Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Italian-Spanish archeologists to launch dig into Luxor tomb

    09/27/2014 10:00:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | September 26, 2014 | Claudio Accogli
    An Italian-Spanish archeological team on Friday prepared to launch a dig in an extraordinary tomb whose discovery was announced six months ago. The tomb belongs to May, an important government officer of the XVIII dynasty, an era ruled by pharoahs such as Tutankhamon and the "heretic" pharoah Akhenaton, who established a sun cult dedicated to the sun disk Aton, among others... The team came upon the tomb of May through a horizontal tunnel located within the Min, which was also visited two centuries ago by the legendary Jean Francois Champollion, considered the father of Egyptology... The few images available show...
  • Did Marco Polo "Discover" America?

    09/27/2014 8:41:05 PM PDT · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | Oct 2014 | Ariel Sabar
    For a guy who claimed to spend 17 years in China as a confidant of Kublai Khan, Marco Polo left a surprisingly skimpy paper trail. No Asian sources mention the footloose Italian. The only record of his 13th-century odyssey through the Far East is the hot air of his own Travels, which was actually an “as told to” penned by a writer of romances. But a set of 14 parchments, now collected and exhaustively studied for the first time, give us a raft of new stories about Polo’s journeys and something notably missing from his own account: maps. If genuine,...
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Home owner discovers ancient underground city beneath his house in Anatolia

    09/27/2014 2:17:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | August 25, 2014 | April Holloway
    A home owner living in the Melikgazi district of Kayseri province in Anatolia made a surprising discovery while clearing out an area under his house – a subterranean city, of which 4,000 square metres have been excavated so far, according to a report in Hurriyet Daily News. The region of Anatolia in Turkey is famous for its underground cities, particularly in the region of Cappadocia where more than 40 complete underground cities and 200 underground villages and tunnel towns complete with hidden passages, secret rooms, and ancient temples have been found. Mustafa Bozdemir, 50, was bequeathed a house in Melikgazi...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • The evidence of polygamy is in our genes

    09/26/2014 8:14:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 25, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    In the genetic history of our species, the mamas outnumber the papas. A new study in Investigative Genetics reports that females have made a bigger contribution than men. By studying the DNA of 623 males from 51 populations, the researchers found more genetic diversity in the DNA inherited from mothers than they did in the DNA inherited from fathers. At first glance, these results could be taken to mean that there used to be more women than men. But if you know anything about history, it makes more sense to blame reproductive habits: In many cultures, more women reproduced than...
  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • Experts: ISIS Destroying Ancient Archaeological Sites To Sell Artifacts On Black Market

    09/21/2014 6:11:48 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 44 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | September 21, 2014 | Francis Martel
    The Islamic State captured Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, in July, and within the month, reports surged that the jihadist terror group had either occupied or destroyed every Christian institution in the city. Not just the Christian legacy is threatened by their presence, however-- thousands of years of civilization may be destroyed under the group's reign of terror.
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • Village from the Roman period discovered in the Carpathians

    09/21/2014 2:11:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 17, 2014 | Science and Scholarship in Poland, tr. RL
    Village from the Roman period, dating from 3rd-4th century AD, has been discovered in Lipnica Dolna near Jasło (Subcarpathia). Among approx. one thousand archaeological objects there is a large pottery kiln, in which ceramics were fired. "The kiln is two meters in length and the same in width. It stands on a small tip in the Wisłoka valley. Its location shows that the wind blowing from the river was used to maintain the temperature during the firing cycle" - said Tomasz Leszczyński, archaeologist from the Subcarpathian Museum in Krosno. He added that "such kilns are extremely rare in the Carpathians"....
  • Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

    09/21/2014 1:20:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 15, 2014 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort) was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other evidence from the time after the fort was abandoned. An unusually large number of finds were made. This is because the Roman troops dismantled the...
  • Highlight 14: Roman enamelled cockerel figurine. The Former Bridges Garage site, Cirencester

