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No, Lady Godiva wasn't & an apple didn't fall on Newton's head... some historical myths revealed
DailyMail.uk ^ | 30th May 2008 | Daily Mail Reporter

Posted on 05/30/2008 12:06:37 PM PDT by yankeedame

No, Lady Godiva wasn't starkers and an apple didn't really fall on Isacc Newton's head... we reveal those other historical myths

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 1:29 AM on 30th May 2008

For decades, visitors to HMS Victory have stood solemnly by a plaque in gold lettering announcing the exact spot on the orlop deck where Nelson met his end.

But this week it was revealed he didn't actually die there after all - it was 25 feet to the fore that he passed away - and the ship's curator Peter Goodwin admitted: 'History is not always what it appears to be.' So what other historical 'facts' are wrong? Here, we uncover a surprising number.

==========================================


Contrary to popular belief the
Emperor Napoleon I of France, never said,
'Not tonight, Josephine'

The phrase first appeared in a play about Napoleon that was not written until 1835, 14 years after Napoleon's death, and the audience roared with laughter because the Bonapartes' marriage was notoriously lusty.

Nor was Napoleon particularly small, despite his nickname, Le Petit Corporal ('The Little Corporal'). He was in fact 5ft 7in, which was fairly tall for the average European male of the early 19th century.

==============================================

It is also quite untrue that so-called 'witches' were burned at the stake after the notorious witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692.

Of the 150 men and women arrested, 31 were tried and 20 were executed, all by hanging except one who was crushed to death by a door that had heavy stones placed upon it.

Of course they were all terrible ways for innocent people to die, but the burning of witches was not standard practice, as it had been for people convicted of heresy in earlier times.
================================================

The story about Sir Isaac Newton discovering gravity when an apple fell on his head as he was sitting under an apple tree is an invention.

Decades after Newton's death in 1727, the French philosopher Voltaire put it in a book, claiming that Newton's niece, Catherine Conduitt, believed it to be true.

If it had been, Newton would probably have made some kind of reference to it during his lifetime.

===========================================

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, wrote about Marie Antoinette who had ignorantly joked about the starving people of Paris but she was only 11 Volitaire's fellow Enlightenment philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, wrote about a princess who had ignorantly joked about the starving people of Paris, telling a courtier: 'Let them eat cake.'

That was in 1766, when Marie Antoinette was only 11 years old. Yet 20 years later, the story got around that it had been she who had made this remark, which went some way to creating the atmosphere of hatred that led to her execution in 1793.

=======================================

Three of the things that everyone knows about the Elizabethan sailor-adventurer Sir Walter Raleigh was that he was responsible for bringing both potatoes and tobacco to England, and that he laid his gorgeous, bejeweled cloak in the mud for Queen Elizabeth I to step on and save her feet from getting dirty.

Yet all three are fictional. Potatoes had been brought to England (from Italy) the year before Raleigh popularized them in 1586 and the Frenchman, Jean Nicot (after whom nicotine is named) introduced tobacco a full 26 years before Raleigh had his first smoke.

The story of the Queen and Raleigh's cloak emerged in 1584 without foundation, but became so connected with him that when he made up his coat of arms, he included a cloak in them, and pretended it was true.

==============================================

And it wasn't in fact Captain James Cook who discovered Australia when he sailed into Sydney in 1770, because years earlier the Dutchmen Abel Tasman (who gave his name to Tasmania) and Dirk Hartog, and an English pirate, William Dampier, had already got there.


A travel poster for Australia, showing Captain Cook landing
in 1770 but it had actually been discovered by a Dutchman

There were plenty of places Cook did discover on his great travels in the 1770s, but he can't claim the whole continent of Australia, and nor was he strictly speaking a captain, holding the rank of lieutenant when he sailed there for the first time.

=============================================

Nero could never have ' fiddled while Rome burned'. For all the movies that we see of the lunatic Emperor playing his violin maniacally as Rome burned around him in 64BC, caring nothing for his subjects as they died in the Great Fire that he himself had started, there is not a grain of truth in the story.

