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Apple's Mac App Store fundamentally changes PC software usage rights
BetaNews ^ | January 6, 2011 | Joe Wilcox

Posted on 01/07/2011 10:16:46 AM PST by stripes1776

Earlier today, Apple officially launched its application store for Macintosh, with about 1,000 free and paid applications available. Snow Leopard users download the Mac OS X 10.6.6 update, and the store is included. But people using the software are in for a change. Consumers typically buy software by machine. Those people buying from the Mac App Store purchase by person. The software is attached to an identity. This is a dramatic departure from how consumer software is typically licensed.

Licensing agreements typically restrict installation on one PC, sometimes two or even three...

The Mac App Store changes the paradigm and usage rights associated with it. Buyers use an existing Apple ID (usually from iTunes) or create another. Software purchases are tied to that identity, not the PC. If a licensee buys another Mac, he or she can redownload the software using the same ID without paying again. People buying music from iTunes or apps for iPad, iPhone from iTunes are used to this kind of identity approach, but it's not common for computer software.

...

The rights are hugely generous and more in line with consumer expectations: That they buy software once and use it anywhere within the household. According to the Mac App Store FAQ: "Apps from the Mac App Store may be used on any Macs that you own or control for your personal use." Emphasis: Any. Not three Macs, or five or any other number. Considering that most software is licensed for one PC -- although many developers probably don't have realistic expectation of 1:1 installation -- any is quite a change. Something else: applications purchased from the store do not require activation keys, registration numbers or serial numbers. Only the Apple ID and password are required.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet; Hobbies; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: ade2fhil2mo2r3st3u; apps; download; ilovebillgates; iwanthim; iwanthimbad; mac; microsoftfanboys; store
The Mac App Store is really going to shake things up. A lot of program developers are buzzing this morning. They can't wait to get their apps on the Mac App Store. Things will be very busy over the coming months.
1 posted on 01/07/2011 10:16:52 AM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776

For the Apple, with a limited customer base and distribution channel, this is indeed a game changer. Developers have had to put an awful lot of effort into getting the word out about their apps, and even more effort into getting it distributed by someone other than themselves.

This has always been an issue with Macs, which initially had leverage into the marketplace by piggybacking onto Apple // software sales, but since the 1990’s has struggled to get even basic apps into the marketplace at large.

I wish Apple the best, and am excited for Apple owners who finally have easy options available to them, without having to transplant a geek into their livingroom to find the software.

A thousand titles.. For a lot of Mac owners, that’s the largest collection of software that’s been available since the days of BBSs.


2 posted on 01/07/2011 10:43:47 AM PST by kingu (Favorite Sticker: Lost hope, and Obama took my change.)
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To: stripes1776

Same principal they use for the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch.

But its only for the Mac and its only for those who wish to use it. Downloading it yourself is still allowed. This merely frees the developer from expensive overheads.


3 posted on 01/07/2011 10:45:40 AM PST by smith288 (Peace at all costs gives you tyranny free of charge)
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To: Swordmaker

pinging Swordmaker. Interesting shift in paradigm for software ownership


4 posted on 01/07/2011 11:21:21 AM PST by Bush_Democrat ((Ex-Dem since 2001 *Folding@Home for the Gipper - Join the FReeper Folders*))
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To: stripes1776

The App store will Torpedo Microsoft. Apple is certainly more innovative than Microsoft who always seems late to the game. Windows 7 is great, but why did it take them so long?


5 posted on 01/07/2011 12:02:08 PM PST by Sprite518
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To: smith288
Same principal they use for the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch.

It's great to see this put on the Mac. This is like a little preview of Lion which should be coming out this summer. I am really looking forward to the next version of OS X.

6 posted on 01/07/2011 1:13:45 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: Sprite518
Apple is certainly more innovative than Microsoft who always seems late to the game.

Yes, it's really interesting to see all the great things Apple is doing these days. I'm a fairly new Mac owner, less than a year, but I am really impressed.

7 posted on 01/07/2011 1:21:38 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776

I’ve been using PC’s for years, and never had trouble moving/reinstalling my software over to the new machines.

I’m not sure what’s so revolutionary about this concept.


8 posted on 01/07/2011 1:29:35 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: Cementjungle
I’ve been using PC’s for years, and never had trouble moving/reinstalling my software over to the new machines.
I’m not sure what’s so revolutionary about this concept.

As the article points out, most software today requires an installation through an activation key. The license to use that software is identified with a particular machine, not the person who bought the software. The license may be for one or perhaps up to three machines.