    09/21/2014 12:47:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | retrieved September 20, 2014 | unattributed
    The find is believed to date to the middle decades of the second century AD. It came from the grave of a child aged 2–3 years. The child had been buried in a nailed wooden coffin and also accompanied by his or her shoes, of which only the iron hobnails survived, and a pottery feeding cup or ‘tettine’. Only eight finds of this type are known from the Roman world, from Britain, Germany and the Low Countries. It is believed that cockerel figurines of this type, together with other richly-enamelled bronze vessels of high workmanship, were made in northern Britain...
  • Engineers found Teutonic axes in the Forest District Wipsowo

    09/21/2014 12:27:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 2014 | tr. RL
    Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Warmia and Mazury). Historic weapons will be donated to the museum. Engineers stumbled upon the historic axes by chance, while searching the woods metal detectors. The weapons have been initially identified by an archaeologist as late-medieval Teutonic battle axes. Iron axes were close to each other, shallow underground, among the roots of trees. "It can be assumed that this is a deposit that someone left for better times. Perhaps the person...
  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • Millennia-old sunken ship could be world’s oldest, researchers suggest

    09/21/2014 11:49:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Friday, September 5 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Underwater excavations led by Ankara University’s Research Center for Maritime Archaeology (ANKÜSAM) have uncovered sunken ships ranging from the second century B.C. to the Ottoman period in İzmir’s Urla district. A recent excavation uncovered a ship estimated to date back 4,000 years, which experts say would make it the oldest sunken ship to have been discovered in the Mediterranean. Urla Port is one of Turkey’s rare underwater excavation sites. Professor Hayat Erkanal, the head of Limantepe excavations for the underwater ancient city of Klozemenai and director of ANKÜSAM, said the port dates back to the seventh century B.C. Klozemenai, he...
  • Pharaoh-Branded Amulet Found at Ancient Copper Mine in Jordan

    09/21/2014 11:21:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 19, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    ...The tiny artifact could attest to the fabled military campaign that Sheshonq I waged in the region nearly 3,000 years ago, researchers say... The site, which was discovered during excavations in 2002, was home to intense metal production during the Early Bronze Age, between about 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C. But there is also evidence of more recent smelting activities at Khirbat Hamra Ifdan during the Iron Age, from about 1000 B.C. to 900 B.C. The hieroglyphic sequence on the scarab reads: "bright is the manifestation of Re, chosen of Amun/Re." That moniker corresponds to the throne name of Sheshonq...
  • Massive submerged structure stumps Israeli archaeologists

    05/23/2013 11:36:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | 05-23-2013 | Staff
    The massive circular structure appears to be an archaeologist's dream: a recently discovered antiquity that could reveal secrets of ancient life in the Middle East and is just waiting to be excavated. It's thousands of years old -- a conical, manmade behemoth weighing hundreds of tons, practically begging to be explored. The problem is -- it's at the bottom of the biblical Sea of Galilee. For now, at least, Israeli researchers are left stranded on dry land, wondering what finds lurk below. The monumental structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 230 feet, emerged from a routine...
  • China: Ancient Tomb of First Emperor Qin Shi Huang's Grandmother Discovered in Xi'an

    09/21/2014 10:33:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Mary-Ann Russon | September 11, 2014
    According to China.org.cn, the tomb complex covers an area measuring 173,325 square metres, stretching 550m in length and 310 meters in width, and is the second largest tomb to have ever been discovered in the country... Qin Shi Huang (260-210BC) was the first emperor to unify China and enact major economic and political reforms across the country. China had previously consisted of a multitude of warring states and kingdoms, each under the control of feudal overlords, leading to much instability... After the death of Qin Shi Huang's father, he took the throne at the age of 13. His mother took...
  • The Star-Spangled Banner: Family Keepsake

    09/21/2014 8:38:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | retrieved 2014 | unattributed
    While Francis Scott Key's song was known to most Americans by the end of the Civil War, the flag that inspired it remained an Armistead family keepsake. It was exhibited occasionally at patriotic gatherings in Baltimore but largely unknown outside of that city until the 1870s. The flag remained the private property of Lieutenant Colonel Armistead's widow, Louisa Armistead, his daughter Georgiana Armistead Appleton, and his grandson Eben Appleton for 90 years. During that time, the increasing popularity of Key's anthem and the American public's developing sense of national heritage transformed the Star-Spangled Banner from a family keepsake into a...
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 9 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • Israeli museum unveils ancient Jewish prayer book

