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Dealing with Dementia - - Asking for FR experience, advice
free republic ^ | 4/5/2010 | loud mime

Posted on 04/05/2010 11:59:18 AM PDT by Loud Mime

I am taking care of elderly parents; Mom does OK, but Dad has dementia and it is starting to cause other problems.

This thread is posted in order to ask for advice and tips from other freepers. There's a wealth of knowledge on this forum.

From what I have read, the medical community seems split on the question of dementia causing excessive sleep, or that excessive sleep causes dementia. I have noted that after Dad is up for some time and active, his mind is sharper....he remembers things that happened. Therefore, I'm inclined to believe the latter theory.

If I leave him to his own actions, he will spend 20 hours a day in bed - almost all of in sleep.

Getting him to do things is another labor, but I've learned something. I propose the minimum, such as "You do not have to take a full shower, but you need to wash off and towell off." Once in the shower his old habits take over and he's fully clean. He does not remember the previous instruction.

We no longer go for a walk, which is "work." Instead, we go shopping.

Any other tips or experiences?


TOPICS: Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: alzheimers; dementia; elderly
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 04/05/2010 11:59:19 AM PDT by Loud Mime
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To: Loud Mime

“Dealing with Dementia - - Asking for FR experience, advice”

Well, first thing...

Nevermind, I forgot.


2 posted on 04/05/2010 12:02:11 PM PDT by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We're a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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To: Loud Mime

Bump to follow the discussion. My Mom is going down this terrible path.


3 posted on 04/05/2010 12:02:26 PM PDT by TigersEye (Duncan Hunter, Jim DeMint, Michelle Bachman, ...)
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To: Loud Mime

No advice, but I will pray for all involved.


4 posted on 04/05/2010 12:03:32 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim (Live jubtabulously! No moobs, please.)
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To: Loud Mime

Seek help from your father’s insurance. Get in-home help. Look into elder day-care.

Be sure to take care of yourself and your immediate family.

If your father is anything like my father, that’s what he would want.


5 posted on 04/05/2010 12:06:46 PM PDT by HospiceNurse
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To: Loud Mime
If I leave him to his own actions, he will spend 20 hours a day in bed - almost all of in sleep.

Has he been checked for depression? The excessive sleeping can be a sign. Depression and dementia can feed off of each other.

6 posted on 04/05/2010 12:07:03 PM PDT by OB1kNOb (When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty. - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Loud Mime
I have noted that after Dad is up for some time and active, his mind is sharper...

You should have him see a geriatrics expert. Sometimes a small AM dose of methylphenidate/Ritalin will help people focus. He might also try one of the meds aimed at slowing Alzheimers.

7 posted on 04/05/2010 12:07:14 PM PDT by iowamark
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To: Loud Mime

I have worked with people with psychosis, taken care of family with dementia and talked quite a few people down from bad acid trips and the one thing they have in common is that they need to be reassured about their safety, and their environment.

When they are confused, you need to remind them of where they are, who you are and the time and year and of course that they are safe. Find an object that they associate with security, a stuffed animal, a picture, etc.

And to get them to go places and do things, you need to be very matter of fact about it and do not offer them options. It is very much like dealing with a three year old child.

You are the parent now and they are the child.


8 posted on 04/05/2010 12:07:34 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: Loud Mime

My father is sharper early in the day. As the day wears on, he becomes less engaging, more confused.

But he’s up early and then early to bed.


9 posted on 04/05/2010 12:08:43 PM PDT by hoe_cake
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To: Loud Mime
This is a hard thing to deal with. At some point you may have to consider additional help or care beyond what you can provide. Once one has dementia it's a slow slide downward with no turning back.

My father-in-law suffered from this and succumbed to it after a little over 5 years. I have seen the progression. You need to start planning. Medicine for this is primarily experimental or of unknown assistance. Even still, medication at this point only promises to slow down the progression, but even that is open to debate.

Best to you. It is difficult, but it is a blessing that you are there to care, or direct the care, of your parents.

10 posted on 04/05/2010 12:09:12 PM PDT by Obadiah (ObamaCare = VA hospitals for everyone)
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To: Loud Mime

Bookmarking for future reference.

