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Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

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  • Ancient underwater forest discovered off Norfolk coast

    01/31/2015 4:49:37 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 7 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 January 2015 Last updated at 00:28 GMT | Credit: The underwater diving footage is copyright and courtesy of Rob Spray and Dawn Watson
    Nature experts have discovered a remarkable submerged forest thousands of years old under the sea close to the Norfolk coast. The trees were part of an area known as 'Doggerland' which formed part of a much bigger area before it was flooded by the North Sea. It was once so vast that hunter-gatherers who lived in the vicinity could have walked to Germany across its land mass.
  • Mystery of Confederate submarine that sank Union ship then vanished finally solved?

    01/30/2015 12:59:21 PM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 59 replies
    DailyMail.co.uk ^ | January 30, 2015 | Sadie Whitelocks
    After 15 years of painstaking restoration, scientists say they are on the brink of solving what sank the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley - the first sub in history to wreck an enemy warship. Considered the Confederacy's stealth weapon during the Civil War, the hand-cranked Hunley sank the Union warship Housatonic in winter 1864 and then disappeared with all eight Confederate sailors inside. Its remains were discovered in 1995 in waters off South Carolina and five later it was raised to a conservation lab. Now with about 70per cent of the hull cleaned of heavy rust, Paul Mardikian, a senior conservator...
  • After 150 years, Confederate submarine's hull again revealed

    01/30/2015 11:13:54 AM PST · by Kartographer · 66 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 1/30/15 | BRUCE SMITH
    A century and a half after it sank and a decade and a half after it was raised, scientists are finally getting a look at the hull of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. What they find may finally solve the mystery of why the hand-cranked submarine sank during the Civil War. "It's like unwrapping a Christmas gift after 15 years. We have been wanting to do this for many years now," said Paul Mardikian, senior conservator on the Hunley project.
  • Guide to American Presidents GEORGE WASHINGTON 1732-99 [GW's English Ancestry]

    06/18/2013 8:25:00 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 21 replies
    Burke's Peerage ^ | Unknown | Anon.
    1st PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1789-97 FAMILY ESSAY "Washington came of very good blood - aw, quite good - I b'lieve." Attributed by his classmates to Amory Blaine in F. Scott Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise. The Washingtons are of unusual antiquity in European terms, let alone American ones. A direct male ancestry has been traced back to William de Wessington or Wessyngton (i.e., Washington, a town in Tyne and Wear, formerly County Durham, in northern England), who was living in the late 12th century. The remoter ancestry is not absolutely certain but a detailed argument has...
  • Humans and Neandertals likely interbred in Middle East

    01/29/2015 1:26:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    Science ^ | 28 January 2015 | Michael Balter
    The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull of a modern human in an Israeli cave, the first sighting of Homo sapiens in this time and place, offers skeletal evidence to support the idea that Neandertals and moderns mated in the Middle East between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago. What's more, the skull could belong to an ancestor of the modern humans who later swept across Europe and Asia and replaced the Neandertals. The find supports a raft of recent genetic studies. A 2010 analysis, for example, found that up to 2% of the genomes of today's Europeans and Asians consist...
  • Genghis Khan's genetic legacy has competition

    01/29/2015 1:19:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Nature ^ | 23 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    In addition to Genghis Khan and his male descendants, researchers have previously identified the founders of two other highly successful Y-chromosome lineages: one that began in China with Giocangga, a Qinq Dynasty ruler who died in 15823, and another belonging to the medieval Uí NĂ©ill dynasty in Ireland. Jobling's team made a systematic search for genetic founders by analysing the Y chromosomes of more than 5,000 men from 127 populations spanning Asia... because lots of data were available and there was already evidence of such lineages. The team identified 11 Y-chromosome sequences that were each shared by more than 20...
  • Found in Spain: traces of Hannibal's troops

    01/29/2015 12:59:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    The Local, Spain's news in English ^ | January 28, 2015 | Jessica Jones
    Spanish archaeology students have discovered a 2,200-year-old moat in what is now the Catalan town of Valls, filled with objects providing evidence of the presence of troops of the Carthaginian general Hannibal in the area. The moat, which surrounded the Iberian town of Vilar de Vals, contained coins and lead projectiles, researchers said in a statement. It is estimated the moat could have had a width of 40 metres (131 feet), a depth of five metres, and a length of nearly half a kilometre. Jaume Noguera from the Prehistory department at the University of Barcelona, and Jordi López, from the...
  • Anthropologists Have Mapped All 61 Tattoos On Ötzi The Iceman

