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We Shall Remain - PBS American Experience
JesusWeptAnAmericanStory ^ | April 20, 2009 | AuntB

Posted on 04/20/2009 9:09:34 AM PDT by AuntB

Last Monday began the PBS Series, "WE SHALL REMAIN" with their first Episode "After The Mayflower".

The ones that will get my attention begin next week, Monday April 20th, 2009, and especially the April 27th "Trail of Tears" episode which will feature "The Ridge", the Cherokee leader and his clan who I wrote about in "Jesus Wept" An American Story.

It will be VERY interesting to see how PBS deals with this situation or if they will be overtaken with the usual political correctness and historical rumor. My story is taken from documented records as well as family letters saved from the time. I sincerely hope PBS's story is also as factual. We shall see. It's a story worth telling.

From PBS: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/

"Though the Cherokee embraced “civilization” and won recognition of tribal sovereignty in the U.S. Supreme Court, their resistance to removal from their homeland failed. Thousands were forced on a perilous march to Oklahoma."

'We Shall Remain': From Plymouth to Wounded Knee, a Tale of Survival

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/12/AR2009041202539

"The episodes devoted to Tecumseh and the Trail of Tears are the most emotionally powerful, and achieve the best balance between reenactment and standard documentary style. In "Trail of Tears," the third episode, distinguished Native American actor Wes Studi stars as Major Ridge, a prosperous Cherokee landholder who decided it was in the interest of his people, and his own prosperity, to give up an independent Cherokee homeland in the southern Appalachians in hopes of peace and resettlement in land west of the Mississippi. It is one of the most vile and shameful chapters in the history of U.S. relations with Native Americans, and Studi captures well the anguish of his conflicted character.

The filmmakers don't shy away from internal conflicts within native societies, and these conflicts were often exploited by outsiders. It was the Mohawks, loyal to the English, who turned on King Philip and defeated him. After Major Ridge, who owned black slaves and sent his son to boarding school in Connecticut, signed a desperate treaty with the Americans he was viewed as a traitor. He and his son were killed by their own people."


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; Books/Literature; Education; History
KEYWORDS: aliens; americanindians; boudinot; cherokee; history; immigration; indians; invasion; majorridge; manifestdestiny; nativeamericans; pbs; propertyrights; ridge; sovereign; trailoftears; tribes; tv; ushistory; weshallremain
Did anyone catch the first episode last week?
1 posted on 04/20/2009 9:09:34 AM PDT by AuntB
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To: AuntB

I saw it and have my DVR set to record all of the series. I’m a Wes Studi fan, and he’s going to be in one of the upcoming episodes.


2 posted on 04/20/2009 9:14:02 AM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: Issaquahking; blackie; Jeff Head; redrock; wolfcreek; norton; DoughtyOne; patton; ...

FYI


3 posted on 04/20/2009 9:16:07 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: mass55th

“I saw it and have my DVR set to record all of the series. I’m a Wes Studi fan, and he’s going to be in one of the upcoming episodes.”

Studi will portray “The Ridge”, a Cherokee leader named Major Ridge by President Jackson.

Following is a snip of a letter written by John Ridge, Major Ridge’s son.

“All Nations have their rises & their falls.
This has been the case with us.
Within the orbit the U. States move the States
& within these we move in a little circle,
dependent on the great center.
We may live this way fifty years and then we shall
by Natural Causes merge in & mingle with the U. States.......
Cherokee blood, if not destroyed,
will win its courses in beings of fair complexions,
who will read that their ancestors became civilized
under the frowns of misfortune
& the causes of their enemies.” -

John Ridge , letter to Albert Gallatin,
member of Thomas Jefferson’s staff - February 27, 1826


4 posted on 04/20/2009 9:20:02 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

I still remember Wes Studi from Dances with Wolves.


5 posted on 04/20/2009 9:45:05 AM PDT by Dr. Ursus
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To: Dr. Ursus
Magua is his most well-known role.

