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Need help with Dis-assembly/ Field Stripping of a Remington Model 11 Shotgun (vanity)
1/2/10 | blueflag

Posted on 01/02/2010 12:57:48 PM PST by Blueflag

Need some FReeper help here. I now have my dad's Model 11 Remington shotgun. It's a 12 G, 2 3/4" shells, serial number 744763. Mod choke. Made 1940s or earlier.

I'd like to clean and prep it quite thoroughly prior to its trip to a gunsmith for a safety/ops check.

Anybody have a good source for how to dissemble/clean it?

many thanks!


TOPICS: Education; Hobbies; Military/Veterans; Outdoors
KEYWORDS: banglist; fieldstrip; model11; remington; shotgun
Need some FReeper help here. I now have my dad's Model 11 Remington shotgun. It's a 12 G, 2 3/4" shells, serial number 744763. Mod choke. Made 1940s or earlier.

I'd like to clean and prep it quite thoroughly prior to its trip to a gunsmith for a safety/ops check.

Anybody have a good source for how to dissemble/clean it?

many thanks!

1 posted on 01/02/2010 12:57:51 PM PST by Blueflag
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To: Blueflag

There are probably videos on it out on YouTube.


2 posted on 01/02/2010 1:00:13 PM PST by aimhigh
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To: Blueflag

Take it to a trusted ‘smith’ for the work. A good smithie will check the action as well as the bore and primary firing mechanism.

A few dollars will pay dividends!


3 posted on 01/02/2010 1:01:44 PM PST by Cletus.D.Yokel (FreepMail me if you want on the Bourbon ping list!)
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To: Blueflag
Instructions are available in the Gun Digest Book of Firearms Assembly/Disassembly Part V: Shotguns. It's available at Amazon.com

Link:

http://www.amazon.com/.Digest-Book-Firearms-Assembly-Disassembly/dp/0873494008/ref=dp_cp_ob_b_title_2

4 posted on 01/02/2010 1:02:36 PM PST by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
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To: aimhigh

I actually checked youtube first; didn’t find a video on dis-assembly/cleaning. Several videos were fascinated with the recoil mechanism, but nuthin *I* found guides assembly/cleaning.

But I coulda just missed it.


5 posted on 01/02/2010 1:02:55 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

Unless you really know the gunsmith is good I’d let well enough alone and just clean and oil it .. free owners manual with takedown/disassembly http://www.remington.com/Pages/News-and-Resources/Downloads/Owners-Manuals.aspx


6 posted on 01/02/2010 1:03:03 PM PST by Neidermeyer
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To: Cletus.D.Yokel

I agree.

I just wanted to clean it up good prior to dropping it off. It’s been stored in a hard-side carrying case for years. It was put away oiled and clean, but my dad had never taken it out of the case for probably 20 years!

Beautiful gun. Action works smoothly.

Thanks for the advice.


7 posted on 01/02/2010 1:05:37 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Neidermeyer

LOL .. “Niedermeyer” ... got the silver helmet?

I had found that site but it doesn’t list the model 11 from the 1940s and earlier. I have to request the ‘obsolete manual’ . Thanks anyways!


8 posted on 01/02/2010 1:08:40 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

Just re-oil with rem oil and wipe everything your finger can reach with a rag. Theres no need to detail strip a pump, ever IMO. unless it was oiled with junk that gums up over time.


9 posted on 01/02/2010 1:10:24 PM PST by omega4179 (Marco2010)
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To: Blueflag
My advice, for whatever it's worth.....

I'd pull the thing apart and clean it just once, and then put it up on the shelf until kingdom come.

Semiauto shotguns are probably the single kind of firearm which has come the furthest in the last fifty or sixty years. The new ones have screw-in chokes so you don't need separate shotguns for every kind of use, they're much more reliable, much faster, much easier to clean, and many have recoil attenuation mechanisms including ported barrels, back boring, and things like the Beretta kickoff.

The Beretta Xtrema-II is one of life's bargains. Beretta makes its money on guns costing 3G - 30G and up and forces dealers to take a certain number of the hunting guns which are generally sold on the internet. The 900 - 1400 pricetag which you see on gunbroker.com for the Xtrema-II in various configurations can't be much more than the cost of producing the thing and shipping it here. It's all either stainless or man-made and totally immune to any and all weather, can handle all 12ga sizes including the 3.5 mags, and has a heavy spring and bleedoff valve so that you can shoot skeets one day and geese the next without changing anything other than ammo. It's startlingly easy to pull apart and clean and doesn't really need much cleaning beyond a bore snake and some chemical to take off plastic wadding residue, which all shotguns need.

