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What to do when a friend is being misprescribed psych meds
06/05/12 | Auntie Mame

Posted on 06/05/2012 4:48:53 PM PDT by Auntie Mame

A friend of mine is becoming crazier and crazier, it's almost impossible to talk with her anymore. Today I asked and she freely gave me a list of her medications. I am very scared for her. Here's what she is being prescribed:

Latuda 80 mg

Paroxetine (Paxil) 40 mg

Lamotrigine 200 mg

Topiramate 200 mg 2x/day

Her doctor is not a psychiatrist, just a general practitioner. She says she speaks with him once a week over the telephone, and then comes to his office to pick up her prescriptions which are held for her at the desk.

What do I mean when I say she's getting crazier and crazier?

She talks 90 miles an hour, she can't stay on topic, she's all over the place in her conversation. She's verbally and actively obsessive about certain things, things that because of her bad decisions (probably brought on by all these meds) she's caused herself.

I looked up the meds and it appears the dosages are really high.

I called the Medical licensing board and spoke to someone but they are of no help whatsoever. I'm thinking of calling up the doctor and putting the fear of God into him. I'm not sure what else I can do. She has been getting a lot of moving violation tickets lately, and recently totaled her car but she says it was not her fault. She is in no shape to help herself and has no family looking out for her.

She's very open to hearing me tell her how worried I am about her. I think if I could find some kind of treatment program she would be amendable to checking it out.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: drugs; prescriptionmeds; psychmeds
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Is there anything anyone can think of that I can do for her? I'm really scared for her well being and she is in no shape to help herself.

Are there any treatment programs for people hooked on meds like these? These are not the kind of drugs you can just stop taking.

1 posted on 06/05/2012 4:49:02 PM PDT by Auntie Mame
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To: Auntie Mame

Second opinion needed.


2 posted on 06/05/2012 4:51:36 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: Auntie Mame

Call your local social services and report that you think she may be a vulnerable adult.....then tell them why...and they SHOULD refer her case to someone to investigate...You can also make this call anonymously


4 posted on 06/05/2012 4:54:47 PM PDT by MagUSNRET
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To: Auntie Mame

How old? It sounds like it’s HER decision to take them. No one is forcing her, right? Doctors prescribing patients as many medications as they can nowadays IS BIG BUSINESS.. Especially the addictive ones. Sounds like she’s just a money maker for the pharmas and the Doctor gets his kickbacks..


5 posted on 06/05/2012 4:55:06 PM PDT by GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
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To: Auntie Mame

She needs GOD!!! Get her to Church and introduce her to the Priest or the Pastor.


6 posted on 06/05/2012 4:55:26 PM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: Auntie Mame

Regular docs prescribing psych meds is never a good idea. Maybe get her to a Psychiatrist, and let them talk to her. I’ve dealt with mental illness my whole life, currently not taking anything. I decided I’d rather deal with the illness than the effects of the meds.


7 posted on 06/05/2012 4:56:43 PM PDT by real saxophonist (The fact that you play tuba doesn't make you any less lethal. -USMC bandsman in Iraq)
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To: Auntie Mame

It’s possible that she appears normal when speaking to the Dr. and when she picks up her prescription. Perhaps, before ‘putting the fear of God’ in him, you might contact the Dr.’s office and explain that her observed behavior is terrifying and give him specific examples. Perhaps ask if he might consider referring her to a psychiatrist since she’s not responding as anticipated to the drugs. This way you don’t alienate the Dr. - you want his help at this point. If he were intentionally doing this - I’d want to use the method you explained but at this point, he doesn’t appear to know. And it might influence him just by letting him know you know and have reported it to him.


8 posted on 06/05/2012 4:57:17 PM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Auntie Mame

I suggest you first talk to an actual pharmacist, preferably with your friend present.


9 posted on 06/05/2012 4:57:32 PM PDT by sarasmom ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xZsFe6dM3EY)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Latuda is only indicated for schizophrenia. I believe some of the others are for bipolar disorder.

Now, some of the symptoms you mention like “being all over the place” could be consistent with schizophrenia. I guess the issue is, did she have these symptoms before being loaded up with all these meds? If she did have schizophrenic symptoms, then Latuda could be appropriate, but it sounds like she may be getting worse.

