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'Catcher In The Rye' Author J.D. Salinger Dies
WCCO.com ^ | 1/28/10 | AP

Posted on 01/28/2010 10:16:21 AM PST by ButThreeLeftsDo

J.D. Salinger, the legendary author, youth hero and fugitive from fame whose "The Catcher in the Rye" shocked and inspired a world he increasingly shunned, has died. He was 91.

Salinger died of natural causes at his home on Wednesday, the author's son said in a statement from Salinger's literary representative. He had lived for decades in self-imposed isolation in the small, remote house in Cornish, N.H.

(Excerpt) Read more at wcco.com ...


TOPICS: Books/Literature
KEYWORDS: jdsalinger; obituaries; obituary; salinger
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RIP
1 posted on 01/28/2010 10:16:21 AM PST by ButThreeLeftsDo
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo
One book wonder and quite possibly the 2nd most over rated author of the 20th Century.

Still, RIP Mr. Salinger.

2 posted on 01/28/2010 10:19:58 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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R.I.P. for J.D. Salinger. Great writer. Catcher in the Rye was the first book that really made me laugh out loud; both times that I read it, years apart. A wonderfully written story.


3 posted on 01/28/2010 10:20:46 AM PST by NoRedTape
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Worst. Book. Ever.


4 posted on 01/28/2010 10:20:47 AM PST by GOP_Party_Animal
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

A very messed up guy. A contributor to the decline of the modern novel.


5 posted on 01/28/2010 10:24:17 AM PST by ClearCase_guy (We have the 1st so that we can call on people to rebel. We have 2nd so that they can.)
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To: Lurker
One book wonder and quite possibly the 2nd most over rated author of the 20th Century.

RIP, too - but I certainly agree with you about Salinger being overrated. If you don't mind sharing, I'm curious as to who you chose as #1 (there are a number of good candidates). I have someone specifically in mind for the top honor.

6 posted on 01/28/2010 10:24:23 AM PST by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
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To: Lurker
One book wonder and quite possibly the 2nd most over rated author of the 20th Century.

Who's the first? John Steinbeck or Ernest Hemingway?
7 posted on 01/28/2010 10:24:36 AM PST by aruanan
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

And how many of this guy’s book would have been sold if the “Public School” establishment would not have bought them by the millions.


8 posted on 01/28/2010 10:24:57 AM PST by US Navy Vet
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo
For an interesting take on a Salinger-esque personna, as well as some crackling-good writing and character development, I recommend Finding Forrester.


9 posted on 01/28/2010 10:28:25 AM PST by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Does this mean Thomas Pynchon is dead too?


10 posted on 01/28/2010 10:28:26 AM PST by Ozone34 ("There are only two philosophies: Thomism and bullshitism!" -Leon Bloy)
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To: andy58-in-nh; aruanan

Hemingway. No doubt in my mind.


11 posted on 01/28/2010 10:28:29 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo
I read that book.
12 posted on 01/28/2010 10:28:53 AM PST by dancusa (Political Correctness is a firewall to the truth.)
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To: Lurker

You nailed it. ;-)


13 posted on 01/28/2010 10:29:39 AM PST by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo
WORST. BOOK. EVER.
14 posted on 01/28/2010 10:30:25 AM PST by meowmeow (In Loving Memory of Our Dear Viking Kitty (1987-2006))
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To: ClearCase_guy

How so?


15 posted on 01/28/2010 10:35:26 AM PST by Borges
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To: Borges
No offense, but I have observed in the past that you and I see culture about as differently as any two people could. I dislike the things you praise, and you dislike the things I praise.

It's what makes the world interesting I suppose.

16 posted on 01/28/2010 10:38:28 AM PST by ClearCase_guy (We have the 1st so that we can call on people to rebel. We have 2nd so that they can.)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Salinger, Zinn, who’s next?


17 posted on 01/28/2010 10:39:35 AM PST by techcor (I hope Obama succeeds... in becoming a one term president.)
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To: andy58-in-nh

Ditto!


18 posted on 01/28/2010 10:39:48 AM PST by Little Bill (Carol Che-Porter is a MOONBAT.)
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To: ClearCase_guy

I was just wondering what you meant. How is Salinger’s depiction of slangy youth any different from Mark Twain’s?


19 posted on 01/28/2010 10:40:09 AM PST by Borges
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To: US Navy Vet

Salinger’s books were bestsellers upon publication.