Fiddles weren't invented for another millennium, and Nero was 35 miles outside the city at Antium when the fire broke out.

==================================

Although the Americans love their Fourth of July celebrations, with fireworks and parties, the signing of the Declaration did not actually take place then, but on July 2, 1776.

The 4th was merely the day that the document itself went to the printers. Nor did America legally become independent until much later, after the American War of Independence ended on September 3, 1783, with what was called the Definitive Treaty of Peace.

==============================================

America's greatest inventor,Thomas Edison,came up with the ideas for many great and world- changing things, but the electric lightbulb was not in fact one of them.


Thomas Edison and the electric lightbulb which he invented
ich is one from a box of 23 bulbs that were found in an attic
used in his 1890 patent court case

That was invented by the Englishman Sir Humphry Davy who thought up the concept of a carbon filament arc light.

What Edison, or at least his many engineers, managed to do was discover a better filament that would glow for long enough for the light to be worthwhile. Edison did however, take out over a thousand patents in his lifetime, for inventions connected with telegraphy, megaphones, gramaphones, the kinetoscope, and metallurgy.

========================================


Godiva riding through the streets naked sadly
not ring true

Although everyone loves the tale of the Tenth century Anglo-Saxon noblewoman Lady Godiva, who was supposed to have ridden naked through Coventry to pressure her husband Leofric into treating his tenants better, very little about it actually rings true.

Leofric was famously generous, endowing a Benedictine monastery in Coventry in 1043 under no apparent compulsion from Godiva, clothed or naked.

Some have claimed that the story originates from a custom in which penitents were forced to make a public procession in only their shift, a sleeveless white garment considered underwear, or that Lady Godiva's nakedness refers to her riding through the streets stripped of her jewellery, the trademark of her upper-class rank.

But neither of these accounts accord with the plain fact of her husband Leofric's legendary generosity.

======================================

The great Dutch artist Vincent Van Gogh did not actually cut off his own ear, as the most powerful legend in the history of art states - or at least not much of it.


The popular myth about Van
Gogh is exactly that - it was in
fact Paul Gauguin who cut off a
portion of his left lobe

In fact, after a great quarrel with fellow post-impressionist painter Paul Gauguin in 1890, Van Gogh cut off a portion of his left lobe. He did later commit suicide, however, taking two days to die from a gunshot wound.

===========================================

George Washington was not the first of America's 43 presidents. During the American War of Independence, the Continental Congress sitting in Pennsylvania chose Peyton Randolph as their first President.

He then appointed General Washington as commander of the Revolutionary army, called the Continental Army.

In 1781, John Hancock became president, and Washington wrote to him addressing the letter to 'The President of the United States'. Washington only became the first popularly elected President of the United States.

The story is also told that George Washington as a young boy chopped down a cherry tree, but such was his honesty that when asked by his father who had done it, said: 'Father, I cannot lie: it was me'. He was then beaten soundly. This too, is a complete fabrication.


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I know...I know...but, heck, it's Friday. Why not?
1 posted on 05/30/2008 12:06:37 PM PDT by yankeedame
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To: yankeedame

So I guess this means it is also a myth that the cheer “Hooray for our side” did NOT originate when Lady Godiva rode side-saddle down the streets of Coventry?


2 posted on 05/30/2008 12:17:26 PM PDT by 21twelve (Don't wish for peace. Pray for Victory.)
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To: yankeedame
Does this mean that Frosted Lucky Charms are not magically delicious?
3 posted on 05/30/2008 12:22:18 PM PDT by Flycatcher (Strong copy for a strong America)
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To: Flycatcher

I’m afraid so. And Cap’n Crunch was only a Lieutenant.


4 posted on 05/30/2008 12:35:32 PM PDT by Carpe Cerevisi
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To: yankeedame
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, wrote about Marie Antoinette who had ignorantly joked about the starving people of Paris but she was only 11 Volitaire's fellow Enlightenment philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, wrote about a princess who had ignorantly joked about the starving people of Paris, telling a courtier: 'Let them eat cake.' That was in 1766, when Marie Antoinette was only 11 years old.