His most unfortunate role was as "The Sphinx" in Mystery Men...


6 posted on 04/20/2009 9:50:11 AM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner (Sarah Palin is a smart missile aimed at the heart of the left!)
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To: Dr. Ursus

Here are some photos, etc. from the show of Studi.

http://www.paulridenour.com/weshallremain.htm


7 posted on 04/20/2009 9:51:44 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

Seventy tribes attacked them but, by the guidance of God, they were victorious. The last warrior of their attackers, Ner-du-er-gi, was on top of a mountain overlooking their camp in the deep valley below. This warrior saw a smoke arising from the camp which “extended up beyond Heaven”. The smoke was divided into three parts and in that there was an eagle holding arrows. When the warrior and his followers saw this, he ordered them not to attack the Indians for they were God’s people and powerful and if they attacked they would be destroyed.

When God created these people he gave them great, mysterious power to be used for the best interests of the people. They lived in large cities with tall buildings. Some wise men began to use their power different than was intended which troubled the people. God instructed them to take their white fire and move away from that place. Some went to Asia, some to India, and others to North America leaving the wise men behind. After they had gone to other countries, these large cities were destroyed when the ground sank and are now under the ocean. God turned to the people that came to America and gave them wisdom and guided them.

There came a time when the people began to violate their teachings - committing crimes against each other, committing murders, and feuding between the seven clans. The people met with their medicine men around their fire to ask God for guidance. The medicine men were inspired to go up to a high mountain, one at a time on each of seven days.

On the seventh day, they heard a noise over them and a light brighter than day appeared and a voice said, “I am a messenger from God. God has heard your prayers and He has great passion for your people and from now on you shall be called Keetoowah. Go back to your fire and worship. There is a white ball from way east, who is your enemy, coming and your grandchildren’s feet are directed west. They shall have great trials on the edge of the prairie. They shall be divided into different factions and their blood shall be about only on half. Families shall be divided against each other and they shall disregard their chiefs, leaders, medicine men, and captains. But if these younger generation should endeavor to follow your God’s instruction there is a chance to turn back east and if not, the next move shall be west, on to the coast and from there on to the boat and this shall be the last.”

http://cherokeehistory.com/legendke.html


8 posted on 04/20/2009 9:53:42 AM PDT by macebowman
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To: AuntB
Did anyone catch the first episode last week?

Missed it. Thanks for the heads-up. No people from Alabama among your ancestors?
9 posted on 04/20/2009 10:11:33 AM PDT by caveat emptor
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To: macebowman; SwinneySwitch; All

Following is an excerpt of a poignant letter written by John Rollin Ridge, the grandson of Major Ridge (portrayed by Wes Studi) describing the assassinations of his father and grandfather.

In 1837, my father moved his family to his new home. He built his houses and opened his farm; gave encouragement to the rising neighborhood, and fed many a hungry and naked Indian whom oppression had prostrated, to the dust. A second time he built a schoolhouse, and Miss Sawyer again instructed his own children and the children of his neighbors. Two years culled away in quietude but the Spring of 1839 brought in a terrible train of events. Parties had arisen in the Nation. The removal West had fomented discontents of the darkest and deadliest nature. The ignorant Indians, unable to vent their rage on the whites, turned their wrath towards their own chiefs, and chose to hold them responsible for what had happened.

John Ross made use of these prejudices to establish his own power. He held a secret council and plotted the death of my father and grandfather, and Boudinot, and others, who were friendly to the interests of these men. John Ridge was at this time the most powerful man in the Nation, and it was necessary for Ross, in order to realize his ambitious scheme for ruling the whole Nation, not only to put the Ridges out of the way, but those who most prominently supported them, lest they might cause trouble afterwards.

