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The ***OFFICIAL*** Weekend Singles' Thread US/British food and confectionery (October 13-15, 2006)
13th October 2006 | Snugs

Posted on 10/13/2006 4:31:20 PM PDT by snugs

Winston Churchill famously said that American and Britain were 2 countries divided by a common language nor more so is this true than when it comes to food. We can eat the same sort of things but at completely different times of the day and serve it with completely different type of food.

A dessert in Britain is often looked upon as a breakfast dish in America.

American cookies are similar to British biscuits, American biscuits are similar to British sconces.

What is called a grill in England is a broiler in America.

A stove is a cooker and a cook book is a cookery book in England.

I thought it might be interesting to look at foods and confectionery that are identified with both countries, where they overlap, where they are different and personal tastes and traditions that have over the years shaped what we eat and when.

I posed the following questions to some American freepers and the following graphics reflect their answers.

1) What would you consider to be typical English food
2) What would you consider to be a typical English meal
3) What sweets (candies) do you identify with England

4) What would you consider to be typical American food
5) Would you consider to be a typical American meal
6) What candies do you consider are American

I have also compiled graphics from an English point of view regarding the above points.

Come and take a look at the food remember favourites from yesteryear and add your own thoughts and tastes. Lets make this an interesting, fun thread full of great memories of the past and present and that friendly homely feeling that familiar food conquers up. The memories and warm feelings of giving and sharing with the festivities that go with it or simply the pleasure of well cooked meal at the end of a busy and tiring day.

Food is also associated with different seasons and events such as Easter, Thanksgiving (US) Bonfire Night (UK) Christmas, New Year and of course birthdays and family traditions.

These events for singles can be fun time when they get drawn into a larger group plus made to feel part of a family but on the other hand often it can be the reverse. Christmas, New Year and Easter and of course for Americans Thanksgiving can be very lonely times for singles not fitting into any particular group and also sad for those who in the past have been part of family groups at these particular times of the year.

Below are Dolly's thoughts on this very point


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Food
KEYWORDS: confectionery; festivals; food; usbritain
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For singles Thanksgiving & Christmas can be lonely. You can go to events & be with lots of people, but still be lonely. I speak from experience.

Single guys.. even if cooking “Ian’t your thing”.. DO TRY HARD to develop a couple recipes that are “you”.. you take to friend’s homes w/invite; take to church carry ins etc. Your “signature dish” , if you will. I have a feeling Snugs and others will be sharing a lot of ideas for you to work on. Cooking is NOT women’s world in reality, although traditionally it is. You will be tickled & flattered when you get an invite & people suggest you bring that “great” ______ dish.

I have many great memories of Thanksgiving over the years. NONE OF THE GREAT memories involve preparing the turkey.. There were memories but not great.

Over the decades I have followed a vegetarian diet (animal lover, not health reason) I have NOT really done a T meal. Seems I have been invited to others homes & I bring a dish or to various restaurants. There is always plenty to eat!

I came across this link & depending on what is going on this year I might try this.

Vegetarian Thanksgiving


There is NO mention of a “stuffing” dressing, so I will share a recipe that I have created & it is modified each & every time.. One of those dump it kind of recipes. I always liked stuffing but NOT the giblets inside. At one time I made a stuffing with Pork or Italian sausage & it was good & got raves & requests for recipe.

Here is the Harvest stuffing recipe:

Herb & Fruit Dressing

8 Cups cubed bread (about 12 slices) I use a Brownberry health nut or 12 grain bread.
½ cup butter
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 large sweet onion, chopped
4 apples, peeled, cored, & chopped
1-1/2 tsp sage, rubbed dried
1 tsp thyme, dried
1 tsp pumpkin spice
1/2 Cup chopped dried cranberries
1/2 Cup raisins
I can sliced/chopped water chestnuts
1 cup pecans &/or walnuts mixed
2 Cups vegetable stock
salt && pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spread bread cubes on a
baking sheet and toast for 15 or 20 minutes, until
lightly toasted.

Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Put
celery and onion into skillet, cover, and sauteé
for 5 minutes. Add two Tbsp of the stock and stir
to release any browned bits. Simmer until liquid
evaporates. Add apples & two more Tbsp of stock &
simmer, stirring, until liquid evaporates.

Stir in seasonings & 1/4 cup of stock, cover, reduce heat to low,
& simmer until apples are tender, 5 or 6 minutes.
Pour bread mixture into a large bowl, mix in fruits & nuts & ,
drizzle with remaining stock, & season with salt && pepper.