10 posted on 01/02/2010 1:13:14 PM PST by wendy1946
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To: Blueflag

The Model 11 is a cousin to the Browning “humpback” A5. Semi-auto, squared-off back of the receiver, semi-auto 12ga.

I found you an exploded view. An exploded view of the A5 might also help.

http://www.okiegunsmithshop.com/Remington_Model_11.jpg

The #1 reason why I would recommend that you not do it yourself is that you probably don’t have the required set of screwdrivers to take down a firearm without mashing up the screws. If you look at the set of screwdrivers used by a smith, you’ll see that they’re precision instruments, with blades that fit the screw slots *exactly* - like with less than a thousandth clearance to the sides. This prevents you from making a mess out of a screw if you need to put some torque into removing it. On top of that, I’m guessing you also don’t have a set of brass punches or drifts and a soft hammer with which to drive them.

If you want to buy such a set of screwdrivers, Midway USA and Brownells sell sets - reckon on from $70 to $90 for a set that includes interchangeable bits that fit most screws.

A smith might charge only $50 to strip and clean it. Since you’re taking it there anyway, I’d just have him clean it, because he’s already going to be into it to check the moving components. NB that parts for the Model 11 are difficult to get, so if you or he screws something up in the take-down, or something already is broken, you might be looking at making the piece yourself to get the gun shooting again.


11 posted on 01/02/2010 1:15:41 PM PST by NVDave
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To: NVDave

Good advice. I had previously found the connection between the A5 and the Model 11. The Model 11 was apparently built in the US under a license.

I kinda figure that Remington did NOT want owners to get into the mechanisms behind screws. Every other Remington long gun I have comes apart easily WITHOUT using a screwdriver (EXCEPT to remove the barrel assembly from a receiver).

The Model 11’s barrel and tube came off quite readily, but nothing else.

I’ll go with the advice of cleaning and oiling what I can reach, and then handing it over to a ‘smith for testing.

I’d like to use it. It’s a family/heritage thing to go hunting with your dad’s shotgun that he’s FINALLY passed along ;-) [ he’s 87 ]


12 posted on 01/02/2010 1:25:15 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

Why do you want to disassemble? You are asking for problems that don’t exist.


13 posted on 01/02/2010 1:26:24 PM PST by Kirkwood
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To: Kirkwood

To check for/ remove gunk, grime, gum, corrosion. To clean, lubricate, etc. The usual ‘owner maintenance’ of a fine firearm.

I have no intent of taking apart a trigger mechanism, etc. This was just to ascertain what is the right owner maintenance to perform, and how to do it.

No different than what I would do with any of my other long guns.


14 posted on 01/02/2010 1:30:39 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

If the action works fine, no need to disassemble. Leave it alone. Unless you know the reputation of the gunsmith to be excellent, I wouldn’t have him mess with it either.


15 posted on 01/02/2010 1:44:05 PM PST by Kirkwood
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To: Blueflag
+1 to number 3. If it's an old gun needing a checkup, etc, just let the gunsmith do the cleaning for you. He will do a better job and it will make him happy too.

Also... I know you didn't ask, but DON'T store the gun in a case, etc. Get it home clean and just stand it up in a dry place that has good air circulation. (Assuming you don't have a safe.)

16 posted on 01/02/2010 1:53:04 PM PST by OKSooner ("He's quite mad, you know." - James Bond to P. Galore in "Goldfinger".)
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To: Blueflag

+1 on number 10, too. If it’s an heirloom keep it, shoot it now and then, and get something else to hunt with.


17 posted on 01/02/2010 1:56:53 PM PST by OKSooner ("He's quite mad, you know." - James Bond to P. Galore in "Goldfinger".)
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To: Blueflag

Did you check with Remington? You should be able to contact any gun mfg for a copy of an owners manual for models they produce(d).


18 posted on 01/02/2010 2:01:32 PM PST by AFreeBird (Going Rogue in 2012)
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To: Kirkwood

Agreed.

