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Controversy Erupts Over NASCO and the NAFTA Super-Highway
Human Events Online ^ | Jun 26, 2006 | Jerome R. Corsi

Posted on 06/26/2006 7:16:57 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer

Last Thursday in a radio interview with the 55KRC Morning Show in Cincinnati, Tiffany Melvin, executive director of North America’s SuperCorridor Coalition, told host Jerry Thomas that my June 12 Human Events article on NASCO was “absolutely inaccurate.”



Melvin declined to be interview for this article, stating in an e-mail her current priority was to answer the “accusations, bad information, and false assumptions” in the June 12 article. “After I have a chance to get my life back and return to a normal schedule, I will contact you,” she wrote. “In the meantime, I will continue to respond to the inquiries your erroneous reporting has caused.”

What is NASCO? It is a non-profit 501c6 organization that functions as a trade association and sometimes lobbying group for the public and private entities that are members. NASCO is an acronym for North America’s SuperCorridor Coalition, which is the official title of the organization. According to the group’s website, NASCO is “dedicated to developing the world’s first international, integrated and secure, multi-modal transportation system along the International Mid-Continent Trade and Transportation Corridor to improve both the trade competitiveness and quality of life in North America.”

Specifically, NASCO supports the corridor that encompasses Interstate Highways 35, 29 and 94, and “the significant east/west connectors to those highways in Canada, the United States, and Mexico.” That NASCO is organized around promoting NAFTA trade is obvious. Again, as stated by the group’s website:

From the largest border crossing in North America (The Ambassador Bridge in Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Canada), to the second largest border crossing of Laredo, Texas and Neuvo Laredo, Mexico, extending to the deep water Ports of Manzanillo and Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico and to Manitoba, Canada, the impressive, tri-national NASCO membership truly reflects the international scope of the Corridor and the regions it impacts. (Emphasis in original.)

From an industry perspective, NASCO is one of the organizations supporting various north-south corridors identified to facilitate NAFTA trade. NASCO has absorbed the former North American International Trade Corridor Partnership, a non-profit group organized in Mexico with similar goals of internationalizing U.S. highways into a NAFTA structure to facilitate trade with Mexico and Canada. The North American Inland Port Network (NAIPN) is also listed as a NASCO partner. NAIPN functions as a NASCO sub-committee to develop “inland ports” along the highway corridors “to specifically alleviate congestion at maritime ports and our nation’s borders.”

To get a feel of the NAFTA corridor movement, we also reference CANAMEX, a trade organization that promotes a Western tri-lateral route utilizing I-19, I-10, I-93 and I-15 in the states of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Idaho and Montana to link the three countries in trade. Another non-profit group, the North American Forum on Integration (NAFI), identifies four bands of NAFTA corridors (Pacific, West, East and Atlantic), all relying primarily upon internationalizing north-south existing interstate highways into NAFTA trade corridors.

One of Melvin’s main bones of contention was that NASCO did not stand for the building the NASCO corridor into a Trans-Texas Corridor-type super-highway. “NASCO is working on existing infrastructure,” Melvin told 55KRC. Yet, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is a NASCO member and NASCO supports the Trans-Texas Corridor as part of that relationship. Melvin’s e-mail stated:

The Trans-Texas Corridor is not a NASCO initiative. We support the project in Texas, as it solves critical funding problems and congestion IN TEXAS. I know of NO plans to extend it into additional states. It is not the first section of a NAFTA Super Highway. It is not ready to begin construction next year.

According to the 4,000-page draft environmental impact statement, the plan is to build a 4,000-mile network of new super-highways that will be “up to 1,200 feet wide (at full build-out) with separate lanes for passenger vehicles (three in each direction) and trucks (two in each direction), six rail lines (separate lines in each direction for high-speed rail, commuter rail, and freight rail), and a 200-foot wide utility corridor.”