Definitely time for a second opinion, and not one that deals with her over the phone.


10 posted on 06/05/2012 4:57:32 PM PDT by mtrott
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To: Auntie Mame

Talk to your pharmacist, then a psychiatrist


11 posted on 06/05/2012 4:58:37 PM PDT by shalom aleichem
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To: Auntie Mame
Just wait until the Adderal comes next..........Then Clonezapam so she can sleep..........

Qualudes, black beauties, and weed were tame stuff in the 60's and 70's. Now big pharma has rebranded amphetamines into adhd / add meds, and barbituates have been rebranded into something to turn down the amphetamines so you can sleep.

The more things change the more they stay the same, only now with a copay and a doctor instead of $5.00 for a bottle or a baggie.

12 posted on 06/05/2012 4:59:43 PM PDT by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: Auntie Mame
Not sure, but is it a crime for you to list her meds, a violation of confidentiality or something?

Not saying its wrong, just cautioning you as to whether or not you could get into trouble with the lawman.

13 posted on 06/05/2012 5:00:06 PM PDT by Copenhagen Smile
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To: Auntie Mame

She needs to see a real psychiatrist fast becuase what you describe are classic symptoms of the manic phase of bipolar disorder.

I have bipolar disorder myself and based on the drugs she is taking she is being treated for depression but not mania.


14 posted on 06/05/2012 5:01:12 PM PDT by nhoward14 (It's not racism when we do it. - Liberals)
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To: ransomnote

” And it might influence him just by letting him know you know and have reported it to him.”

He won’t or can’t talk to you about her. Get a second opinion.


15 posted on 06/05/2012 5:01:18 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Auntie Mame

Unless and until you have your MD in Psychiatry, it is inappropriate for you to get involved with another person’s Rx regime. If you do not have a guardianship it is potentially illegal as well.

Other then suggest a second opinion you can and should do no more.


16 posted on 06/05/2012 5:02:17 PM PDT by freedumb2003 ('RETRO' Abortions = performed on 84th trimester individuals who think killing babies is a "right.")
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To: Auntie Mame

I was in a similar situation a few years ago. I first provided enough links to try to convince her that psychology is the new snake oil. That at least made her unsure...but then I sat her down and had a serious chat about how radically her personality had changed since she started taking the meds. She soon thankfully quit cold turkey and thanks me for it to this day.


17 posted on 06/05/2012 5:02:39 PM PDT by Teflonic
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To: MagUSNRET

Call your local social services and report that you think she may be a vulnerable adult.....then tell them why...and they SHOULD refer her case to someone to investigate...You can also make this call anonymously


This is good advice. You can also call and talk to local or state mental health professionals and ask if your friend needs an assigned worker or at the very least an assessment.


18 posted on 06/05/2012 5:02:51 PM PDT by volunbeer (Don't worry America, our kids can pay for it!)
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To: Auntie Mame
Here's a little memory trick to describe the symptoms of a bi-polar manic episode:

Symptoms of mania DIGFAST

D = Distractibility and easy frustration
I = Irresponsibility and erratic uninhibited behavior
G = Grandiosity
F = Flight of ideas
A = Activity increased with weight loss and increased libido
S = Sleep is decreased
T = Talkativeness

19 posted on 06/05/2012 5:04:56 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: Auntie Mame

What condition is she being treated for? Put another way, what is the worst that could happen if she just stopped taking the meds? Now you do need medical input on that, because some psych meds you can’t just quit with safety. But some you can.

And you may remind the good doctor he may be criminally liable if her medication leads to an accident with injury or fatalities. He may not be aware that the dose he is prescribing is having such a dramatic effect, and if she’s really muddled, she probably isn’t telling him. His rear is on the line and he might think you were doing him a favor to relay how dangerous her behavior is becoming. No doctor really wants one or more wrongful death lawsuits or possible criminal negligence charges landing unexpectedly on his doorstep. Could really ruin his day.