On this shotgun, the barrel, breach and carrier all recoil as one unit. About an hour ago, I could NOT get the action to work smoothly; it was very sticky and felt quite ‘dry’. After simple dis-assembly, cleaning and oiling, the action works readily and smoothly. Should be good to go.

If I get brave (and it freaking warms up a bit!) I may take it out back and burn up some birdshot rounds just to see how it works.

*IF* I encounter any irregularities, I’ll get it professionally refurbed.

Thanks.


19 posted on 01/02/2010 2:02:00 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag
I'd like to clean and prep it quite thoroughly prior to its trip to a gunsmith for a safety/ops check.

Isn't that sorta like thoroughly cleaning the house before the housekeeper shows up?

Pay a little extra and have the gunsmith strip it and check it out. He has the proper screwdrivers and brass punches to properly dismantle the gun without damaging the screws or scratching the surfaces of the metal. He can adjust it as needed for proper operation.

20 posted on 01/02/2010 2:02:49 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE isAAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: OKSooner

I don’t intend to hunt with a scatter gun. I’ll treat this one as an heirloom. But I still want it to be functional.

I have always been a small bore long rifle hunter. Thought it to be more sporting. Also, after ONE waterfowl hunting foray, where I stood in shin deep ice water for hours, just to hope a target flew within range ... I have no personal use for that type of hunting. I much prefer to walk and stalk. Can’t do the deer stand thing either.

Thanks all for the advice.


21 posted on 01/02/2010 2:07:14 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Swordmaker

LOL. it’s exactly like that!

I just hate to take a firearm to a ‘smith that’s potentially in bad shape. I can at least clean it and oil it!

But, yeah, it’s a bit OCD ;-)


22 posted on 01/02/2010 2:10:18 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag; All

thanks all for the advice!

The good news is that my study now has a very manly gun oil/ Outers aroma ;-)


23 posted on 01/02/2010 2:28:57 PM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

Based om memory, DO NOT LET THE MAINSPRING GET AWAY FROM YOU !! Other than that I don’t recall it being a complicated issue. There is a bronze ring around the magazine tube, mark it with a sharpie so you know which way it goes. It’s Browning all the way as far as design goes.


24 posted on 01/02/2010 3:04:35 PM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (THE SECOND AMENDMENT, A MATTER OF FACT, NOT A MATTER OF OPINION)
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To: Blueflag

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0geutbwxj9LmvQAZLZXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEybmhsZ3BlBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA2FjMgR2dGlkA0Y5NDVfOTc-/SIG=123fdr3fs/EXP=1262557296/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_11

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0geutbwxj9LmvQAcLZXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEyZml2czJ1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNwRjb2xvA2FjMgR2dGlkA0Y5NDVfOTc-/SIG=12eh3qhlh/EXP=1262557296/**http%3a//www.wisnersinc.com/additional_info/remington_11.htm

Here ya’ go,,,

Just remove the barrel,,,

Note the info on the Placement of friction rings for

functioning with different ammo,,,

I just wipe mine down with very LITTLE lite oil and

wipe it Dry,,,

The one I have is below SN 360,000...

P.S. : Don’t mash your fingers !...;0)


25 posted on 01/02/2010 3:10:22 PM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: Blueflag

The aroma of Hoppe’s #9 also does a lot for a gun room.

But beware the stench of Birchwood-Casey stock stain. Or very old Outers walnut stain. Not just the bottles but the rags too.

They will stink up the entire house. Not helpful for domestic tranquillity. Best used outside.

;^)


26 posted on 01/02/2010 3:46:13 PM PST by elcid1970 ("O Muslim! My bullets are dipped in pig grease!")
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To: Blueflag

That’s why I dis-recommend trying to take it down with normal screwdrivers which will invariably mash up some of the original screws. It is an heirloom in your family, and while the “market value” among “serious collectors” might not be very high, to YOU the value is “priceless.”

The A5 semi-auto design was rather complicated as semi-auto shotguns are seen today. They were very reliable in their day and today the only downside of them is that they’re not as simple and easy to repair as some semi-autos. There’s nothing wrong with them, however, and properly maintained, you’ll enjoy many years of use from a M-11 or A5.