    01/29/2015 7:56:36 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 79 replies
    By using an innovative non-invasive photographic technique, European researchers have managed to locate and map the extensive set of tattoos on the exquisitely preserved remains of Ötzi the Iceman. Remarkably, they even found a previously unknown tattoo on his ribcage. Ötzi's frozen remains were discovered by two German tourists in the Ötzal Alps on the border between Austria and Italy in 1991. He lived around 3,300 BCE and represents Europe's oldest natural human mummy. Because he was so well preserved in ice, he has provided anthropologists with a slew of information about Copper Age (or Chalcolithic) humans. ... It's worth...
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 74 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • A Voyage through Time on the Canal du Midi

    01/28/2015 1:35:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    France Today ^ | October 19, 2014 | Florence Derrick
    ...Pierre-Paul Riquet, the man behind one of the 17th century's greatest works of engineering -- and some say, works of art -- remains in Vauban's shadow, despite his life's accomplishment, which was classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. This 150-mile long waterway was once known as the Canal Royal en Languedoc, for good reason. French revolutionaries may have removed the 'royal' from its title in 1789, yet this is a canal which remains fit for a king. Dappled sunlight streams onto its emerald-green water from between the leaves of the 42,000 plane and oak trees which line...
  • Son of ex-slave who served in Union army during Civil War dies 179 years after father's birth

    01/27/2015 7:40:15 PM PST · by iowamark · 55 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1/27/2015 | AP
    RALEIGH, N.C. – Luke Martin Jr., whose father was an ex-slave and Civil War Union soldier, has died — 179 years after his father was born. Martin was 97 when he died Sunday at his home in New Bern, North Carolina.. ..lived in the house where he was born — a house his father built in the 1890s. Martin had little memory of his father, Luke Martin Sr., who died at age 84 in 1920 when the son was just a few years old, according to Martin-Williams. The elder Martin, who was born in 1836, was married twice, the second...
  • Israeli settlers’ archaeology tourism challenges Palestinian history

    01/31/2014 9:19:15 AM PST · by Para-Ord.45 · 23 replies
    http://english.alarabiya.net ^ | January 29 2014 | Reuters, West Bank
    Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) archaeologist Eli Shukron shows an ancient seal, at an archaeological site known as the City of David in Jerusalem On an ancient hill dotted with 1,000-year-old olive trees, Israelis are busy excavating in search of the first palace of King David in the heart of the West Bank. The Jewish settlers who started the dig with the help of Israel's Antiquities Authority say they want to turn it into an archaeological park to celebrate its historical significance. But for Palestinians who hope the West Bank will someday form part of a Palestinian state, the move is...
  • Traces of 2,000-year-old wartime famine unearthed in Jerusalem

    07/01/2013 10:54:23 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 13 replies
    LiveScience via Foxnews.com ^ | July 01, 2013 | By Megan Gannon
    Archaeologists may have discovered evidence of a dire famine that gripped Jerusalem during a Roman siege nearly 2,000 years ago. Cooking pots and a ceramic lamp were found in an ancient cistern near the Western Wall, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced. Excavators believe these artifacts were left in the underground chamber by Jewish residents who were trying to eat what little food they had in secret during the war. "This is the first time we are able to connect archaeological finds with the famine that occurred during the siege of Jerusalem at the time of the Great Revolt," Eli...
  • American Hero: Samuel Whittemore (80 Years Old!) Takes on the Redcoats on April 18, 1775

    07/04/2006 6:16:02 AM PDT · by Oakleaf · 33 replies · 1,347+ views
    Bob Hartwell.com ^ | Unknown | Bob Harwell
    As darkness began to set in, colonials began to attack the front of the column. There were a few cavalry units made up of older, experienced men who rode to within shot of the front of the column, dismounted and fired with great accuracy, then mounting and riding away only to reappear elsewhere. Now and then, the Regulars would fire cannon scattering the Militia who would quickly materialize again as the British column approached Menotomy. At Jason Russel’s house, British soldiers invaded the house killing eleven Americans, including Russel who was later found bayoneted at the foot of the stairs....
  • Voices of the Revolution: The Five Riders [Four + One]