With the Mac App Store the purchase of software is identified with the person who bought it. The right to install and use the software is not tied to any particular machine, but rather to the person who bought it. That means you can install it on any machine you want. So all you have to do to install on any machine is check in to the Mac App Store, and if you purchased the software, it will download and install. There is no limit to the number of machines you can install the software on.

A user will still be able to install software the old-fashioned way--buy a CD or download it from a website. But the Mac App Store is more convenient to use. The Store is an application on the Mac, not a website. So a user does't need a CD drive to install. This is why the new MacBook Air laptops don't have a DVD/CD drive built in.

9 posted on 01/07/2011 2:20:27 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776

Adobe (Photoshop, Lightroom, etc.) let’s you simply deactivate the license on your old machine and install and use it on a new machine (or on a couple of machines). Pretty simple process. I don’t think there’s anything I’ve ever had to purchase again just because I moved to a new PC (which I do about every 3 years).


10 posted on 01/07/2011 2:35:59 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: Cementjungle
Adobe (Photoshop, Lightroom, etc.) let’s you simply deactivate the license on your old machine and install and use it on a new machine (or on a couple of machines). Pretty simple process. I don’t think there’s anything I’ve ever had to purchase again just because I moved to a new PC (which I do about every 3 years).

Exactly. Adobe, like most software today, requires a license that is restricted to a particular machine at the time of installation. To use it on another machine, you have to deactivate the license for one machine, and reactive the license for a different machine.

Mac App Store works quite differently. There is no license. Software is not associated with any particular machine. The software a user purchases is associated with that user. The user can then install that software on any number of machines. There is no license to deactivate on one machine and then reactive for a different machine. Simply install it on as many machines as you like.

There are also no CDs/DVDs. Everything installs online. But if a user prefers the old-fashioned way, software can still be installed that way.

11 posted on 01/07/2011 3:36:11 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: Cementjungle

It works differently than what you’re used to. And, it’s done by Apple. Therefore, it is revolutionary and game changing.

I use Windows. If I needed software (and of course I never never do) I could go to Pirate Bay and download it for free.
http://thepiratebay.org/search/adobe%20photoshop/0/99/300
That’s not new at all. I have Windows, and for years, software has just been available.

It seems like mac has just set up a new website to download software, am I right here? And it’s great, especially to people who like the way mac does things.

And I get that apple knows exactly who you are and what software you have. People thing that’s a great thing. I’m not sure why people need a bunch of expensive macs in their house, and why they need photoshop on every one of them.

But this is definitely a bonus to those people who have multiple macs in their house, want photoshop on all of them, but don’t have a minute to type in a serial number or an activation code, but do have the time to download the software from the internet over and over.

Without seeing it, i’m sure that the mac store is “cool”. Apple stuff typically is. Cool and typically much more expensive.


12 posted on 01/07/2011 3:46:58 PM PST by truthfreedom
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To: stripes1776
Exactly. Adobe, like most software today, requires a license that is restricted to a particular machine at the time of installation. To use it on another machine, you have to deactivate the license for one machine, and reactive the license for a different machine.

Mac App Store works quite differently. There is no license. Software is not associated with any particular machine. The software a user purchases is associated with that user. The user can then install that software on any number of machines. There is no license to deactivate on one machine and then reactive for a different machine. Simply install it on as many machines as you like.

Well, you still have to authenticate yourself to the store in order to gain access to your software download. Whether that's done via a license key, username/password or some other piece of personal information is really not much of an issue. In any case, you still have to tell the store you are the owner of the software.

I really don't see how this is any sort of "game changer", since software portability isn't really a new concept.

13 posted on 01/07/2011 3:55:55 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: Cementjungle
I really don't see how this is any sort of "game changer", since software portability isn't really a new concept.

You're license for Photoshop restricts you to how many machines? The apps in the Mac App Store have no restrictions on the number of times you can install the app once you purchase it. Also you don't need to mess around with activation keys. You also have a list of all the apps you have purchased in one central location.

Now let's see. Where did I put that CD for MS Office? And where is that CD for Photoshop? It must be here someplace. Excuse me why I go search around the house for those.

14 posted on 01/07/2011 4:21:51 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776
Ah... if they let you run software on as many machines (concurrently) as you like, then that's nice... I would like that.

As for a central "store" for all products, I guess that's nice too... assuming that every product you use is available there. As for me, I simply have a box where I keep all my original CD's in. That works fine for me.