20 posted on 06/05/2012 5:05:47 PM PDT by Springfield Reformer (Winston Churchill: No Peace Till Victory!)
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To: Auntie Mame

A lot depends on what is meant by crazy. Side effects of over medication? Failure of medication to achieve its intended goal? Something entirely unrelated? Mere personality conflict? Neighbor trying to horn in on relative’s business? Legally competent or not, or questionable?

If she’s willing to talk with you, suggest she see a neurologist with a psychiatry degree (neurologist may sound less threatening than psychiatrist).

If she’s not, then MAYBE social workers could be of help. It depends on locale. Sometimes they are crazier than the relative.


21 posted on 06/05/2012 5:06:20 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Let me ABOs run loose Lou!)
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To: shalom aleichem

According to our good friend who is a pharmacist, 9/10 psychiatrists are drug pushers who pose as doctors. Lithium(lithobid) is the most useful and theraputic antipsychotic medication.


22 posted on 06/05/2012 5:07:04 PM PDT by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: Auntie Mame
It sounds to me like she is in the midst of the manic side of bipolar disease. Paxil, the antidepressant she is on, will do nothing but make it worse.

She needs to meet with a Psychiatrist ASAP or if it's an emergency situation go to the emergency room and they will probably send her to their Psych floor and start her on a mood stabilizer such as Lithium, Depakote or an atypical antipsychotic like Risperdol or Seroquel for faster relief.

I think her doctor may recognize she is bipolar in that he gave her Paxil to keep the depression at bay, and also gave her some lesser known mood stabilizers in an attempt to keep her from switching to Mania, but it didn't work.

Mania will resolve itself but who knows how long, and she may have ruined her life at that point. It will most certainly be followed by a crushing depression if not treated correctly.

I am not a doctor but have had to deal with Bipolar disease in a loved one my whole life. In my case the person always refused care until something horrible would happen and she would be taken to the hospital either forcibly or convinced by the Police to check herself in.

I was sworn at, lied to, threatened, etc by this person. But it's worth it when they get the care they need and are back to normal.

23 posted on 06/05/2012 5:07:04 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: Auntie Mame
CALIFORNIA - LOCAL COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS INTERVENTION NUMBERS

http://www.dmh.ca.gov/docs/24_Hour_MH_Crisis_Hotline_List.pdf

24 posted on 06/05/2012 5:10:45 PM PDT by Tex-Con-Man (T. Coddington Van Voorhees VII 2012 - "Together, I Shall Ride You To Victory")
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To: Auntie Mame
My mother was diagnosed with schizophrenia - the "doctors" were psychiatrists, who are the modern day Witch Doctors.

Let me speak plainly - they DON'T know what they are doing.

My mother was given every drug on the planet, and then some. Then more combinations of drugs, more "therapy" that bankrupted our family to point of financial ruin. Then the "doctors" sent us even more bills after she had committed suicide.

I am convinced that many, many people who are diagnosed with the faux "syndromes" are actually demonically possessed or oppressed. The human soul is not an arm or a spleen. You can't treat it as such, but the "Mental Health" profession does. It is all a rigged game.

Let me repeat: they attempt to fool you that they know what is wrong, and when they are found out, they switch tactics.

It is all the same.

Trust me on this.

25 posted on 06/05/2012 5:12:13 PM PDT by SkyPilot
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To: freedumb2003

“If you do not have a guardianship it is potentially illegal as well.”

uh no


26 posted on 06/05/2012 5:12:53 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: MacMattico

She is already on an atypical antipsychotic, Latuda.


27 posted on 06/05/2012 5:13:50 PM PDT by mtrott
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To: Teflonic
She soon thankfully quit cold turkey

With many psychiatric medications that is extremely dangerous.
28 posted on 06/05/2012 5:14:27 PM PDT by visualops (artlife.us)
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To: Ann Archy

Everyone needs God.

God gave us doctors, she needs to use another one of ‘em.


29 posted on 06/05/2012 5:15:22 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: SkyPilot
Let me speak plainly - they DON'T know what they are doing. My mother was given every drug on the planet, and then some. Then more combinations of drugs, more "therapy" that bankrupted our family to point of financial ruin. Then the "doctors" sent us even more bills after she had committed suicide. "I am convinced that many, many people who are diagnosed with the faux "syndromes" are actually demonically possessed or oppressed. The human soul is not an arm or a spleen. You can't treat it as such, but the "Mental Health" profession does. It is all a rigged game. Let me repeat: they attempt to fool you that they know what is wrong, and when they are found out, they switch tactics."

