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Study finds that sorghum bran has more antioxidants than blueberries, pomegranates
University of Georgia ^ | September 10, 2010 | Kirk McAlpin

Posted on 09/13/2010 7:14:20 AM PDT by decimon

Athens, Ga. - A new University of Georgia study has found that select varieties of sorghum bran have greater antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties than well-known foods such as blueberries and pomegranates.

Researchers measured polyphenolic compounds, which naturally occur in plants to help fight against pests and disease, and found that the black and sumac varieties of sorghum have significant levels of antioxidants. Many fruits also contain these compounds, they said, though sorghum bran may prove to be the richest and cheapest source.

“Since most human chronic disease states are associated with chronic inflammation and high oxidative stress, a food ingredient such as sorghum bran could potentially make certain processed foods better for a healthy diet,” said study co-author Diane Hartle, director of the UGA Nutraceutical Research Laboratory and an associate professor in the College of Pharmacy.

Hartle and her colleagues, whose results appear in the current issue of the Journal of Medicinal Food, measured the degree to which extracts from four different varieties of sorghum reduced inflammation in mice. They found that black and sumac varieties showed significantly higher levels of polyphenolic content and antioxidant levels than the two low-tannin varieties tested, which did not reduce inflammation.

The authors found that levels of polyphenolic compounds in the high-tannin sorghum varieties ranged from 23 to 62 mg of polyphenols per gram. For comparison, blueberries contain approximately 5 mg of polyphenolics per gram, while pomegranate juice contains 2 to 3.5 mg per gram.

The U.S. is the largest producer of sorghum in the world. Most of the sorghum grown, however, is a low-tannin variety that is fed to cattle and poultry or used to manufacture ethanol to fuel cars. “High-tannin sorghums can be of greater economy to manufacturers because of the current cost of berry and fruit sources of similar plant-based chemicals,” said study co-author Phillip Greenspan, associate professor in the UGA College of Pharmacy.

High-tannin sorghum bran products have not been available in supermarket foods until recently. The researchers said they hope to generate interest in sorghum bran or its extract as an additive to food and beverages. Sorghum bran extract could be added to a variety of foods and beverages as a liquid concentrate or dried powder. The Great Plains area of the U.S. is the largest worldwide producer of sorghum, and the researchers said that the combination of its low price and high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties will make it widely useful as an inexpensive and nutritional food additive.

The researchers have already experimented with adding the extract to apple juice to make it an affordable alternative to pomegranate juice and other antioxidant-rich products. “We’re hoping that some company decides to extract this bran and pull these chemicals out and put the extract into a beverage that can help you fight disease rather than promote disease,” Hartle said.

Study co-author James Hargrove, associate professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, added that high-tannin sorghum has more antioxidant phytochemicals than other brans such as rice, wheat and oats, whose phenolic content and antioxidant values are low. He and Hartle said that the use of sorghum can become a way to reintroduce a quality food to many products that now use bleached, refined flour.

“Sorghum bran not only provides the fiber but gives you a real medicinal punch at the same time because it delivers a lot of other chemicals that a berry would give you,” Hartle said.

##

Note to editors: For a copy of the study, contact Diane Hartle at dhartle@rx.uga.edu.


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: antioxidants; blueberries; health; medicine; pomegranates; sorghum; sorghumbran
"High-tannin sorghum bran products have not been available in supermarket foods until recently."
1 posted on 09/13/2010 7:14:21 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

make a baby boomer face cream ..it should sell well


2 posted on 09/13/2010 7:19:33 AM PDT by dalebert
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To: decimon
"Study finds that sorghum bran has more antioxidants than blueberries, pomegranates"

Well, hell...my day is made now, I'm going out this morning and buy a truckload of sorghum bran.
3 posted on 09/13/2010 7:26:50 AM PDT by FrankR (It doesn't matter what they call us, only what we answer to....)
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To: FrankR

Probably like eating sawdust...


4 posted on 09/13/2010 7:28:10 AM PDT by refermech
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To: All

fyi, sorghum can be fermented and distilled to produce maotai, which is regarded as one of the china’s most famous liquors.

i prefer the version in taiwan however...


5 posted on 09/13/2010 7:31:17 AM PDT by VAFreedom (maybe i should take a nap before work)
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To: decimon
I'd follow the money on this one.

Blueberries are so good, they actually reverse the aging process. The body starts rebuilding it's own nerve cells.

Japan did an antioxidant study on blueberries, strawberries, and spinach. To their surprise, the older rats being fed nothing but blueberry extract became youthful again. The Japanese study was on the net for a short while, then pulled. We tried to order blueberry plants in bulk after that, but Japan had bought out every blueberry plant in the U.S. that year. After that, there was no mention of it from Japan.

If you google "blueberries reverse aging process", you'll find numerous links, but the original report can no longer be found. I printed it before it disappeared, so I do have a copy of it.

