Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $72,043
81%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $16k to go!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • This Little Boy Held A Salute For An Hour [powerful VIDEO]

    In June of 2014, an 11 year-old boy travelled to Normandy, France in honor of the seventieth anniversary of D-Day. While there, he launched a project called “Project Vigil” in which he spent four days tourists about three paratroopers who were buried in the American Cemetery. The boy had planned on wearing his WWII-style uniform to the official D-Day celebration, but local police wouldn’t allow him to do so. Undeterred, the boy threw on his uniform and headed to Omaha Beach with his American Flag. The boy planted the flag in the sand and spent an hour staring towards the...
  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 72 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • 'Stone Age Art' In Upper Franconian Cave Not An Archaeological Sensation After All

    05/22/2016 9:03:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    FAU News ^ | April 27, 2016 | Julia Blumenrother
    The Mäanderhöhle cave near Bamberg was previously regarded as an archaeological sensation. It was thought to contain some of the oldest cave art in Germany. However, Julia Blumenröther, a former student at FAU's Institute of Prehistory and Early History, has demonstrated in her Master's thesis that the markings discovered inside the cave in 2005 are not fertility symbols carved by humans as previously thought. In fact, these lines occurred as a result of natural processes, the archaeologist says. One of the caverns in the 75-metre long cave is full of spherical deposits of minerals known as cave clouds that form...
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Rome Mulls 'Metro Museum' After New Line Unearths Ruin

    05/21/2016 5:27:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Local ^ | 17 May 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Rome authorities are set to build the world's first 'archaeological underground station' around an ancient Roman barracks which came to light during works to build a new underground station. The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city's new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes. Lying so deep under the city, it was impossible for modern survey equipment to detect the ruin before work began. But work on the...
  • Elizabeth I dress: Altar cloth may be Queen's gown

    05/21/2016 4:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | May 16, 2016 | unattributed
    The fabric at St Faith's Church in Bacton has been identified by experts as a piece of a 16th Century dress. An examination by Historic Royal Palaces curators has strengthened a theory it formed part of a court dress. The Queen is depicted in the Rainbow Portrait wearing a similar fabric, but no documentary evidence has been found to suggest the dress was worn by her. Historians believe the monarch could have gifted the garment to one of her servants, Blanche Parry. Dating back to the last decades of the 16th Century, the altar cloth that hung in a glass...
  • 'Sleeping giant' glacier may lift seas two metres: study

    05/18/2016 5:31:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 122 replies
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 5/18/16 | Marlowe Hood
    Paris (AFP) - A rapidly melting glacier atop East Antarctica is on track to lift oceans at least two metres, and could soon pass a "tipping point" of no return, researchers said Wednesday. To date, scientists have mostly worried about the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets as dangerous drivers of sea level rise. But the new study, following up on earlier work by the same team, has identified a third major threat to hundreds of millions of people living in coastal areas around the world. "I predict that before the end of the century the great global cities of...
  • New Ice Age knowledge

    05/13/2016 12:27:40 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | May 13, 2016
    In fact, deep ocean circulation slowed down to such an extent that the heavy, saline water mass below a depth of 2000 metres was not in contact with the surface for almost 3000 years. "During this time, so much bound carbon in the form of animal and algae remains trickled down from the more intermixed sea surface into the deep water layer that we were able to identify it as the major carbon reservoir that we have looked for so intensively," says Thomas Ronge. The data also showed that the already old age of the water masses was artificially increased...
  • Six American Independence War Maps Up For Auction

    05/20/2016 3:02:24 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 19 replies
    Breitbart ^ | May 20, 2016
    Six maps from the American War of Independence, which helped convince George Washington to make a crucial change in strategy, go up for auction in a French chateau next month.
  • 10 Controversial Artifacts That Could Have Changed History