Similar situation for me, but your dad sounds quite a bit worse than mine. Last Cristmas, my dad really lost his temper with my brother over something trivial and I’ve been kind of worried ever since. Today he fell down trying to chase the neighborhood cat away from the bird feeder. He does childish things sometimes.


11 posted on 04/05/2010 12:09:14 PM PDT by smokingfrog (Free Men will always be armed with the Truth.)
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To: Loud Mime

If they prescribe steroids be careful. two people I know went on MAJOR spending sprees due to the side affects of the steroids.

Multiple cars, computers, stocks on margin, etc. Mania, delusions of grandeur, and of course tendency to spend gobs of money.


12 posted on 04/05/2010 12:09:22 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Loud Mime

Seriously, Loud mime, I don’t envy you. I’ve done it myself, for my parents, years ago. There’s no easy solution, and it sounds like you are doing things as well as can be expected, you’re patient, and that is probably the best thing you can do. Your parents are lucky to have you.


13 posted on 04/05/2010 12:09:41 PM PDT by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We're a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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To: Loud Mime

Geez, I wish I had the answer. I have an uncle with it...
Look on a site dedicated to Alzheimers, because they two seem to be correlated, and they often have the latest news of treatment options, as well as things you can do to keep their minds sharp.

Good luck, will pray for you both.


14 posted on 04/05/2010 12:10:10 PM PDT by theDentist (fybo; qwerty ergo typo : i type, therefore i misspelll)
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To: Loud Mime

Anthing you can do to stimulate his intellect will be beneficial. Card playing, reading magazine articles, particularly about events from his life, having him makes lists, and the like can be beneficial in my experience.


15 posted on 04/05/2010 12:10:52 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: Loud Mime

I am a firm believer in a schedule -— alarm in the AM, get going, do something structured.

Work, water aerobics (my mom), whatever.


16 posted on 04/05/2010 12:12:30 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: Loud Mime

Sorry to hear about your Dad. I’ve volunteered at a local Senior Center for several years. We have a few dementia and Alzheimer’s Seniors. Their spouses and/or children bring them in and each of them seems to have a passion for something. We have a weekly sing-along and one of our ladies is a beautiful singer...she knows every word to every song, but she can’t tell you her husband’s name. One of our elderly gentlemen is a real card shark, but can’t find his own way home.
If there is a Senior Center in your area, check it out. Getting these folks to do something different and socialize on a daily basis can make a huge difference in their overall well being.


17 posted on 04/05/2010 12:14:19 PM PDT by WesternMA
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To: Loud Mime

There is a book that has a lot of information about this and other brain activity. I watched it on PBS one night and ordered the book the next day.

Dr Amen gives supplements and diet that may work. I will look up his suggestions in the book for you.

The book is “Change Your Brain Change Your Body” http://www.amenclinics.com/cybcyb/

Then Dr Wright has done some research on a supplement found in tomatoes, lithium. Not the prescription dosage but the supplement dosage. Also know to protect the brain if someone has a stroke.

http://www.tahomaclinic.com/lithium1.shtml

and I’m convinced that lithium is an anti-aging nutrient for human brains. And there are also some very strong reasons to believe that lithium therapy will slow the progression of serious degenerative mental problems, including Alzheimer’s disease, senile dementia, and Parkinson’s disease.

You would have to have any supplements cleared by the physician of course. Which may be your biggest battle ever.

Someone here mentions depression. Dr Amen also talks about that.


18 posted on 04/05/2010 12:15:44 PM PDT by OafOfOffice (W.C:Socialism:Philosophy of failure,creed of ignorance,gospel of envy,the equal sharing of misery)
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To: hoe_cake

Same with my Mom. She’s more “with it” in the mornings. As the day wears on, or she gets ‘stressed’ the forgetfullness kicks in.

Excessive sleeping is also apparent, though I’m having her checked for depression as well.

I give her as little choice as possible when it comes to doing things. Keep it positive.