On March 11, 2005, TxDOT signed a definitive agreement with Cintra Zachry, a limited partnership formed by Cintra Concesiones de Infraestructures de Transport in Spain and the San Antonio-based Zachry Construction Co. “to develop the Oklahoma to Mexico/Gulf Coast element of the Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC-35). This agreement calls for the Cintra-Zachry limited partnership to pay Texas $1.2 billion “for the long-term right to build and operate the initial segment as a toll facility.” The initial TTC-35 segment is scheduled to be built roughly parallel to I-35 between Dallas and San Antonio. The final public hearings are scheduled in Texas for July and August. While construction contracts have yet to be finalized, Cintra-Zachry presumably holds those rights as a result of the $1.2 billion payment to Texas, as described in the March 11, 2005, contract. The timeline published on the Trans-Texas Corridor website envisions final federal approval by the summer of 2007, with the construction of the first TTC-35 segment to follow immediately afterward.

In regard to whether NASCO intends to rely only on existing interstate highway infrastructure, the NASCO statement of purpose cited above calls for building “the world’s first international, integrated and secure, multi-modal transportation system.” The TTC-35 project is the first super-highway project in the U.S. proceeding to incorporate railroad as part of the design, producing a truly “integrated” and “multi-modal” highway-railroad system.

Do other states plan to build TTC like roads? Most states today are strapped for cash even to maintain existing highways. Still, the investment banking and international capital pools that put together the TTC project are certain to want to apply the model to additional states along the I-35 corridor. I would also note that Cintra-Zachry is unlikely to be building TTC-35 with the idea that the four-football-fields-wide super-highway just ends at the Oklahoma border. Once the investment bankers have the deal sealed in Texas, the TTC plan and funding are certain to be taken to many other states, including Oklahoma and Kansas.

The city of Kansas City, Mo., and the Kansas City SmartPort are both listed on the NASCO website as NASCO members. The Kansas City Area Development Council has directly confirmed that the Kansas City SmartPort intends to build a Mexican customs facility to facilitate out-going traffic headed to Mexico. A copy of the Kansas City council resolution authorizing the construction of the Mexican customs facility can be found on the Internet.

Melvin also maintained that NASCO is “not competing with West Coast ports or trying to take work from them.” This argument is made, however, in a brochure posted on the website of the Kansas City SmartPort, titled “Lazaro Cardenas—Kansas City Transportation Corridor Offers Opportunities for International Shippers.”

Yet, in March 2005, Kansas City signed a cooperative pact with representatives from the Mexican state of Michoacan and with representatives from Lazaro Cardenas, a deep-port town on the Pacific coast south of the Baha peninsula, to increase the cargo volume between Lazaro Cardenas and Kansas City. The goal is to bring super-ships carrying 4,000 containers or more from China and the Far East into Mexico so the containers can be moved into the heart of the United States, bypassing the West Coast ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Right now transportation costs about double the cost of cheap goods made in China and the Far East. The Kansas City SmartPort plan offers a methodology for cutting out U.S. workers from the International Longshoremen’s Association, the United Transportation Union and the Teamsters. As the brochure explains:

Shipments will be pre-screened in Southeast Asia and the shipper will send advance notification to Mexican and American Customs with the corresponding “pre-clearance” information on the cargo. Upon arrival in Mexico, containers will pass through multiple X-ray and gamma ray screenings, allowing any containers with anomalies to quickly be removed for further inspection.

Container shipments will be tracked using intelligent transportation systems (ITS) that could include global positioning systems (GPS) or radio frequency identification systems (RFID) and monitored by the ITS on their way to inland trade-processing centers in Kansas City and elsewhere in the United States.

The Kansas City SmartPort brochure could not be more explicit: “Kansas City offers the opportunity for sealed cargo containers to travel to Mexican port cities with virtually no border delays. It will streamline shipments from Asia and cut the time and labor costs associated with shipping through the congested ports on the West Coast.”

The plan to put the NAFTA Super-Highway is intended to be done incrementally, designed to stay below the radar of mainstream media attention. The full build-out of the Trans-Texas Corridor’s 4,000-mile planned network is projected to be completed in discrete stages, over the next 50 years. This gives plenty of time to expand the super-highway network incrementally, state-by-state up-and-down the various identified NAFTA corridors.

The plan to create a North American Union as a regional government in 2010 is directly stated only in the May 2005 task force report, “Building a North American Community.” Still, we must examine how the Security and Prosperity Partnership signed by President Bush with Mexico and Canada in Waco, Tex., on March 23, 2005, is being implemented. We find that government offices such as the Security and Prosperity Partnership working groups being organized within the U.S. Department of Commerce are signing trilateral memoranda of understanding and other agreements with Mexico and Canada consistent with the goal of fulfilling the CFR’s dream to bring about a North American Union by 2010.

