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Don't let claims on honey labels dupe you; If it's made in America, it's likely not organic
Seattle P-I ^ | December 30, 2008 | ANDREW SCHNEIDER

Posted on 01/02/2009 6:49:24 AM PST by Daffynition

When it comes to sizing up the purity of the honey you buy, you're pretty much on your own.

You may be paying more for honey labeled "certified organic" or feel reassured by the "USDA Grade A" seal, but the truth is, there are few federal standards for honey, no government certification and no consequences for making false claims.

For American-made honey, the "organic" boast, experts say, is highly suspect. Beekeepers may be doing their part, but honeybees have a foraging range of several miles, exposing them to pesticides, fertilizers and pollutants on their way back to the hive.

And while they're required to put the country of origin on the label -- a fact that could help guide wary consumers -- some honey producers don't bother.

The head of one major honey company advises caution and warns that in the United States, there's confusion over label terminology and inconsistent enforcement of labeling laws.

"There is honey out there that is illegally and purposely mislabeled, an adulterated product that is very difficult to stop," said Dwight Stoller, chief executive of Kansas-based Golden Heritage Foods. "There's probably not a lot, but it's still a real issue, and consumers must be aware of that."

Unless shoppers buy honey from a farmers market, where they can talk with the person who raised the bees and bottled the honey, they're relying on what's printed on the label.

Major supermarkets offer dozens of different brands, sizes, types and flavors of honey for sale. Consumers might walk away with the finest-tasting, highest-quality honey there is. Or they could end up with an unlabeled blend, adulterated with impossible-to-detect cheap sweeteners or illegal antibiotics.

Part of this is because of the government's failure to define what true honey is, but the blame also goes to a handful of sleazy honey packers who buy and sell cut-rate foreign honey, which usually has little problem slipping past overstretched customs inspectors.

The Seattle P-I surveyed 60 honey products commonly sold in the Pacific Northwest and found glowing praises of healthfulness, sincere promises of quality and an endless selection of advertising adjectives touting honey as the true elixir.

"100% Pure." "U.S. Grade A Pure." "U.S. Grade 1." "America's Best Honey." "U.S. Choice." "Natural and Pure."

The list goes on and on, but it's mostly hype, experts say.

"If somebody puts 'U.S. Grade A' on there, who's going to say it isn't?" said Harriet Behar, outreach coordinator with the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service. "There's no enforcement, so people can say whatever they want."

The government takes a minor role in the grading of honey. It's left entirely up to the industry.

Stoller was the only one willing to discuss it openly. His company, with beekeeping roots going back 90 years, is one of the nation's largest suppliers of honey to retail outlets, the food-processing industry and food service and restaurant-supply companies.

The government, he said, doesn't have the resources to set and enforce needed standards. And that leads to inaccurate or misleading labeling.

"Some packers just slap on whatever they feel like," he said. "Whatever they believe will attract the shopper to their product." 'Meaningless' claims

Where things really get sticky is the selling of "organic" honey -- sold in some form by every major chain.

Government, academic and industry experts insist that U.S. organic honey is a myth. With rare exceptions, this country is too developed and uses too many agricultural and industrial chemicals to allow for the production of organic honey.

"Like other foods from free-roaming, wild creatures, it is difficult -- and in some places impossible -- to assure that honey bees have not come in contact with prohibited substances, like pesticides," said Chuck Benbrook, chief scientist for the Organic Center, a national advocacy group for the research and promotion of organic food.

Recent U.S. Department of Agriculture research, he said, shows that the average hive contains traces of five or more pesticide residues.

Arthur Harvey of the International Association of Organic Inspectors, who doubles as a Maine beekeeper, said two factors must be considered when attempting to produce organic honey: what the beekeeper puts into the hive, such as chemicals or medication of any kind; and the location of the hive.

Can the bee fly to a place that can be a source of potential contamination?