    05/20/2016 10:12:43 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    listverse.com ^ | 05/09/2016 | Debra Kelly
    6. The Davenport Tablets The Davenport Academy was a major force in early American amateur archeology. Unfortunately, the organization ended up lending its name to one of the most ridiculous hoaxes in American history. In 1877, Reverend Jacob Gass claimed to have found a set of four inscribed tablets buried in an ancient mound in Iowa. Gass was quickly invited to join the Davenport Academy, which contained many supporters of the “Mound Builders” myth. This theory, now entirely discredited, argued that Native Americans were too primitive to have built the giant earthworks that dot the American countryside. Instead, 19th century...
  • Teen uses satellite imagery to discover possible ancient Mayan ruins

    05/20/2016 10:31:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 11, 2016 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: Canadian Space Agency, via TheTelegraph ====================================================================================================================== William Gadoury, a 15 year old Mayan history enthusiast who lives in Saint-Jean-de-Matha in Lanaudière, Quebec, has, according to Le Journal de Montréal, used satellite imagery to make associations between ancient Mayan city locations and constellations, and in so doing, may have actually discovered a site that has not been previously known. According to the news report, Gadoury, who claims to have been long interested in the Mayan culture, gained access to satellite imagery—after applying the Geographic Information System he found a correlation between 22 constellations and 117 Mayan cities. But, in so...
  • Space Impact 'Saved Christianity'

    06/25/2003 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Davea · 33 replies · 99+ views
    BBC | 06/25/03
    Space impact 'saved Christianity' By Dr David Whitehouse BBC News Online science editor Did a meteor over central Italy in AD 312 change the course of Roman and Christian history? About the size of a football field: The impact crater left behind A team of geologists believes it has found the incoming space rock's impact crater, and dating suggests its formation coincided with the celestial vision said to have converted a future Roman emperor to Christianity. It was just before a decisive battle for control of Rome and the empire that Constantine saw a blazing light cross the sky and...
  • Ancient Device for Determining Taxes Discovered in Egypt

    05/19/2016 8:32:23 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    American and Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a rare structure called a nilometer in the ruins of the ancient city of Thmuis in Egypt’s Delta region. Likely constructed during the third century B.C., the nilometer was used for roughly a thousand years to calculate the water level of the river during the annual flooding of the Nile. Fewer than two dozen of the devices are known to exist. Before the completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1970, the Nile flooded the surrounding plains each year in late July or August. As the waters receded in September and October, they left...
  • Study Sheds Light On Ancient Roman Water System In Naples

    05/18/2016 1:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 16, 2016 | editors
    A study suggests that lead isotopes can reveal the history of ancient Roman water distribution systems. The impact of the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in AD 79 on the water supply of Naples and other nearby cities has been a matter of debate. Hugo Delile and colleagues measured lead isotopic compositions of a well-dated sedimentary sequence from the excavated ancient harbor of Naples. The isotopic composition of leachates from the harbor sediments differed from those of lead native to the region, suggesting contamination from imported lead used in the ancient plumbing. The authors observed an abrupt change in isotopic composition in...
  • Discovery of Roman fort built after Boudican revolt

    05/18/2016 1:36:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | May 13, 2016 | editors
    New research published by archaeologists from MOLA reveals a previously unknown Roman fort, built in AD63 as a direct response to the sacking of London by the native tribal Queen of the Iceni, Boudica. The revolt razed the early Roman town to the ground in AD60/61 but until now little was understood about the Roman's response to this devastating uprising. Excavations at Plantation Place for British Land on Fenchurch Street in the City of London exposed a section of a rectangular fort that covered 3.7acres. The timber and earthwork fort had 3metre high banks reinforced with interlacing timbers and faced...
  • Jerusalem Dig Calls for Support

    05/18/2016 1:29:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, May 15, 2016 | editors
    Just below the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem, a team of archaeologists, scholars and students will soon be busy at work excavating one of Jerusalem's most important archaeological sites... a wealthy residential area that saw its heyday during the time of Herod and Jesus. Directing the operation is Shimon Gibson, a British-born Israeli archaeologist and adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte... Referred to as the Mount Zion excavation because of its location in the sacred elevated area at the center of ancient Jerusalem near the historical Temple Mount, the work here is important because...
  • Tiny organisms have huge effect on world’s atmosphere