Dualing circumstances here.

30 posted on 06/05/2012 5:15:40 PM PDT by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: Auntie Mame
Not an MD but married to a bipolar.

Sounds like your friend is having a manic episode.

My wife's shrink is also her sister's shrink. He's told us that he can't say anything about her sister to us but we can say anything about her sister to him.

I would not assume that anything your friend tells you about her meds or MDs is correct and sometimes people who are manic are delusional (psychotic) as well.

I would go on the web and find her MD’s fax number and fax a letter to him stating the symptoms you observed (speeding, etc...that is in the DSM-IV TR as a diagnostic symptom) and alleged meds that she says she is taking without making any judgmental comments directed at the MD.

Just say this is what she appears to be taking and this is how she is behaving.

At the top of the fax state “RE Jane Doe, DOB (date of birth) MM-DD-YYYY so they have a specific medical record identifier.

Good luck to you and your friend!

31 posted on 06/05/2012 5:15:55 PM PDT by Seizethecarp
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To: blackdog

That’s true. Psychoanalysis take “too long” and insurers stopped covering it so, yes, take a pill and howl at the moon.


32 posted on 06/05/2012 5:18:51 PM PDT by shalom aleichem
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To: freedumb2003

“Unless and until you have your MD in Psychiatry, it is inappropriate for you to get involved with another person’s Rx regime. If you do not have a guardianship it is potentially illegal as well.”

Not even a guardian can interfere with medical orders, but it is not illegal to be involved such to find a second opinion or make reports to authorities.


33 posted on 06/05/2012 5:19:58 PM PDT by CodeToad (Homosexuals are homophobes. They insist on being called 'gay' instead.)
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To: Auntie Mame

She needs to get a second opinion from a qualified medical professional like a psychiatrist or nurse practitioner (overseen by a psychiatrist).
You don’t mention what her diagnosis is, what her history is, so your comments are rather out of context. It would be very inappropriate for you to call her doctor.


34 posted on 06/05/2012 5:21:00 PM PDT by visualops (artlife.us)
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To: Auntie Mame

Has she ever talked to her pharmacist about drug drug interactions? Is she getting all her meds from the same pharmacy?


35 posted on 06/05/2012 5:22:43 PM PDT by tellw
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To: blackdog

I’m sure these pharmacists meet in extensive counseling sessions with these patients?

Of course a pharmacist is going to be aware of doctors writing prescriptions, duh. The ones who do not will pass by his or her notice.


36 posted on 06/05/2012 5:23:06 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Let me ABOs run loose Lou!)
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To: Auntie Mame

In most States if she is over 55 there are usually “at risk adult” laws, and along with those laws are county adult protective hotlines that go to Adult Protective Services. They are typically the county “crisis hotline” and can be found in the phone book, online, or by calling 411 information. If you can’t find that, call the local police department and they can direct your call appropriately. APS investigate all “abuse, neglect, and exploitation” issues with at risk persons, from mentally ill to elderly.


37 posted on 06/05/2012 5:24:28 PM PDT by CodeToad (Homosexuals are homophobes. They insist on being called 'gay' instead.)
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To: Auntie Mame

Go to med school and become a doctor...


38 posted on 06/05/2012 5:24:41 PM PDT by steveo
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

I agree a second opinion is best.