15 posted on 01/07/2011 4:39:27 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: Cementjungle
As for me, I simply have a box where I keep all my original CD's in. That works fine for me.

If that box works for you, that's fine. But let's say you have 10 applications on your old computer and each applications has a license for just one machine. And of course each was activated with a long and unique key.

So you buy a new machine. So get out your box of CDs and deactivate each application on the old machine, each with a unique key. Now reinstall each application with that unique key on the new machine. So what do you do with the old machine which doesn't have any of your favorite applications on it? You could always buy a license for more machines for each application. But of course that means 10 phone calls or logging into 10 different websites.

So lets say I bought 10 productivity applications on my older Mac, all from the Mac App Store. When I buy a new machine, I go to the App Store. It shows me a list of all the apps I have purchased. So I click on the install button, and it installs all my apps on the new machine. Everything just installs while I attend to other tasks. There was nothing to deactivate. I didn't have to use 10 different keys. And I still have use of all the applications on the old machine.

I would call this, to use the words of the article, "a dramatic departure from how consumer software is typically licensed". But if you are particularly attached to that box of CDs, that's fine.

16 posted on 01/07/2011 5:10:59 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776
If that box works for you, that's fine. But let's say you have 10 applications on your old computer and each applications has a license for just one machine. And of course each was activated with a long and unique key.

As a matter of full disclosure, I'm probably not the typical PC user. I have over 30 years experience in IT. I've installed/maintained/upgraded/moved mainframe operating systems, headed a project to roll-out over 500 IBM AS/400's with various applications on them, designed applications to be installed on hundreds of remote shopping mall machines (PC's), and so on. I've also been buying computers for my personal use/education since the days of the TRS-80 model I.

Anyway, whatever makes it easier and cheaper for the end-user is fine by me.

17 posted on 01/07/2011 6:05:19 PM PST by Cementjungle
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To: stripes1776; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; 50mm; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; ..
The Mac App Store makes a paradigm shift in the software licensing and usage... PING!

Please!
No Flame Wars!
Discuss technical issues, software, and hardware.
Don't attack people!

Don't respond to the Anti-Apple Thread Trolls!
PLEASE IGNORE THEM!!!


Apple Mac App Store concept Ping!

If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

18 posted on 01/07/2011 6:20:07 PM PST by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: stripes1776

This is how it should be. The machine-based approach always have pissed me off.

The same goes for music. If I buy a CD the rights to that music should be mine no matter where or how I choose to play it.

Kudos to Apple.


19 posted on 01/07/2011 6:28:06 PM PST by big'ol_freeper ("[T]here is nothing so aggravating [in life] as being condescended to by an idiot" ~ Ann Coulter)
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To: truthfreedom
If I needed software (and of course I never never do) I could go to Pirate Bay and download it for free.

Software theft isn't new. The app store isn't about stealing software. There are additional risks with using peer to peer like the Pirate Bay because while you're filesharing your IP address is out there, and that's how RIAA has caught a lot of people who steal music. There is also the risk of either a virus or a trojan being included in the download. I know there are ways to hide your IP and check the program for infections.

20 posted on 01/07/2011 6:44:56 PM PST by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: truthfreedom
It seems like mac has just set up a new website to download software, am I right here?

Actually, it's not a website. It is a service that Apple offers by means of an application that comes on the Mac operating system. It provides an easy way to purchase apps. Also a lot of the apps at the Mac App Store are free.

Without seeing it, i’m sure that the mac store is “cool”. Apple stuff typically is. Cool and typically much more expensive.

Yes, it is very cool. But the apps are not very expensive. As above, a lot of the apps are free.

21 posted on 01/07/2011 6:54:36 PM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776

Yeah, I’m not saying the apps are expensive. The computers are. And yeah, not a website. Apple is big on things like that. Like Itunes. Apple really likes to put things in its own software that it could easily do with a standard website on the internet.


22 posted on 01/07/2011 7:19:55 PM PST by truthfreedom
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To: Richard Kimball

So, you understand. There are certainly the risks, but people don’t care. I’m just saying that what we have right now, free software, easy to get, the way it has been for a long long time, it’s hard to see exactly how gee whiz it is.

And I’m not really dumping on Apple’s new download thing. I haven’t seen it. It probably is a clean, easy to use, visually attractive. Certainly it’s something. And Microsoft doesn’t really have that thing. If you want to buy software really really easy, Apple has it and Microsoft doesn’t.

But I don’t see how its quite as revolutionary as people try to say it is. I already know about downloading software.