    05/17/2016 3:02:37 PM PDT · by Reeses · 30 replies
    University of East Anglia UK ^ | May 16, 2016 | University of East Anglia UK
    Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have discovered how a tiny yet abundant ocean organism helps regulate the Earth’s climate. Research published today in Nature Microbiology reveals how a bacterial group called ‘Pelagibacterales’ plays an important function in keeping the Earth’s atmosphere stable. The project was led by Prof Steve Giovannoni and Dr Jing Sun at Oregon State University, in collaboration with researchers from UEA among others. They showed that these tiny, hugely abundant bacteria could make the environmentally important gas, dimethyl sulfide. Researchers at UEA identified and characterised the gene that is responsible for this property. Dr...
  • Roman-Era Shipwreck Yields Moon Goddess Statue, Coin Stashes

    05/17/2016 2:45:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 16, 2016 | Stephanie Pappas
    One civilization's trash is another civilization's treasure. A ship in Israel's Caesarea Harbor was filled with bronze statues headed for recycling when it sank about 1,600 years ago. Now, thanks to a chance discovery by a pair of divers, archaeologists have salvaged a haul of statuary fragments, figurines and coins from the seafloor. The coins found in the wreckage date to the mid-300s A.D. Some show Constantine, who ruled the Western Roman Empire from A.D. 312-324, and who unified the Eastern and Western Roman Empire in A.D. 324; he ruled both until his death in A.D. 337. Other coins show...
  • Bomarzo: Grove of the Monsters

    05/17/2016 1:17:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Unmuseum ^ | 2007 | Lee Krystek
    The story starts with a young nobleman named Duke Pierfrancesco "Vicino" Orsini. Orsini was born around 1516 and married a noblewoman named Guilia Farnese in 1544. He worked as a military officer and diplomat until 1553 when he was captured in the same battle that killed his best friend. He was held for ransom for three years and then, shortly after his release, his beloved wife died. Depressed, Orsini retreated to his family's holdings near Bomarzo where he began to plan his strange, melancholy garden. What is known of the garden is mostly just what historians have found by visiting...
  • Amateur archaeologist finds Denmark’s oldest crucifix

    05/17/2016 8:42:20 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 14 replies
    cphpost.dk ^ | 5-17-16 | Christian W
    When amateur archaeologist Dennis Fabricius Holm got off work early last Friday and decided to spend a couple of hours searching a little field in Funen with his metal detector, little did he know he was about to make history. Holm stumbled across one of the most extraordinary finds in recent times near the little town of Aunslev when he discovered a crucifix that dates back about 1,100 years – Denmark’s oldest crucifix ever found. It could rewrite Danish history. “It’s a completely sensational find that dates back to the first half of the 900s,” Malene Refshauge Beck, a curator...
  • Ancient Humans, Dogs Hunted Mastodon in Florida: Early Dogs Helped Humans Hunt Mammoths

    05/16/2016 2:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Discovery News ^ | May 13, 2016 | Jennifer Viegas
    The geology of the site, as well as pollen and algae finds, suggest that the hunter-gatherers encountered the mastodon next to a small pond that both humans and animals used as a water source, the researchers believe. Waters said that the prehistoric "people knew how to find game, fresh water and materials for making tools. These people were well adapted to this environment. The site is a slam-dunk pre-Clovis site with unequivocal artifacts, clear stratigraphy and thorough dating." Another research team previously excavated the site and found what they believed were dog remains, so dogs "would most likely have been...
  • Clues to ancient giant asteroid found in Australia