20 posted on 01/28/2010 10:41:33 AM PST by Borges
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

RIP

Catcher in the Rye = Great book!!!!!

The rest of his work kind of sucked, though.


21 posted on 01/28/2010 10:42:02 AM PST by Chi-townChief
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To: aruanan

I liked Steinbeck, read most everything he wrote. Hemmingway, “The Sun Also Rises”, first and last good book.


22 posted on 01/28/2010 10:46:12 AM PST by Little Bill (Carol Che-Porter is a MOONBAT.)
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To: Chi-townChief

What was wrong with Nine Stories? It’s his best work!


23 posted on 01/28/2010 10:46:29 AM PST by Borges
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To: US Navy Vet
And how many of this guy’s books would have been sold if the “Public School” establishment would not have bought them by the millions.

When I attended a public high school in the '60's, we read Homer and Shakespeare as freshmen and Dostoevskii, Orwell, Dickens and Victor Hugo as sophomores. As juniors, we read American authors such as Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Stephen Crane, Hemingway, and Scott Fitzgerald.

I consider myself lucky to have been exposed to great and near-great literature. It seems to have been the next generation that was assigned books like Catcher in the Rye

24 posted on 01/28/2010 10:46:36 AM PST by Taft in '52
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To: Taft in '52

Salinger was a much better writer than Orwell. Do you think there should be a chronological cutoff date for what’s taught in schools? Fitzgerald was only 23 years older than Salinger.


25 posted on 01/28/2010 10:48:06 AM PST by Borges
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To: techcor
Salinger, Zinn, who’s next?

And can we make requests?

26 posted on 01/28/2010 10:48:09 AM PST by Tijeras_Slim (Live jubtabulously!)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo
Grilled cheese sandwich and a malted.


27 posted on 01/28/2010 10:49:30 AM PST by paulycy (Demand Constitutionality.)
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To: Borges

Vaguely remember but pretty good, if I recall. I was thinking more of Franny and Zooey which I couldn’t get into at all.


28 posted on 01/28/2010 10:50:16 AM PST by Chi-townChief
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To: Borges
The central character is whiny and self-obsessed. Holden Caulfield is a rebellious, nihilistic teenager. I consider it no coincidence that the Boomer Generation that grew up with this books consisted largedly of whiny, self-obsessed, rebellious, nihilistic people who never matured and remained teenagers for the rest of their lives.

Some books elevate the reader. This one does not. It basically made it cool to be a jerk.

29 posted on 01/28/2010 10:51:43 AM PST by ClearCase_guy (We have the 1st so that we can call on people to rebel. We have 2nd so that they can.)
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To: Borges

I was not going to comment (I was enjoying the conversation from a distance) but Salinger was NOT better than Orwell!


30 posted on 01/28/2010 10:53:57 AM PST by NucSubs ( Cognitive dissonance: Conflict or anxiety resulting from inconsistency between beliefs and actions)
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To: Borges
You don't like Orwell?

Not Road to Wigan Pier or even Nineteen Eighty-four?

I found them both to be brilliant.

31 posted on 01/28/2010 10:54:24 AM PST by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Caulfield is not a likable character. It becomes apparent the more one reads it and as one matures. The book is critical of his attitudes and the limits they impose on him.


32 posted on 01/28/2010 10:55:57 AM PST by Borges
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To: Petronski; NucSubs

Orwell’s essays are great. Orwell’s fiction (if Animal Farm and 1984 are any indication) is crude and journalistic. I can agree with the ideas in 1984 but that doesn’t make it great literary art. You can extract its ideas and dispense with the book entirely.


33 posted on 01/28/2010 10:57:47 AM PST by Borges
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

What an excellent writer and an incredible inspiration he is and has been for me. May he rest in peace.


34 posted on 01/28/2010 10:58:51 AM PST by GOP Poet (Obama is an OLYMPIC failure.)
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To: andy58-in-nh; Lurker; ButThreeLeftsDo
You didn't ask me, but you know how little I worry about such things. ;)

It has to be either Norman Mailer, or Tom Wolfe ...uhhhhhhhhhhhhh ...Wolfe.


35 posted on 01/28/2010 10:58:52 AM PST by Daffynition (What's all this about hellfire and Dalmatians?)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Rest in peace.