19 posted on 04/05/2010 12:17:04 PM PDT by Tallguy ("The sh- t's chess, it ain't checkers!" -- Alonzo (Denzel Washington) in "Training Day")
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To: Loud Mime

Can your father take this test?

http://www.amenclinics.com/cybcyb/online-tests-calculators/cyb-questionnaire/


20 posted on 04/05/2010 12:17:32 PM PDT by OafOfOffice (W.C:Socialism:Philosophy of failure,creed of ignorance,gospel of envy,the equal sharing of misery)
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To: AuntB

That was an easy one. You could have done better!


21 posted on 04/05/2010 12:17:48 PM PDT by Sawdring
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To: Sawdring

You’re right.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/2487104/posts?page=13#13


22 posted on 04/05/2010 12:19:24 PM PDT by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We're a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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To: Loud Mime
I, myself, would go the holistic route. Here's one such article, but there are certainly more articles on the Web in this regard.

Super Spice Secrets: Can This Miracle Spice Stop Cancer, Alzheimer's and Arthritis?
23 posted on 04/05/2010 12:19:37 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: Loud Mime

I can say that it’s better to initiate treatment as early as possible. Some medications ( Aricept for example) can slow the progression of the disease considerably, but time is of the essence as it cannot regain any “mental ground” so to speak-which has already been lost. I will keep you in my prayers. I understand what you are going through, because my grandmother suffered from dementia for the last six years of her life. We cared for her in home as a family.


24 posted on 04/05/2010 12:20:36 PM PDT by dixiedarlindownsouth (Coming soon to a bookstore near you, Barack Obama's "How to win friends as you screw your country")
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To: Loud Mime

Here’s my personal story: If he’s on a statin medication for cholesterol, take him off it immediately. My mother-in-law was diagnosed with dementia. She was getting really bad, she would sit and stare and was non-communicative. She was always very social. We took her off her statin medication and started her on weekly vitamin B shots (tiny, thin needle-you can barely feel the shot) which cost about $5.00 for a rather large bottle so it’s extremely inexpensive. It’s like night and day! She is doing so much better and carries on conversations with us again.

There’s a lot on the internet about this Transient Global Amnesia and it’s relation to statins (Lipitor). Here’s a webpage by a former NASA astronaut, Dr. Duane Graveline, that experienced it himself.
http://www.spacedoc.net/


25 posted on 04/05/2010 12:20:56 PM PDT by FrdmLvr
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To: Tallguy

depressions comes with the territory, I would think.

Dad knows enough to know he’s not thinking clearly, and this embarrasses him.

And when we have to correct him or give him instructions he is further embarrassed.

I also think that if he is engaged in conversation, or cross word puzzles or some mental activity, he stays sharper.


26 posted on 04/05/2010 12:22:22 PM PDT by hoe_cake
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To: Loud Mime

I’m not trying to accuse your dad of anything and I know good, honest people can get dementia but has anyone noticed a quicker onset to someone who would frequently lie? I’m just curious because, well, my mother in law . . .


27 posted on 04/05/2010 12:22:47 PM PDT by RushingWater
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To: Loud Mime

A colleague of mine has begun physical therapy, home nursing and a nutritionist for her husband and it’s still very tough to keep her head above water (so to speak). He doesn’t know whether it’s day or night, dresses and undresses repeatedly and is very uncooperative. I pray that you can get some assistance.


28 posted on 04/05/2010 12:25:39 PM PDT by sarasota
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To: Loud Mime

First of all, I would get him on a “fancy” B-12 vitamin. One of the expensive ones. I am on B-12 due to chemo (chemo brain). It is the same issue, same disconnected receptors. B-12 repairs this. Next, I would get my parent into a clinical trial. There are numerous new drugs being tested — most based in B-12 — that are being found to not only slow the process, but turn it around. You won’t have access to them for years unless you’re in a clinical trial. Do some homework online and talk to the doctor. If your doctor is unaware, find one who is keeping current. This is an exciting time in this field of research and there is help. Find a clinical trial. Start by Googling “B-12 Dementia” or “Dementia ‘clinical trial’”. You should get some bits of info there to get you started.


29 posted on 04/05/2010 12:26:47 PM PDT by DRey
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To: Loud Mime

I went through this with my Mom. Thankfully when the time came, she was able to take up residence in her home town nursing home, where everyone knew her and she received excellent care.
The one piece of advice I have is to keep him on a schedule and KEEP HIM BUSY. THINKING.... DOING.... whatever....
“An idle mind is the devil’s workshop.... and the devil’s name is alzheimers”......