    05/16/2016 8:53:57 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/16/2016 | Australian National University
    Scientists have found evidence of a huge asteroid that struck the Earth early in its life with an impact larger than anything humans have experienced. Tiny glass beads called spherules, found in north-western Australia were formed from vaporised material from the asteroid impact, said Dr Andrew Glikson from The Australian National University (ANU). "The impact would have triggered earthquakes orders of magnitude greater than terrestrial earthquakes, it would have caused huge tsunamis and would have made cliffs crumble," said Dr Glikson, from the ANU Planetary Institute. "Material from the impact would have spread worldwide. These spherules were found in sea...
  • More Powerful Than a Bomb

    05/16/2016 5:13:18 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 20 replies
    Belmont Club ^ | 5-15-2016 | Richard Fernandez
    (snip) Explosives can achieve gross destruction. But it misses things between the craters; by contrast a mental bomb can destroy civilization itself; its value, institutions, goals and even its grip upon reality. In the contest between Panzer division and Manifesto, the manifesto appears far the more powerful. The computer revolution has given us the tools to understand why Communism has so much devastating power. We can now recognize it as history's greatest and most dangerous piece of intellectual malware, whose only true rival is radical Islam. It tricks the social network into thinking you can get something for nothing; it...
  • Scientists Say Egypt is in Denial Over Hidden Rooms in King Tut's Tomb

    05/15/2016 5:22:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | May 12, 2016 | Erik Shilling
    Scientists said earlier this year that they had found some secret rooms in Tutankhamen's tomb. What could they contain? A popular theory was the tomb of Queen Nefertiti. But other scientists later said that there was good reason to doubt the claims, which were based on scans. Now, the situation has gotten a little bit uglier. A team of radar technicians performed a second, more detailed set of scans on the tomb earlier this year, and sent their results off to Egypt's ministry of antiquities. But the government now has refused to release their findings, and scientists are beginning to...
  • Washington and Hamilton – The Alliance That Formed America

    05/15/2016 2:47:48 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 28 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 15, 2016 | Christoper N, Malagisi
    In a gripping new look at the important relationship between American founders George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Stephen F. Knott and Tony Williams – authors of the new book Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance That Formed America, tell the story below of the American founding, which would not have been possible without this grand alliance.  While many historians focus on the friendship and alliance of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, Washington and Hamilton reminds us why America would truly not be the prosperous country it is today without this special alliance.Congratulations Stephen & Tony on the paperback release of your new book: Washington and...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/15/2016 1:15:34 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 10 replies
    business-standard.com ^ | May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST | Press Trust of India
    Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India Press Trust of India | Melbourne May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST Ancient Irish musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India, according to a new study of musical horns from iron-age Ireland. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts shows a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • Archaeologists Discover Ancient Bison Bones in Vero Beach

    05/14/2016 11:55:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Florida Atlantic University ^ | May 11, 2016 | Gisele Galoustian
    The bone was found below a layer that contained material from the Pleistocene period when the last ice age was thought to have occurred. The archaeologists identified the bison using an upper molar, which is thought to be representative of a Bison antiquus, a direct ancestor of the American bison that roamed North America until it became extinct. Because bison was a grassland-adapted animal, nearly 100 percent of their bones disintegrated after death unless they were preserved in some way. "This finding is especially significant because of the meticulous documentation that has been involved," said James M. Adovasio, Ph.D., principal...
  • Three of the Oldest Images of Jesus

    05/14/2016 4:50:18 AM PDT · by NYer · 68 replies
    Aletelial ^ | May 14, 2016 | Daniel Esparza
    None of the four Gospels describes Jesus in detail. However, the Christian tradition has nevertheless represented him using different iconographic models. From the beardless and youthful “Alexandrine Christ,” based on classic Greek proportions and canons normally applied to sculpture, to the long-haired and bearded “Syrian Christ” following the Byzantine Empire’s custom, Christendom has always recognized in the image not only a liturgical, cultural related element but also an effective evangelization tool in a world where reading and writing are not widespread skills.Here, we wanted to share with you just three of the earliest images in the Christian tradition, which bear witness to different...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/14/2016 12:23:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 13, 2016 | Australian National University
    An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artefacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "Archaeology is usually silent. I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive and living in Kerala today," said the ANU College of Asia-Pacific student... The findings help show that Europe and India had...
  • What phrases commonly used today are derived from obsolete technologies?