    09/18/2014 12:44:09 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep 18, 2014 3:00 PM EDT
    An Israeli museum on Thursday unveiled what it says in the oldest known Jewish prayer book in the world, dating back to the 9th century A.D. The prayer book, about 10 centimeters (four inches) long and seven centimeters wide, is written in Hebrew, contains about 50 pages, and is still in its original binding. It was donated to the Bible Lands Museum in Jerusalem by Oklahoma businessman Steve Green, a devout Christian and owner of one of the largest collections of rare biblical artifacts in the world. Green’s family controls the Hobby Lobby crafts store chain, which won a closely-watched...
  • Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers

    09/19/2014 3:27:29 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 6 replies
    proteinpower ^ | 2. April 2009, | Michael R Eades
    Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers 22. April 2009, 2:21 UhrLow-carb diets, Paleolithic diet, Paleopathologymreades139 comments 87 When I wrote the Overcoming the Curse of the Mummies chapter in Protein Power, I wrote mainly about the evidence of disease found in the mummies of ancient Egyptians and correlated this disease with their high-carbohydrate diet.  Along with all the material on mummies, which is the part everyone seems to remember, I wrote about a study done in the United States in the 1970s that persuasively demonstrated the superiority of the hunter diet as compared to an agricultural diet, which no...
  • Decoding Columbus’ map

    09/19/2014 7:48:44 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 42 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 19 September 2014 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    In 1491, German cartographer Henricus Martellus created a map of the world that would help Christopher Columbus navigate the Atlantic. Today, the map holds secrets about what Europeans in the 15th Century knew about geography. But unfortunately much of its historic text has faded. But now a team of researchers in the US is using a technique called multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden information that Columbus had at his fingertips. In 1491, cartographer Henricus Martellus created a map of the world that would help Christopher Columbus navigate the Atlantic. Today, it holds secrets into what 15th Century Europeans knew...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:17:18 AM PDT · by Natufian · 28 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/17/2014 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans.
  • Ancient 'moon god' monument unearthed in Israel

    09/17/2014 11:02:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:55PM BST 17 Sep 2014 | By Inna Lazareva, Tel Aviv
    A structure once believed to form part of an ancient town is identified as a 5,000 year old monument believed to have been used to honour the Mesopotamian moon god 'Sin' A stone monument in the shape of a crescent moon found in northern Israel is more than 5,000 years old, archaeologists have said. The structure, known as Rujum en-Nabi Shua'ayb or Jethro Cairn, is located near the Sea of Galilee and predates the construction of Stonehenge, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, as well as the writing of the Bible. It was initially discovered in the early part of the...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • Europe goes back to the Middle Ages: Map shows how patchwork continent would look if every

    09/17/2014 6:42:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 17, 2014 | Sam Webb
    This map shows how Europe would look if every separatist movement was granted its dream of independence. With the Scottish referendum just days away, the issue of regions breaking away from their traditional rulers is looming large over the continent. The map features well-known separatist movements, such as the powerful and vocal Basque Nationalist movement in northern Spain and southwestern France, as well as the more obscure, such as the Savoyan League, which supports the independence of the Savoy region of France, which has a population of around 405,500.
  • Europeans descended from three ancient tribes

    09/18/2014 10:20:25 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | 9/17/14 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based on analysis of genomes from nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers...
  • 800,000-year-old human footprints found in Norfolk

    02/09/2014 2:06:18 AM PST · by Islander7 · 26 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Feb 7, 2014 | Maev Kennedy
    The oldest human footprints ever found outside Africa, dated at between 850,000 and 950,000 years old, have been discovered on the storm-lashed beach at Happisburgh in Norfolk, one of the fastest eroding stretches of the British coast. Within a fortnight the sea tides that exposed the prints last May destroyed them, leaving only casts and 3D images made through photogrammetry – by stitching together hundreds of photographs – as evidence that a little group from a long-extinct early human species had passed that way. They walked through a startlingly different landscape from today’s, along the estuary of what may have...
  • Attention to gender imbalance : Terracotta female artists (Bilingual ) (Title translated)