Lifting your family up in prayer.


30 posted on 04/05/2010 12:27:43 PM PDT by NC Belle
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To: iowamark

I agree. First thing you need to do is see a geriatric expert.


31 posted on 04/05/2010 12:28:30 PM PDT by KYGrandma (The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home......)
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To: Loud Mime
I've been down that road--for 16 years. My mother started showing signs when she was 78 and will be 94 in May. She has been bedridden for 5 years. The most tiring times are when they are mobile.

#1 Be sure you have all exits in house secured because one day they probably will decide to leave on their own and it could be at 3 a.m. I had alarm system when doors opened.

#2 Don't expect them to be rational, i.e., if you go to Red Lobster because they like the popcorn shrimp there and once there, they will only order carrot cake---let them eat cake!

#3 Go with the flow...if you have a problem that won't be a problem tomorrow, it's not worth a hassle.

#4 Hide the car keys

#5 Never ever forget that most of the time they don't have a care in the world!

32 posted on 04/05/2010 12:35:24 PM PDT by lonestar (Better Obama picks his nose than our pockets!)
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To: Loud Mime
As one nearing the end of this long journey with my mother, I would add to other suggestions the need for establishing the legal framework whereby you can handle your parents affairs when they cannot.

If you have not done so already, I suggest you contact an experienced elder-care attorney in your area right away. The following documents will greatly aid in your being able to provide continuous care and oversight of your parents, without any need for government intrusion.

- Durable Power of Attorney
- Health Care Surrogate
- HIPAA Release (gives you access to their medical records)
- Will

My husband and I have had less success with his parents in seeing the need for these documents. My in-laws do not see the danger in becoming incapacitated or incompetent, and not having provided a way for others to pay the bills, write the checks, confer with the doctors, etc. Unfortunately, they still feel that having a "Will" and long-term care insurance is all they need to provide for their care.

Bottom line ... get some good elder-care legal advice.

33 posted on 04/05/2010 12:37:22 PM PDT by RightField (A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.)
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To: Loud Mime
My Grandmother (92) has been on this track for several years. We started to notice stories repeating themselves a LOT about 5 years ago. Combining that, obvious short term memory loss and a propensity for getting lost even in familiar areas we moved her into retirement community. She had her own apartment and was free to do as she liked but at least there were people to associate with (she was always bored because she couldn't remember what she had done half an hour before) and they provided transportation to the grocery store, etc.

That worked pretty well for about 3 years as we strived to get things more and more regimented. We found that if she had a plan for the day she maintained a good attitude. Keep in mind that NOTHING we did stemmed the progression of memory loss.

After 3 years we moved her to an assisted living facility that specialized in dementia patients. She still has her own apartment but aides come by to handle medication, check on general hygiene and wellness, etc. They provide activities and meals as well as structure for her and an unbiased set of eyes and ears for us.

As the disease progresses I HIGHLY RECOMMEND that you make decisions that include your own mental health. Dementia patients, as you probably know, can easily take up every last bit of your time. There are also feelings of guilt and helplessness. It's easy to feel guilty when a loved one says they miss you 2 hours after you spent the entire day with them shopping and having lunch. It's easy to feel helpless when you get (literally) 20 phone calls asking the same question over a 2 hour period.

I know that it may seem harsh to put a loved one in the care of someone else but, if it is at all possible, doing so provides them with the day to day care that they need, provides them with some semblance of independence, and provides you with the opportunity to enjoy their company without the gut wrenching frustration of being 100% tied to an emotional roller coaster.

34 posted on 04/05/2010 12:45:00 PM PDT by Tucsonican
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To: Loud Mime

So much depends on the type and cause of the dementia. Not all dementia is the same.


