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  • Etruscan settlement found in Sardinia for first time [tr]

    01/21/2018 2:55:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | January 8, 2018 | unattributed
    An Etruscan settlement that dates back to the 9th century BC has been found on the Sardinian coasts near Olbia. The presence emerged during a review of the findings of recent years by the archaeological superintendency for the Sassari and Nuoro provinces. The area of the settlement - according to a statement issued by the superintendency - is on the Tavolara isle, a position that enabled a certain degree of caution in contact with coastal inhabitants and those further inland. Archaeologists note that other settlements might be found in the Gallura area, on the opposite shore from Etruria. Etruria's cities...
  • Neolithic girl's reconstructed face unveiled at Athens Acropolis Museum on January 19th

    01/18/2018 6:24:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Tornos news ^ | January 10, 2018 | unattributed
    An 18-year-old girl who lived in Greece 7,000 years ago and was unearthed by archaeologists in Theopetra cave, near the city of Trikala, has had her face reconstructed and is about to officially introduce herself to the public... Dawn (Avgi in Greek) is a woman from the Mesolithic era (7,000 BC) who lived in the Theopetra cave, according to Athens University professor Manolis Papagrigorakis; who has invested a great deal of time and learning in order to bring Greeks “face to face” with their ancestors... Papagrigorakis' team is also working on the reconstruction of the skull of a girl from...
  • Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

    01/18/2018 5:56:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 10, 2018 | from PLOS
    E. Matisoo-Smith from the University of Otago, New Zealand and Pierre Zalloua from the Lebanese American University, Beirut, and colleagues... looked at mitochondrial genomes... to investigate how Phoenicians integrated with the Sardinian communities they settled. The researchers found 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon and Sardinia and then compared these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia. The researchers found evidence of continuity of some lineages of indigenous Sardinians after Phoenician settlement, which suggests that there was integration between Sardinians...
  • A Search for a Lost Hammer Led to the Largest Cache of Roman Treasure Ever Found in Britain

    01/18/2018 5:41:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | January 9, 2018 | Lorraine Boissoneault
    Romano-British citizens who no longer had the protection of the Roman Empire were so terrified of the raiding Saxons, Angles, Picts and others that they buried their most valuable belongings. According to an entry from 418 in the 9th-century text Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, "In this year the Romans collected all the treasures which were in Britain and hid some in the earth so that no one afterwards could find them, and some they took with them into Gaul." ... Because no organic materials survived in the Hoxne hoard, radiocarbon can't be used as a dating technique. Instead, archaeologists use the age...
  • British Museum claims French artist Rodin proves why Parthenon Marbles should stay in Britain

    01/18/2018 5:15:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Greek City Times ^ | January 15, 2018 | GCT Team
    The idea is to show how the headless figures taught Rodin that the body could express emotion, as shown in his masterpiece 'The Kiss' and because he never visited Greece, experts say he may have picked up the idea from some of his 15 visits to the British Museum. This, it is argued by British Museum, shows why the museum is the right setting for the Marbles, acquired from the ruins of the Parthenon by Lord Elgin and brought to Britain about 200 years ago.
  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • World's longest underwater cave discovered in Mexico - could shed light on Mayan civilization

    01/17/2018 11:03:49 AM PST · by mairdie · 33 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 17 January 2018 | Jennifer Newton
    The Gran Acuifero Maya (GAM), a project dedicated to the study and preservation of the subterranean waters of the Yucatan peninsula, said the 216-mile (347km) cave was identified after months of exploring a maze of underwater channels. Near the beach resort of Tulum, the project found that the cave system known as Sac Actun, once measured at 163 miles, is actually connected with the 53-mile Dos Ojos system. In a statement, GAM said for that reason, Sac Actun now absorbs Dos Ojos. GAM director and underwater archaeologist Guillermo de Anda hailed the discovery as an 'amazing' find. He also said...
  • Longest underground river found

    03/02/2007 7:35:36 AM PST · by driftdiver · 16 replies · 1,008+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mar 1, 2007 | uknown
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Cave divers in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula have discovered what may be the world's longest underground river, connecting two cave systems with a waterway at least 95 miles long. A group of foreign divers exploring the area near the Caribbean beach resort of Playa del Carmen have yet to name the stretch, but believe it could be connected to two other major systems, adding more than 125 miles to its length. "It's a bit of the Star Trek syndrome: the thrill of exploration, to go where no one has gone before," said diver Steve Bogaerts, who helped...
  • Has Tutankhamun's tragic teenage wife finally been found?