If you ever go into that M-11, you’ll want a big clean work area, and you’ll want little pans into which you’ll put all the parts - there will be small screws, pins, springs, etc that will come out of that action, seemingly by the bushel-full. The other thing about the A5/M-11 is that they depended upon the “Blish effect” - ie, the friction between dissimilar metals under high pressure or speed. In the M-11 and A5, there is a “friction ring” which rides on the magazine tube to soak up some of the recoil of the bolt being moved to the rear during the cycling. You don’t want to over-lube that ring - it is supposed to have some friction (”sticktion” really) to slow down the bolt’s speed to the rear. You never, ever want to operate the gun without that bronze friction ring in the gun, because the bolt will fly rearward with enough force to possibly crack the receiver (eg, with magnum loads).

You want to be careful about losing parts, because I rather doubt that you can find replacements from Remington any more. If you lose a part that is difficult for a machinist or ‘smith to replicate, it could become a wall-hanger until you buy a whole ‘nuther M-11 to use as a shop queen for parts.


27 posted on 01/02/2010 3:49:43 PM PST by NVDave
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To: Blueflag

If you’re ever looking for a field gun at a reasonable price (ie, keep the M-11 where it is dry and clean, and take your “field” scattergun out hunting), check out the Beretta A390/A391 shotguns. They’re semi-auto, gas-operated, simple as a rock (like four pieces in the gas mechanism) and they’re about $900 to $1000 new in most places. Watch for them on sale or used. You can get chokes and parts for them all day long, they’re reliable, simple guns and I can personally attest that they survive the most grueling conditions into which I’ve put them. When mine ceased to cycle properly from too much of Nevada’s talc-fine dust, I simply poured in some Delo 15W40 diesel motor oil, shook it out, racked the bolt a couple times and ignored it for another year.

They’re indestructible scatterguns for which you can find OEM and aftermarket parts at reasonable prices, and they’ll handle 3” magnum loads.


28 posted on 01/02/2010 3:57:30 PM PST by NVDave
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To: Blueflag
Blueflag,

I looked this up in my NRA Guide to Firearms Assembly (1980). The trigger group on this old gun doesn't come out as a unit, but rather, in pieces at a time, and can be a real challenge if you aren't sure what you are doing. I have some instructions below that might help you. NOW... If you are like me and like to store history information with your firearms, cut and paste this information to a blank page, then print it out for safe keeping:

*****
"In 1900, John M. Browning was granted U. S. Patent No. 659.507 for a locked-breech, long recoil operated semi-automatic shotgun mechanism. Browning first offered this design to Winchester Repeating Arms Co., as he had done with his arms designs in previous years, but on a royalty basis instead of outright sale as had been his practice. The parties could not reach an agreement, and Browning terminated his 17-year relationship with Winchester.

At that time, no other American arms maker was in a position to produce this shotgun, so Browning went to Belgium where he arranged for its manufacture by Fabrique Nationale d'Armes de Guerre in Liege. Initial production by the FN firm was in 1903.

In 1905 Remington Arms Co. was licensed to manufacture the Browning shotgun in this country. It was introduced that year as the Remington Model 11 and was offered in 12-, 16-, and 20-ga. and in several grades with various barrel lengths and chokes.

The Model 11 No. 0 Riot Grade shotgun with 18 1/2" barrel in 12-ga. only was offered the following year.

The Model 11 Police Special with 18 1/2" barrel in 12-ga. only was introduced in 1921. The barrel was especially bored for buckshot loads and the gun was furnished with sling swivels.

Remington's Model 11 Riot gun was also introduced in 1921. It was furnished with 20" cylinder-bored barrel in 12-, 16-, and 20-ga.

A 3-shot version of the Model 11 was introduced in 1931. Designated Sportsman Model, it was available in various barrel lengths and grades in 12-, 16-, and 20-ga.

Production of the Model 11 shotgun terminated in 1948 and was replaced the following year by the Model 11-48."
*****

If the shotgun is operating properly otherwise, I would not detail strip it (dis-assembly of entire trigger group) for cleaning - just field strip and then the following:

