mallet and in four swings breached the 200-litre barrel.</p>