We find the same here. NASCO is a trade organization that will never fund or build a single highway anywhere. Yet NASCO supports its members and NASCO members are hard at work building the NAFTA Super-Highway.


TOPICS: Conspiracy
KEYWORDS: childrensicecream; cuespookymusic; icecreammandrake; morethorazineplease; nafta; naftacorridor; nasco; nau; northamericanunion; notthiscrapagain; preciousbodilyfluids; publicprivate; sapandimpurify; texas; theboogeyman; transtexascorridor; ttc; ttc35; tx; txdot
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A public-private partnership is exactly what it says it is. It is a business partnership with the goal of making a profit and NOT providing a service like government. A formal business agreement or contract seals the partnership. The business form of partnership provides the most flexibility for operating business as it can be expanded and more partners can be added in the future. Secondly, there are public and private partners. The public partners are all levels of government, from local, to county, state, regional and federal as well as foreign and international, such as the United Nations. The private partners include corporations - those with the deepest pockets and non-governmental organizations like Planned Parenthood, The nature Conservancy, Sierra Club, Red Cross, or the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation. Examples of public-private partnerships include sewer systems, power plants, water facilities, charter schools, etc.,

Because all levels of government are broke, the fact that business comes in to "help" is really a transfer of the responsibilities that government use to provide for its citizens as a service to corporations. The corporations want to make a profit. The little lady who receives a 30% increase in her sewer or water bill is not going to understand that the sewer system that used to belong to the city where she lives has now been transferred into a business arrangement that still includes the City as a partner but also has new financial resources with the corporate partner. Who has the real power? Whoever has the money. All across the country and globe, at every level of government, assets are being transferred from government and the citizenry to a new business arrangement in which the goal is a profit.

--Joan Veon

1 posted on 06/26/2006 7:17:02 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: calcowgirl; nicmarlo; texastoo; William Terrell; Tolerance Sucks Rocks; cinives; Czar; ...
The NASCO corridor is the product of "free trade".

A cautionary note about the end game of "free trade":

A continual process of war, revolution, and terrorism [creative destruction], removing major impediments for the global establishment of a unique and unified America/British capitalism based on the political, economic and social precepts of Fabian Socialism. Free trade requires the complete destruction of national sovereignty and is a cornerstone of the Fabian Socialism. In the end, it is an international form of socialism that will control all the economic, political, and social activities of this planet. The United Nations and its many agencies are assisting in helping to establish this reality. Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism are all integral parts of the same process

--The Permanent Revolution
Terry Hayfield
2 posted on 06/26/2006 7:21:06 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: hedgetrimmer

Why do we need this massive system in the middle of the country when the vast majority of the people live on the coast? Who made the decision to "abandon" Long Beach in favor of a new improved super port in Mexico, a nation that hates us?

What do these "business people" know that we dont about the future direction of our country?


3 posted on 06/26/2006 7:28:35 AM PDT by winodog (Its the constitution, dummy.)
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To: hedgetrimmer

The deep question is how do you make Mexico a first class country. This is something that Vincente Fox has brought up frequently recently.

The trouble is that no one quite sees that the very best thing we could do for Mexico is to send their now well trained citizens home.

Suddenly Mexico would have a skilled workforce who knew something about how a world class country worked.

Think these folk would propel a great leap forward for Mexico?

I do.

Basically the ruling class in Mexico is preditory to its own detriment and will not change of its own volition--even if those changes were in its own interest. But it can be forced to change.

The Mexicans in the USA have had the picture of what a well run country looks like tatooed on the back of their eyeballs. And they'll have an idea of how to get there. Send them back to Mexico and they'll get a revolution in Mexico that'll do that country some good.

The shock troops for that would be the 12 million repatriated Mexican citizens. Having seen what a well run country looks like they would not want to be stuffed back in the old wineskin.

There's something more.