Not quite accurate.

In 1766 Marie Antoinette was a virtually unknown Austrian princess - she was the eleventh of eleven sisters. Most people would have assumed that she would have been married off to an Austrian or Hungarian nobleman.

But two of her older sisters died and one was permanently crippled in a 1767 smallpox epidemic, when she was twelve.

When she was thirteen she was the only healthy unbetrothed daughter left and was promised to the French Dauphin. She did not actually arrive in France until she was fourteen.

During 1766 I believe Voltaire was living in Berlin - far from the Viennese court where the as yet unimportant-to-Frenchmen Maria Antonia (Marie Antoinette) was living. There is no proof of any kind that the princess he was referring to was her, or that she at that time had any knowledge at all of French current events.

there is not a grain of truth in the story. Fiddles weren't invented for another millennium, and Nero was 35 miles outside the city at Antium when the fire broke out

The word "fiddle" was used by Elizabethan translators of Cassius Dio and Tacitus to translate the word lyra or lyre. Like the fiddle it was a stringed instrument played with a utensil - so that was the logical choice of word in an English langauge which was at that time much more fluid than it is today.

Only one source places Nero at Antium. Others place him at estates not far from the city.

In any case, the fire burned for at least five days - more than enough time for an imperial courier to notify him of what was going on.

A couple of contemporary sources attest that while the fire was raging he was acting in a play and playing the lyre in safety and luxury.

The 4th was merely the day that the document itself went to the printers.

False. The 4th was the day that the changes suggested to the document by the Congress were made and officially adopted. It was sent to the printer that day, but its final draft was approved - hence the fact that it is dated July 4th and not July 2nd.

5 posted on 05/30/2008 12:35:36 PM PDT by wideawake (Why is it that those who call themselves Constitutionalists know the least about the Constitution?)
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To: wideawake

Thank you for the informative post. As I recall - perhaps it was Jefferson? - that said something like “This day (July 2) will be remembered with fireworks and parades as a day.....” And as I recall, they were waiting on a couple of more guys to review it and sign it?


6 posted on 05/30/2008 12:45:23 PM PDT by 21twelve (Don't wish for peace. Pray for Victory.)
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To: Carpe Cerevisi

However, it is true that Trix are for kids.


7 posted on 05/30/2008 1:05:55 PM PDT by AnnGora (I am unique. Just like everybody else.)
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To: yankeedame
Sir Humphry Davy who thought up the concept of a carbon filament arc light. What Edison, or at least his many engineers, managed to do was discover a better filament that would glow for long enough for the light to be worthwhile. Edison did however, take out over a thousand patents in his lifetime, for inventions connected with telegraphy, megaphones, gramaphones, the kinetoscope, and metallurgy

I thought up the idea of the electric car, but I alas never actually made it work.

The story is also told that George Washington as a young boy chopped down a cherry tree, but such was his honesty that when asked by his father who had done it, said: 'Father, I cannot lie: it was me'. He was then beaten soundly. This too, is a complete fabrication.

When was the time machine invented that sent the historian back in time to confirm this was just a fabrication?

8 posted on 05/30/2008 1:08:59 PM PDT by normy (Don't take it personally, just take it seriously.)
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To: 21twelve

I just straightened out my granddaughter on the GW cherry tree bit. The true story: He killed his mother’s favorite colt “horsing around” with the guys. He may have told the truth to mom....but I’ll bet he didn’t get praise for the truth and got a severe punishment.


9 posted on 05/30/2008 1:10:56 PM PDT by Sacajaweau ("The Cracker" will be renamed "The Crapper")
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To: 21twelve
As I recall - perhaps it was Jefferson? - that said something like “This day (July 2) will be remembered with fireworks and parades as a day.....” And as I recall, they were waiting on a couple of more guys to review it and sign it?