Transfer to a 12 – 14 cup casserole, lightly coated with
non-stick spray, cover, & bake in a 325 degree F oven
for 35 to 45 minutes.

note:
apples which maintain their shape when baked are best,
Northern Spy is *the* quintessential choice but Golden
Delicious would be good too.

Happy Planning... DollyCali


1 posted on 10/13/2006 4:31:22 PM PDT by snugs
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To: 38special; 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub; aft_lizard; abishai; A knight without armor; ...

2 posted on 10/13/2006 4:32:58 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
Typical British meal -
Bangers and mash
Lager

Typical American meal -
Pizza
Lager



Well, it's typical in my circles, anyway.

3 posted on 10/13/2006 4:34:22 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: snugs
Now for my favourite bit the food. The following are collages I have put together of various food and confectionery identified with either or both countries and at the end items that are associated with festivities such as Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter etc.

Today the main meal type food concentrates on English food tomorrow I will do similar for American food, freep me any suggestions you would like included in the graphics for tomorrow of your favourite American food.


4 posted on 10/13/2006 4:34:23 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

5 posted on 10/13/2006 4:34:50 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

6 posted on 10/13/2006 4:35:25 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

7 posted on 10/13/2006 4:36:01 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

8 posted on 10/13/2006 4:36:40 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

9 posted on 10/13/2006 4:37:27 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

10 posted on 10/13/2006 4:43:21 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
3) British sweets (candy): Toffee

Love, love,love British toffee! Its great for a sore throat.

11 posted on 10/13/2006 4:46:26 PM PDT by proudofthesouth (Mao said that power comes at the point of a rifle; I say FREEDOM does.)
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To: snugs
Everything I know about British lifestyle I learned on Fawlty Towers. They were always eating kippers and prawns and in one episode with the rat named Basil they were serving cheese cubes for dessert. Of course the rat managed to be in with the cheese.

I've never had a kipper or a prawn. I think I'd like kipper because I really like fish including anchovies and sardines, etc. I don't get what prawns are. They looked like shrimp.
12 posted on 10/13/2006 4:47:17 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: snugs

The truly authentic English candy is to die for, and easily acquired in Canada, which isn't that far from where I live. My favorite is the English toffee. I go to Canada once a month just to buy authentic English candies.


13 posted on 10/13/2006 4:50:27 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: Billthedrill
I prefer beer to lager but you are right lager is probably now more popular than beer in Britain and I also suspect that pizza is probably eaten as much as bangers and mash as well.

Amongst women I would say the drink of preference is what we call alcol pops


14 posted on 10/13/2006 4:50:49 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: A knight without armor

Prawns are what you call shrimps. We only call the very small shrimps, shrimps.


15 posted on 10/13/2006 4:52:43 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: A knight without armor

Prawns are similar to shrimp only larger.


16 posted on 10/13/2006 4:54:26 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: BigSkyFreeper
When I was in America in 1997 I tried your Kit Kat but it just was not to me what I know as Kit Kat. Then we went to Niagara and there was the real thing I did not realise but I had English chocolate withdraw LOL.

I think I ate 3 bars of Kit Kat whilst in Canada that day :o)
17 posted on 10/13/2006 4:55:57 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: BigSkyFreeper

I like toffee with brazil nut in it complete with the little hammer to break it :0)


18 posted on 10/13/2006 4:56:33 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: BigSkyFreeper

We call all shrimps prawns apart from the very little brown ones which we call shrimps.


19 posted on 10/13/2006 4:57:36 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
Ugh. Nasty stuff. I prefer ales, myself. The British may have had an empire and invented the language and a bunch of other minor stuff, but as a civilization they'll be immortal for having invented India Pale Ale. Nectar Of The Gods!!

Food? Who needs food?

20 posted on 10/13/2006 4:57:43 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: snugs

LOL! The Kit Kats in Canada are probably closer to what you have in England. There is a definate difference! :) And if I recall, the wafers were just slightly bigger on the Canadian variety.


21 posted on 10/13/2006 4:58:37 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: snugs
I like toffee with brazil nut in it complete with the little hammer to break it :0)

My mother's mom makes that for Christmas! She keeps a little hammer in her utensil drawer for such an occasion and places it on the serving tray! :)

22 posted on 10/13/2006 5:00:05 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: Billthedrill

Do you get some of the real ale in the States such Old Speckled Hen, Old Thumpers and Ruddles?

You might find these 2 websites interesting

http://www.enjoyengland.com/ideas/inspirational-ideas/food-and-drink/drink/brewery-tours/index.aspx

http://www.quaffale.org.uk/

Also Camra's site (Campaign for real ale)

http://www.camra.org.uk/



23 posted on 10/13/2006 5:05:36 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
Here's some candy bars commonly found in Canada that I really enjoy.