Harvey shares the concerns of many that there are no real USDA standards for organic honey.

"What USDA has said is that you can certify any product as organic as long as you comply with existing regulation, but there are no regulations for honey," he said. "That means the green USDA organic sticker on honey is meaningless."

Across the globe, there are 30 different, wide-ranging certification standards for organic honey, but there's no way for inspectors to detect fraud, according to Harvey. The USDA, he said, has never levied a fine for a violation of organic rules -- for honey or any other product.

The Naturally Preferred honey brand, widely distributed by the Kroger supermarket chain, has a USDA seal on the front label. On the back, it boasts, "Certified Organic by the Washington State Department of Agriculture."

Not so, say state officials.

The Washington State Department of Agriculture doesn't certify honey "because we have no standards for organic honey," said agency spokesman Mike Louisell.

"It shouldn't have WSDA on its label," he said, "because we don't do it."

Jerry Hayes, chief of the apiary section for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, said there are no organic standards for honey in the United States because honeybees forage in a 2 to 2 1/2-mile radius of their colonies.

"They're flying dust mops and will pick up unbelievable amounts of environmental contaminants," Hayes said.

Unlike most states, Florida has 15 full-time inspectors, a lab and other resources dedicated to ensuring honey quality, and the state is poised to do what the federal government hasn't -- pass a law defining what honey is.

Consumers stand to benefit, said Dr. Marion Aller, who heads Florida's food safety division.

"This will make enforcement of food safety easier," he said.

Aller said the honey industry supports the move because it's increasingly concerned that products touted as "pure" actually may be cut with other sugars or syrups.

Washington has no apiculture inspectors, largely because there isn't the budget for it.

Claudia Coles, food safety manager for the Agriculture Department, said her staff inspects Washington's honey producers for sanitary practices only, as it does with 1,700 other licensed food processors statewide.

"But the quality analysis of honey -- determining what's really in the bottle -- isn't something we have funding for," she said. "We struggle first with issues of E. coli, pathogens that make people sick with acute illnesses."

Some U.S. producers say they're confident offering certain foreign organic honeys to the public.

Mike Ingalls, president of Pure Foods Inc. in Sultan, recently stood beside a stack of brown steel drums in his warehouse. It's all marked "Organic Honey" and "Product of Argentina" -- and each drum carries a sticker with a tracking number.

"I can use that number to track the honey back to the supplier in Argentina and the specific beehives in latitude and longitude and degrees, minutes and seconds," he said, "so I can plot precisely where those hives were, and that they were at least six miles away from any cultivated crop."

While Canada also produces some authentic organic honey, Ingalls said that product is currently in short supply so he's had to turn to South American imports.

As for the domestic variety, he added: "We don't produce any organic honey in the United States." Ultra-filtered honey

The industry hopes Florida's proposed honey standard is adopted by other states and the USDA.

If so, it may provide law enforcement the tools it needs to stop the flood of adulterated honey products.

Honey brokers and scientists say that not only is Chinese honey being laundered in other countries to avoid stiff U.S. tariffs and inspections, but also it's being sold as "malt sweetener," "blended syrup" and "rice syrup."

Florida's inspectors say some honey exported from China and India is put through an ultra-filtration process that is meant to remove contaminants. Honey is heavily diluted with water, then repeatedly boiled and filtered until it returns to a more natural consistency. Those who have tested and tasted the filtered brew said the process can completely remove all traces of contaminants, "including the color."

But there's a downside.

"In the process of taking out the chemicals, they also take out all the good qualities of the honey. What the consumer is left with is a very low-quality, sweet product -- but certainly not honey," said Mark Brady, president of the American Honey Producers Association.

"If it is cheap and packers can use it to blend into other dark, cheap honey to make it lighter in color and taste a tad better, the ignorant general consumer is none the wiser. Caveat emptor," he warned.

A warning consumers should be getting, but often don't, is a disclosure of where their honey came from.