These bloody deeds were perpetrated under circumstances of peculiar aggravation. On the morning of the 22nd of June, 1839, about daybreak, our family was aroused from sleep by a violent noise. The doors were broken down, and the house was full of armed men. I saw my father in the hands of assassins. He endeavored to speak to them, but they shouted and drowned his voice for they were instructed not to listen to him for a moment for fear they would be persuaded not to kill him. They dragged him into the yard, and prepared to murder him. Two men held him by the arms, and others by the body, while another stabbed him deliberately with a dirk twenty-nine times. My mother rushed out the door, but they pushed her back with their guns into the house, and prevented her egress until their act was finished, when they left the place quietly. My father fell to earth but did not immediately expire.

My mother ran out to him. He raised himself on his elbow and tried to speak, but the blood flowed into his mouth and prevented him.

In a few moments more he died, without speaking that last word which he wished to say. Then succeeded a scene of agony the sight of which might make one regret that the human race had ever been created. It has darkened my mind with an eternal shadow.

In a room prepared for the purpose, lay pale in death the man whose voice had been listened to with awe and admiration in the councils of his Nation, and whose fame had passed to the remotest of the United States, the blood oozing through his winding sheet, and falling drop by drop on the floor. By his side sat my mother, with hands clasped, and in speechless agony— she who had given him her heart in the days of her youth and beauty, left the home of her parents, and followed the husband of her choice to a wild and distant land. And bending over him was his own afflicted mother, with her long, white hair flung loose over her shoulders and bosom, crying to the Great Spirit to sustain her in that dreadful hour. And in addition to all these, the wife, the mother and the little children, who scarcely knew their loss, were the dark faces of those who had been the murdered man’s friends, and possibly, some who had been privy to the assassination, who had come to smile over the scene.

There was yet another blow to be dealt. Major Ridge had started on a journey the day before to Van Buren, a town on the Arkansas River, in the State of Arkansas. He was traveling down what was called the Line Road, in the direction of Evansville. A runner was sent with all possible speed to inform him of what had happened. The runner returned with the news that Major Ridge himself was killed. It is useless to lengthen description. It would fall far short of the theme.

From Chapter 4 “Retribution” Blood Vendetta, The Cherokee Civil War, Jesus Wept An American Story


10 posted on 04/20/2009 10:14:27 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: caveat emptor

My ancestors were from the area of Rome, Georgia and New Echota, the capitol of the Cherokee Nation.


11 posted on 04/20/2009 10:16:37 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

Good stuff!


12 posted on 04/20/2009 10:17:09 AM PDT by blackie (Be Well~Be Armed~Be Safe~Molon Labe!)
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To: AuntB

Families shall be divided against each other and they shall disregard their chiefs, leaders, medicine men, and captains.


13 posted on 04/20/2009 10:32:28 AM PDT by macebowman
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To: macebowman

Indeed. And history does repeat itself.


14 posted on 04/20/2009 10:33:35 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: blackie

Did you see the first episode, blackie? It seems they’re handling it well so far.


15 posted on 04/20/2009 10:37:53 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Virginia Ridgerunner

Here are some photos, etc. from the show of Studi.

http://www.paulridenour.com/weshallremain.htm


16 posted on 04/20/2009 10:41:05 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Virginia Ridgerunner

Maybe it’s the acne scars, but Wes Studi reminds me strongly of Edward James Olmos, who is an America-hating traitor!


17 posted on 04/20/2009 11:21:26 AM PDT by I Buried My Guns (I just hope CW2 comes before my creaky knees give out completely!)
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To: AuntB

Thanks for the info on Major Ridge and the excerpt from his son’s letter.


18 posted on 04/20/2009 11:23:27 AM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: AuntB

Part of it...when is the next installment on? I’ll set the DVR to record it.


19 posted on 04/20/2009 12:22:36 PM PDT by blackie (Be Well~Be Armed~Be Safe~Molon Labe!)
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To: All

Episode 3 on April 27th will cover the political turmoil within the Cherokee tribe and removal to Indian Territory c. 1838.

This is an excerpt from a military report on the Trail of Tears.