35 posted on 04/05/2010 12:47:02 PM PDT by Eva
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To: OafOfOffice

Statins can take memory away. They are often worthless too. Niacin, Omega 3, exercise and healthy diet. http://bit.ly/acqAbO

http://bit.ly/9oWKec

Types of Memory
http://bit.ly/9hnJS1

Understanding and Treating Memory Loss
http://bit.ly/cr0DmD

Medical Tests to Consider to Evaluate Memory Problems

Supplements That May Be Helpful to Enhance Memory
http://bit.ly/cV2B9l


36 posted on 04/05/2010 12:51:16 PM PDT by OafOfOffice (W.C:Socialism:Philosophy of failure,creed of ignorance,gospel of envy,the equal sharing of misery)
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To: Loud Mime

Get him on Aricept. I was amazed at the difference in my father after getting him on it. I took care of him from 2003 to 2009 and after a while the Aricept will wear off, but it can work for a long time. Not to mention the interest in cleanliness that seemed to come back. My poor father lived alone and when I would pick him to go to the doctor, he would smell to high heaven. After the Aricept, he still needed prodding, but he at least took an interest in bathing again.

If you have any questions, please feel free to Freepmail me. I went down the whole path with him and it’s a ride, that’s for sure.


37 posted on 04/05/2010 12:52:49 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the chariot wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: Loud Mime

Sorry to hear about your father’s failing health.

I’d guess that in his state of mind, he wakes up, sees himself in bed, and thinks that he should still be sleeping.

Can he still read a clock? Try putting a large wall clock on the bedroom wall where he can see it. A window with an eastern exposure will also allow in the cue of the rising sun.


38 posted on 04/05/2010 12:57:37 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: Loud Mime
Here is another holistic avenue to take; this particular essential oil is very reasonable. I've just started taking it everyday for vertigo and calming, as the other essential oil I was taking for the same issues, although it worked very well, was quite costly. Mail me if you're interested in other details.

Nervine: Lemongrass Essential Oil acts as a tonic for the nerves and the nervous system. It helps cure many nervous disorders such as shaking hands or limbs, nervousness, vertigo, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and convulsions, sluggishness, lack of reflexes etc. It strengthens nerves and activates them. Link
39 posted on 04/05/2010 12:59:29 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: TigersEye

My sister has it and her eyesight is failing. she worked in a defense plant during WWII.


40 posted on 04/05/2010 1:00:37 PM PDT by Big Horn (Rebuild the GOP to a conservative party)
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To: Loud Mime

I’m going through dementia/Alzheimers with both my parents. My Mother went through a difficult period, while she was still living at home, when she became angry and suspicious. She would hide things and forget where she put them, then accuse everyone of stealing and trying to get her things/money/car. After it got intolerable, her doctor put her on some behavioral meds that made a huge difference. Believe me, it is better to have her pleasant and a little spaced out than being hostile. You may find some of this behavior with your Father, when he resents taking a bath or medicines. Like others have said, you are now the parent and you just have to do what has to be done, just as you would with a child. May God grant you peace and success in dealing with these old age issues.


41 posted on 04/05/2010 1:02:47 PM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: Loud Mime

Another thing to check is whether your father communicates better, or is reported to communicate better, with certain people than with others. Especially if the “others” are yourself. I had the very aggravating situation of an elderly aunt who would become incoherent in my presence, about the same time that a very pushy neighbor began to dominate her life. Since you’re around your father all the time this might be unlikely to be happening before your eyes, but there are a few people who can and will take unfair advantage of an elderly person losing his or her mind.


42 posted on 04/05/2010 1:06:41 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: Loud Mime; TigersEye; pandoraou812

My husband (who was much older than me) began his trip down Alzheimer’s Lane by exhibiting major changes in his personal and grooming habits. He quit shaving his neck, and combed his hair straight forward, instead of off to the side. He let his nails grow long, and quit showering.

The shower was the hardest part (along with the incontinence) to deal with. He became combative when I tried to shower him every three or four days. I had to have someone with me, for fear he would attack me. (He had always been a very gentle man.)

I finally had to have a professional care-giver come twice a week to shower him, and it was always a fight.

He started two microwaves on fire, would open the door in the middle of the night, and leave it open, he constantly turned on the airconditioner to it’s coldest, then turned the heat all the way up.

I found that the best way to handle the situation was to let him know he was safe. And I always kept him well groomed, as they DO have ‘moments’ of cognizance. I wanted him to know that he was being well cared for.

The incontinance was the hardest (and the longest) part of his illness, and became a twice a day occurance. I had to have carpet cleaners here every week, and had to have
carpet removed in the bedroom, with linoleum installed.