Federal law requires that the country of origin be printed on food labels, but many companies offer no clue.

Nondisclosing companies range from small producers, such as Haggen Honey, distributed from Bellingham, and Anna's Honey, distributed by Seattle Gourmet Foods, to national distributors such as Target and Wal-Mart.

A Target spokeswoman wouldn't disclose where the discount retailer's honey came from. But she said the Market Pantry Grade A honey "meets all USDA and FDA inspection standards."

Linda Brown Blakley, a Wal-Mart senior spokeswoman, said it's her "understanding" that "if the honey is produced domestically, country of origin need not be included on the label."

However, USDA says honey is considered a "perishable agricultural commodity" and country of origin is required.

The label on Heins Organic Trail Honey, packaged by Pure Foods, errs on the side of overdisclosure, listing five countries of origin: U.S., Canada, China, Argentina and Australia. Ingalls, however, said that, too, isn't exactly right: He no longer imports from China and is just using up old labels. 'Tread carefully'

Besides its certified organic claims, Kroger's Naturally Preferred honey also carries the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.

That puzzles honey experts such as Behar.

"I don't know how Good Housekeeping can do this. They don't know anything about honey standards," she said.

Good Housekeeping -- a magazine owned by The Hearst Corp., the P-I's parent company -- confirmed that, in 2005, Naturally Preferred honey qualified for the seal, a status that expired last month.

A magazine spokesperson said food products considered for the seal of approval are evaluated for nutritional value based on "federal, standard guidelines."

The USDA, however, said it doesn't have such standards for honey.

Consumer advocates warn shoppers not to put too much stock in seals of approval -- or even claims that the supermarket product with "honey" in the name actually contains any.

Pringles' Honey Buttered Wheat Stix, for example, doesn't list honey among its 30-plus ingredients.

A company representative said the snack is made in Thailand and contains artificial honey flavoring, not real honey. "We call it 'honey butter' because that's what it tastes like," she said.

Honey Graham Crackers do contain honey -- it's on the ingredient list after sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.

Ditto for Nabisco's Honey Maid Grahams and 16 other brands of "honey" crackers, snacks and cereals the P-I inspected.

Paul van Westendorp, the provincial apiculturist for British Columbia's Ministry of Agriculture, said that in Canada, there are renewed calls to tighten up the regulations of honey labeling.

"The erosion of the label 'honey' has been going on for decades and beekeepers have often been frustrated by the big food processors such as General Mills, Kellogg's and many others for using honey in their product-line advertising while the product contains little or no honey," he said.

"Is the consumer getting cheated? That depends entirely on what the label says. The difference, of course, is that this type of product is typically sold to the ... uninformed consumer."

That practice is commonplace, said Diane Dunaway, who has studied honey marketing and is editor of Bee-scene magazine, produced for Canadian beekeepers in British Columbia and elsewhere.

"It's come down to consumers taking the time to read the ingredients list on the product label versus the marketing text," she said.

"The folks who make Pringles aren't the first to exploit the health-inspiring word 'honey' for profit. Companies like these and other food processors are relying on the dumbing down of consumer awareness," Dunaway said.

As warm and cuddly as the honeybee is to Madison Avenue, she warned food processors to tread carefully.

"Hell hath no fury like a soccer mom scorned!"


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine; Outdoors
KEYWORDS: argentina; bees; china; food; honey; honeybees; organic
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1 posted on 01/02/2009 6:49:24 AM PST by Daffynition
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To: Daffynition

Cool shot, did you take it?


2 posted on 01/02/2009 6:55:31 AM PST by brytlea (You can fool enough of the people enough of the time.)
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To: Daffynition
Part of this is because of the government's failure to define what true honey is,

Our "government" cannot even be truthful about the meaning of the word IS.