36 posted on 01/28/2010 11:03:42 AM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: Borges
Well I didn't much care for Animal Farm, I think the spare, almost-gaunt prose in Nineteen Eighty-four establishes mood and fits well with the underlying themes of the destruction of soul and individuality--even language itself.
37 posted on 01/28/2010 11:06:49 AM PST by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: Petronski

Those are great themes but the language doesn’t express them. Expressing them by ‘absence’ is a stretch and brings to mind the Imitative Fallacy (Art about soulessness and tedium doesn’t have to be soulless and tedious). That whole middle section where he finds an old history book and Orwell goes on to transcribe huge sections of it is a structural mess.


38 posted on 01/28/2010 11:11:29 AM PST by Borges
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To: Daffynition; Lurker
I like your graphic a great deal, but I'll have to disagree with you to some extent about Tom Wolfe - Bonfire of the Vanities was awful, but The Right Stuff and Radical Chic... most decidedly were not. Normal Mailer is bad, but not as awful as Gore Vidal. Truman Capote, I was once told, is an acquired taste. I never acquired it. Likewise, John Steinbeck I adjudge a fine writer of fiction, yet I've always despised his desolate, irredeemable sense of life as well as the pathetic hopelessness of his characters.
39 posted on 01/28/2010 11:15:26 AM PST by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Of course I had to read this in high school. Not very impressed at the time; although looking back I did not have the maturity and experiences to appreciate it. I want to read something that will lift my mind and spirit not throw it into the gutter like this book.


40 posted on 01/28/2010 11:16:12 AM PST by C19fan
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To: andy58-in-nh

Vidal’s fiction will be forgotten but his essays are going to be around for a long time.


41 posted on 01/28/2010 11:17:56 AM PST by Borges
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To: Borges
That whole middle section where he finds an old history book and Orwell goes on to transcribe huge sections of it is a structural mess.

I don't recall that section at all and scanning my copy I cannot locate it.

As for this:

Art about soullessness and tedium doesn’t have to be soulless and tedious.

Of course it doesn't have to be so. But in so being it can succeed.

Well, anyway, there's no accounting for taste I suppose.

42 posted on 01/28/2010 11:19:13 AM PST by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

RIP.


43 posted on 01/28/2010 11:33:05 AM PST by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Alps !"~~)
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To: Taft in '52
It seems to have been the next generation that was assigned books like Catcher in the Rye

Yep. Class of '82 here. The Catcher in the Rye was assigned reading for us.

44 posted on 01/28/2010 11:36:13 AM PST by Tired of Taxes (Dad, I will always think of you.)
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To: andy58-in-nh
I bought "Bonfires" as one of those beach books and I just couldn't get through it, even though I tried a couple of times...as you say ... a stylistic, taste thing.

I recall watching Vidal on Firing Line in my formative political years ...dang those were super debates. I never read any of Vidal's novels b/c I disliked his values so...guess I thought I wouldn't identify with his themes and characters either. And in all fairness, I didn't particularly like Buckley's Blackford Oakes novels either.

Funny that you mention Steinbeck ...at one time I devoured everything he wrote. I was very socially liberal during my growing up ...joined the fight for migrant laborer's rights, the Peace Corps, yada. And it was precisely his character's *pathetic hopelessness*, as you say, that made me such a sucker for Rand, Goldwater, and all who followed, when I read them.

RIP Mr. Salinger. I'm sure there was some good you did. ;)


45 posted on 01/28/2010 11:47:51 AM PST by Daffynition (What's all this about hellfire and Dalmatians?)
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To: Petronski

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Theory_and_Practice_of_Oligarchical_Collectivism


46 posted on 01/28/2010 12:00:06 PM PST by Borges
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To: Borges

Old history book?!?

That’s a major plot exposition.


47 posted on 01/28/2010 12:03:38 PM PST by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: Petronski

I should have reffered to it in another way but the fact that so much plot exposition is taken from a fictional book which stops the flow of the novel and Orwell just has Winston describe is bad structure. I prefer Zamyatin’s novel ‘We’. It influenced Orwell.


48 posted on 01/28/2010 12:08:21 PM PST by Borges
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To: Petronski
I'd add Down and Out in Paris and London
49 posted on 01/28/2010 12:11:00 PM PST by Tijeras_Slim (Live jubtabulously!)
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To: Ozone34

“Does this mean Thomas Pynchon is dead too?”

####

The also hugely over-rated Gravity’s Rainbow might be the only POS worse than CITR. Actually made me angry over the time I was wasting, when I was reading it.


50 posted on 01/28/2010 12:23:49 PM PST by EyeGuy
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