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Incredible Read: Calvin Coolidge's Inaugural Address
Bio ^ | 1925 | Calvin Coolidge

Posted on 11/15/2008 8:21:58 PM PST by freemike

...Likewise, the policy of public ownership of railroads and certain electric utilities met with unmistakable defeat. The people declared that they wanted their rights to have not a political but a judicial determination, and their independence and freedom continued and supported by having the ownership and control of their property, not in the Government, but in their own hands. As they always do when they have a fair chance, the people demonstrated that they are sound and are determined to have a sound government. 13

When we turn from what was rejected to inquire what was accepted, the policy that stands out with the greatest clearness is that of economy in public expenditure with reduction and reform of taxation. The principle involved in this effort is that of conservation.

The resources of this country are almost beyond computation. No mind can comprehend them. But the cost of our combined governments is likewise almost beyond definition. Not only those who are now making their tax returns, but those who meet the enhanced cost of existence in their monthly bills, know by hard experience what this great burden is and what it does.

No matter what others may want, these people want a drastic economy. They are opposed to waste. They know that extravagance lengthens the hours and diminishes the rewards of their labor. I favor the policy of economy, not because I wish to save money, but because I wish to save people. The men and women of this country who toil are the ones who bear the cost of the Government. Every dollar that we carelessly waste means that their life will be so much the more meager. Every dollar that we prudently save means that their life will be so much the more abundant. Economy is idealism in its most practical form. 14

If extravagance were not reflected in taxation, and through taxation both directly and indirectly injuriously affecting the people, it would not be of so much consequence. The wisest and soundest method of solving our tax problem is through economy.

Fortunately, of all the great nations this country is best in a position to adopt that simple remedy. We do not any longer need wartime revenues. The collection of any taxes which are not absolutely required, which do not beyond reasonable doubt contribute to the public welfare, is only a species of legalized larceny. Under this republic the rewards of industry belong to those who earn them.

The only constitutional tax is the tax which ministers to public necessity. The property of the country belongs to the people of the country. Their title is absolute. They do not support any privileged class; they do not need to maintain great military forces; they ought not to be burdened with a great array of public employees. They are not required to make any contribution to Government expenditures except that which they voluntarily assess upon themselves through the action of their own representatives. Whenever taxes become burdensome a remedy can be applied by the people; but if they do not act for themselves, no one can be very successful in acting for them. 15

The time is arriving when we can have further tax reduction, when, unless we wish to hamper the people in their right to earn a living, we must have tax reform. The method of raising revenue ought not to impede the transaction of business; it ought to encourage it.

I am opposed to extremely high rates, because they produce little or no revenue, because they are bad for the country, and, finally, because they are wrong.

We can not finance the country, we can not improve social conditions, through any system of injustice, even if we attempt to inflict it upon the rich. Those who suffer the most harm will be the poor. This country believes in prosperity. It is absurd to suppose that it is envious of those who are already prosperous. The wise and correct course to follow in taxation and all other economic legislation is not to destroy those who have already secured success but to create conditions under which every one will have a better chance to be successful. The verdict of the country has been given on this question. That verdict stands. We shall do well to heed it.

These questions involve moral issues. We need not concern ourselves much about the rights of property if we will faithfully observe the rights of persons. Under our institutions their rights are supreme. It is not property but the right to hold property, both great and small, which our Constitution guarantees.

All owners of property are charged with a service. These rights and duties have been revealed, through the conscience of society, to have a divine sanction. The very stability of our society rests upon production and conservation. For individuals or for governments to waste and squander their resources is to deny these rights and disregard these obligations. The result of economic dissipation to a nation is always moral decay.

These policies of better international understandings, greater economy, and lower taxes have contributed largely to peaceful and prosperous industrial relations. Under the helpful influences of restrictive immigration and a protective tariff, employment is plentiful, the rate of pay is high, and wage earners are in a state of contentment seldom before seen. Our transportation systems have been gradually recovering and have been able to meet all the requirements of the service. Agriculture has been very slow in reviving, but the price of cereals at last indicates that the day of its deliverance is at hand.

We are not without our problems, but our most important problem is not to secure new advantages but to maintain those which we already possess. Our system of government made up of three separate and independent departments, our divided sovereignty composed of Nation and State, the matchless wisdom that is enshrined in our Constitution, all these need constant effort and tireless vigilance for their protection and support.

In a republic the first rule for the guidance of the citizen is obedience to law. Under a despotism the law may be imposed upon the subject. He has no voice in its making, no influence in its administration, it does not represent him. Under a free government the citizen makes his own laws, chooses his own administrators, which do represent him. Those who want their rights respected under the Constitution and the law ought to set the example themselves of observing the Constitution and the law. While there may be those of high intelligence who violate the law at times, the barbarian and the defective always violate it. Those who disregard the rules of society are not exhibiting a superior intelligence, are not promoting freedom and independence, are not following the path of civilization, but are displaying the traits of ignorance, of servitude, of savagery, and treading the way that leads back to the jungle.