3 posted on 01/02/2009 6:57:06 AM PST by weegee (Obamunism, just another word for the policies of a NeoCom.)
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To: Daffynition
Insist on Yack's honey from eastern Utah . You will be fine .
4 posted on 01/02/2009 6:58:23 AM PST by kbennkc (For those who have fought for it freedom has a flavor the protected will never know F/8 Cav)
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To: Daffynition

The article casts a wide net.

Says that even if it’s honey, it may not be “organic” because the plants, many miles away, that the bees collect honey from may not be 100% organic (or even fair trade farms). Flies land on animal waste too.

The OTHER beef the author has is that honey-flavored foods may not contain a significant quantity of honey. Here’s some other breaking news, tofu hot dogs DO NOT CONTAIN BEEF, PORK, or even DOG!


5 posted on 01/02/2009 7:00:30 AM PST by weegee (Obamunism, just another word for the policies of a NeoCom.)
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To: Daffynition
"If somebody puts 'U.S. Grade A' on there, who's going to say it isn't?" said Harriet Behar, outreach coordinator with the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service. "There's no enforcement, so people can say whatever they want."

Sounds like honey producers took a lesson from the bond rating agencies. ;)

6 posted on 01/02/2009 7:02:28 AM PST by Mr. Jeeves ("One man's 'magic' is another man's engineering. 'Supernatural' is a null word." -- Robert Heinlein)
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To: Daffynition

Take your mind off it by remembering that you’re eating BEE SPIT!!


7 posted on 01/02/2009 7:02:39 AM PST by DManA
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To: Daffynition; Gabz

Garden - Honey Ping


8 posted on 01/02/2009 7:04:12 AM PST by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Daffynition

Environmentalist minds have too much time on their hands if they are worrying about how to micromanage bee hives, and raise the price of honey with expensive tests and regulations.

My honey comes from just about 12 miles down the road and thats good enough for me.


9 posted on 01/02/2009 7:04:30 AM PST by o_zarkman44 (Since when is paying more, but getting less, considered Patriotic?)
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To: DManA

High energy bee spit.


10 posted on 01/02/2009 7:05:13 AM PST by weegee (Obamunism, just another word for the policies of a NeoCom.)
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To: o_zarkman44

The left is so bloody anxious about fair trade coffee. Why don’t they want the SAME protections for other employment fields? Why must our tech jobs be shipped overseas just so things will be “cheaper”?


11 posted on 01/02/2009 7:06:14 AM PST by weegee (Obamunism, just another word for the policies of a NeoCom.)
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To: Daffynition

I had raised bees for a period of time. I have never tasted honey as good as from those bees. I always suspected that commercial honey was not the same as mine. I recently opened my last jar of 25 year old honey and shared it with family members. Best honey they ever had was their comment.


12 posted on 01/02/2009 7:07:30 AM PST by Cold Heart
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To: Daffynition
Interesting thanks. I buy Texas Wildflower Honey from the Stroope Honey Farm in Pearland Texas. I met the man who owns the company while he and his wife were delivering it to Whole Foods . This article raises some questions that I had not thought to ask.
13 posted on 01/02/2009 7:08:40 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Beeman

ping


14 posted on 01/02/2009 7:09:54 AM PST by Tijeras_Slim
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To: weegee

If it says made in America on the label, then it’s good enough for me. I certainly wouldn’t trust imported “honey” from China or anywhere other than maybe Canada.

This probably wouldn’t have become a problem if people weren’t buying crap from China. Nobody there cares about testing or labeling.


15 posted on 01/02/2009 7:12:59 AM PST by o_zarkman44 (Since when is paying more, but getting less, considered Patriotic?)
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To: o_zarkman44

The word “organic” doesn’t offer many guarantees but the marketplace understands there is money to be made by using it.

Just as low-fat does not mean HEALTHY. Look at how much sodium has been added to “low fat” foods to compensate on flavor.


16 posted on 01/02/2009 7:15:42 AM PST by weegee (Obamunism, just another word for the policies of a NeoCom.)
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To: DManA

I though it was honeybee vomit...

hmmm honeybee vomit...