Now, depending upon how well it has been taken care of in the past, the trigger group may or may not be full of dust, grime, and dirt that is attracted to the same oil that was used to lubricated it. This is what I do on any shotgun trigger group that is suffering from what I call "gunk syndrome" in order to avoid completely disassembling it (sometimes though, you have to 'bite the bullet' and take it apart - avoid this if you have the least bit out doubt, and I mean even the tiniest bit, about whether or not you will be able to get the trigger group reassembled): Buy a can of Birchwood-Casey Gunscrubber... Hose the entire trigger group down, work the action for about a minute to get the Gunscrubber everywhere it needs to be, let it sit for 30 minutes or so, then repeat. Upon the second application (and BTW, the pressure from the can of Gunscrubber will blow quite a bit of gunk out of the assembly, so do this in an area that will not get you in trouble with the Mrs. BEWARE OF FLYING GUNK AS IT WILL STAIN CARPET! I KNOW THIS TO BE TRUE!) you should be making some headway in getting the group clean. I also use canned air from the office supply house to blow the gunk out. Now, canned air can introduce moisture, so I apply another strong round of Gunscrubber just after the canned air. Once clean, I let the Gunscrbber evaporate and then I use Breakfree CLP as the final lubricant. If this type of treatment won't do the trick, it is dis-assembly time... I have only had one semi-auto shotgun cross my bench that the above treatment didn't fix - it was a Remington 1100 that someone had evidently dropped in a nasty puddle of mud while duck hunting. The mud had turned to hard clay...

"Pride goeth before a fall..." My grandmother used to tell me that one all the time when I wouldn't listen to her or my grandfather's sage advise... So, if you have any doubts about working on a firearm, make sure that pride doesn't talk you into something that you will be embarrased about later. I can't count the number of firearms I've had to reassemble for folks that thought they wouldn't have any trouble with a complete dis-assembly "just because they wanted to make sure it was 100% clean" and then couldn't get it back together. They can almost never look you in the eye when they bring one in to you in Ziploc bags for reassembly. I try not to give them a hard time unless they have always exhibited a "know-it-all" attitude when I've dealt with them previously. :-)

Unless you are going to be loading up hot 00 Buck loads or heavy slug loads, I wouldn't worry too much about the shotgun, unless it shows signs of prior abuse. If the bore is not pitted, and the stock is not cracked at the wrist, you are probably just fine with any kind of game load short of heavy, maximum, goose-killer loads (and I would venture to say that you wouldn't even run into any problems then unless you were trying to go through a full case of shells in one day.)

Hope this helps!

Regards,
Raven6

29 posted on 01/02/2010 4:05:05 PM PST by Raven6 (The sword is more important than the shield, and skill is more important than either.)
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To: Raven6

After the divorce, Winchester produced possibly the worst shotgun ever, the Model 1911SL. Similar in operation to the A5, wherever Winchester could evade JMB’s patents. The 1911SL lacked a bolt handle, replaced by a knurled grip on the barrel.To operate the action one must pull the whole action back, being sure to remember to push the bolt retainer as the action wouldn’t stay open. The modeel I had was a takedown model. It had a laminated stock, I can’t guess why.
barbra ann


30 posted on 01/02/2010 4:59:04 PM PST by barb-tex (He aint heavy, he's my brother!)
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Bookmark for more info for my own Model 11.


31 posted on 01/02/2010 6:41:43 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: 300winmag

Ping?


32 posted on 01/02/2010 7:26:57 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: barb-tex
After the divorce, Winchester produced possibly the worst shotgun ever, the Model 1911SL. Similar in operation to the A5, wherever Winchester could evade JMB’s patents. The 1911SL lacked a bolt handle, replaced by a knurled grip on the barrel.To operate the action one must pull the whole action back, being sure to remember to push the bolt retainer as the action wouldn’t stay open. The modeel I had was a takedown model. It had a laminated stock, I can’t guess why.

Ah, the infamous Winchester Model 1911 "Widow Maker" Self Loading shotgun... too many people tried to cock the action by putting the gun butt down on the ground or on the toe of their boot and pushing down on the barrel with the knurled barrel... while leaning over the gun... only to have it not lock back, slam forward, and discharge... into their chests. Result? One dead idiot.


Winchester Model 1911 "Widow Maker" Self Loading Semi-Automatic Shotgun

Needless to say, the Winchester model 1911SL is a rare shotgun... not made for long and even fewer were kept. When I was in the gun business, we would not sell them as operational shotguns... sold as "Collector's Items only." If we sold them at all, we pulled the firing pins (sold with the guns, but not in the guns, and required the buyer to sign that the pin was removed) before delivery to render them non-operational, because they were just too dangerous, and the liability was too great.