6 posted on 09/13/2010 7:33:26 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: concerned about politics

Perhaps this will get buried by the corn and wheat industries? I thought sorgum was also used as a sweetener.


7 posted on 09/13/2010 7:43:37 AM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (The War on Poverty is over. Poverty won. - Howie Carr)
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To: decimon

Perhaps, but I will gladly eat blueberry pancakes.
Sorghum bran pancakes do not sound as appealing.


8 posted on 09/13/2010 7:51:38 AM PDT by kidd
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To: To Hell With Poverty
Ah, the sweet squeezings from the stalk, cooked to make sorghum syrup is great eating with warm home baked biscuits. No mention of the health benefits from the stalk
9 posted on 09/13/2010 7:54:25 AM PDT by Techster
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To: concerned about politics

VERY interesting information.

I hurt my back several years ago. I thought it had healed, but recently, started having trouble again. I went from hiking 6 miles a day to hardly being able to walk with out pain. Out of desperation, I went to a chiropractor who does physical therapy, hoping he could show me ways to build my back muscles up, or something.

He told me to change my diet to an anti-inflammatory diet. I’ve always been a big vegetable eater, so it’s not been too hard (cutting out salt and sugar, not so easy). It’s only been about 3 weeks. If anti-aging, anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory properties are all contained in one little blueberry, I’m in. They taste really good, too. Do they have to be fresh blueberries or can dried blueberries work?


10 posted on 09/13/2010 8:07:35 AM PDT by stansblugrassgrl
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To: decimon

hmmmmmmm BTTT

who knew


11 posted on 09/13/2010 8:08:27 AM PDT by DollyCali (Don't tell God how big your storm is...Tell the storm how big your God is!)
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To: decimon
If they sold it in packages like they do oat and wheat bran, it could be useful to add to a mixture of other grains for baking breads and rolls, or making a breakfast porridge type meal.

It would be more useful than blueberries in that it won't be perishable, like fresh blueberries, or its quality be diminished by long term freezer storage. Probably be cheaper for the same amount of antioxidants, as well.

It might also encourage farmers to start growing food for FOOD, again, rather than for fuel.

12 posted on 09/13/2010 8:12:58 AM PDT by SuziQ
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To: decimon

Is it available in chocolate?


13 posted on 09/13/2010 8:13:33 AM PDT by GreenHornet
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To: stansblugrassgrl
Do they have to be fresh blueberries or can dried blueberries work?

Fresh or frozen (canned has a lot of sugar). Simmer them slowly in their own juices. The juice is important. Do not add water.

There are very few blue/red colored foods. There is an old tale about king Aurthur traveling deep into the woods. He came across an old man sitting on his porch. The man was crying and in great anguish. Aurthur asked him what his problem was, and the man was upset because he accidentally dropped his grandfather while helping him out of bed. Arthur was, of course, confused. What was the secret of his longevity? According to the old man, it was the elderberries growing through out the forest.
Elderberries, like blue berries, also have that blue/red colored juice.

14 posted on 09/13/2010 8:18:05 AM PDT by concerned about politics ("Get thee behind me, Liberal")
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To: decimon

oh great, here come all the sorghum bran drinks.


15 posted on 09/13/2010 8:24:21 AM PDT by Persevero (Homeschooling for Excellence since 1992)
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To: decimon; All

So does anyone know where one can purchase high-tannin sorghum bran?


16 posted on 09/13/2010 8:31:33 AM PDT by OB1kNOb (Contrary to popular belief, America is separated by class.... the political class and all others.)
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To: concerned about politics

We have blackberry bushes where we live. We didn’t get many this year. Had a late snow and a cool, wet summer. We live in AZ, so we’re not complaining.

In summers past, we had so many blackberries we ran out of things to do with them. Blackberries probably have similar properties due to their color.

We’ve got a friend who discovered he’s in the early stages of dementia. His brain is literally shrinking. Doctor said it’s irreversible. I don’t believe that. I’m passing this info on to him. Thank you for posting it!!


17 posted on 09/13/2010 8:57:24 AM PDT by stansblugrassgrl
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To: concerned about politics

There are other foods that are higher in anti-oxidants. Google strawberries for instance.


18 posted on 09/13/2010 9:05:54 AM PDT by handmade
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To: SuziQ
If they sold it in packages like they do oat and wheat bran, it could be useful to add to a mixture of other grains for baking breads and rolls, or making a breakfast porridge type meal.

Added to packaged multigrain bread would be fine with me.

19 posted on 09/13/2010 9:09:41 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon
 Antioxidant Values of Foods Sorted by ORAC Value                                                                 
20 posted on 09/13/2010 9:41:36 AM PDT by mjp ((pro-{God, reality, reason, egoism, individualism, natural rights, limited government, capitalism}))
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To: decimon

Isn’t sorghum just one of those “exports” we used to read about in geography? You know: “The chief exports of Loserstan are jute, sorghum, and tin.”