    05/05/2016 5:03:45 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 159 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/04/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    "Hang up the phone." comes from one specific kind of land-line phone that had a kind of hook you'd hang the handset from when you were done. Doing so would pull down the hook that was connected to a switch inside the phone that would disconnect the line. And lots of nautical stuff: Groggy - In 1740, British Admiral Vernon (whose nickname was "Old Grogram" for the cloak of grogram which he wore) ordered that the sailors' daily ration of rum be diluted with water. The men called the mixture "grog". A sailor who drank too much grog was "groggy"....
  • New evidence that humans settled in southeastern US far earlier than previously believed

    05/13/2016 1:32:25 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 41 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 13, 2016
    The discovery of stone tools found in a Florida river show that humans settled the southeastern United States far earlier than previously believed—perhaps by as much as 1,500 years, according to a team of scientists that includes a University of Michigan paleontologist.
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Scientists gear up to drill into ‘ground zero’ of the impact that killed the dinosaurs

    03/06/2016 8:35:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 59 replies
    Science mag online ^ | Mar. 3, 2016 , 2:00 PM | Eric Hand
    This month, a drilling platform will rise in the Gulf of Mexico, but it won’t be aiming for oil. Scientists will try to sink a diamond-tipped bit into the heart of Chicxulub crater—the buried remnant of the asteroid impact 66 million years ago that killed off the dinosaurs, along with most other life on the planet. They hope that the retrieved rock cores will contain clues to how life came back in the wake of the cataclysm, and whether the crater itself could have been a home for novel microbial life. And by drilling into a circular ridge inside the...
  • ‘You can’t find this in any other country’

    03/24/2009 5:48:59 PM PDT · by forkinsocket · 4 replies · 422+ views
    The National ^ | March 25. 2009 | John Thorne
    ERRIADH, TUNISIA // In 586BC the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar laid waste to Jerusalem, inadvertently sowing seeds for a Jewish haven across the sea that has outlived his realm by 25 centuries and counting. Legend tells that refugees fled to the Tunisian island of Djerba, carrying a block from the ruined Temple of Solomon. Today it lies beneath the El Ghriba synagogue, the cornerstone of a thriving Jewish community. And after decades of Jewish exodus from Arab countries, that community is growing. For western holidaymakers, Djerba is a strip of lavish resorts along a sandy Mediterranean coast. For Tunisians, it also...
  • 3600-year-old Swedish Axes Were Made With Copper From Cyprus

    05/12/2016 8:35:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 66 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 11, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    Bronze tools found in Sweden dating from 3,600 years ago were made using copper from the Mediterranean, archaeologists have shown. They now also believe that rock carvings of ships found in Bohuslan, Sweden were visual documentation of trade between ancient Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Most of the copper circulating in Bronze Age Europe apparently originated from Sicily, Sardinia, the Iberian peninsula - and Cyprus, going by isotope analysis... The precious copper was exchanged for Nordic amber, which was as cherished as gold in Mycenaean Greece and in the prehistoric Middle East... The ancient Cypriot copper industry produced relatively pure stuff,...
  • Cosmic dust reveals Earth's ancient atmosphere

    05/12/2016 10:00:37 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/11/2016 | Monash University
    Using the oldest fossil micrometeorites -- space dust -- ever found, Monash University-led research has made a surprising discovery about the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago. The findings of a new study published today in the journal Nature -- led by Dr Andrew Tomkins and a team from the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment at Monash, along with scientists from the Australian Synchrotron and Imperial College, London -- challenge the accepted view that Earth's ancient atmosphere was oxygen-poor. The findings indicate instead that the ancient Earth's upper atmosphere contained about the same amount of oxygen as...
  • Breaking down the mythical 'Mayan city' discovery