    01/17/2018 3:30:31 PM PST · by mairdie · 105 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 17 January 2018 | Tim Collins
    The mystery of the final resting place of the wife of Ancient Egypt's most famous ruler has moved a step closer to being solved. Egyptologists previously discovered what they believe is the burial chamber of Ankhesenamun, Tutankhamun's wife, in the Valley of The Kings. If confirmed, it could help to unravel the final fate of the boy king's wife, who suddenly disappeared from historical records after her second marriage. The teen bride is believed to have had a tragic life, marrying her father, her grandfather and her half-brother Tutankhamun. Archaeologists have now begun to excavate an area near a tomb...
  • The True Story Of Andrew Jackson’s Swearing Parrot

    01/16/2018 10:19:16 PM PST · by oxcart · 38 replies
    omgfacts.com ^ | 02/22/17 | staff
    Andrew Jackson isn’t the only US President to keep a pet bird in the White House. Teddy Roosevelt had a one-legged rooster and James Buchanan supposedly owned two bald eagles (because America). But to our knowledge, Jackson was the only one to have a swearing parrot. The bird’s name was Poll and was originally meant for Jackson’s wife, Rachel. But after she passed away, Jackson became the African Grey’s caretaker. So how did the parrot get a foul mouth? We can’t say for sure. But with what we know about Jackson—a man so tough and temperamental his nickname was “Old...
  • Ben Franklin made up 200 terms for being wasted

    01/16/2018 3:00:35 AM PST · by beaversmom · 17 replies
    The NY Post ^ | December 30, 2017 | Larry Getlen
    Ben Franklin is often quoted as having said, “Beer is proof God loves us and wants us to be happy.” But he was actually talking about wine. In a 1779 letter to French artist Francois Morellet, Franklin began by stating, “In vino veritas . . . Truth is in wine.” He then continued to wax lyrical: “Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards. There it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.” The new book, “Stirring the Pot with Benjamin Franklin,” by...
  • A New Clue to the Mystery Disease That Once Killed Most of Mexico

    01/16/2018 6:08:19 AM PST · by C19fan · 31 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | January 15, 2018 | Sarah Zang
    In the decades after Hernán Cortés invaded Mexico, one of the worst epidemics in human history swept through the new Spanish colony. A mysterious disease called “cocolitzli” appeared first in 1545 and then again in 1576, each time killing millions of the native population. “From morning to sunset,” wrote a Franciscan friar who witness the epidemic, “the priests did nothing else but carry the dead bodies and throw them into the ditches.” In less than a century, the number of people living in Mexico fell from an estimated 20 million to 2 million. “It’s a massive population loss. Really, it’s...
  • Maybe Rats Aren't to Blame for the Black Death

    01/15/2018 6:21:35 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 67 replies
    Nationak Geographic ^ | JANUARY 15, 2018 | Michael Greshko
    A provocative new study suggests that medieval plagues spread via fleas and lice on people.Rats have long been blamed for spreading the parasites that transmitted plague throughout medieval Europe and Asia, killing millions of people. Now, a provocative new study has modeled these long-ago outbreaks and suggests that the maligned rodents may not be the culprits after all. The study, published on Monday in the journal PNAS, instead points the finger at human parasites—such as fleas and body lice—for primarily spreading plague bacteria during the Second Pandemic, a series of devastating outbreaks that spanned from the 1300s to the early...
  • "We Shall Fight on the Beaches... We Shall Never Surrender" - Sir Winston Churchill

    09/21/2001 12:01:56 PM PDT · by StoneColdGOP · 31 replies · 5,973+ views
    The Winston Churchill Homepage ^ | June 4th, 1940 | Winston Churchill
    We Shall Fight on the Beaches June 4, 1940 House of Commons The position of the B.E.F (British Expeditionary Force) had now become critical. As a result of a most skillfully conducted retreat and German errors, the bulk of the British Forces reached the Dunkirk bridgehead. The peril facing the British nation was now suddenly and universally perceived. On May 26, "Operation Dynamo "--the evacuation from Dunkirk began. The seas remained absolutely calm. The Royal Air Force--bitterly maligned at the time by the Army--fought vehemently to deny the enemy the total air supremacy which would have wrecked the operation. At ...
  • Deciphered telegram reveals the genocide (Armenian Genocide documented)