I could not leave him with a care-giver as he trusted no one but me, and would be combative with them.

This illness is so painful to watch in it’s progression. Every day they seem to lose a little bit more of who they are.

I recommend becoming an Alzheimer’s Caregiver, as you will learn many ways to deal with unsuspecting problems, as they arise.

Finally, you might want to try singing instead of talking. For some reason, it seems easier for them to comprehend a melodious tone, rather than speech.

Good luck, FRiend. The road ahead is long and hard.


43 posted on 04/05/2010 1:07:20 PM PDT by yorkie
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To: Loud Mime

I don’t know where you live but look up the Granite Falls Memory Care Center in Granite Falls, NC. The Neurologist is the founder of the memory care center @ Duke University(he left Duke for Western NC). He’s the best. People from all over the country travel to see him at this location. I know neurologist who send there patients to him when they can’t deal with them anymore. Good Luck. God Bless!!


44 posted on 04/05/2010 1:18:26 PM PDT by personalaccts (Is George W going to protect the border?)
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To: FrdmLvr; All
We have a friend whose Mother was walking into walls and displaying all types of dementia symptoms. She was taken off of most of her medications and has improved considerably.

What FrdLvr said is very important. Start with eliminating meds and go on to add the vitamins. It's worth a good try before you diagnose severe dementia.

PS..do so under the Doctors supervision..:)

sw

45 posted on 04/05/2010 1:31:49 PM PDT by spectre ( Spectre's wife)
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To: Loud Mime

Sounds like you are being very creative with your father. That will serve you well. Prayers up for you. I went through this with my dear mother.

It is difficult when you have to become the parent to your parent, but there is a certain joy in being able to care for them yourself. I hope you will be able to keep them at home and not have to put them in a facility.


46 posted on 04/05/2010 1:33:46 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin/Hunter 2012 -- Bolton their Secretary of State)
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To: potlatch

Alzheimer’s ping.
Maybe some useful tips...


47 posted on 04/05/2010 1:36:05 PM PDT by ntnychik
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To: Loud Mime

He needs to be in an environment with a group of people who will keep him on his toes. Group enforcement will jog is brain some. For rest time he should be made to read the Bible. Also check his thyroid functions and infuse him with vitamin B and Folic acid. This stuff is related to brain metabolics. Reduce any kind of empty entertainment like TV or sex or pain over-medication. Make him write or draw, as it is both physical and mental.


48 posted on 04/05/2010 1:42:05 PM PDT by JudgemAll (Democrates Fed. job-secuirty Whorocracy & hate:hypocrites must be gay like us or be tested crucified)
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To: Loud Mime
I went through this with both of my parents & some other family members. I would see who in the family is willing to help as you will get burned out if you try to do this yourself. Or find a good aide to help you. Learn to laugh as much as you can because there is going to be many times that you may get mad. Your dad won't know that what he is doing is wrong etc. You become the parent & he will be the child. I tried the adult daycare with my mom & wasn't happy with it. She came home bitten & injured a few times. We had to put locks on the doors so she wasn't able to get out. We basically childproofed the house so my mom couldn't get into the knife drawer. My dad didn't want her put into a nursing home & refused to see that she was a danger to herself & others. Some days she would be pretty good & other days it was a nightmare. My brother & sister got to the point of just removing themselves for the situation. You will need breaks so I would look for a good aide that can get along with your dad. God Bless & I will say prayers.
49 posted on 04/05/2010 1:55:24 PM PDT by pandoraou812 (timendi causa est nescire)
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To: pandoraou812

My Dad keeps acting like he’s back to being a fighter pilot, when he used to impress the ladies to no end.

Dealing with humor: When we were in ‘Vegas I took him to a “gentlemen’s club.” He had a lot of fun, but didn’t remember it twenty minutes later. The last time we went to ‘vegas I decided to save money. We went to the casino and a good tip got one of the cocktail waitresses to chat him up for a time; later I told him that we went to the G-club. It was far cheaper and he still had fun.


50 posted on 04/05/2010 2:01:14 PM PDT by Loud Mime (initialpoints.net - - The Constitution as the center of politics)
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