As the picture shows, this bar consists of whipped chocolate that sets with bubbles trapped in the chocolate, hence, "Aero". The bubbles create a lighter texture so that the bar is not too filling/heavy, and provide a distinct eating sensation compared with solid chocolate. The result is a scrumptious chocolate bar that quickly melts in your mouth.


These are similar to M&M's found in the US, but with a distinct flavor, as some "Smarties" already know. Like M&M's, Smarties are milk chocolate pieces covered with bright candy shells. There are eight vibrant colors.


This unique combination of light crispy wafers, bubbly coffee cream and milk chocolate coating satisfies without filling you up. This is the #1 selling candy bar in Canada.

24 posted on 10/13/2006 5:07:55 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: BigSkyFreeper

I prefer Mint Aero to just chocolate aero, smarties I prefer to M & Ms we used to have chocolate treats instead of M & Ms but Mars decided that they wanted to make their sweets (candies) go by the same name in all countries so changed them to M & Ms. At the same time made them multi coloured they used to be just dark brown. They still do large version in dark brown called Minstrels.

Have you noticed in Smarties the orange one is actually orange flavour all the others are just milk chocolate.

Do not know Coffee Crisp never seen that in Britain.

Another interesting thing on names Snickers was another product that Mars decided they wanted to call the same name worldwide because in Britain it was Marathon.


25 posted on 10/13/2006 5:13:48 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
We do. I actually saw a case of Skull-Splitter Ale (from the Orkneys) in my local wine shop yesterday. Here it's served chilled.

(Thumping sound.) Snugs! Snugs! Dang it, Snugs has fainted...

26 posted on 10/13/2006 5:14:20 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: BigSkyFreeper
I also believe that Milky Way in the States is what we call a Mars Bar whereas our Milky Way is very similar to your 3 musketeers.
27 posted on 10/13/2006 5:15:27 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs
I agree, Smarties are better than M&M's, even though I can usually eat a 1 pound bag of M&M's in one evening. LOL

Many candy shops in Canada don't sell M&M's, and for me Smarties were a viable alternative. I spent a month in Alberta many years ago, and whenever I had a craving for M&M's, I'd buy a box of Smarties. They must've changed the flavor of the orange colored Smarties to orange in recent years, because I recall many years ago, they were all chocolate flavored. The coffee crisp bars are really good. There is a wafer that "floats" inside, on top of a bubbly coffee cream made from coffee beans, which is all wrapped in a layer of chocolate on the outside. So when you bite into it, you see this wafer (like the Kit Kat wafer) surrounded by little bubbles of air. It sort of has a taste of coffee with cream in it. I've never tried the Mint Aero's.

My all time favorite candy bar is the Snicker bar. Could never find it in Canada, and a Canadian friend of mine said to just look for the Marathon bar. Same thing. LOL!!

28 posted on 10/13/2006 5:28:24 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: BigSkyFreeper; snugs
Thanks! You call the small ones shrimps - LOL!

I think in England they call apartments flats. That reminds me that I found this really cute video called Flatlife. It think it is very well done and downright cute. It lasts 10 minutes and if you watch it be sure to have the volume on for the little sound effects.

It is at: http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=18844

It has it's own website but I cannot get it to work on my computer. The website is: http://www.flatlife.be/
29 posted on 10/13/2006 5:28:36 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: snugs
I also believe that Milky Way in the States is what we call a Mars Bar whereas our Milky Way is very similar to your 3 musketeers.

In Canada too oddly enough! :)

30 posted on 10/13/2006 5:29:20 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (Karl Rove you magnificent bastard!)
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To: Billthedrill

I like it cool but not ice cold chilled is OK as long it just makes it cool.


31 posted on 10/13/2006 5:34:04 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: A knight without armor
Yes we do call apartments flats we also call a 2 story building divided into flat maisonettes - are you familar with that term.
32 posted on 10/13/2006 5:36:33 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: BigSkyFreeper
I think Canada because of its British connection often seems to have things the same as we do whereas the rest of the world tends to go the American way except for weights and measures.

That brings me on to another thing I have noticed that Americans tend to measure by cup or spoon ingredients rather than weigh them.

That is totally alien to us English we always weigh, I am still pounds and ounces for cooking and my own weight but work wise I use the metric system.

Also we are now centigrade not Fahrenheit.