    05/11/2016 3:12:04 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    cnn ^ | 05/11/2016 | AJ Willingham
    We're all suckers for a great story, and "Teen finds lost Mayan city" definitely sounds promising. Throw in some ancient cosmology, a little help from the Canadian Space Agency and some satellite sleuthing, and the movie offers practically write themselves. Sadly, the reality may not be as cinematic as promised. Experts say the "city" found by Canadian teen William Gadoury could be something much simpler: Abandoned fields. This whole archaeological kerfuffle started as a tantalizing possibility: Gadoury, 15, says he used Mayan constellation patterns to pinpoint ruins of a heretofore unknown ancient Mayan city. The Canadian Space Agency helped him...
  • Genetic Testing Proves Bene Israel Community in India Has Jewish Roots

    05/11/2016 2:05:21 PM PDT · by Theoria · 8 replies
    American Friends of Tel Aviv University ^ | 10 May 2016 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    TAU–Cornell collaboration provides insight into unique community whose history is largely unknown A new study from Tel Aviv University, Cornell University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine reveals genetic proof of the Jewish roots of the Bene Israel community in the western part of India. They have always considered themselves Jewish. "Almost nothing is known about the Bene Israel community before the 18th century, when Cochin Jews and later Christian missionaries first came into contact with it," says first author Yedael Waldman of both TAU's Department of Molecular Microbiology and Cornell's Department of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology. "Beyond...
  • A 1500-Year-Old Underground Byzantine Church Is Found in Turkey

    05/11/2016 1:59:25 PM PDT · by NYer · 24 replies
    Aletelial ^ | May 11, 2016 | Daniel Esparza
    Last February, archaeologists unearthed a unique rock-carved underground church in Nevsehir, in the central Turkish region of Cappadocia. The church was decorated with never before seen frescoes depicting Jesus’ Ascension, the Final Judgement, Jesus feeding the multitudes, and portraits of saints and prophets.The discovery, made during excavations and cleaning operations in an underground city recently uncovered as part of an urban project in Nevsehir, is located within a castle that might date back to the fifth century. Authorities expect it will make Cappadocia an even more important pilgrimage center for Orthodox Christians. Semih İstanbulluoğlu, the archaeologist who heads the works for...
  • Johor to Test if Human-Looking Goat Is Offspring of Human and Animal

    05/10/2016 10:59:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 40 replies
    It will take around two weeks to a month to finalise the investigations on the carcass of a kid in Kota Tinggi that was said to resemble a human infant (pic). Johor state Agriculture and Agro-based Industry committee chairman Ismail Moha­med said then they would be able to find out the possibility of an offspring produced by a human and an animal. "For now we cannot confirm or deny anything as we have never received such a case before. "We will have to wait for the results and findings to be finalised and that takes somewhere between two weeks and...
  • Archaeologists find world's oldest axe in Australia

    05/10/2016 11:24:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 10, 2016 | Australian National University
    Archaeologists from The Australian National University (ANU) have unearthed fragments from the edge of the world's oldest-known axe, found in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Lead archeologist Professor Sue O'Connor said the axe dates back between 46,000 and 49,000 years, around the time people first arrived on the continent. "This is the earliest evidence of hafted axes in the world. Nowhere else in the world do you get axes at this date," said Professor O'Connor from the ANU School of Culture, History and Language. "In Japan such axes appear about 35,000 years ago. But in most countries in the...
  • Mysterious Braided Hair May Belong to Medieval Saint - See more at:

    05/10/2016 8:41:51 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    Live Science ^ | 05/04/2016 | Tom Metcalfe,
    A braided head of hair found buried beneath a medieval abbey in England has given up some of its secrets, thanks to a scientist's curiosity about the relic, which he first saw when he was a schoolboy. Jamie Cameron, an archaeological research assistant at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, first visited Romsey Abbey, near the city of Southampton, on a school field trip when he was 7 years old. Cameron said he became curious about the abbey's display of a brightly colored and braided head of hair, which had been found in a lead casket buried beneath...
  • Nazi gold train hunters defy sceptics and begin digging for treasures