Private John G. Burnett of Captain Abraham McClellan’s Company, penned his observations of the Cherokee Indian Removal. This description is of another contingency which took months longer and did not fare as well as the Bells.
“I saw the helpless Cherokees arrested and dragged from their homes, and driven at the bayonet point into the stockades. And in the chill of a drizzling rain on an October morning I saw them loaded like cattle or sheep into six hundred and forty-five wagons and started toward the west....On the morning of November the 17th we encountered a terrific sleet and snow storm with freezing temperatures and from that day until we reached the end of the fateful journey on March the 26th 1839, the sufferings of the Cherokees were awful. The trail of the exiles was a trail of death. They had to sleep in the wagons and on the ground without fire. And I have known as many as twenty-two of them to die in one night of pneumonia due to ill treatment, cold and exposure.”

From Chapter2 - The Trail where they Cried
From the book “Jesus Wept” An American Story


20 posted on 04/20/2009 12:24:50 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: blackie

Tonight, next week will be ‘Trail of Tears’ which I addressed in the book.


21 posted on 04/20/2009 12:25:39 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: All

If you missed the first episode, it can be seen at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/the_films/index

Watch Episode 1, After The Mayflower


22 posted on 04/20/2009 12:32:15 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

I watched it and thought it pretty good. They did seem to take some shots at the notion of the Christian God and was more sympathetic to the natives (not expressing my opinion on the appropriateness of this, just saying), but interesting coverage on some of the dynamics. I wished there was some more information covering property rights, but that’s the economist in me.


23 posted on 04/20/2009 12:39:35 PM PDT by In veno, veritas (Please identify my Ad Hominem attacks. I should be debating ideas.)
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To: AuntB

Thank you!


24 posted on 04/20/2009 12:47:32 PM PDT by blackie (Be Well~Be Armed~Be Safe~Molon Labe!)
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To: In veno, veritas

“I wished there was some more information covering property rights, but that’s the economist in me.”

It will be interesting to see how PBS handles that issue in the upcoming segments. I covered it more extensively in the book.


25 posted on 04/20/2009 4:28:11 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
Watched it last night for a bit. (I had to leave about half way through.) This one did cover property rights a bit more, focusing on how each treaty was supposed to be the last.

It is interesting to look at these things as economic problems. They showed the native economy to be low intensive use of the land and colonists to be higher, or a least they would obtain higher revenue per acre. I'm not sure how much I agree with that outlook; some natives burned large amounts of land to keep it free of trees. Kinda of an opposing view here: http://www.wildlandfire.com/docs/biblio_indianfire.htm. I've also heard tails of them running whole herds of buffalo off a cliff. These are probably extremes though.

So I guess I'm cautious in that they might romanticize the cultures more than it should. However, there was another series an hour earlier which showed Jackson kicking the Cherokees off their land. And that was an atrocity by any standard.

26 posted on 04/21/2009 8:06:11 AM PDT by In veno, veritas (Please identify my Ad Hominem attacks. I should be debating ideas.)
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To: In veno, veritas

“So I guess I’m cautious in that they might romanticize the cultures more than it should. However, there was another series an hour earlier which showed Jackson kicking the Cherokees off their land. And that was an atrocity by any standard.”

I haven’t seen last night’s segment yet, but did watch the Jackson program, which was interesting in this context. Next weeks segment will cover extensively the Cherokee removal, which is what I outlined in my book. Interesting, the Ridge party group of Cherokees were aristocratic, richer and more productive than their white counterparts, which PBS will bring out. Should be interesting.


27 posted on 04/21/2009 8:31:44 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: stand watie

Ping

If you missed the first episode, it can be seen at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/the_films/index

Watch Episode 1, After The Mayflower


28 posted on 04/22/2009 10:19:31 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Eaker

Ping to watch tonight.


29 posted on 04/22/2009 11:51:18 AM PDT by Eaker (The Two Loudest Sounds in the World.....Bang When it should have been Click and the Reverse.)
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To: AuntB; 1_Inch_Group; 2sheep; 2Trievers; 3AngelaD; 3pools; 3rdcanyon; 4Freedom; 4ourprogeny; ...