John Adams correctly predicted the holiday, but was off on the date. July 2 was when the congress voted to declare independence and it was that date he thought would be commemorated.

July 4 was when the official language of the Declaration was approved, but the act was taken 2 days earlier.

10 posted on 05/30/2008 1:35:29 PM PDT by SoothingDave
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To: yankeedame
"It is also quite untrue that so-called 'witches' were burned at the stake after the notorious witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692......all by hanging except one who was crushed to death by a door that had heavy stones placed upon it."

I believe this was Miles Corey who when asked if he was ready to confess replied, "more weight"

11 posted on 05/30/2008 1:51:51 PM PDT by joebuck (Finitum non capax infinitum!)
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To: yankeedame
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, wrote about Marie Antoinette ... That was in 1766, when Marie Antoinette was only 11 years old. Yet 20 years later, the story got around that it had been she who had made this remark, which went some way to creating the atmosphere of hatred that led to her execution in 1793.

So, even then the academics (with the help of the media, no doubt) have made untrue story about their government... Not unlike today...

12 posted on 05/30/2008 1:58:19 PM PDT by paudio (Like it or not, 'conservatism' is a word with many meanings. Hence the quotes.)
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To: normy
When was the time machine invented that sent the historian back in time to confirm this was just a fabrication?

It's long been considered as such. See, e.g., this discussion.

13 posted on 05/30/2008 2:07:33 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb

Oh I know many people consider it bunk but no one really knows.


14 posted on 05/30/2008 2:24:49 PM PDT by normy (Don't take it personally, just take it seriously.)
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To: normy
Oh I know many people consider it bunk but no one really knows.

The story first showed up in 1800 or so ... after Washington had died. For a man as lionized in his lifetime as Washington was, I think the story would have been told much earlier, were it authentic. Chances are that Pastor Weems made it up.

15 posted on 05/30/2008 2:28:38 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb
By the way, nothing irritates me more than when history is changed by modern man unless its proven without a shadow of a doubt the original account was false.

In 20 years Francis Scott Key will not have actually been held prisoner but was a songwriter trying to sell his wares.

16 posted on 05/30/2008 2:28:42 PM PDT by normy (Don't take it personally, just take it seriously.)
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To: yankeedame
Nor was Napoleon particularly small, despite his nickname, Le Petit Corporal ('The Little Corporal'). He was in fact 5ft 7in, which was fairly tall for the average European male of the early 19th century.

Le Petit Corporal wasn't Napoleon but one of his body parts: “one inch long and resembling a grape”.

17 posted on 05/30/2008 3:31:36 PM PDT by Oztrich Boy ("Never apologize, Mister. It's a sign of weakness" - Nathan Brittles)
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To: yankeedame
"Washington only became the first popularly elected President of the United States"

There's a reason we date the US Presidency from Washington's First Inauguration - it's something called the US Constitution. Washington is the first CONSTITUTIONALLY elected President of the USA.
18 posted on 05/30/2008 3:41:40 PM PDT by Enchante (Barack Chamberlain: My 1930s Appeasement Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Socialist Policies!)
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To: wideawake

re: Nero

That tale always struck me as strange anyway, b/c in those days there wasn’t exactly a serious fire-fighting capability. What exactly was Nero supposed to do that people were not already doing on their own? (either fleeing for their lives or trying to rescue some possessions if they saw a way to do so)


19 posted on 05/30/2008 3:50:28 PM PDT by Enchante (Barack Chamberlain: My 1930s Appeasement Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Socialist Policies!)
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To: yankeedame

But Al Gore really did invent the internet didn’t he?


20 posted on 05/30/2008 3:52:45 PM PDT by Boiling point (If God had wanted us to vote, he would have given us candidates.)
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To: Enchante
What exactly was Nero supposed to do

As imperator he should have mobilized a few legions to restore order, set up temporary quarters, dig latrines and open the granaries for dole purposes.

Actually show up and behave like he might give a rat's ass about his people.