    05/10/2016 7:06:19 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 12 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 9 May 2016 | Matthew Day
    <p>Two treasure hunters who claim to have found the last resting place of a German military train believed be to laden gold are set to begin digging on the site despite widespread scepticism over their claim.</p> <p>Piotr Koper and Andreas Richter, the two treasure hunters, sparked international attention and a mini gold rush last summer when they claimed to have found the train in a secret siding beside a railway line near the southern Polish town of Walbrzych.</p>
  • Star pupil finds lost Mayan city by studying ancient charts of the night sky from his bedroom

    05/10/2016 6:51:59 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 94 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 10 May 16 | Telegraph Reporters
    (Title was shortened. Add: "of the night sky from his bedroom ") A Canadian schoolboy appears to have discovered a lost Mayan city hidden deep in the jungles of Mexico using a new method of matching stars to the location of temples on earth. William Gadoury, 15, was fascinated by the ancient Central American civilization and spent hours poring over diagrams of constellations and maps of known Mayan cities. And then he made a startling realisation: the two appeared to be linked. “I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched...
  • Egypt: new archaeological discovery in Matariya

    05/10/2016 5:02:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    ANSA ^ | May 6, 2016 | unattributed
    The Egyptian-German Archaeological Mission to Matariya (Ministry of Antiquities of the Arab Republic of Egypt, Egyptian Museum University of Leipzig, University of Applied Sciences Mainz) has discovered new evidence for a sanctuary of Nectanebo I (380-363 BC) in the temple precinct of Heliopolis, according to Dr. Mahmoud Afify, head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities sector at the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Dr. Aiman Ashmawy, head of the Egyptian team at the Mission, said the number of blocks from a limited area proves that the excavation area is the site of the original building built of limestone reliefs and columns, with...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • Chinese archaeologists discover 8,000-year-old paddy

    05/10/2016 12:32:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    China Daily ^ | May 6, 2016 | Xinhua
    Chinese archaeologists said they have found a paddy dating back more than 8,000 years, which could be the earliest wet rice farming site in the world. The field, covering less than 100 square meters, was discovered at the neolithic ruins of Hanjing in Sihong county in East China's Jiangsu province in November 2015, according to a spokesman with the archeology institute of Nanjing Museum. At a seminar held in late April to discuss findings at the Hanjing ruins, more than 70 scholars from universities, archeology institutes and museums across the country concluded that the wet rice field was the oldest...
  • Are we Rome?

    08/05/2007 8:43:29 AM PDT · by Dick Bachert · 92 replies · 1,797+ views
    Dallas Morning News ^ | 7-30-2007 | Rod Dreher
    How the U.S. can avoid its own version of the fall of the Roman empire That is, are we Americans, citizens of the mightiest empire the world has known since the days of the Caesars, living in the last days of our civilization? Is the United States, like the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century, doomed to collapse from its own decadence? Or can we avoid Rome's fate?
  • Rome didn't fall in a day

    06/30/2005 3:38:05 PM PDT · by MRMEAN · 9 replies · 865+ views
    arts.telegraph ^ | 19/06/2005 | Peter Jones reviewer, Peter Heather author
    In 1984 a German scholar worked out that 210 reasons had been advocated for the fall of the Roman empire. Peter Jones enjoys a "fine narrative history" that concentrates on just one.Peter Jones reviews and The Fall of the Roman Empire by Peter Heather and The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilization by Bryan Ward-PerkinsIn 1984 a German scholar worked out that 210 reasons had been advocated for the fall of the Roman empire in the West in the fifth century AD - from bureaucracy to deforestation, from moral decline to over-hot public baths, from female emancipation to...