When a friend of mine had a psychotic break, I basically tricked her into going to the dr telling her that even though she felt fine, the car accident she had been in (low speed no injures) could have caused injuries. She heard me on the phone with her husband explaining that she needed help and the ‘real’ reason I wanted her to go the dr., she said “I heard everything you said and there is absolutely nothing wrong with my mental health!” YET - she agreed to go to the Dr. and I drove her there. I believe she was going to ‘prove’ to me nothng was wrong.
A few days before I picked her up for the appointment, I called the office and asked to speak with the nurse. I explained my observations and said I had asked her to see the dr. with the excuse of the light car accident. This offended the nurse and she said the office doesn’t trick patients and I said no - but I wanted the dr. to know that she was hearing voices and paranoid and that is something patient would not be able to say for herself. We ended the call with her disgust.
I called back immediately and asked to speak to a different nurse. I explained specific examples of her hallucinations etc., that she had been in a car accident and because she heard me speaking to her husband re her mental status
she wouldn’t be likely to report these symptoms. The nurse wanted to help and was unsure what message I was asking her to give. I said “Tell him that between 2pm and 10pm on the day of the car accident, she reported hearing voices trying to kill her, seeing the Coca Cola truck parked on the side of the road meant ‘they were watching her’ and that she was markedly different (obsessive paranoia) from her normal condition.” THe nurse thanked me and said she’d tell the Dr.
On the ride home in the car my ill friend she kept praising the Dr. She finally said as we pulled into her driveway. “At first I wasn’t going to tell him anything (looked at me hard here), but he was so very kind and kept asking me questions. I told him how ‘they’ were hiding tape recorders in the trees outside my home and the light fixtures, how they want to kill me, I told him about the coca cola truck.” I was overjoyed with relief.
Note that the Dr. had a few days prior to this appointment to consult with friends or legal and that ‘we’ never discussed it. All the information flowed from me to them - they weren’t violating HIPPA by hearing me speak - even if they said ‘we can’t do anything’ they did hear it.
He was an excellent Dr. to get past her paranoia and she felt relieved to speak with him. A few days later she received a letter from his office carefully explaining that he believed that she needed medication to restore her quality of life. He believed that she was schizophrenic and that the good news was, there was a highly effective medication available etc...” She, of course, believed that ‘they’ got to him and now he was trying to kill her. Note that he didn’t render his diagnoses while she was in his office. I assume this was on advice he had received and that he may have consulted following the appointment. I felt grateful that he listened and investigated in his appointment with her and did a terrific job. I was crushed that she wouldn’t take medicine for her condition but felt I had done everything I could do to assist her and perhaps offered her some protection should she have legal or medical problems in the near future - which her behavior was indeed likely to provoke.
So I agree that she needs a second opinion and just assumed that the OP was dealing with schizoid behavior where they don’t want to comply with appointments. If she will go, perhaps the OP could attend the appointment with her.


39 posted on 06/05/2012 5:28:35 PM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Auntie Mame

First of all thank you for caring so much about your friend and you are willing to help her.....

I cannot stress the importance of her being evaluated by a psychiatrist and they should be prescribing her medication not a GP.......it is a delicate balance that can go south in a heart beat and it sounds like your friend is already there.....someone else suggested a call to social service which is a good idea.....if there is a mental health unit in your area, you could call them and ask them for suggestions.....

Maybe you could find a psychiatrist and offer to go with her......she sounds like she is not rational so that makes it even harder to deal with her.....

prayers for you and her......God bless


40 posted on 06/05/2012 5:29:12 PM PDT by Kimmers (Fair isn't everybody getting the same thing, fair is getting what you need to be successful)
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To: Auntie Mame

First of all thank you for caring so much about your friend and you are willing to help her.....

I cannot stress the importance of her being evaluated by a psychiatrist and they should be prescribing her medication not a GP.......it is a delicate balance that can go south in a heart beat and it sounds like your friend is already there.....someone else suggested a call to social service which is a good idea.....if there is a mental health unit in your area, you could call them and ask them for suggestions.....

Maybe you could find a psychiatrist and offer to go with her......she sounds like she is not rational so that makes it even harder to deal with her.....

prayers for you and her......God bless


41 posted on 06/05/2012 5:29:21 PM PDT by Kimmers (Fair isn't everybody getting the same thing, fair is getting what you need to be successful)
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To: mtrott
Sometimes, certain medications in the same category don't work for their intended purpose in certain people. Obviously it didn't keep the mania at bay. Seroquel and Risperdol have a better track record, in my opinion. Also, if she is showing no signs of Psychosis, getting her off the Antipsychotics and Antidepressants and onto Lithium or Depakote may be a better plan. Seroquel or Risperdol has also been used to bring the mania down, and then Lithium or Depakote for maintenance, as both have been proven to work on Mania and depression. Still, certain medications don't work for everyone and sometimes the best meds only work to make the time between episodes longer, there is no cure. And a lot of people think because they feel better they can stop taking their medication— which is a no-no. Like an insulin dependent diabetic, you just can't stop your meds.
42 posted on 06/05/2012 5:30:46 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: volunbeer; MagUSNRET; Auntie Mame

Sorry, but I don’t necessarily agree. It depends on the precise nature of the medical condition. Tossing social services at her prematurely could have lasting damaging effects, both physically and personally.