I follow water desalination research pretty closely. While water desalination costs have dropped to about a third of what they were 15 years ago--the rate at which prices will drop over the next seven years will accelerate considerably. imo in even the next five years we will see desalination costs drop to 1/10th of today's costs. Or even faster than the fall the 3/4 fall that the LLNL researchers suggest.
http://www.physorg.com/news67262683.html
Basically, the foundations are being laid today to make it economically feasable to to turn all the world's deserts green. (The proper way to look at this is to recall that cars, tv's and computers were at first rich men's toys but when prices came down they changed the world. Desalinised water is still relatively speaking -- a rich man's toy. But when the price drops sufficiently--desalinised water will change the world--because most deserts are right beside the ocean. Pumping the water 1000 miles inland will require that the scientists collapse the cost cracking out hydrogen from water. I think that this nut will be cracked sooner than desalination.)

imho cheap desalinised water will do for the republicans (if they can get this on their agenda or even the democrats if the pubbies drop the ball) what the great dam building projects & the tva of the 1930's & 40's did for democrats because 1/3 of the US is deserts. We would increase the habitable size of the USA by 1/3.

Dirt cheap desalinised water will also do things like make it possible to double the habitable size of Mexico. Cheap water is no magic bullet but it will give the Mexican Nationalists a way to dream while the Mexican people do the real work.

And desalinated water in tandem with repatriation of now skilled Mexican citizens would propel Mexico into being a world class country.

Oh and one last thing. Mexico will need a stronger dose of of the Peruvian Hernando Desoto ideas. Basically DeSoto asked the question why are some countries poor and some questions rich. His answers are being implimented successfully in countries around the world. http://www.ild.org.pe/home.htm

Hernando de Soto's organization was invited to Mexico and did some work on the question. He says that only 6 percent of Mexican enterprises are legal, the rest are informal. So how do you reverse that so that only 6% of the economy is informal -- as is the case the USA. De Soto would provide the ideas around which the 12 million american trained Mexican returnees could rally.

There is a winner here. The winner is Mexico.

The US profits too by having a prosperous politically stable country with a broad middle class to the south as we do to the north.


4 posted on 06/26/2006 7:29:07 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: hedgetrimmer
We find that government offices such as the Security and Prosperity Partnership working groups being organized within the U.S. Department of Commerce are signing trilateral memoranda of understanding and other agreements with Mexico and Canada consistent with the goal of fulfilling the CFR’s dream to bring about a North American Union by 2010.

Does anyone know under what legal authority this is happening? What bills passed by congress and signed into law provide the funding for this? What congressional committees have oversight?
5 posted on 06/26/2006 7:30:33 AM PDT by rottndog (WOOF!!!!--Keep your "compassion" away from my wallet!)
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To: rottndog
Does anyone know under what legal authority this is happening?

The Security and Prosperity Partnership was created by Executive Order. The president instructs federal government agencies to implement it, and they do so out of existing budgets. Congress has no authority, unless it is to rescind the EO.
6 posted on 06/26/2006 7:33:24 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: hedgetrimmer
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the Executive branch limited to implementing and enforcing laws passed by Congress? The President can send out all the EOs he wants, but without a specific law giving him the authority, especially with regards to expenditures of tax dollars, does he really have the legal right?

Also, isn't this subject to FOIA? (Where's Judicial Watch when you need them?)
7 posted on 06/26/2006 7:44:03 AM PDT by rottndog (WOOF!!!!--Keep your "compassion" away from my wallet!)
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To: hedgetrimmer
A question.

If I had the chance to inform an uninformed about what is going on with the North America Union BS. If I could only offer them one article to see what's happening, what would that article be? Remember, I would only get one shot...one article.

8 posted on 06/26/2006 7:45:14 AM PDT by processing please hold (If you can't stand behind our military, stand in front of them.)
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To: pbrown; calcowgirl; nicmarlo; texastoo; William Terrell; Tolerance Sucks Rocks; cinives; Czar; ...
If I could only offer them one article to see what's happening, what would that article be?

What do you all suggest?
9 posted on 06/26/2006 7:52:43 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: hedgetrimmer

Do you have the E.O. number? I'd like to read it.


10 posted on 06/26/2006 8:00:28 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: ckilmer

"The US profits too by having a prosperous politically stable country with a broad middle class to the south as we do to the north."

How will these ideas of yours solve the #1 problem of Mexico, which is massive corruption?

Corruption, payoffs, etc.


11 posted on 06/26/2006 8:02:48 AM PDT by antisocial (Texas SCV - Deo Vindice)
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To: hedgetrimmer
"Congress has no authority"

Sure they do. They have the authority to pass the North American Cooperative Security Act.