    01/15/2018 2:21:01 PM PST · by Texas Fossil · 33 replies
    AGOS ^ | 04.26.2017 | Taner Akcam
    Historian Taner Akçam decpihred the telegram by executive of Teşikilat-ı Mahsusa (Secret Organization) and Commitee of Union and Progress Bahaettin Şakir dated July 4, 1915. The telegram is about coordination of deportation and annihilation of Armenians. The letterhead on the telegram proves that it is indeed original.We have a telegram written by Bahaettin Şakir on July 4, 1915, which was sent to Governor Sabit Bey for delivering it to Elağız (Harput/Kharpet) Inspector of CUP Nazım Bey. The purpose of the telegram was to coordinate deportation and annihilation of Armenians. The telegram reads: “Are the Armenians who were deported from...
  • Giza Pyramid mystery chamber may hold Pharaoh’s 'meteorite throne'

    01/15/2018 10:10:37 AM PST · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    www.rt.com ^ | 14 Jan, 2018 07:53 | Staff
    A huge void discovered inside the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt late last year may hold an iron throne carved from meteorites, according to new analysis of ancient religious texts. Giulio Magli, Director of the Department of Mathematics and Professor of Archaeoastronomy at the Politecnico di Milano, studied the Pyramid Texts, religious writings carved into pyramid walls around 2400 BC. Based on his studies, Magli proposes that it’s possible the throne of Pharaoh Khufu – or ‘Cheops’ – lies inside the chamber. ================================================================================================================================ “Of course it would not be melted iron but meteoritic iron, that is, fallen from the...
  • On January 15, 1919, Boston's 2.3 million gallon molasses flood killed 21 people

    01/15/2018 6:32:51 AM PST · by harpygoddess · 34 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 01/15/2018 | Harpygoddess
    On January 15, 1919, a tank containing 2.3 million gallons of molasses weighing an estimated 26 million pounds burst open, unleashing a sticky flood onto Boston's North End. The 25-foot high wave of goo oozed over the streets at 35 miles per hour, crushing buildings in its wake and killing 21 people. The wave broke steel girders of the Boston Elevated Railway, almost swept a train off its tracks, knocked buildings off their foundations, and toppled electrical poles, the wires hissing and sparking as they fell into the brown flood. The Boston Globe reported that people 'were picked up and...
  • Remembering the Deadly London Beer Flood of 1814

    10/19/2014 4:14:23 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 46 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | October 17, 2014 | Nick Greene
    200 years ago today, one of history's most bizarre disasters befell London when a 15-foot wave of beer flooded an entire neighborhood and left eight people dead.The Horse Shoe Brewery on Tottenham Court Road in London boasted a massive 22-foot-tall vat that held some 160,000 gallons of dark porter. On October 17, 1814, one of the metal hoops meant to secure it snapped, and the wooden vat succumbed to the immense pressure of all that fermenting brew. The gushing beer smashed open the brewery's other vats, resulting in a raging sea of beer that burst forth from the building.Over one...
  • A Vast, 430-Year-Old World Map, Full of Places and Creatures, Real and Imagined

    01/09/2018 7:38:36 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    atlasobscura ^ | January 08, 2018 | Natasha Frost
    Monte envisaged the component maps—60 in all—being stitched together, and so left detailed instructions for how to turn them into one giant representation of the world, over nine feet in diameter. Included in the four volumes are also charts showing the lengths of days at different times of year and an extended geographical treatise on the world and cosmology. Unlike many modern maps, which use the Mercator projection from around the same time, his map shows the world from directly above the North Pole. Today, this perspective is known as the north polar azimuthal projection... Once assembled, the map shows...
  • The 250 year old kitchen of Thomas Jefferson's enslaved chef James Hemings

    01/10/2018 6:26:48 PM PST · by mairdie · 73 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10 January 2018 | Valerie Edwards
    Archaeologists have uncovered the 250-year-old kitchen of Thomas Jefferson's enslaved chef, James Hemings, who introduced mac and cheese and meringues into US culture. Hemings became the property of Thomas Jefferson in January of 1774 when he was just nine years old. His younger sister is Sally Hemings, who had six children believed to have been fathered by Jefferson after the death of his wife Martha Jefferson. Growing up, Hemings was one of Jefferson's favorite servants and even accompanied him to Paris, France, in 1784. In France, Hemings learned the art of French cookery and upon their return to America, he...