A slight deviation from our usual threads to bring attention to a topic close to AuntB’s heart...

disclaimer: I’m pinging of my own accord...


30 posted on 04/25/2009 1:29:14 PM PDT by HiJinx (~ Support Our Troops ~ www.AmericaSupportsYou.mil ~)
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To: AuntB

My wife is part Chiracahua, Maya, Pagago and other native blood as well. And both she and I have been somewhat underwhelmed by this series. It’s too academic and too make-a-big-deal-about-what-we-know-already, as far as we are both concerned.


31 posted on 04/25/2009 6:10:57 PM PDT by dirtboy
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To: HiJinx

A slight deviation from our usual threads to bring attention to a topic close to AuntB’s heart...

disclaimer: I’m pinging of my own accord...”

The Indian needed a better immigration policy....;<)

Be sure to catch the episode tomorrow night...Trail of Tears...we’ll see how badly PBS botches it. Then when you want ‘the rest of the story’, read my book.


32 posted on 04/26/2009 9:21:46 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: dirtboy

“And both she and I have been somewhat underwhelmed by this series. It’s too academic and too make-a-big-deal-about-what-we-know-already, as far as we are both concerned.”

There may be some parts of Monday’s segment that will surprise you. For one thing the extent that many of the Cherokees went to to become ‘civilized’.


33 posted on 04/26/2009 11:51:31 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: All

Tonight’s segment, “Trail of Tears” is the one featuring Wes Studi as the Cherokee leader, “The Ridge”.

Following is a quote by his son John:

“All Nations have their rises & their falls.
This has been the case with us.
Within the orbit of the U. States move the States
& within these we move in a little circle,
dependent on the great center.
We may live this way fifty years and then we shall
by Natural Causes merge in & mingle with the U. States.......
Cherokee blood, if not destroyed,
will win its courses in beings of fair complexions,
who will read that their ancestors became civilized
under the frowns of misfortune
& the causes of their enemies.” -

John Ridge , letter to Albert Gallatin,
member of Thomas Jefferson’s staff - February 27, 1826

______________

One thing that will surprise many is the extent this group of Indians became ‘civilized’.

Following is a description of their typical home.

After some time passed, Benjamin Gold, Harriet’s father traveled to the ‘wilderness’ to look in on his daughter living among the savages. On the 8th of December, 1829, he wrote from New Echota to his brother in New England describing his daughter’s home.
“She has a large and convenient framed house, two story, 60 by 40 ft. on the ground, well done off and well furnished with comforts of life.
They get their supplies of clothes and groceries—they have their year’s store of teas, clothes, paper, ink, etc.,—from Boston, and their sugars, molasses, etc., from Augusta; they have two or three barrels of flour on hand at once.
This neighborhood is truly an interesting and pleasant place; the ground is smooth and level as a floor—the centre of the Nation—a new place laid out in city form, —one hundred lots, one acre each—a spring called the public spring, about twice as large as our sawmill brook, near the centre, with other springs on the plat; six framed houses in sight, besides a Council House, Court House, printing office, and four stores all in sight of Boudinot’s house.”

The 1835 Cherokee Census in Georgia recorded: Indians 8,946, Intermarried Whites 68, Slaves 776, Farms 1,735, Acres under Cultivation 19,216.

From the book: Jesus Wept An American Story
http://jesusweptanamericanstory.blogspot.com/


34 posted on 04/27/2009 10:40:33 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
There may be some parts of Monday’s segment that will surprise you. For one thing the extent that many of the Cherokees went to to become ‘civilized’.

I went to high school in Oklahoma. I am well-versed in the history of the Five Civilized Tribes.