12 posted on 06/26/2006 8:03:19 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: antisocial; ckilmer
How will these ideas of yours solve the #1 problem of Mexico, which is massive corruption?

I would include in that question what is to be done with the fact that much of Northern Mexico is controlled by drug cartels (the ones for which beheadings are now standard operating procedure)?
13 posted on 06/26/2006 8:06:25 AM PDT by rottndog (WOOF!!!!--Keep your "compassion" away from my wallet!)
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To: rottndog

Rechecking the SPP, and its not formed from an EO but a trilateral agreement with Canada and Mexico. It is linked to the Department of Commerce. Through them, you can request documents via FOIA.

How to File a FOIA Request
A FOIA request can be made for any agency record that is not publicly available. Describe as best as possible the records you are requesting. In your description include information such as the date and place the records were created, the file descriptions, subject matter, persons involved, and other pertinent details that will help identify the records. Please be aware that the FOIA does not require agencies to answer questions, or to create records to respond to a request.

Include a mailing address and a daytime telephone number so we can contact you if necessary. When submitting your request by mail, please mark the envelope "FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST."

Note: Keep a copy of your request. You may need to refer to it in further correspondence with the agency.

Office of the Secretary
Bobbie Parsons
Immediate Office of the Secretary
Office of Management and Organization
U.S. Department of Commerce
14th and Constitution Avenue N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20230
Phone: 202-482-3707
Fax: 202-219-8979
BParsons@doc.gov

Sample FOIA Request Letter
Date

Freedom of Information Act Request

Agency Head or FOIA Officer

Name of agency or agency component

Address (see discussion above on whom to contact

Dear __________:

Under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. § 552, I am requesting copies of [identify the records as clearly and specifically as possible].

If there are any fees for searching or copying the records, please let me know before you fill my request. [Or, please supply the records without informing me of the cost if the fees do not exceed $______, which I agree to pay.]

If you deny all or any part of this request, please cite each specific exemption to think justify your withholding of information. Notify me of appeal procedures available under the law. Optional: If you have any questions about handling this request, you may telephone me at ___________ (home phone) or at ___________ (office phone).

Sincerely,


Name

Address





http://www.osec.doc.gov/omo/FOIA/foiarequest.htm


14 posted on 06/26/2006 8:08:33 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: hedgetrimmer; pbrown
It's a very large subject that can't be wrapped into one article. For starters, I'd go to an article posted here on the Free Republic in 1999, titled:
"Shadow Government of the United States"
Shadow Gov.
Lots of good info. Build your knowledge base from there.

 

15 posted on 06/26/2006 8:10:05 AM PDT by Smartass (Believe in God - And forgive us our trash baskets as we forgive those who put trash in our baskets)
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To: antisocial

Masssive corruption is what you get when everything is off the books. Hernando de Soto estimated that 94% of Mexico's economy is informal or off the books. Hernando de soto would put everything back on the books. Its harder to cook the books.

So you wouldn't stop the corruption but you would scale it back considerably.


16 posted on 06/26/2006 8:10:21 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: hedgetrimmer

Thanks for the ping and keeping us up to date on the latest.


17 posted on 06/26/2006 8:11:07 AM PDT by OB1kNOb (This is no time for bleeding hearts, pacifists, and appeasers to prevail in free world opinion.)
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To: pbrown
If I had the chance to inform an uninformed about what is going on with the North America Union BS. If I could only offer them one article to see what's happening, what would that article be?

I would search the SPP website, myself. You could use its own words to make your point without sounding like a nutter.

18 posted on 06/26/2006 8:12:21 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: hedgetrimmer
In the Twentieth Century, a prominent statesman named Benito Mussolini had a name for public-private partnerships: Fascism. By definition, that's private ownership with government control.

It's worth keeping in mind that Hitler was a National Socialist (Nazi), not a Fascist. The 1920 platform of the National Socialist Party was a typical socialist platform. There was no room for private ownership in it. Mussolini rejected pure socialism, wanting to combine the efficiency of private ownership with the egalitarianism of government control. The results were disastrous. Italy is still stuck with the remnants of Fascism, with certain industries largely being under the control of particular political parties, who traditionally get certain ministries, no matter who forms a government.