    09/17/2014 10:06:48 PM PDT · by Morgana · 3 replies
    SINA.COM ^ | &#20013;&#22269;&#26085;&#25253;&#32593; China News Network
    ORIGINAL TITLE IN CHINESE: 关注性别失衡:艺术家创作女兵马俑(双语) When Emperor Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China, anticipated his death more than 2,000 years ago, he wanted an army of warriors to guard his mausoleum forever and protect him in the afterlife。   So he ordered the creation of some 8,000 terra-cotta soldiers, along with hundreds of terra-cotta horses and chariots, to be buried with him in his tomb. Historians speculate the soldiers were modeled after eight individuals. When the statues were discovered by workers digging a well in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, in 1974, the world was stunned by the spectacular funerary art...
  • Deep Frieze Meaning: What is the Parthenon telling us?

    09/02/2014 11:54:52 AM PDT · by mojito · 20 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | 9/8/2014 | A.&#8201;E. STALLINGS
    The Parthenon represents, for many, a golden age in human achievement: the 5th-century b.c. Greek flowering of democracy, sciences, and the arts. But what if its chief ornament, the Parthenon frieze, turned out to be not an embodiment of reason and proportion—of stillness at the heart of motion, quiet piety, and enlightened civic responsibility—but (or, rather, also) something darker, more primitive: a representation of the critical moment in an ancient story of a king at war, a human sacrifice, and a goddess’s demand for virgin blood? That’s the argument at the heart of The Parthenon Engima. The plot involves not...
  • Roman Treasure Hidden from Boudicca's Army Discovered in Colchester [UK]

    09/04/2014 1:43:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    International Business Times ^ | September 4, 2014 15:12 BST | By Hannah Osborne
    A hoard of Roman treasure believed to have been hidden from Boudicca in the first century has been discovered by archaeologists in Colchester. The collection, including fine gold and silver jewellery, had been buried for safekeeping during the early stages of Boudicca's Revolt, Colchester Archaeological Trust said. It represents the first hoard of precious metals ever found in Colchester town centre and is thought to have belonged to a wealthy Roman woman, who stashed the treasure under her house when she heard the vengeful queen's armies were approaching. The archaeologists said the hoard was found under the floor of a...
  • Rebuilt 18th century ship tests French waters

    09/09/2014 8:00:18 AM PDT · by SWAMPSNIPER · 37 replies
    WOKV ^ | Sept 07/2014 | FRANCOIS MORI
    PARIS — A reconstruction of the 213-foot (65-meter) frigate used by France's Marquis de Lafayette to bring reinforcements to American revolutionaries in 1780 has tested the waters for the first time.
  • Historic 'Ghost Ships' Discovered Near Golden Gate Bridge

    09/18/2014 9:22:35 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    The waters just west of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge hide a graveyard of sunken ships. By some estimates, there are 300 wrecks in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area alone. But only a fraction of them have been seen by scientists. Marine archaeologists and researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have set out to document those lost vessels. Over the course of a five-day survey that just ended yesterday (Sept. 15), the team discovered the sites of at least four wrecks: the 1910 SS Selja shipwreck, the...
  • The Ghost Hotels of the Catskills

    08/25/2014 9:42:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brandon Presser
    Phones on desks, linens on beds, catalog cards spilling out of the filing cabinets—all covered with a fine patina of dust. Neglected for years, and abandoned in seconds, it’s like a modern-day Pompeii in which the earth suddenly reclaimed its souls as they went about their daily business. But this isn’t fodder for the next Dean Koontz thriller; it’s real, and its 100 miles north of New York City. Sullivan County once boasted 538 hotels and over 50,000 bungalows, but today practically nothing remains of this illustrious, vacationing era, save crumbling towers and abandoned estates. Walking through the haunting wreckage—thirsty...
  • Geoffrey Chaucer’s Tales Continue to Lure Tourists to Canterbury