But I will say - this episode was an order of magnitude improvement over the first two. It is a sorrowful tale - the clash between Major Ridge and the traditionals, but in the end, Major Ridge probably took the pragamtic approach that salvaged something for the Cherokee people. And for that, he was killed. A lesson for all of us as we in turn deal with powers and principalities that seek to dispossess Americans from their heritage.

35 posted on 04/27/2009 7:21:14 PM PDT by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

“But I will say - this episode was an order of magnitude improvement over the first two. It is a sorrowful tale - the clash between Major Ridge and the traditionals, but in the end, Major Ridge probably took the pragamtic approach that salvaged something for the Cherokee people. And for that, he was killed. A lesson for all of us as we in turn deal with powers and principalities that seek to dispossess Americans from their heritage.”

This is exactly what I covered in my book. I haven’t seen last nights episode yet, can’t wait! You are right, dirtboy, there are SO many lessons in this sad tale for all of us today. The Cherokee were being removed by the State of Georgia Militia for years before the army removal. They had no choice. It was leave or die. Chief John Ross ( the John Kerry of the Cherokee tribe- he was for it before he was against it) wanted more money and held out causing those many deaths instead of getting his people to safety when he could have. My grgruncle , John Adair Bell, also one of the signers of the treaty of New Echota, led one wagon train of 700 and only lost 21 on the trip...because they prepared.
Ridge, his son, Boudinot, Stand Watie and Bell all went back and forth to the ‘new territory’, to prepare for the arrival of the removed Cherokee, while Ross told his people to wait. Wait for what?? Death, that’s what.

[a snip]

President Jackson passed his Indian Removal act into law. Settlers were moving into Cherokee homes and it became apparent to the sensible leaders of the Cherokee Nation that removal would happen. Their protests and their Supreme Court victory which stated the Cherokee Nation had all the rights of any state of the union and was by any legal definition, sovereign, did not matter. Jackson’s position was that he would not enforce the ruling of the court to stop the incursion. Prominent Cherokees in the community were made examples of to further the ends of white settlement of the Cherokee homes. Others were held long enough for their property to be siezed if they were perceived as troublesome.

An 1832 edition of the Cherokee Phoenix Newspaper in New Echota tells of the arrest of the twenty-six year old son of John Bell, Jr. and Charlotte Adair. He was also the grandson of John Bell, the earlier mentioned Scottish immigrant and his Cherokee wife. For decades, four generations of this family occupied their homes in Georgia as did their native ancestors before them.

“We understand on Wednesday morning Mr. John A. Bell of Coosewaytee was arrested by a detachment of the Georgia Guard. Mr. B. is a native. What the charge was we are unable to say; and in fact it is impossible to know, for these law officers go to work without a written precept.”

Subsequent issues of The Phoenix contain letters from other citizens stating that weeks later Bell and others had not been charged, but were still held in custody, not allowed representation or visitation. No ‘crime’ was necessary. The only prerequisite was having something the ‘powers that be’ of Georgia wanted or to be eloquent and bold enough to speak against them. Such treatment would explain why Cherokees like John Adair “Jack” Bell signed the Treaty of New Echota in December of 1835 and chose to accept the offer by the U.S. Government to remove voluntarily beyond the Mississippi. To escape living with the daily persecution by the State of Georgia Militia and its citizens must have seemed logical. To them, it was a choice of having life and home somewhere with dignity or to lose it all.”

From Chapter 3 - Law, Law Understood, and Law Executed
“Jesus Wept” An American Story


36 posted on 04/28/2009 8:51:48 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
Because of Major Ridge, the Cherokees got the best land in Oklahoma, land that was fairly similar to their ancestral home. And Andrew Jackson's precedent should send a chill down our spines - John Ross and his followers learned the inherent danger of being morally right when the government is intent on being morally wrong.

Next week should be good as well, about Gerinomo. My wife is part Chiracahua, so she'll be in top form for it.