19 posted on 06/26/2006 8:12:54 AM PDT by JoeFromSidney (My book is out. Read excerpts at www.thejusticecooperative.com)
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To: Ben Ficklin
They have the authority to pass the North American Cooperative Security Act.

Do they? The have the authority to secure Canada and Mexico with our tax dollars? To secure Mexico's southern border with our tax dollars?
20 posted on 06/26/2006 8:12:58 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: rottndog

desperate people do desperate things. The idea above would make for fewer desperate people.


21 posted on 06/26/2006 8:14:24 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: hedgetrimmer

Can anybody find the E.O. creating the Security and Prosperity Partnership? I've searched back through 2004 and cannot find it.


22 posted on 06/26/2006 8:18:37 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

I corrected that statement.


23 posted on 06/26/2006 8:20:30 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: 1rudeboy
Thanks, the last thing I want to do is sound like a nutter when I try to open someones eyes about the situation in our country.

I'll check out the site now.

24 posted on 06/26/2006 8:21:00 AM PDT by processing please hold (If you can't stand behind our military, stand in front of them.)
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To: winodog
For about 150 years, people have been trying to get some type of transportation line from Kansas City to the West Coast. The shortest goes south through Presidio Texas, Chihuahua City, and Topolobampo in Sinaloa (spellings?). There was a rail line there about 40 years ago (I've taken the train.) which goes through the Barranca del Cobre, a canyon somewhat larger than the Grand Canyon. It's economically a good idea, except: (hah!) Mexico's government is so corrupt that they can't even make this break even. Topolombampo has a beautiful harbor, much like LAN Francisco's but larger.

The "private sector" has been shipping through Laredo and Nuevo Laredo for years; this is one of the largest PoE's in the US. Again, the corruption of the border officials (and now the drug lords) makes it not so feasible.

What drives these things is that water shipment is cheaper than rail or road shipment. Even a small savings is important when moving lots of merchandise.

25 posted on 06/26/2006 8:23:48 AM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch ist der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: hedgetrimmer
Once complete, the new road will allow containers from the Far East to enter the United States through the Mexican port of Lazaro Cardenas

A jobs program for thousands of Mexican truck drivers, paid for by the United States. It will also be a five lane expressway for illegals entering the United States.

No Thanks.

26 posted on 06/26/2006 8:24:50 AM PDT by RJL
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To: hedgetrimmer

Get 'R Done


27 posted on 06/26/2006 8:25:02 AM PDT by deport
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To: ckilmer

What a wonderful hopeful vision you portray. I'll have to check out your link.


28 posted on 06/26/2006 8:25:37 AM PDT by DManA
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To: winodog
"Why do we need this massive system in the middle of the country.....?"

You shouldn't believe what Corsi is writing.

This road is but one of the US High Priority Corridors

While Corsi may call this the NAFTA highway, it isn't. The NAFTA Highway is actually the proposed I 69 from Laredo to Port Huron.

As far as the nation, I 69 is the most important. The TTC 35 that Corsi is talking about is most important to Texas because I 35 is is extremely crowded.

29 posted on 06/26/2006 8:28:51 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: hedgetrimmer
"secure Canada and Mexico"

Its called pushing out the border.

30 posted on 06/26/2006 8:31:06 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: Ben Ficklin








Following the implementation of NAFTA, coalitions of interest have been formed in order to promote specific transport channels, to develop the infrastructures of these channels and to propose jurisdictional amendments to facilitate the crossing of borders. These coalitions include businesses, government agencies, civil organizations, metropolitan areas, rural communities and also individuals, wishing to strengthen the commercial hubs of their regions.

The North American trade corridors are bi- or tri-national channels for which various cross-border interests have grouped together in order to develop or consolidate the infrastructures. The North American corridors are considered multimodal in the sense that they bring into play different modes of transport in succession.

The infrastructures may include roads, highways, transit routes, airports, pipelines, railways and train stations, river canal systems and port facilities, telecommunications networks and teleports.

http://www.fina-nafi.org/eng/integ/corridors.asp?langue=eng#ouest
31 posted on 06/26/2006 8:44:14 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Thanks for the info. I can be sold on the need for better roads and shipping throughout America. I cant be sold on exporting and importing all these vital goods from a country that is as corrupt and unfriendly to America as Mexico is.

Lets improve our ports first.