The essence of a republic is representative government. Our Congress represents the people and the States. In all legislative affairs it is the natural collaborator with the President. In spite of all the criticism which often falls to its lot, I do not hesitate to say that there is no more independent and effective legislative body in the world. It is, and should be, jealous of its prerogative. I welcome its cooperation, and expect to share with it not only the responsibility, but the credit, for our common effort to secure beneficial legislation. 21

It is in such contemplations, my fellow countrymen, which are not exhaustive but only representative, that I find ample warrant for satisfaction and encouragement. We should not let the much that is to do obscure the much which has been done. The past and present show faith and hope and courage fully justified. Here stands our country, an example of tranquility at home, a patron of tranquility abroad. Here stands its Government, aware of its might but obedient to its conscience. Here it will continue to stand, seeking peace and prosperity, solicitous for the welfare of the wage earner, promoting enterprise, developing waterways and natural resources, attentive to the intuitive counsel of womanhood, encouraging education, desiring the advancement of religion, supporting the cause of justice and honor among the nations. America seeks no earthly empire built on blood and force. No ambition, no temptation, lures her to thought of foreign dominions. The legions which she sends forth are armed, not with the sword, but with the cross. The higher state to which she seeks the allegiance of all mankind is not of human, but of divine origin. She cherishes no purpose save to merit the favor of Almighty God. 23


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Education; Miscellaneous; Religion
KEYWORDS: calvincoolidge; coolidge; propertyrights; taxation

1 posted on 11/15/2008 8:21:58 PM PST by freemike
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To: freemike

This is an incredible read! If only someone would speak like this today!


2 posted on 11/15/2008 8:22:57 PM PST by freemike
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To: freemike

reference ping


3 posted on 11/15/2008 8:27:31 PM PST by Para-Ord.45
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To: freemike

Obama 2008: “I AM the change you’ve been waiting for.”


4 posted on 11/15/2008 8:28:01 PM PST by Mad_Tom_Rackham ("The land of the Free...Because of the Brave")
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To: freemike
This hails from the days when people were taught how to read the classics in the original Greek and Latin.

In high school.

5 posted on 11/15/2008 8:28:09 PM PST by George Smiley (Palin is the real deal.)
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To: freemike

ping


6 posted on 11/15/2008 8:31:18 PM PST by woweeitsme
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To: freemike

I should mention these are excerpts here,,, I read the whole thing. I have been interested in President Wilson and what came after him. Knew nothing about Coolidge.
President Wilson was really, really bad. Funny how things repeat. He had the first community organizers,, 250,000 strong, based in 600 cities, working for the FBI, going around and beating people up. It was actually illegal to speak against the government through the sedition act.
But,, you know what,, we got through it, and good Republicans came and restored the nation.
History is really full of surprises.


7 posted on 11/15/2008 8:31:22 PM PST by freemike
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To: freemike

>The time is arriving when we can have further tax reduction, when, unless we wish to hamper the people in their right to earn a living, we must have tax reform. The method of raising revenue ought not to impede the transaction of business; it ought to encourage it.<

liberal-socialist history profs have given cal a bad rep.


8 posted on 11/15/2008 8:33:52 PM PST by ken21 (people die and you never hear from them again.)
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To: freemike

BTT


9 posted on 11/15/2008 8:39:48 PM PST by allmendream (Wealth is EARNED not distributed.... so how could it be Redistributed?)
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To: freemike

Cal my favorite president.


10 posted on 11/15/2008 8:42:50 PM PST by redangus
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To: freemike

Obama is almost literally the polar opposite of Silent Cal.


11 posted on 11/15/2008 8:47:11 PM PST by SMCC1
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To: freemike

Thank you for sharing


12 posted on 11/15/2008 8:49:13 PM PST by An American! (Proud To Be An American!)
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To: freemike

good read


13 posted on 11/15/2008 8:49:51 PM PST by smokingfrog (If it's to be a bloodbath, let it be now. Appeasement is not the answer. - Ronald Reagan)
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To: nutmeg

bookmark


14 posted on 11/15/2008 8:51:13 PM PST by nutmeg (Palin/Jindal or Jindal/Palin 2012)
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To: smokingfrog

I should have high lighted more to make it easier to skim.
This is just as relevant today as then.
But,, that is the way of truth,, it will always be relevant.
A thousand years from today,, our constitution will still be relevant. Freedom of speech, property rights, the right to associate with who you want, religious rights and even gun rights
The weapons may change,, but the right to self defense will be just as valid a thousand years from now as it is today.


15 posted on 11/15/2008 8:54:05 PM PST by freemike
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To: freemike

God bless “Silent” Cal. He was the last great President.


16 posted on 11/15/2008 9:00:10 PM PST by pankot
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To: pankot
Mr. President: I bet my husband I could get you to say three words to me tonight.

Pres Cal: You lose.

17 posted on 11/15/2008 9:13:53 PM PST by nufsed
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To: freemike

ping


18 posted on 11/15/2008 10:55:44 PM PST by madconservative (Obama is kind of right I guess; the ideas of Adam Smith are "older" than those of Karl Marx.)
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To: freemike

Coolidge has a lot to offer conservatives. He was spot on as regards adherence to originalist philosophy and always steered towards “least gov’t is best gov’t”. Also, read up on his run as Governor of Mass.

In my college days, I knew an old guy who was a bit of a Wilsonian pinko. I used to get into great debates with him because I’m a huge Coolidge fan and he absolutely had Coolidge Derangement Syndrome.


19 posted on 11/16/2008 5:01:29 AM PST by Paine in the Neck (Nepolean fries the idea powder)
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To: freemike
As they always do when they have a fair chance, the people demonstrated that they are sound and are determined to have a sound government.

Unfortunately, this is just not true. "The people" can make bad decisions, just as any other ruling group can.

Slavery was supported by most Americans well into the Civil War. Secession was wildly popular in most of the South, as was Jim Crow.

We just elected a probably disastrous president and congress. The people are not always right.

Elections determine what is popular, not what is right or wise.

20 posted on 11/16/2008 5:09:44 AM PST by Sherman Logan (Everyone has a right to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.)
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To: Sherman Logan

The collection of any taxes which are not absolutely required, which do not beyond reasonable doubt contribute to the public welfare, is only a species of legalized larceny


21 posted on 11/16/2008 11:03:58 AM PST by freemike
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