    01/26/2015 1:01:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Constitution Facts ^ | Oak Hill Publishing
    ...Paul Revere, born in Boston in 1734... After the death of his father in 1754, Paul enlisted in the provincial army to fight in the French and Indian War... When the war was over, he returned to Boston to take over his father's silversmith business, only to fall into financial difficulties during the Stamp Act of 1765. Frustrated by this gave him cause to join the Sons of Liberty... On the night of April 18, 1775, Joseph Warren sent Revere to send the signal to Charlestown that the British troops were on the move... His journey ended in Lexington where...
  • Is Da Vinci's Mona Lisa a Self-Portrait? Some say...{It} May Be a Self-Portrait... in Drag

    01/27/2010 5:15:52 AM PST · by drpix · 24 replies · 1,152+ views
    abcnews.com ^ | 1/26/10 | NICK WATT and AMMU KANNAMPILLY
    Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa is arguably the most famous portrait in the world, but now some are speculating that the woman with the inscrutable smile may not be a woman after all. They are suggesting that the Mona Lisa may be a self-portrait, da Vinci in drag. -more-
  • Nude, Mona Lisa-like painting surfaces

    06/12/2009 4:52:22 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 58 replies · 3,811+ views
    Discovery ^ | JUne 12, 2009 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Leonardo da Vinci, in a Renaissance version of Mad Magazine, may have painted his famous Mona Lisa in a number of ways, including nude. Now, a painting has surfaced that looks much like the original, sparking debate over just how far the master took his iconic painting. The newly revealed painting, hidden for almost a century within the wood wall of a private library, shows a portrait of a half-naked woman with clear links to the famous (and clothed) Mona Lisa. The work, which documents suggest was at least based on never-seen similar work by da Vinci, is now on...
  • Copy of Mona Lisa provides insight into original

    09/26/2006 3:48:28 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 28 replies · 1,202+ views
    CBC Arts ^ | Sept. 24, 2006
    An early copy of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, which has bright colours believed to reflect the original painting, will go on display in London for the first time since 1902. The original Mona Lisa painting hangs in the Louvre in Paris. (Canadian Press) The Dulwich Picture Gallery will exhibit a reproduction once owned by portrait painter Sir Joshua Reynolds, who received it from the Duke of Leeds in 1790. ..... The reproduction is wider than the original, showing a pair of columns flanking the figure that are only hinted at in Leonardo's version. As well, the colours are much...
  • Enigma of Mona Lisa Smile Cracked

    12/15/2005 3:42:43 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 63 replies · 2,329+ views
    Sci-Tech Today ^ | December 15, 2005 | Robin Arnfield
    According to findings published in the New Scientist, a British journal, the exact breakdown of Mona Lisa's emotions, as captured by Leonardo da Vinci, were 83 percent happy, 9 percent disgusted, 6 percent fearful, and 2 percent angry. The enigma of Leonardo da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa painting has been cracked with the help of emotion-recognition software from scientists at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The painting, which is now in the Louvre Museum in Paris, France, was painted at some point between 1503 and 1506, according to art historians. After...
  • Louvre: The Mona Lisa Is Deteriorating

    04/26/2004 10:21:27 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 111 replies · 455+ views
    AP ^ | April 26, 2004
    The Mona Lisa (search), Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece of a mysterious woman with a slight smile, is deteriorating, and the Louvre Museum (search) said Monday it will conduct an in-depth technical study to determine why. The thin panel of poplar wood that the work is painted on has become deformed since conservation experts last evaluated the painting, the Louvre said in a written statement. It did not say when the last evaluation was. The Louvre said the condition of the Mona Lisa was causing "some worry" and that a new study on the state of the work has been launched....
  • Italy seizes more than 5,000 looted antiquities in record haul

    01/25/2015 1:33:45 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    France24 ^ | 22 January 2015 | AFP
    The Italian government on Wednesday said police had seized more than 5,000 ancient artefacts in a record 45-million-euro haul after dismantling a Swiss-Italian trafficking ring. Culture Minister Dario Franceschini said it was the country's "largest discovery yet" of looted works and consisted of 5,361 pieces, including vases, jewellery, frescoes and bronze statues, all dating from the 8th century BC to the 3rd century AD. The archaeological treasures came from illegal digs across Italy and "will be returned to where they were found", the minister told reporters. Police said the items were worth around 45 million euros ($52 million) and were...
  • Mani and the Persian Kings