21 posted on 05/30/2008 4:29:16 PM PDT by wideawake (Why is it that those who call themselves Constitutionalists know the least about the Constitution?)
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To: wideawake

Sure, but I was thinking of the phrase “WHILE Rome burned” so I was focusing just on the fire-fighting aspect that was pretty hopeless in those days. But you are right of course, there is an enormous set of relief challenges beginning even while such a castrophe is underway and continuing long after.


22 posted on 05/30/2008 5:53:48 PM PDT by Enchante (Barack Chamberlain: My 1930s Appeasement Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Socialist Policies!)
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To: AnnGora

“...However, it is true that Trix are for kids....”

And the walrus WAS Paul.


23 posted on 05/30/2008 6:54:36 PM PDT by NCC-1701 (PUT AN END TO ORGANIZED CRIME. ABOLISH THE I.R.S.)
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To: normy
The Cherry Tree Incident, was invented by a certain Parson Weems who never let the truth get in the way of a good story.
24 posted on 05/30/2008 7:23:58 PM PDT by NathanR (Obama: More 'African' than 'American'.)
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To: yankeedame
That was invented by the Englishman Sir Humphry Davy who thought up the concept of a carbon filament arc light.

Excuse me, but there is no such thing as a practical carbon filament arc light. A filament could not sustain an arc for even a fraction of a second.

We all have probably seen a "filament" arc light... it is the extremely bright light you see when a lightbulb burns out. That light is the arc across the two broken ends of the filament as it falls away from where it broke.

Electric light was not a new thing when Edison invented his vacuum filled carbon filament bulb. What Sir Humphrey Davy invented was the Carbon Arc lamp... which was used up until the 1970s in movie projectors (I was a projectionist in college), stage follow spot lights ... and are still being used in the large ballyhoo lights, which are essentially surplus WWII Siege/air-raid lights, used at theater openings and store grand-openings.

Carbon arc lamps work by using two carbon rods connected to a high voltage source. They are touched together and then backed away from contact after a very bright arc of electricity is started. The rods are consumed by the high heat over a fairly short period of time. As the rods are consumed, the operator or an automatic mechanism keeps moving the points of consumption so that the arc is maintained. IIRC, 2 - 10" by 1/4" carbon rods will last about a half hour... or two reels time of a movie... before having to be replaced.

Edison invented the first successful electric lightbulb after trying and testing over 1500 different filament materials.

25 posted on 05/30/2008 8:43:41 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: yankeedame
Many of these "myth" debunkings are also full or error and false assumptions.

Captain James Cook did not discover Australia . . . nor was he strictly speaking a captain, holding the rank of lieutenant when he sailed there for the first time.

Yes, he was. He was the master of the ship which makes him, very strictly speaking, a Captain, regardless of any official rank. Another such case was Lieutenant William Bligh, the infamous master of the Bounty, who was also a Captain when his some of his crew mutinied against him. Lieutenant Bligh was exonerated of any wrong doing in the mutiny and was commended for his seamanship. He eventually reached the rank of Vice-Admiral... but when he mastered a ship, as Vice-Admiral, he was still a Captain.

To this day, if a military Captain is aboard a US Navy ship, he is addressed as Commodore, not Captain, to avoid confusion with the real master of the ship, who may have an official rank far below the "Commodore's." Captain James Cook had been hired by the Royal Society, a non-military organization, to make the journey to the Pacific to make observations of the Transit of Venus across the face of the Sun. He and his ship were on loan from the Royal Navy to the Royal Society. His rank aboard ship absolutely was Captain... and he was also the expedition Commander. I do not believe it has ever been claimed that Cook "discovered" Australia. That honor actually does go to Abel Tasman. Cook was the first European to circumnavigate New Zealand and map the South Eastern Australia coast.

26 posted on 05/30/2008 9:16:09 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: Enchante
That tale always struck me as strange anyway, b/c in those days there wasn’t exactly a serious fire-fighting capability.