BTW, honey is the only food that does not spoil.


17 posted on 01/02/2009 7:23:41 AM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: Daffynition

It seems unlikely that honey could contain any noticeable amount of pesticide. That would kill the bees.


18 posted on 01/02/2009 7:26:04 AM PST by SeeSharp
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To: DManA
Bee spit? LOL, it's more accurately bee sh!t...

The nectar has to be digested before it becomes honey. Just because it came back the same way it went in, doesn't mean that it isn't sh!t.

Delicious sh!t, at that.


19 posted on 01/02/2009 7:27:22 AM PST by MyTwoCopperCoins
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To: Daffynition

I think we need a Honey Czar. A cabinet level position, and a gigantic new bureaucracy to rival TSA. No way can we continue to allow honey to be sold with no regulation. We need government standards, testing, inspection, of the entire supply chain. We pay for it by taxing... hmm... howz bout we tax gasoline? Screw that lets just tax BTU’s. And all animate objects! Yes! What fun! Oh, lets tax cell phones even though they are inanimate objects!!!! Here we go if it moves, if it does not move, and if it makes heat, or cold lets tax it!!!!!!!


20 posted on 01/02/2009 7:28:27 AM PST by DariusBane (I've got a bracelet too :))
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To: MyTwoCopperCoins

“Bee spit? LOL, it’s more accurately bee sh!t... “

No, I would say it is closer to bee cud.


21 posted on 01/02/2009 7:47:02 AM PST by Born to Conserve
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In my opinion the type that tastes the best is “Fire Weed” honey.

Honey is also good to kill germs. Just put some on a band-aid, or plaster if your from England, and a cut heals up without a scar.

The ancient Romans used honey and silver staples to treat and close sword wounds after a battle.


22 posted on 01/02/2009 7:47:18 AM PST by Duke Phelan
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To: Mr. Jeeves

Grade A from USDA is just what it says.

This is just organic people obfuscating.

It is like sea salt sellers trying to push the BS that pure sodium chloride from location “A” is different from pure sodium chloride from location “B”.

All nonsense. The article does not even name names.


23 posted on 01/02/2009 7:50:44 AM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: DariusBane
No way can we continue to allow honey to be sold with no regulation.

That's always the point of the "do-gooders", more regulation, more beauracracy, more gov't.

The average person is incapable of taking care of anything themselves.....

24 posted on 01/02/2009 7:51:03 AM PST by Erik Latranyi (Too many conservatives urge retreat when the war of politics doesn't go their way.)
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To: longtermmemmory; MyTwoCopperCoins

My favorite breakfast; Chicken embryos, shredded swine flesh, and bee vomit/excrement on toast. Yummo


25 posted on 01/02/2009 7:51:51 AM PST by DManA
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To: Daffynition

I’m just glad we can get some from our cousin down the road. If they are sold out we read labels and buy as locally as possible.


26 posted on 01/02/2009 7:55:36 AM PST by Cloverfarm
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To: weegee

Everything that grows is naturally organic. Anything done intentionally to change how something grows is an intervention regardless of if manure is used for fertilizer, or chemicals are used. As for bees flying anywhere and everywhere collecting pollen, that is impossible to regulate.

Anything done to change the consistency of a natural product can still be called organic as long as nothing is added to enhance flavor, sweetness, or consistency. If honey is reprocessed beyond the comb it is still natural as long as nothing chemical is added.

But there are chemicals in everything man made. What do we expect? It’s the price we pay for progress. The world will never go back to where it was regardless of how mankind intervenes. It’s part of the adaptation of species, otherwise known as evolution. Has mankind become so intelligent that we kill off our species?

Or would an intelligent decision be to stop importing food crap from China and other 3rd world countries if we don’t have complete inspections of every item? This is completely dooable. Regulating where honey bees gather pollen is not.