33 posted on 01/02/2010 7:45:46 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE isAAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: SuziQ
Ping?

The advice is all good. It's a complex system, especially being the first of its kind. Later gas-operated autoloaders had fewer parts, and were easier to build and maintain.

Just as a point of historical interest, here's my early-WW2-vintage Model 11 riot gun. Remington used up all the checkered stocks and roll-engraved receivers before going with plain ones later in production.

This one is "The Sportsman", which had a two-shot magazine tube for waterfowl hunting, rather than the four-shot magazine. It was not usually made as a riot gun, but the government was desperate for shotguns, so Remington made both three and five-shot versions to use up the parts on hand before going over to the "mil-spec" version.

Since it used commercial parts, it had the commercial blue finish, still visible on the underside of the barrel, where the forearm shielded the finish from the elements.

Remington was so concerned that the troops, as possible future Remington customers, would look down on the parkerized finish of the later riot guns that they marked the left side of the receiver with "Remington Military Finish" so you couldn't mistake them from their fine commercial bluing. The military markings consisted of a "US" on the receiver, and a ordnance "flaming bomb" on the receiver and top of the barrel. As with all trench guns and riot guns, the barrel was only 20 inches, and cylinder bored.


34 posted on 01/02/2010 8:25:32 PM PST by 300winmag (Zero to abject failure in under a month. A new land speed record!)
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To: Blueflag
"I don’t intend to hunt with a scatter gun."

Don't know what part of the country you live in, but if you're not going "upland bird hunting", with a trained dog, you're missing out. You'll forget all about waterfowl. :)

35 posted on 01/03/2010 7:17:58 AM PST by OKSooner ("He's quite mad, you know." - James Bond to P. Galore in "Goldfinger".)
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To: Raven6

Wow! Many thanks for the thorough reply. Very helpful.

FWIW, I got the ‘11 to an arguably clean enough state; got the action will lubed and smooth, set the friction ring per the factory recommendation ... and then waited til a little after noon today (finally got above freezing) and fired 10 rounds of #8 Winchester Dove & Quail. Worked just fine, thank you all very much.

So now the heirloom is re-cleaned, lubed and wiped in the gun rack in the master closet.


36 posted on 01/03/2010 10:41:11 AM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Cletus.D.Yokel; Blueflag
Take it to a trusted ‘smith’ for the work. A good smithie will check the action as well as the bore and primary firing mechanism.

And a good gunsmith will also clean it for around fifty bucks and sit down and show you how to strip and reassemble it.

Also, there are usually some older gentlemen hanging around just about any gun shop or range who could strip and reassemble a Remington model 11 blindfolded.

37 posted on 01/03/2010 10:44:38 AM PST by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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To: OKSooner

you’re probably right. I like to enjoy the ‘outdoor’ experience as much as the hunting, so any type of static hunting is uninteresting to me. Following a bird dog to flush out game probably would be fun. Never did it. But that’s what my dad used to do with this gun and his short-haired pointers.

Good idea. I’ll keep it in mind, as I have a friend with 100s of acres of private land down south of Fort Benning, GA.


38 posted on 01/03/2010 10:45:13 AM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: 300winmag

My dad’s gun (now mine) has a four shot magazine, even though it’s the civilian finish (not Parkerized). He used to keep a wooden plug in the magazine so he could comply with the three shell rule in place in Wisconsin, and have one round in the chamber and two in the tube.


39 posted on 01/03/2010 10:49:46 AM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Raven6

BTW, I never had any intent to detail strip the ‘11. I’d be in the plastic baggie mode you mentioned ;-)

I might do that with a British Leyland motor, but never a British Leyland overdrive transmission for the same reasons.


40 posted on 01/03/2010 10:54:01 AM PST by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag

Glad to see that you got everything squared away. Being a close cousin to the Browning A-5, the Model 11 shares much of it’s robustness and easy of maintenance (very few parts interchange though).

I collect A-5’s and find that barring abuse, even the ones close to 100 years old operate well with just basic maintenance. Keep the magazine tube clean and either dry or very light oil.

If the gun has trouble cycling, if the rings are set up correctly (and it sound like you understand how they work) the next thing to check is chamber cleanliness. It can look clean, feel clean, and still be sticky enough to prevent proper extraction. Pull the barrel, wrap some 0000 steel wool around a bronze brush of the righs size, chuck the rod in a drill and polish away. That has solved extraction problems for every A-5 I’have had including my 1914.