    08/12/2014 3:51:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 4 replies
    Gulf News ^ | August 8, 2014
    Canterbury Cathedral, where Archbishop Thomas Becket was killed, is the city’s biggest tourist attraction with a million visitors every yearAfter nearly 1,000 years, murder in the cathedral is still luring visitors to Canterbury. It was in the Canterbury Cathedral in 1107 that Archbishop Thomas Becket was killed, viciously, by four knights who believed they were doing the bidding of King Henry 2. As a result, Becket became a martyr and the cathedral a place of pilgrimage to his shrine. The homicide was the subject of Murder in the Cathedral, a verse drama by T.S. Eliot, and was more famously immortalised...
  • Before He Died, Richard III Lived Large

    08/24/2014 10:48:27 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 37 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-19-14 | Rachel Nuwer
    Bone chemistry sheds light on the monarch's shifting diet throughout his brief life Richard III was only 32 years old when he was struck down at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. But according to new research, the King of England at least enjoyed some good eating throughout his life—especially in the few years leading up to his death. Scientists from the British Geological Survey and the University of Leicester analyzed Richard III's teeth, his femur and his ribs to see what they could reveal about the monarch's diet, Phys.org reports. They used isotope analysis to identify chemical signatures...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:19:24 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    BBC News Science and Environment ^ | 09/17/2014 | By Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. Multiple lines of evidence suggested this new way...
  • T. Rex Confirmed As Great Grandaddy Of All Birds

    04/24/2008 1:37:14 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 3,796+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 4-24-2008 | Ewen Callaway
    T. rex confirmed as great granddaddy of all birds 19:00 24 April 2008 NewScientist.com news service Ewen Callaway John Asara, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Mary Schweitzer, North Carolina State University Thomas Holtz, University of Maryland Tyrannosaurus rex, meet the chicken – your third cousin more than 100 million years removed. A new family tree based on protein sequences recovered from dinosaur fossils firms up the dinosaur's avian lineage. "Palaeontologists have known this overall connection. We have now confirmed it with molecular data," says John Asara, a biochemist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who led the study....
  • Discovery of the Oldest-Known Ceratopsian, an Ancestor of Triceratops and Other Horned Dinosaurs

    08/24/2006 10:49:15 PM PDT · by Virginia-American · 27 replies · 943+ views
    George Washington University Press Release ^ | May 16, 2006 | Wendy Carey, Matt Lindsay
    GW PROFESSOR JAMES M. CLARK LEADS DISCOVERY OF THE OLDEST-KNOWN CERATOPSIAN, AN ANCESTOR OF TRICERATOPS AND OTHER HORNED DINOSAURS New Find is Evolutionary Link Between Ceratopsians and Pachycephalosaurs, the "Bone-Headed" Dinosaurs WASHINGTON -- James M. Clark, Ronald B. Weintraub Associate Professor of Biology at The George Washington University, and Xu Xing of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, have discovered the oldest-known ceratopsian, a finding that solidifies the close evolutionary evidence between ceratopsians and pachycephalosarians, the "bone-headed" dinosaurs. Roaming the earth 160 million years ago, the new basal ceratopsian dinosaur, Yinlong downsi, appeared 20 million years...
  • Dover, PA Evolution Trial [daily thread for 07 Oct]

    10/07/2005 7:23:15 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 456 replies · 4,761+ views
    York Daily Record ^ | 07 October 2005 | Staff
    To keep this all in one daily thread, here are links to two articles in the York Daily Record (with excerpts from each), which has been doing a great job of reporting on the trial: Forrest cross-examination a rambling wonder. About the time that Richard Thompson, head law guy at the Thomas More center and chief defender of the Dover Area School Board, started his third year of cross-examination of philosopher Barbara Forrest, it was easy to imagine that at that moment, everyone in the courtroom, including Forrest, who doesn’t believe in God, was violating the separation of church and...
  • Hunters Claim to Find 4-Winged Dinosaur

    01/22/2003 11:38:37 AM PST · by Dallas · 56 replies · 748+ views
    Fossil hunters in China have discovered what may be one of the weirdest prehistoric species ever seen -- a four-winged dinosaur that apparently glided from tree to tree. The 128-million-year-old animal -- called Microraptor gui, in honor of Chinese paleontologist Gu Zhiwei -- was about 2 1/2 feet long and had two sets of feathered wings, with one set on its forelimbs and the other on its hind legs. Exactly where the creature fits into the evolution of birds and dinosaurs is not clear. But researchers speculated that it developed around the same time as or even later than...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • King Richard III's Final Moments Were Quick & Brutal