Actually the Roman fire department (the watch) was pretty good for that day and time. They had to be as Rome caught fire on a regular basis.

27 posted on 05/30/2008 9:23:16 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (A good marriage is like a casserole, only those responsible for it really know what goes into it.)
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To: wideawake
I think you and I are on the same page with these de-constructors of history.

A couple of contemporary sources attest that while the fire was raging he was acting in a play and playing the lyre in safety and luxury.

And some others report that he was active in directing the effort against the fire and assisting with the evacuation.

It is entirely possible that he WAS acting in a play, or playing a lyre, when the first reports were brought to him of the conflagration's start. It is also possible that he delegated authority to handle the problem and remained safely out of harms way.

It is also possible that he had a bad reputation that was imputed to him as propaganda in later years because of his treatment of the Christian martyrs of Rome.

Can you imagine what history/myth in 2000 years will report about G.W. Bush and what he was doing at the time of 9-11?

28 posted on 05/30/2008 9:43:31 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: normy
By the way, nothing irritates me more than when history is changed by modern man unless its proven without a shadow of a doubt the original account was false.

I thought the same about the allegation that Sir Walter Raleigh did not spread his cloak for the Queen and he merely "pretended" it was true. Would not he be a contemporaneous source—especially since he included it in his family coat of arm? This comment is based on a LACK of contemporary commentary.

The "pretended" comment is particularly egregious given the lack of facts to back it up. There were no "newspapers" with gossip columns— or anything like them that would have published such gossip—at the time. The closest thing was the posting of Broadsheets with announcements and some news that would be read by someone literate to whoever would listen. Word of mouth would have spread the story of the gallant Raleigh and such "gossip" may not or may not have been written down by any of the diarists of the day.

29 posted on 05/30/2008 9:54:59 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: NathanR
The Cherry Tree Incident, was invented by a certain Parson Weems who never let the truth get in the way of a good story.

Do you suppose he might be metaphorically related to a certain Pastor Wright who never let the truth get in the way of a bad story?

30 posted on 05/30/2008 9:58:22 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: Swordmaker
We see eye to eye on this one. It is entirely possible that the cherry tree and the cloak stories are not true. It is also entirely possible they are true. Lately historians have been changing history to suit agendas. It smacks of an attitude of "no one would be that honest or that gallant so it must be false" and usually never based on new evidence.

Remember WWII? Well according to some the Holocaust didn't happen and the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima were war crimes and done due to the violent racism of America and not actually to save lives on both sides.

31 posted on 05/31/2008 3:23:59 AM PDT by normy (Don't take it personally, just take it seriously.)
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To: Swordmaker
"will report about G.W. Bush and what he was doing at the time of 9-11?"

Oh, yes, maybe historians will ridicule him for reading "My Pet Goat" instead of leaping into action and shooting down 4 commericial airliners himself. Oh, wait, we've already heard that propaganda from Michael Moore.
32 posted on 05/31/2008 6:34:20 AM PDT by Enchante (Barack Chamberlain: My 1930s Appeasement Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Socialist Policies!)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
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33 posted on 06/16/2008 8:58:24 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_________________________Profile updated Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv

Lady Godiva

34 posted on 06/16/2008 9:28:36 PM PDT by blam
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To: Carpe Cerevisi; Cap'n Crunch; Flycatcher; SunkenCiv; MeekOneGOP; All
......And Cap’n Crunch was only a Lieutenant


Cap'n Crunch
Since Apr 21, 1999

view home page, enter name:

Actually, Cap'n Crunch is a well known FReeper and has been at FR for a long time.

Hiya Cap'n! How's things?

35 posted on 06/16/2008 11:18:37 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Oztrich Boy

And John Dillinger’s...ahem...Johnson was normal size, not bodacious as often reported. I have read an eyewitness report from a physician present at Dillinger’s autopsy.