    01/25/2015 1:00:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Patheos ^ | January 25, 2015 | Philip Jenkins
    It is astonishing that scholars of religion refer so little to the Manichaean faith, which in its day -- roughly from the third century AD through the fourteenth century -- was a fully fledged world religion, which interacted with Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Zoroastrianism and Judaism. At various times, its adherents could be found across the whole of Eurasia, from France to China. It also created a substantial body of scriptures and commentaries, most of which are now lost. Manichaeanism (Manichaeism) is, I believe, the only example of a world religion that has arisen and then vanished entirely, seemingly without trace....
  • History’s First Rainbow Political Execution

    01/25/2015 11:00:13 AM PST · by CharlesOConnell · 8 replies
    If MSNBC Says Something Alone in the Forest, Is It Still Stupid? ^ | c. 430 – 354 BC | Ξενοφῶν (Xenophon)
    Socrates Â… took occasion of the presence of a whole company and of Euthydemus to remark that Critias appeared to be suffering from a swinish affection, or else why this desire to rub himself against Euthydemus like a herd of piglings scraping against stones. The hatred of Critias to Socrates doubtless dates from this incident. He treasured it up against him, and afterwards, when he was one of the Thirty [Tyrants] Â… he framed the law against teaching the art of words merely from a desire to vilify Socrates. He was at a loss to know how else to...
  • Lars Andersen: a new level of archery (YouTube video, 5:51)

    01/24/2015 1:05:27 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEG-ly9tQGk&x-yt-cl=84503534&x-yt-ts=1421914688
  • Ancient red numbers discovered on Colosseum: Restorers find marks indicating sectors of stadium

    01/24/2015 3:48:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Wanted in Rome ^ | January 22, 2015 | unattributed
    Traces of painted red numbers have been discovered during the ongoing restoration of the Colosseum, indicating various sectors of the amphitheatre similar to the seating system employed by today's stadiums. The numbers were painted on the arches of the Colosseum to guide visitors to their respective stands, according to their social class. Describing it as an "exceptional discovery", the monument's director Rossella Rea said that restorers had not expected the painted numbers to have survived. The director of the restoration project Cinzia Conti said the discovery proved the delicacy of the water-powered process, which removes dirt and smog residue but...
  • Cats Are Finally Getting Geneticists' Attention

    01/24/2015 3:27:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    January 15, 2015 ^ | January 15, 2015 | Carl Engelking
    Consumer doggie DNA testing is old hat at this point, having been around since 2007. But cat-lovers who wish to decipher their pet's breed are out of luck -- no such tests exist for felines. That fact reflects the state of the underlying science. Since the first full dog genome was sequenced ten years ago, geneticists have identified hundreds of genes behind canine diseases and physical traits. By comparison, just a handful of such genes have been identified in cats. But a group of geneticists is working to close this gap by sequencing 99 domestic cats. This week the researchers...
  • Scan finds new tattoos on 5300-year-old Iceman

    01/24/2015 3:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    redOrbit ^ | January 22, 2015 | Aaron Deter-Wolf
    A new study has used advanced imaging techniques to identify previously unknown tattoos on the ribcage of the 5300-year old man known as Ötzi, bringing his total number of tattoos to 61... Thanks to more than two decades of analysis, scientists arguably know more about Ötzi's health and final days than those of any other ancient human. He died at around 45 years of age after being shot in the back with a stone-tipped arrow and bludgeoned. In the 12 hours preceding his death he climbed into the mountains from an Italian valley, and ate a last meal consisting of...
  • Thousands Sign Petition Calling for Richard III to Have a Catholic Burial

    01/23/2015 6:23:37 AM PST · by marshmallow · 18 replies
    The Catholic Herald (UK) ^ | 1/23/15 | Mark Greaves
    Petition is organised by historians whose efforts led to the discovery of the king's remainsThree thousand people have signed a petition calling for Richard III to be given a Catholic burial. The petition, addressed to Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the Archbishop of Westminster, is being organised by the historians whose efforts led to the king’s remains being found under a car park in Leicester. Under present plans Richard III, who died in the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, before the Reformation, will be buried at the Anglican cathedral in Leicester on March 26. But Philippa Langley, leader of the Looking for...
  • Archery Quite Unlike Any Other (video)