37 posted on 04/28/2009 9:04:55 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

“And Andrew Jackson’s precedent should send a chill down our spines -”

Yep!!!

another snip:

Some historians contend Congressman David Crockett’s political career ended because of his support for the Cherokee against President Jackson’s removal plans. Crockett explains his position in 1834:
“.......His famous, or rather I should say infamous, Indian bill was brought forward, and I opposed it from the purest motives in the world. Several of my colleagues got around me, and told me how well they loved me, and that I was ruining myself. They said this was a favourite measure of the president, and I ought to go for it. I told them I believed it was a wicked, unjust measure, and that I should go against it, let the cost to myself be what it might; that I was willing to go with General Jackson in everything that I believed was honest and right; but further than this I wouldn’t go for him, or any other man in the whole creation.
I voted against this Indian bill, and my conscience yet tells me that I gave a good honest vote, and that I believe will not make me ashamed in the day of judgment.”

Other popular voices of reason and compassion of the time appealed to the powers of the government on the Cherokees’ behalf, only to be ignored. One such advocate was Ralph Waldo Emerson. The unwelcome duty of Cherokee removal fell to President Martin Van Buren who succeeded Jackson. From Concord, Massachusetts on April 23rd, 1838, Emerson wrote Van Buren with his concerns.
“Sir, my communication respects the sinister rumors that fill this part of the country concerning the Cherokee people. ...... Even in our distant State some good rumor of their worth and civility has arrived. We have learned with joy their improvement in the social arts. We have read their newspapers. We have seen some of them in our schools and colleges. In common with the great body of the American people, we have witnessed with sympathy the painful labors of these red men to redeem their own race from the doom of eternal inferiority, and to borrow and domesticate in the tribe the arts and customs of the Caucasian race.
[Rumors are]…you are contracting to put this active nation into carts and boats, and to drag them over mountains and rivers to a wilderness at a vast distance beyond the Mississippi. And a paper purporting to be an army order fixes a month from this day as the hour for this doleful removal.
In the name of God, sir, we ask you if this be so. Do the newspapers rightly inform us? Men and women with pale and perplexed faces meet one another in the streets and churches here, and ask if this be so. We have inquired if this be a gross misrepresentation from the party opposed to the government and anxious to blacken it with the people. We have looked in the newspapers of different parties and find a horrid confirmation of the tale. We are slow to believe it. We hoped the Indians were misinformed, and that their remonstrance was premature, and will turn out to be a needless act of terror.
In speaking thus the sentiments of my neighbors and my own, perhaps I overstep the bounds of decorum. But would it not be a higher indecorum coldly to argue a matter like this? We only state the fact that a crime is projected that confounds our understandings by its magnitude, - a crime that really deprives us as well as the Cherokees of a country. For how could we call the conspiracy that should crush these poor Indians our government, or the land that was cursed by their parting and dying imprecations our country, any more? You, sir, will bring down that renowned chair in which you sit into infamy if your seal is set to this instrument of perfidy; and the name of this nation, hitherto the sweet omen of religion and liberty, will stink to the world...
I write thus, sir, to inform you of the state of mind these Indian tidings have awakened here, and to pray with one voice more that you, whose hands are strong with the delegated power of millions of men, will avert with that might the terrific injury which threatens the Cherokee tribe. With great respect, sir, I am your fellow citizen,
Ralph Waldo Emerson”


38 posted on 04/28/2009 9:17:55 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
There were many trails....that could be called "Trails of Tears"

My ancestors were marched to Kansas/Oklahoma also...

I know of some of my past family...and it's incredibly interesting.

39 posted on 04/28/2009 12:42:25 PM PDT by Osage Orange (There ought to be one day-- just one-- when there is open season on senators. - Will Rodgers)
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To: Osage Orange

There were many trails....that could be called “Trails of Tears”

Indeed. Scroll down for a map of some of them.(sorry, don’t know how to post photos here) My family was the Bell Contingent who only lost 21 out of 700, because they planned instead of relying on the government.

http://jesusweptanamericanstory.blogspot.com/


40 posted on 04/28/2009 2:23:56 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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