    09/17/2014 12:39:21 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 94 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | September 17, 2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    Richard III's last moments were likely quick but terrifying, according to a new study of the death wounds of the last king of England to die in battle. The last king of the Plantagenet dynasty faced his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug. 22, 1485, only two years after ascending the throne. The battle was the deciding clash in the long-running Wars of the Roses, and ended with the establishment of Henry Tudor as the new English monarch. But Richard III's last moments were the stuff of legend alone, as the king's body was lost until September...
  • Global Warming and the Rise of the Mongolian Empire

    03/12/2014 6:56:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    National Review ^ | 03/12/2014 | Alec Torres
    Humanity’s greatest land empire was made possible by non-human climate change. Many phenomena, real and imagined, have been attributed to global warming. From rising ocean levels to increased agricultural yields to tornadoes to polar vortices to droughts to rapes to car thefts, global warming now stands as the cause of just about anything. And because of current political dogma, man is ultimately blamed for all these evils (and occasional goods). Now a recent study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that there is a correlation between increasing global temperatures and the rise of the Mongolian empire. According...
  • COLUMN: Historic ship found in Canadian arctic

    09/13/2014 10:59:28 PM PDT · by roses of sharon · 10 replies
    Statesville Record ^ | Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:00 am | O.C. Stonestreet
    Historically valuable items are continually being lost or destroyed or being found. For example, most R&L readers likely missed a two-paragraph item in the middle of page 10A of last Wednesday's edition. The title of the article was "Canada Finds One of Two Explorers Ships Lost in Arctic." I feel this discovery warrants more coverage. The two vessels were the HMS Erebus and the HMS Terror, both lost during an expedition to determine the feasibility of traversing the "Northwest Passage," a route over the top of North America to link the Atlantic Ocean and Europe to the Pacific Ocean and...
  • Spinosaurus fossil: 'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

    09/12/2014 6:01:43 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    BBC ^ | September 11, 2014 | Rebecca Morelle
    The 95-million-year-old remains confirm a long-held theory: that this is the first-known swimming dinosaur. Scientists say the beast had flat, paddle-like feet and nostrils on top of its crocodilian head that would allow it to submerge with ease. The research is published in the journal Science. Lead author Nizar Ibrahim, a palaeontologist from the University of Chicago, said: "It is a really bizarre dinosaur - there's no real blueprint for it.
  • Pictograph Photo Gallery

    09/11/2014 2:06:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 9/11/2014 | Staff
    Pictograph Photo Gallery A pictograph is a drawing or painting that is created on a rock. It is not "carved" into the rock - that would be a "petroglyph." This is a series of photographs of pictographs from around the world. There are many links to other galleries.
  • Egyptian chronology and the Bible.

    09/11/2014 7:49:21 AM PDT · by fishtank · 24 replies
    Egyptian chronology and the Bible. Framing the issues Do the dates ascribed to the Egyptian dynasties falsify the date of biblical creation? by Gary Bates Published: 2 September 2014 (GMT+10) Egyptian chronology can be a challenging subject for biblical creationists. That’s because the secular, majority view about these chronologies extends further back than an objective reading of the biblical chronogenealogies allows for creation: a little over 6,000 years ago. These chronologies are hotly debated among Christians and secularists alike, with the consensus being increasingly challenged. Moreover, some of the incredible Egyptian monuments like the great pyramids on the Giza Plateau...
  • Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

    09/10/2014 10:14:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by Duke University
    Sir Mick Jagger has a new animal named after him. Scientists have named an extinct swamp-dwelling creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa after the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both share—their supersized lips. "We gave it the scientific name Jaggermeryx naida, which translates to 'Jagger's water nymph,'" said study co-author Ellen Miller of Wake Forest University. The animal's fossilized jaw bones suggest it was roughly the size of a small deer and akin to a cross between a slender hippo and a long-legged pig. Researchers uncovered the fossils—consisting of multiple jawbone fragments—amid the...