    01/23/2015 7:04:55 PM PST · by servo1969 · 40 replies
    TruthRevolt.org ^ | 1-23-2015 | Yehuda Remer
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEG-ly9tQGk Danish archer Lars Andersen might be the most accomplished archer of our time. Not because of any awards or medals, but purely because of what he has accomplished by studying ancient texts and paintings. Andersen posted a video on Friday attempting to disprove the Hollywood myth of archery. Not only that, he explains how the art of archery is lost on today's archers because a majority of them stand still and aim at their target rather than be able to run, shoot, and hit their targets while also being able to shoot rapidly. Andersen says that the ultimate feat...
  • World's fastest archer Lars Anderson debunks Hollywood archery myths

    01/24/2015 5:34:10 AM PST · by Plainsman · 54 replies
    International Business Times ^ | January 23, 2015 | Adam Justice
    For thousands of years, the bow and arrow was used for war. Those days are long gone, and most people today only know of archery through TV and movies. However, as the Danish archer Lars Andersen has proved, Hollywood archery has very little to do with actual war archery. Lars Andersen originally started using bow and arrow to fight in pretend battles during Larps (live action role play) events, where he played a soldier in a medieval-inspired army. While Larps can be about anything – the Danish/Polish Harry Potter inspired larp College of Wizardry (cowlarp.com) recently got world-wide media attention...
  • Papyrus Found in Mummy Mask May Hold Oldest Known Gospel Text

    01/23/2015 9:20:32 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 01/23/2015 | By James Maynard
    The Gospel of Mark has been discovered written on a tiny fragment of ancient papyrus, found within a mummy mask. During the era when the mask was created, papyrus was expensive, and the religious text was reused to create the decorative wear for the mummy. This discovery could represent the oldest gospel text ever found by archaeologists. The oldest samples of Christian scripture date from the Second Century of the Common Era. Pharaohs and wealthy individuals were often adorned with mummy masks made of gold and precious materials. Masks for people from lower economic classes were often manufactured from papyrus,...
  • A colonial heritage in scholarly interpretations of Mark's gospel

    12/13/2011 7:38:18 PM PST · by decimon · 11 replies · 1+ views
    University of Gothenburg ^ | December 13, 2011
    When the story of Jesus known as The Gospel of Mark began to circulate as a written text in the ancient Mediterranean cities, it became engaged in a form of negotiation with the Roman imperial culture. A newly published dissertation from the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) shows, however, that a European colonial heritage probably has caused biblical scholars to neglect the earliest Gospel's primary act of negotiation with its imperial context. Biblical scholar Hans Leander has investigated how Mark's Gospel was related to Rome's Empire when it began to circulate among the early Christians during the first century C.E. He...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found the Oldest Copy of One of the Gospels-(A mummy's mask)

    01/23/2015 12:03:21 PM PST · by virgil283 · 8 replies
    tatler ^ | January 21, 2015 | Chris Queen
    "New technology that allows scientists to remove the glue from the masks of mummies without damaging the ink on the paper used to make the mask has yielded an exciting discovery: a piece of papyrus that may contain the oldest known copy of one of the gospels. The finding, a fragment of the Gospel of Mark, which dates back to the year 90, is one of several fascinating texts that archaeologists are discovering in the masks of mummies. This first-century gospel fragment was written on a sheet of papyrus that was later reused to create a mask that was worn...
  • Beard on King Tut's burial mask damaged after epoxy gluing

    01/22/2015 8:36:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 28 replies
    AP ^ | January 22, 2014 | Staff
    The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with epoxy, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning, conservators at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo said Wednesday. The museum is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds, mounted on walls, crumble from behind open panels of glass. Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are its top exhibits. Three of the museum's conservators reached by telephone gave...
  • OLDEST KNOWN GOSPEL RETRIEVED FROM MUMMY MASK, RESEARCHERS CLAIM

    01/21/2015 11:34:40 AM PST · by bkopto · 75 replies
    Breitbart/UPI ^ | Jan 21, 2015 | staff
    The mummy masks of ancient commoners are a treasure trove of classical and religious documents — Christian scripture, Phoenician histories, Greek poetry. While the rich and royal members of ancient Egyptian society were buried in mummy masks of flaked gold and other precious metals, common people were forced to construct theirs with recycled pieces of paper. Recently, archaeologists found what they believe to be the world’s oldest piece of scripture in the mask of mummy from the first century. Researchers say the new scrap of spiritual papyrus is a portion of the the Gospel of Mark, the second chapter of...
  • Archaeologists Investigate Ancient Greek Temenos on Black Sea Island