Once again, idiots are turning to the government to fix another problem of their own making by adding additional potential government failure. Feel any safer yet people??


27 posted on 01/02/2009 7:56:30 AM PST by o_zarkman44 (Since when is paying more, but getting less, considered Patriotic?)
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To: Duke Phelan
Honey is also good to kill germs.

It has nothing to do with the source itself, just the sugar content. The high osmolality of any concentrated sugar has strong antibacterial properties when used in a wound. Maple syrup or even grape jelly will do the same thing.

28 posted on 01/02/2009 7:58:48 AM PST by CholeraJoe (Don't it make you want to rock 'n roll all night long? Mohammed's radio.)
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To: Daffynition

Not “organic”? Is honey now made of plastic?


29 posted on 01/02/2009 8:05:06 AM PST by DesertSapper (God, Family, Country . . . . . . . . . . and dead terrorists!!!)
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To: Daffynition

I love honey, so I insist on the best. We buy local honey (made by Texas bees in Weatherford, Texas!) at the farmer’s market around the corner from our house. It’s packed in a mason-type jar with a label that was printed on a desktop printer, and it still has the comb in it.

Local honey is said to have properties beneficial to those who suffer from seasonal pollen allergies, as I do.


30 posted on 01/02/2009 8:06:54 AM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: CholeraJoe

True, but the honey isn’t as sticky as the jelly or syrup.

The best breakfast is french toast with creamy peanut butter and honey....Mmm, Yummy! You have to put the peanut butter on when the french toast is warm so it melts in with the honey.


31 posted on 01/02/2009 8:42:46 AM PST by Duke Phelan
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To: brytlea

Thanks


32 posted on 01/02/2009 9:01:00 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: weegee

“We’re from the government and we’re here to help you.”


33 posted on 01/02/2009 9:02:35 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: kbennkc

Those of you who live in the “wide-open-spaces” have an advantage ...those of us who live in close proximity, less of a choice.


34 posted on 01/02/2009 9:04:32 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: weegee; Mr. Jeeves

Oi!


35 posted on 01/02/2009 9:05:55 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: Ditter

I used to buy honey from a farm stand that was private labeled...over time after talking to the owner, he told me that he bought his honey in bulk from many different sources and just bottled it. That pretty much turned me off ...so unless, I can “see” the hives, I’m uncertain as to where the honey was gathered.


36 posted on 01/02/2009 9:09:37 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: Cold Heart

Awesome! What if it would age like fine wine, that would be kinda cool!


37 posted on 01/02/2009 9:11:54 AM PST by Daffynition ("Beauty is in the sty of the beholder." ~ Joe 6-pack)
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To: Cold Heart

I can’t get honey to keep from crystallizing for 3 months in the pantry or fridge, how on earth did you keep honey tasting good for 25 years?


38 posted on 01/02/2009 9:17:18 AM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (America: Home of the Free Because of the Brave)
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To: Daffynition

My guy said he had his own hives and had them in areas that had large numbers of Tallow trees. Tallow trees are a sort of trash tree in the Gulf Coast area, so I don’t know how he refers to his honey as wildflower honey. Like I said I would have a few more questions for him now that I have read your article.


39 posted on 01/02/2009 9:28:44 AM PST by Ditter
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To: o_zarkman44

Isn’t honey from your local area good for controlling certain pollen allergies? I have heard that several times but I am not sure if is is fact based.

BTW - What’s with this organic craze? Bear crap and poison ivy are both organic. I don’t see people rushing to eat it.


40 posted on 01/02/2009 10:08:20 AM PST by Dutch Boy
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Warm your honey can in a pan of water on your stove at low heat and it will be just right again .
41 posted on 01/02/2009 10:10:54 AM PST by kbennkc (For those who have fought for it freedom has a flavor the protected will never know F/8 Cav)
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To: Dutch Boy

Honey has a lot of good restorative qualities. In addition, the naturally occurring sugar is much healthier than the processed varietys. I have heard the allergy relationship, but don’t know if it’s real or not. but it makes sense.