32 posted on 06/26/2006 8:48:37 AM PDT by winodog (Its the constitution, dummy.)
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To: winodog
I can be sold on the need for better roads and shipping throughout America. I cant be sold on exporting and importing all these vital goods from a country that is as corrupt and unfriendly to America as Mexico is. Lets improve our ports first.

BTTT!

American jobs are more important than what this globalist president has in store for us.

33 posted on 06/26/2006 9:05:56 AM PDT by janetgreen
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To: winodog
Lets improve our ports first.
Agree that their capabilites need to be improved/expanded. But the ground transportation is still a problem today and long range plans need to be devised today to begin the process so that the loads can be handle as the ports improve.

Here's a little tidbit about Tower 55 in the DFW area that is a huge bottleneck for rail transportation and will only get worse unless changes are made. This is a portion of the Texas transportation problem and is being looked at as port of the TTC concept.

Tower 55
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/columnists/jack_z_smith/14074927.htm
.....
The outlying freight rail corridor could help relieve congestion at Tower 55, a rail hub on the southeast edge of downtown Fort Worth where the north-south Burlington Northern Santa Fe and east-west Union Pacific tracks meet at grade to form one of the worst train choke points in the nation. ("At grade" means that the tracks intersect on the same level rather than one passing over the other.)

The congestion at Tower 55 is akin to the nightmarish auto and truck gridlock that would occur if there were a traffic stoplight at Interstates 35W and 30 in downtown Fort Worth, said Mike Sims, a COG senior program manager for transportation.

"Most rail people say [Tower 55] is the busiest rail intersection at grade west of the Mississippi," Sims said
Some reports say that Tower 55 has as many as 120 trains a day on it's busiest days and on average is occupied 70% of the time.
34 posted on 06/26/2006 9:07:33 AM PDT by deport
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To: deport

I know there is talk about having all the containers from LB trucked or railed into a out of the way location.That would be the port of entry and containers would be inspected and unloaded there.

There is a massive bottleneck there and all over America. I would like the President to step up to the soapbox and tell us IF something is being done and what that something is.


35 posted on 06/26/2006 10:24:08 AM PDT by winodog (Its the constitution, dummy.)
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To: winodog

I know there is talk about having all the containers from LB trucked or railed into a out of the way location.That would be the port of entry and containers would be inspected and unloaded there.



The Kansas City Smart Port is planning the same approach. They plan to have a Mexico Customs facility onsite at their 'inland port facility' so that goods leaving the US won't have to stop at the border. Apparently KC is a cross hub in middle America.


36 posted on 06/26/2006 10:36:58 AM PDT by deport
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To: Smartass

Thanks, I'll bookmarked it.


37 posted on 06/26/2006 11:22:42 AM PDT by processing please hold (If you can't stand behind our military, stand in front of them.)
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To: deport

So we will wind up shipping most goods through Mexico instead of our west coast ports?

Doesnt this go through Nuevo Laredo? It is not safe for Americans to walk the streets just across the border.

I am not convinced this is good for Americans. Mexico needs to make progress to becoming a good neighbor first IMHO.


38 posted on 06/26/2006 11:23:03 AM PDT by winodog (Who will stop Bubba and the Beast in 08?)
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To: winodog
Lets improve our ports first.

Are you nuts? We can barely get our longshoremen to use bar-code scanners.

39 posted on 06/26/2006 11:24:11 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

Yes I am. Nonetheless I believe the cons outweigh the pros.



40 posted on 06/26/2006 11:52:48 AM PDT by winodog (Who will stop Bubba and the Beast in 08?)
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To: winodog
So we will wind up shipping most goods through Mexico instead of our west coast ports?
Depending upon the route you take but one route would take you to Laredo. Also don't forget the I-69 Corridor from South Texas to Port Huron, MI. Another route[s] could be coming in from one of the Mexico's Pacific ports. Corsi keeps writing about Lazaro Cardenos [which is farther south of Topolobampa and would use Laredo] and then there is the other from Topolobampo [La-Entrada_Al-Pacifico>


La-Entrada_Al-Pacifico

Walmart has already moved a lot of it's container imports from the West Coast to Houston with a new facility that just opened. They will be shipping up to 28% of the total container imports thru the facility and use the Panama Canal with smaller ships and a longer shipping time.