    01/21/2015 6:44:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, January 19, 2015 | editors
    A team of archaeologists are discovering new finds on a tiny island just off the Black Sea coast near Sozopol, Bulgaria -- finds that may shed additional light on the location and features of a lost temple to Apollo erected by Archaic Greeks in the late 6th century BCE. Epigraphic sources document that a temple to Apollo was raised on an island near the ancient Greek colony of Apollonia Pontica, which is located near present-day Sozopol. But there has been no evidence to suggest where the temple was actually located -- until recently, when an archaeological team under the direction...
  • Tuberculosis genomes track human history

    01/21/2015 6:34:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Nature ^ | 19 January 2015 Corrected: 20 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Although M. tuberculosis probably first emerged some 40,000 years ago in Africa, the disease did not take hold until humans took to farming... A previous analysis by his team had shown that the common ancestor of all the M. bacterium strains circulating today began spreading around 10,000 years ago in the ancient Fertile Crescent, a region stretching from Mesopotamia to the Nile Delta that was a cradle of agriculture... 4,987 samples of the Beijing lineage from 99 countries... the information to date the expansion of the lineage and show how the strains are related... the Beijing lineage did indeed emerge...
  • Copyright Infringement complaint from Vanity Fair/Condé Nast

    09/23/2003 1:40:22 PM PDT · by Jim Robinson · 174 replies · 4,244+ views
    Email
    <p>From: "Gigante, John D."</p> <p>We represent The Conde Nast Publications, publisher of Vanity Fair. It has come to our attention that your website posted and continues to post without permission at least two copies of an article entitled "The Message in the Anthrax" written by Don Foster for the October 2003 issue of Vanity Fair.</p>
  • X-ray technique 'reads' burnt Vesuvius scroll

    01/20/2015 12:10:59 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 39 replies
    BBC ^ | 20 January 2015 | Jonathan Webb
    For the first time, words have been read from a burnt, rolled-up scroll buried by Mount Vesuvius in AD79. The scrolls of Herculaneum, the only classical library still in existence, were blasted by volcanic gas hotter than 300C and are desperately fragile. Deep inside one scroll, physicists distinguished the ink from the paper using a 3D X-ray imaging technique sometimes used in breast scans. They believe that other scrolls could also be deciphered without unrolling.
  • Simon de Montfort: The turning point for democracy that gets overlooked

    01/20/2015 1:34:10 AM PST · by moose07 · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 19 January 2015 | BBC,Luke Foddy.
    In June the world will celebrate 800 years since the issuing of Magna Carta. But 2015 is also the anniversary of another important, and far more radical, British milestone in democratic history, writes Luke Foddy. Almost exactly 750 years ago, an extraordinary parliament opened in Westminster. For the very first time, elected representatives from every county and major town in England were invited to parliament on behalf of their local communities. It was, in the words of one historian, "the House of Commons in embryo". The January Parliament, which first met on 20 January 1265, is one of the...
  • Was the Gospel of St Luke 'written' by MARY?

    04/14/2014 4:20:41 PM PDT · by GreyFriar · 47 replies
    The Daily Mail Online ^ | April 14, 2014 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Dr. Adam Bradford believes third Gospel was originally a legal document. He says it was written by Luke, a Greek physician, as a letter of support for St Paul who was imprisoned for the political crime of supporting Jesus. Details about Jesus' childhood could only have come from Mary, he claims. He argues feminine words in the scripture give away the true author.
  • Mummy Mask May Reveal Oldest Known Gospel

    01/19/2015 11:10:30 PM PST · by SteveH · 30 replies
    livescience ^ | January 18, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    A text that may be the oldest copy of a gospel known to exist — a fragment of the Gospel of Mark that was written during the first century, before the year 90 — is set to be published. At present, the oldest surviving copies of the gospel texts date to the second century (the years 101 to 200). This first-century gospel fragment was written on a sheet of papyrus that was later reused to create a mask that was worn by a mummy. Although the mummies of Egyptian pharaohs wore masks made of gold, ordinary people had to settle...
  • Alexander-era tomb contains bones of woman, baby, men

    01/19/2015 2:12:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | Monday, January 19, 2015 | Reuters
    The culture ministry said research on the tomb's bones showed the buried woman was over 60 years old and about 1.57 metres tall while the two men were aged 35 to 45 years old. One of the men had cut marks in his left chest that were most likely from mortal injuries inflicted by a knife or small sword, the ministry said. The men had an estimated height of 1.62 to 1.68 metres. The few burned bone remains of the fifth interred person, who was cremated, could not reveal the person's gender and authorities said further testing would be carried...
  • Timber project to explore Shropshire's medieval heritage