This seems like a great opportunity for people who just realized they could download software on their computers to tell Windows people this, or any people who know what computers can do.


23 posted on 01/07/2011 7:59:36 PM PST by truthfreedom
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To: kingu
For the Apple, with a limited customer base and distribution channel

False premise.
24 posted on 01/07/2011 8:19:36 PM PST by Terpfen (Buh-bye, Suntan Charlie.)
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To: Cementjungle

Licenses can get pretty stupid. Back when Quark was king, they wanted a newspaper to pay for all new licenses because they were moving their offices. According to Quark, the license was for the old location, and didn’t cover the new one.


25 posted on 01/07/2011 9:54:44 PM PST by antiRepublicrat
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To: truthfreedom

There is the little fact that you won’t be violating anyone’s copyright by using the App Store as opposed to the Pirate Bay. Developers will actually be making money for their work.

I tried an app from the App Store and it was the easiest thing I’ve ever seen on a desktop. I clicked it, and a few seconds later it had been installed on my Mac, sitting right there in the Dock ready for me to launch.


26 posted on 01/07/2011 10:01:50 PM PST by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat
Licenses can get pretty stupid. Back when Quark was king, they wanted a newspaper to pay for all new licenses because they were moving their offices. According to Quark, the license was for the old location, and didn’t cover the new one.

I worked in print production in the early '90s, and everyone in the business had a love-hate relationship with XPress (the software) and a hate-hate relationship with Quark (the company).

Quark was incredibly slow with bug fixes, and positively glacial with updates for new hardware and OS revisions. Knowing Quark workarounds was a core professional competency. Production shops kept 680x0 machines around, and in later years kept OS 9 around, years after the rest of the world while they were waiting for a stable Quark on PowerPC and OS X. I wouldn't be surprised if there are still shops with PowerPC machines because Quark has lingering issues with Intel.

As you mentioned, Quark was insufferable with licensing terms. They were the 800-pound gorilla in the industry, and threw that weight around in ways that were downright abusive. I do not know of any software product that was more eagerly awaited or enthusiastically embraced than InDesign, more because of disgust with Quark than a deep and abiding love for Adobe.

27 posted on 01/07/2011 11:57:31 PM PST by ReignOfError
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To: truthfreedom
I’m just saying that what we have right now, free software, easy to get, the way it has been for a long long time, it’s hard to see exactly how gee whiz it is.

You could say the same thing about iTunes. It was possible to steal music before iTunes, but not to buy it legally, conveniently and inexpensively. iTunes was gee-whiz enough to become the world's largest music retailer in the span of a few years.

28 posted on 01/08/2011 12:01:06 AM PST by ReignOfError
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To: ReignOfError

i’m trying to recall the old days of mp3s. mp3.com was big.
i know that there were others. amazon sells a lot now.

Itunes did well in part because mp3s were fairly new. Software has been around a long time. People with Windows really don’t have a problem getting software. Whether it’s free, or freeware, shareware or pay. I’m not saying this is a bad thing at all for mac users, I’m sure it’s an improvement for them.


29 posted on 01/08/2011 4:02:03 AM PST by truthfreedom
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To: Cementjungle
I really don't see how this is any sort of "game changer", since software portability isn't really a new concept.

The exception is the arrangement MS has with OEM hardware companies for installing Windows. Other than that, you're right. The software is licensed to you, not the machine.

Not sure if the author of the article doesn't understand that, or does but doesn't think we do so he can get away with proclaiming this to be some kind of big new thing in how software is licensed.

30 posted on 01/08/2011 4:21:32 AM PST by tacticalogic
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To: stripes1776

Surely you are not implying that Photoshop, through Apple’s App store, will now have unlimited licenses, or not need licences for every computer it is installed on? Nor Windows Office for Apple?

As a Droid phone owner, I know the power of apps, but I don’t think the big software vendors will suddenly give up all the profit that individual licenses provide them. Yeah, little apps that do some small specific thing, but the big complex code suites? Those guys want to get paid.

Perhaps someday someone will develop a BETTER and CHEAPER app than the big vendor programs, one that will go head-to-head with them with the same functionality, but then they may get into all kinds of copyright problems if they code for that vendor’s file type, specifications, etc. For example, look at Open Office. It’s free, but Microsoft still sells the vast majority of desktop application suite software.

I am certainly opposed to piracy. Anyone who downloads for pay code for free from some hacker site is violating the law. I thought Free Republic was a conservative web site? How can a FReeper advocate software piracy?