Another thing gas cookers I have never seen an American recipe saying Gas Mark 4 or 5 or whatever - do you not have gas ovens or if you do are the temperature in Fahrenheit not mark.
33 posted on 10/13/2006 5:40:36 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

No, I've never heard of a masionette. What you describe would be a duplex. A house divided into 3 apartments is a triplex and a 4 apt. house would be a quadruplex.


34 posted on 10/13/2006 5:46:27 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: A knight without armor
Maisonettes are normally a block not a house. Do you use the term bed sit where a house is divided up into rooms with communal cooking and washing facilities.
35 posted on 10/13/2006 5:58:24 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

36 posted on 10/13/2006 6:03:03 PM PDT by MotleyGirl70
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To: Cagey

Do you have the picture of the Seinfeld basket of candy? I can't find it. Ping the usual suspects when/if you find it :)


37 posted on 10/13/2006 6:07:50 PM PDT by MotleyGirl70
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To: MotleyGirl70
When I was little Woolworth's sold the small Reeses cups loose you either bougth them by the quarter or so many for so much cannot remember now.

What I did not realise though at the time that they were in fact an American import, we do not make it in the UK but we actually import it.
38 posted on 10/13/2006 6:20:54 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

Thanks for the great pics snugs!

Now I'm hungry....and really want a Crunchie bar!


39 posted on 10/13/2006 6:25:50 PM PDT by Hoodlum91 (I've been rocked.)
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To: snugs

1) What would you consider to be typical English food?
2) What would you consider to be a typical English meal?
3) What sweets (candies) do you identify with England?



1) Steak and Kidney Pie
2) Bangers and Mash or Bubble and Squeak
3) Wine Gums


40 posted on 10/13/2006 6:26:19 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Army Air Corps

Can't argue about that


41 posted on 10/13/2006 6:28:44 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: Hoodlum91
Do they sell crunchies in the States I cannot remember seeing them when I visited all I could seem to get was your version of KitKat in the touristy tuck shops.
42 posted on 10/13/2006 6:29:55 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

Do I earn a "spot on!"? ;-)

As an anglophile and an epicure, I am enjoying this thread.


43 posted on 10/13/2006 6:30:16 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Army Air Corps

Absolutely spot on LOL


44 posted on 10/13/2006 6:32:30 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: snugs

Never heard of bed sit. Sounds like you describe a rooming house.


45 posted on 10/13/2006 6:39:20 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: MotleyGirl70

Am I allowed in here?

46 posted on 10/13/2006 6:46:15 PM PDT by Cagey
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To: snugs
"Another thing gas cookers I have never seen an American recipe saying Gas Mark 4 or 5 or whatever - do you not have gas ovens or if you do are the temperature in Fahrenheit not mark."

Yes, we have gas ovens in the US. All the gas ranges that I have seen have a knob for the oven marked with Fahrenheit temperatures. However, the knobs for the surface burners are usually marked with "Low", "Med", and "High" with tick marks in between. I have seen some units that feature surface unit knobs that include settings such as "Simmer" and "Boil".
47 posted on 10/13/2006 6:49:22 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Cagey
That's the one I was looking for. Thanks...and I saved it this time for future posting.

Am I allowed in here?

Lol! Well....we let married folks in here once in a while for a small fee or a piece of candy ;)

48 posted on 10/13/2006 6:52:50 PM PDT by MotleyGirl70
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To: A knight without armor
I guess so I think maybe we think bed sit sounds posher. Basically it is a bedroom but it also doubles as your sitting room as it is the only room you get. Hence bed sit.

What has become popular in recent years is private homes letting out a room to help out with house hold costs.

Often a single person will let out one or even 2 rooms to help with the mortgage. In this case it almost becomes like a house share but of course the owner is there so they have the last say in matters.

Sometimes couples will also let a room out after their children have left home sometimes because of money issues but also not liking the empty nest feeling. This is often the case in University towns.
49 posted on 10/13/2006 6:57:00 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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To: Army Air Corps
I thought it must be the case because all your recipes mention temperature and not mark thanks for confirming. Most gas burners do not usually have any marks on the knobs occasionally graphics indicating which way is higher or lower. With electric hobs though they are normally in numbers mine have 6 settings.

I recently got a new second hand cooker (stove/oven whatever you call it) and I am enjoy ceramic hot plates for the first time.

I need a new switch for the main oven door so cannot really use this until that is fixed but apart from that it is a lovely unit and has been well looked after.

Here it is installed in our kitchen. By the way our temperatures are now all centigrade for ovens.


50 posted on 10/13/2006 7:03:30 PM PDT by snugs ((An English Cheney Chick - BIG TIME))
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