All said and done there are many options being explored and which will be the viable ones is yet to be determined. But I suspect one or more will come into being as commerce isn't going to be denied, imo. The Luddites are long gone and the buggy whip isn't needed for the current transportation modes.

Now back to the paint brush/roller for a while.

41 posted on 06/26/2006 12:36:46 PM PDT by deport
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To: hedgetrimmer

Port Authority and Alliance to Promote Logistics Corridor in China

"Officials of the Port Authority of San Antonio (formerly Greater Kelly Development Authority), Free Trade Alliance San Antonio, Port of Lázaro Cardenas, Hutchison Port Holdings and transpacific shipping lines will travel to China the first week of April to promote a newly developed logistics corridor for Chinese imports into the U.S. market.

In January of 2006, a collaboration of several logistics entities in the U.S. and Mexico began operation of a new multimodal logistics corridor for Chinese goods entering the U.S. market.  The new corridor brings containerized goods from China on either Maersk or CP Ships transpacific service to the Mexican Port of Lázaro Cardenas.  There, the containers are off loaded by a new world class terminal operated by Hutchison Ports based in Hong Kong.  The containers are loaded onto the Kansas City Southern Railroad de Mexico where they move in-bond into the U.S.  The containers clear U.S. customs in San Antonio, Texas and are processed for distribution."

http://www.freetradealliance.org/newsletter/admin/e_nternationaldetail.asp?id=795


History of the the "NAFTA Railway" - "Two Worlds - One Route"
www.kcsmartport.com/pdf/SmtPrtOneRoute.pdf



42 posted on 06/26/2006 12:42:10 PM PDT by Kimberly GG (Tancredo '08)
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To: winodog

The more I look at this I'm wondering if we'll see Mexican truckers driving these loads all the way to KC or elsewhere and what will be the licensing regulations as well as who or what will monitor the increased truck traffic for safety? Every so often in the Dallas area there's some sort of horrific crash involving these trucks on I-35 and many people in the area avoid that interstate as much as possible.


43 posted on 06/26/2006 1:10:28 PM PDT by american spirit
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To: Ben Ficklin
At least you're honest about your support for the radical blurring (at least) of our borders. Most on your side will ridicule the possibility until its on the table then they will defend it.
44 posted on 06/26/2006 1:53:37 PM PDT by mthom
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To: abner; Abundy; AGreatPer; alisasny; ALlRightAllTheTime; AlwaysFree; AnnaSASsyFR; Angelwood; ...

General and Trans-Texas Corridor SUPER-PING!

My apologies to anyone who was already pinged to this article.


45 posted on 06/26/2006 2:28:22 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (One flag--American. One language--English. One allegiance--to America!)
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To: hedgetrimmer

This article seems to be a good one for starters, since it includes an example of rebuttal by a NASCO officer, so you get some balance to the report. I've pinged both my lists to it.


46 posted on 06/26/2006 2:38:09 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (One flag--American. One language--English. One allegiance--to America!)
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To: mthom
What you refer to as a "radical blurring of our borders", sane people see as being important to protect our borders.

For all the inadequacies of inpections of containers entering our ports, those containers passing thru Mexico and Canada get less scrutiny.

It is important that the US have the authority/ability to control Mexico's and Canada's ports.

47 posted on 06/26/2006 2:54:53 PM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

BTTT


48 posted on 06/26/2006 2:58:58 PM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: E.G.C.

bump.


49 posted on 06/26/2006 3:17:44 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (One flag--American. One language--English. One allegiance--to America!)
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To: Kimberly GG; nicmarlo; calcowgirl; texastoo; Czar
New Leadership in U.S.-Canada Relations:
Leveraging Federalism to Manage North American Integration
June 27, 2006


As North American integration proceeds, there is a growing and improving amount of collaboration between the two federal governments in Washington and Ottawa with the governments of states and provinces in addressing issues of shared concern. The conference panels will explore topics of growing U.S.-Canada cooperation from provincial, bilateral, and global perspectives. Our luncheon keynote speakers will include former U.S. Ambassadors to Canada Governor Blanchard and Governor Cellucci as well as The Honorable Anne McLellan, former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and The Honorable Gary Mar, Alberta Minister of International and Intergovernmental Relations.

North American Integration Monitor
50 posted on 06/26/2006 6:30:03 PM PDT by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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