31 posted on 01/08/2011 4:28:44 AM PST by Alas Babylon! (Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must-like men-undergo the fatigue of supporting it)
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To: stripes1776

I’m surprised no one has mentioned the obvious; Steam has been using this business model for the PC games market for several years and it’s a SMASHING success. The games can be reinstalled as often as needed and are tied to the account, there are no worries about malware, things are kept up to date effortlessly.


32 posted on 01/08/2011 7:14:03 AM PST by Fire_on_High (Stupid should hurt.)
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To: stripes1776

That’s exactly the way Gametap and a number of other online based distribution systems have worked since day 1, the license belongs to the “login” and can go on as many machines as the person wants to login from. It’s nice that Apple’s on board but it’s not new.


33 posted on 01/08/2011 7:19:27 AM PST by discostu (this is defninitely not my confused face)
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To: truthfreedom

I think the store is evolutionary rather than revolutionary. It’s targeted initially at people who aren’t web gurus. It comes down to the ease of use, and it’s going to be a lot easier. I don’t know how the numbers break down on computer users, but a ton of people use computers, and probably less than 15% of them are advanced users. That’s a huge potential market in the less experienced users. Sometimes it’s not the huge changes that force something over the tipping point to general acceptance, it’s the small things that reduce complexity. I think that’s why some experienced users are flummoxed by Apple’s success in these areas. With the iPad, there were a bunch of Freepers saying “It doesn’t have a USB port, it doesn’t have a smart card reader, it doesn’t have a real keyboard, it doesn’t read Flash!” Apple, however, figured out that these features were only wanted by a small percentage, and that for the majority they were clutter and increased manufacturing costs and confused the target consumer.
Advantages for developers are that they save a ton on marketing, sales and delivery costs.
For users, they have the advantage of having a defined store. Unlike a developer web site, where the developer can scrub negative comments or hide flaws, there are reviews of apps. Users don’t have to give a credit card number to “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Software Company.”
I also think there’s an advantage in the updating area. In the update area, the old model was the user either had to negotiate back to the web site and check, or the software program had to have a “check on launch” feature, which adds to the size of the program and also creates system usage overhead. For me personally, I don’t start a program unless I want to use it, and it annoys the heck out of me that when I start an Adobe program, for example, Adobe updater starts, tells me I have an update, and if I decide to install it, I’m supposed to close my web browsers and the program I want to use and wait fifteen minutes for the download and installation. Adobe also has a real problem with about twenty percent of their updates failing.
While I’m complaining about Adobe, the only Adobe programs I need are Photoshop and Acrobat. Adobe figured this out, and either charges out the wazoo for Photoshop or packages it with their less successful programs.


34 posted on 01/08/2011 7:29:12 AM PST by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: discostu
the license belongs to the “login” and can go on as many machines as the person wants to login from. It’s nice that Apple’s on board but it’s not new. It’s nice that Apple’s on board but it’s not new.

As the article points out, "Identity licensing isn't new, and it's widely used for content licensed for other purposes or mobile devices." But it does not involve a license. I think the argument could be made that the distribution and installation of software based on identity began back in the 1970s with FTP servers. You can pretty that concept up with a graphical interface and make it a lot easier for the average person to use.

35 posted on 01/08/2011 9:13:46 AM PST by stripes1776
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To: stripes1776

It’s funny that it starts by saying they “fundamentally change” the business, then say it’s not new. The headline is wrong, the story is right. It’s no fundamental change, it’s just a large company joining an idea that’s been around a long time and in actually rather heavy usage lately.


36 posted on 01/08/2011 9:37:15 AM PST by discostu (this is defninitely not my confused face)
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To: Alas Babylon!
Surely you are not implying that Photoshop, through Apple’s App store, will now have unlimited licenses, or not need licences for every computer it is installed on? Nor Windows Office for Apple?

You are correct. I am not implying the Photoshop is now sold in the Mac App Store. But programs like Pixelmator ($30.00) are available. Nor am I implying that MS Office is now sold in the Mac App Store, but Apple's iWork suite is available. Pages, Numbers, and Keynote give me all the functionality I need for creating documents, spreadsheets, and slide presentation for a lot less money. And I only have to buy once, and I can then install them on as many Mac's as I want.

I am certainly opposed to piracy. Anyone who downloads for pay code for free from some hacker site is violating the law. I thought Free Republic was a conservative web site? How can a FReeper advocate software piracy?

I haven't seen anyone on FReeRepublic advocating software piracy.

37 posted on 01/08/2011 9:41:19 AM PST by stripes1776
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