21 posted on 09/13/2010 9:42:18 AM PDT by Arthur McGowan (In Edward Kennedy's America, federal funding of brothels is a right, not a privilege.)
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To: decimon

Isn’t sorghum just one of those “exports” we used to read about in geography? You know: “The chief exports of Loserstan are jute, sorghum, and tin.”


22 posted on 09/13/2010 9:42:37 AM PDT by Arthur McGowan (In Edward Kennedy's America, federal funding of brothels is a right, not a privilege.)
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To: mjp
Antioxidant Values of Foods Sorted by ORAC Value

Interesting. Thanks. But note that the article addresses anti-inflammatory properties as well.

23 posted on 09/13/2010 10:14:26 AM PDT by decimon
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To: Arthur McGowan
Isn’t sorghum just one of those “exports” we used to read about in geography?

The article says the U.S. is the largest producer but mostly not of black or sumac sorghum.

24 posted on 09/13/2010 10:16:55 AM PDT by decimon
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To: Techster

Yeah, I remember seeing stands selling the syrup up in the N. GA mountains every time I visited. I really should have given it a try after all those years (15 in GA, UGA’s my alma mater). I will admit to a little native NH snobbery in my hesitance to do so - maple syrup snobbery! ;)


25 posted on 09/13/2010 7:42:19 PM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (The War on Poverty is over. Poverty won. - Howie Carr)
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To: stansblugrassgrl

I’ve been sort of toying with a paleo/primal diet lately, since I have degenerative disc disease in my lower back and have to deal with a lot of inflammation, too. It’s just really hard to do with two very young children, so I’ve put it on hold. I wonder what this does to that whole low-carb/no-carb diet philosophy. Do the antioxidants outweigh the negatives of any grain anti-nutrients? Does sorghum contain whey? Can it make a decent wheatless bread? Very interesting indeed!

BTW I’ve been taking a lot of Omega 3’s lately because I had LASEK eye surgery and it helps with the healing, and I’ve noticed a difference in my level of back pain. Two big horsepills a day, one flax seed oil and one fish oil, plus some vitamin C. :)


26 posted on 09/13/2010 9:11:29 PM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (The War on Poverty is over. Poverty won. - Howie Carr)
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To: To Hell With Poverty

My daughter puts flax seed in all kinds of stuff. She swears by it. She also takes fish oil. It’s amazing that you’ve already seen a difference.

I read the Dr. Weil’s book on the anti-inflammatory diet. It made sense and I like most of the recommended foods. I’m trying to eat a salad every day with extra virgin olive oil and rice wine viniger, stir fries with brown rice, carrot and other veggie juices, etc. My went along with it for a week then begged for a hamburger.


27 posted on 09/13/2010 9:49:01 PM PDT by stansblugrassgrl
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To: To Hell With Poverty

opps. I meant to say my HUSBAND went along for a while. He’s committed to the Dr. Pepper and Red Vine diet.


28 posted on 09/13/2010 10:01:57 PM PDT by stansblugrassgrl
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To: stansblugrassgrl
;)

I've read most of the Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson. It's based on the evolutionary perspective that humans developed in an environment with lots of meat, healthy fats, and vegetables but not grains. Although we may be able to digest grains and sugars, we are not truly designed for them and that is the source of all our autoimmune/inflammatory disorders such as diabetes and arthritis. When we developed agriculture we became soft and sickly, and now live sedentary yet workaholic lifestyles that are incompatible with the activity and rest levels we naturally should maintain. It seems very logical to me (I suppose one could even take the Creationist perspective that we were made for a before-the-fall lifestyle, Adam and Eve initially didn't need to work the earth and bake bread), but with toddlers it's really hard to go without bread. I can't talk them into salads for lunch at this point, and I don't want to spend my entire day cooking either. Must have sandwiches!!! Oh yeah, not to mention ice cream. Anyway, your husband might be interested in the Primal Blueprint because it does emphasize meat meat MEAT! I also have the cookbook and it's awesome (I will repeat that I don't really like cooking but the cookbook actually got me interested in expanding our supper repertoire).

29 posted on 09/14/2010 12:25:08 PM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (The War on Poverty is over. Poverty won. - Howie Carr)
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To: To Hell With Poverty

The amazing thing is, in our current society, we actually have a choice in what to eat. In many places, people don’t have any choice and must eat what ever is available.


30 posted on 09/14/2010 11:30:25 PM PDT by stansblugrassgrl
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To: stansblugrassgrl

Yes, that’s very true!


31 posted on 09/15/2010 8:49:18 PM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (The War on Poverty is over. Poverty won. - Howie Carr)
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