36 posted on 06/17/2008 4:44:43 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("One look in the mirror and I'm tickled pink, I don't give a hoot about what you think.")
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To: SunkenCiv
Bummer. Since said Lady is in my ancestry, I was hoping the tale was true, as it would explain my propensity to disrobe a lot of things.
37 posted on 06/17/2008 7:12:46 AM PDT by Monkey Face ("Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without any proof.")
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To: Monkey Face

I had read once that the riding unclothed was in protest of taxes.


38 posted on 06/17/2008 7:26:40 AM PDT by Jaded ("I have a mustard- seed; and I am not afraid to use it."- Joseph Ratzinger)
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To: Jaded

It was. I don’t think that type of protest would do much good today.

The thought crossed my mind that we should somehow get a million nekkid wimmins to ride Arabian horses in protest of the gas prices, but I suspect the ride would have better results if we did it in front of the oil companies’ corporate offices. Mebbe.

Or not.


39 posted on 06/17/2008 8:47:42 AM PDT by Monkey Face ("Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without any proof.")
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To: blam; AnAmericanMother; Billthedrill; aculeus; MozarkDawg; Constitution Day; Petronski; ...
(larger scan)

Protest of taxes, fiddlesticks. She exhausted her clothing budget on the horse.

40 posted on 06/17/2008 9:05:21 AM PDT by dighton
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To: dighton

Aw heck yeah.

Always loved that Collier rendition.


41 posted on 06/17/2008 9:48:32 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Monkey Face

:’D


42 posted on 06/17/2008 10:16:24 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_________________________Profile updated Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: Fiddlstix

I heard he was a cereal killer.


43 posted on 06/17/2008 10:19:49 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_________________________Profile updated Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: Monkey Face

Of course the Godiva legend is true - or a lot of models and actresses took their clothes off for nothing, in which case we’d have to make the legend up anyway.


44 posted on 06/17/2008 12:48:05 PM PDT by colorado tanker (Number nine, number nine, number nine . . .)
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To: colorado tanker

Since there is a notation in my genealogy next to Lady Godiva’s info, I have to believe she really did make that ride. But I also thought she rode bareback, not just bare. (Wonder where I got THAT idea?)


45 posted on 06/17/2008 12:59:45 PM PDT by Monkey Face ("Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without any proof.")
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To: yankeedame
George Washington was not the first of America's 43 presidents. During the American War of Independence, the Continental Congress sitting in Pennsylvania chose Peyton Randolph as their first President.

I see this pop up from time to time...Peyton Randolph and John Hancock were both President of the Continental Congress...they were not President of the United States. There were no United States to be President of.

Washington only became the first popularly elected President of the United States.

As if being elected meant nothing.

46 posted on 06/17/2008 1:10:12 PM PDT by pgkdan (Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions - G.K. Chesterton)
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To: yankeedame
George Washington was not the first of America's 43 presidents. During the American War of Independence, the Continental Congress sitting in Pennsylvania chose Peyton Randolph as their first President.

I see this pop up from time to time...Peyton Randolph and John Hancock were both President of the Continental Congress...they were not President of the United States. There were no United States to be President of.

Washington only became the first popularly elected President of the United States.

As if being elected meant nothing.

47 posted on 06/17/2008 1:11:06 PM PDT by pgkdan (Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions - G.K. Chesterton)
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To: Swordmaker

I am proud to say that my Great Uncle, along with another inventor, were responsible for the tipless lighbulb, commonly used today. They invented it when they were employed at GE.


48 posted on 06/17/2008 1:27:15 PM PDT by jaydubya2
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To: Monkey Face

Most of the depictions I’ve seen show her riding bareback, too. Hey, why not be consistent?


49 posted on 06/18/2008 9:17:34 AM PDT by colorado tanker (Number nine, number nine, number nine . . .)
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To: colorado tanker

See? Of course, I think the long hair was stretching the modesty factor. Nakedidity aside, if that’s all that was between her and the bridle, then...well...then...she was NEKKID!

Now THERE’s a freedom....

;o])


50 posted on 06/18/2008 9:23:21 AM PDT by Monkey Face ("Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without any proof.")
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