    01/19/2015 4:53:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    University of Bristol ^ | 16 January 2015 | press release
    The grant will allow the team to archaeologically survey the village using a variety of methods, with particular focus on the group of timber-framed buildings which are present on an estate map of 1631. Many of these buildings probably have their origins within the medieval period. Dr Nash said: "Based on place-name evidence, the village of Tilley probably has its origins during the Early Medieval (Anglo-Saxon) period. The 'ley' element of Tilley translates into 'leah', meaning wood clearing." The project, one of the largest of its kind, will include a dendrochronology survey of 28 buildings that stand within the Tilley...
  • Ireland's Dairies Date Back 6,000 Years

    01/19/2015 4:45:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, January 16, 2015 | editors
    Ninety percent of the fats found in Neolithic cooking pots from Ireland came from dairy products, according to a new study conducted at the University of Bristol. "We know from previous research that dairying was an important part of many early farming economies, but what was a big surprise was the prevalence of dairy residues in Irish pots. It looks to have been a very important food source," said Jessica Smyth of the School of Chemistry. The remaining ten percent of the residues came from beef or mutton fat, or a mixture of milk and meat. "People can obviously cook...
  • Archaeologists find 1882 rifle leaning against Nevada desert tree

    01/16/2015 6:46:32 AM PST · by nikos1121 · 25 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 1/16/2015 | Dan Whitcomb
    Archaeologists conducting a survey in Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada have stumbled upon a 132-year-old Winchester rifle propped against a tree, possibly having been left there more than a century ago. The rifle, which records show was manufactured and shipped by the gun maker in 1882, had been leaning against the Juniper tree for so long that the wood of its stock was cracked and deteriorated from the desert sun, its barrel rusted. "It really is a mystery," said Nichole Andler, a public information officer for Great Basin National Park. "We know it has been out there awhile...
  • Discovery of site of Jesus' trial creates dilemma for pilgrims

    01/19/2015 1:58:28 AM PST · by BlackVeil · 6 replies
    Catholic News Service ^ | 19 Jan 2015 | anon
    Archaeologists might have uncovered the site of the trial of Jesus. While excavating the floors underneath an abandoned building next to the Tower of David Museum in Jerusalem, archaeologists came across the foundation walls and sewage system that lay beneath Herod the Great’s Jerusalem palace. According to scholars, this is most likely the place ...
  • First DNA tests say Kennewick Man was Native American

    01/18/2015 9:27:17 PM PST · by Theoria · 41 replies
    The Seattle Times ^ | 17 Jan 2015 | Sandi Doughton
    Nearly two decades after the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man was discovered on the banks of the Columbia River, the mystery of his origins appears to be nearing resolution. Genetic analysis is still under way in Denmark, but documents obtained through the federal Freedom of Information Act say preliminary results point to a Native-American heritage.The researchers performing the DNA analysis “feel that Kennewick has normal, standard Native-American genetics,” according to a 2013 email to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for the care and management of the bones. “At present there is no indication he has a...
  • MIT scientists find way to more easily map the brain

    01/18/2015 10:46:28 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 1/15/15 | Carolyn Y. Johnson
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists examining the intricate network of brain cells that underlie sight, thought, and psychiatric disease had a running joke in the laboratory: let’s just make everything bigger. If they could simply enlarge brain cells, they reasoned, the task of mapping the circuits would be easier. Now, they have found a way to do just that, using a technique that has shades of a 1950s science fiction movie. But instead of spawning killer ants or a 50-foot giantess, the researchers have found a controlled way to cause a tissue sample swell to roughly four and a half...
  • Atomic Bombs Help Solve Brain Mystery

    06/07/2013 11:41:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 6 June 2013 | Emily Underwood
    Enlarge Image Nuclear fallout. Radioactive carbon-14 atoms released by atomic bombs are helping scientists determine the birthdays of new neurons in the hippocampus (inset). Credit: Spalding et al., Cell (2013);(inset) Weissman, Livet, Sanes, and Lichtman/Harvard University The mushroom clouds produced by more than 500 nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War may have had a silver lining, after all. More than 50 years later, scientists have found a way to use radioactive carbon isotopes released into the atmosphere by nuclear testing to settle a long-standing debate in neuroscience: Does the adult human brain produce new neurons? After working to...