Also, supposedly locally produced honey, and other food items indiginous to an area within a longitude and latitude are supposed to be healthier than imported foods. Something about Ying and Yang beliefs of harmonious nature.


42 posted on 01/02/2009 10:14:57 AM PST by o_zarkman44 (Since when is paying more, but getting less, considered Patriotic?)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
You can just heat the honey (in a pan of hot water) to uncrystalize it. BTW they found honey in some Egyptian tombs and it was still edible after thousands of years. At least they said it was...they didn't share any with me!
43 posted on 01/02/2009 10:23:47 AM PST by brytlea (You can fool enough of the people enough of the time.)
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To: Dutch Boy

While a lot of the organic craze is silly, to compare it to bear crap and poison ivy has to be one of the silliest things I’ve read! Thanks for the laugh.


44 posted on 01/02/2009 10:24:54 AM PST by brytlea (You can fool enough of the people enough of the time.)
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To: jahp; LilAngel; metmom; EggsAckley; Battle Axe; SweetCaroline; Grizzled Bear; goldfinch; B4Ranch; ..
Honey brokers and scientists say that not only is Chinese honey being laundered in other countries to avoid stiff U.S. tariffs and inspections, but also it's being sold as "malt sweetener," "blended syrup" and "rice syrup."

Florida's inspectors say some honey exported from China and India is put through an ultra-filtration process that is meant to remove contaminants. Honey is heavily diluted with water, then repeatedly boiled and filtered until it returns to a more natural consistency. Those who have tested and tasted the filtered brew said the process can completely remove all traces of contaminants, "including the color."

...The label on Heins Organic Trail Honey, packaged by Pure Foods, errs on the side of overdisclosure, listing five countries of origin: U.S., Canada, China, Argentina and Australia. Ingalls, however, said that, too, isn't exactly right: He no longer imports from China and is just using up old labels.

MADE IN CHINA POTTERY STAMP

A ping list dedicated to exposing the quality, safety and security issues of anything “Made in China”.


Please FReepmail me if you would like to be on or off of the list.

(This can be a high volume ping list.)

45 posted on 01/02/2009 1:17:51 PM PST by JACKRUSSELL
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To: JACKRUSSELL

I get my honey from a couple of different friends who have their own hives. yuuuummmm


46 posted on 01/02/2009 1:44:29 PM PST by kimmie7 (***sigh***)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I can’t keep the commercial stuff from crystalizing either. I figure they must be watering it down or something. I never filtered the honey either, possibly a wax content may have helped preserve it. I am considering starting some hives again. Oh yeah, it was mostly from black berry blossoms.


47 posted on 01/02/2009 1:47:00 PM PST by Cold Heart
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To: B-Chan

I asked my allergist if there was any truth to the claim that honey helped with allergies and he said yes.

I was more than a little surprised, coming from a medical professional.

He said it’s not as good as allergy shots, but for some people, it can help.

It helped mr. mm. He had such bad reactions to the shots that he had to quit them. Once we started eating local honey, his allergies improved DRAMATICALLY.


48 posted on 01/02/2009 3:35:50 PM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: Cold Heart

Wow, how long can you store honey?

I have some honey that crystallizes over time. I was wondering if that meant it was mixed with sugar and wasn’t pure honey.


49 posted on 01/02/2009 3:48:56 PM PST by fightinJAG (Good riddance, UAW.)
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To: fightinJAG
Not necessarily, crystallizing is a normal process. Higher pollen content also makes it crystallize faster. However, the quick rate in which the normal off the shelf honey crystallizes gives rise to suspicion as to question what they are doing to the honey. Gentle heating dissolves the crystals.
50 posted on 01/02/2009 4:08:38 PM PST by Cold Heart
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