Avoid lots of oil in the action, it’s not that necessary, and if you store the gun upright it will drain down the action spring tube and make the stock “punky” over time. Getting excess oil out of the wood is a pain.

That gun will outlive us all, no matter how much you shoot it. Please though, no steel shot, it will score the barrel and with a full choke, likely bulge the barrel as well. Stick to the softer non-toxics.


41 posted on 01/03/2010 10:55:45 AM PST by Tijeras_Slim (Live jubtabulously!)
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To: Blueflag
Glad it worked out for you...

While most of the shotguns I have are of the more recent, tactical variety, this is one that I carry in my truck on an everyday basis. This picture doesn't do it justice, as it makes the shotgun appear more dark than it actually is. The wood is a medium walnut, and the leather ammo cuff is actually a light acorn brown.

Photobucket

This is my $25, "bought it at an antique store because the didn't know what they had" 1902 Iver Johnson Champion... It originally had a 30" barrel, and sat in my vault for about 5 years before I decided (out of boredom) to cut it to 18.25" (.25" above minimum for safety's sake) and use it as a truck gun. In Tennessee, if you hold a valid Handgun Carry Permit you can carry any legal longarm in your vehicle as long as there is no round in the chamber... Want to carry your AR-15 with a 100 round Beta-Mag? It's is legal as long as you don't have a round chambered!

I didn't want to risk losing an expensive rifle or shotgun, so I decided to build a short inexpensive shotgun. Since the longarm must stay in the vehicle, I would only be out $25 for the shotgun, and about $25 worth of material (and my time) for the leather ammo cuff that is laced onto the butt. It rides right between my seat and the console, action open, with the ammo cuff fully loaded and the first round (if needed) in the cup holder. What started out as a "boredom breaker" has become one of my favorite shotguns... Prints 00 Buck in about an 10" circle at 10 yards... And looks like an artillery piece from the muzzle end!

Regards,
Raven6

PS: A close-up of the ammo cuff... I ended up making 4 total, with 3 ending up as Christmas presents last month. I made mine look old, since the shotgun is 107 years old.:

Leather Ammo Cuff

42 posted on 01/03/2010 7:50:07 PM PST by Raven6 (The sword is more important than the shield, and skill is more important than either.)
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To: Tijeras_Slim
"...wrap some 0000 steel wool around a bronze brush of the right size, chuck the rod in a drill and polish away."

I used to use 0000 steel wool, but got tired of trying to get rid of all of the little, short, steel "whiskers" that were left over/created in the process. I switched over to the green Scotchbrite pads and use the same process. They work a little cleaner - you just have to make sure and not get over-zealous with it. :-)

Regards,
Raven6

43 posted on 01/03/2010 8:05:31 PM PST by Raven6 (The sword is more important than the shield, and skill is more important than either.)
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To: Swordmaker

I did not mention the one I had was prone to go full auto and double or even triple. I never did figure out how to operate the action, with out assuming the widow maker position. I don’t know what ever happened to mine, just lost on the journey thru life, I guess.
barbra ann


44 posted on 01/07/2010 10:36:59 AM PST by barb-tex (He aint heavy, he's my brother!)
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To: Swordmaker

I did not mention the one I had was prone to go full auto and double or even triple. I never did figure out how to operate the action, with out assuming the widow maker position. I don’t know what ever happened to mine, just lost on the journey thru life, I guess.
barbra ann


45 posted on 01/07/2010 10:37:09 AM PST by barb-tex (He aint heavy, he's my brother!)
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To: barb-tex
I did not mention the one I had was prone to go full auto and double or even triple. I never did figure out how to operate the action, with out assuming the widow maker position. I don’t know what ever happened to mine, just lost on the journey thru life, I guess.

Yep, that was why the action tended to fire when slamming forward... the sear was made of a softer steel that wore easily... oops. BANG! Dead idiot.

To properly cock the action of the Model 1911 required a very long reach... one that only very tall men could accomplish. It was a really, really bad design.

Winchester wanted the model 1911 off the market sooooo badly that they were giving customers a free Winchester 1912 pump to people who traded their model 1911 in...

46 posted on 01/07/2010 12:28:04 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE isAAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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