First, psychotropic treatment regimens are often in the nature of self-fulfilling prophecies. The science of psychotropic effect is sketchy at best, and the mechanisms for “cure” are poorly understood and chemically primitive. There is some evidence that some treatments, even at the supposedly correct dosage, actually make the disorder worse over extended periods of time.

Furthermore, if she once gets absorbed by the “system,” and in particular if it goes as far as an involuntary commitment, she will have a “record” that can result in various forms of debilitating discriminatory treatment. If it is necessary, then so be it. But the cost should be weighed before going that direction. Make sure it’s the not the meds first. That’s all I’m saying. Her life will change permanently for the worse if a mistake is made here.


43 posted on 06/05/2012 5:31:27 PM PDT by Springfield Reformer (Winston Churchill: No Peace Till Victory!)
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To: freedumb2003
Unless and until you have your MD in Psychiatry, it is inappropriate for you to get involved with another person’s Rx regime. If you do not have a guardianship it is potentially illegal as well.

As someone who has been on antidepressants for more than 20 years I heartily agree. There is a lot of very bad advice here.....she needs to get to a good psych asap. Psych medications can be lifesavers when administered properly.

44 posted on 06/05/2012 5:34:17 PM PDT by cerberus
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To: Auntie Mame

My mother went through the same thing. We made an appointment with a Psychiatrist and I talked to him first explaining that I was extremely concerned about the medication she was taking.

He weeded her off all unnecessary meds and got her back under control. Once she stopped seeing him though, the doctors started loading her up again. Doctors push drugs, psychiatrists seem to be more concerned that the drugs you are taking are not affecting your brain. See if you can talk her into it seeing one just for that simple fact.


45 posted on 06/05/2012 5:35:03 PM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: Auntie Mame

Topiramate is for migraines


46 posted on 06/05/2012 5:35:03 PM PDT by yldstrk ( My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: Auntie Mame

Are you certain she isn’t an alcoholic or drug addict?

They often get involved with prescription meds, thinking that will help straighten them out (ie. not yet willing to admit to alcoholism, drug addiction).

Many medical professionals don’t have the expertise to spot alcoholism/drug addiction—even though those conditions can produce symptoms of mental illness, and indications for more drugs.

Viscious circle. Denial by patient. Lying by patient.


47 posted on 06/05/2012 5:38:26 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: Auntie Mame

Does your friend need all those drugs?
Have you researched the side effects of each?
Chances are she is getting medicated based on the drug side effects and not what her original problem was.

I’ve noticed that doctors add drugs on top of drugs and rarely eliminate those which cause a problem or have no more effect. It’s as if “that” side effect is the problem which must be taken care of by another pill.

You’re a good friend.
Have you considered taping her (with her permission of course)to show her how she behaves under the influence? It could be an eye opener for her.


48 posted on 06/05/2012 5:42:02 PM PDT by 1_Rain_Drop
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To: Auntie Mame

Are you certain she isn’t an alcoholic or drug addict?

They often get involved with prescription meds, thinking that will help straighten them out (ie. not yet willing to admit to alcoholism, drug addiction).

Many medical professionals don’t have the expertise to spot alcoholism/drug addiction—even though those conditions can produce symptoms of mental illness, and indications for more drugs.

Viscious circle. Denial by patient. Lying by patient.


49 posted on 06/05/2012 5:46:26 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: Auntie Mame

If your friend will listen, get her into see another physician for an evaluation. Other than getting her in for a second opinion, there isn’t anything you can or should do. You’re certainly not qualified to evaluate her physical health, mental health, or the effect that her medications are having on either.


50 posted on 06/05/2012 5:47:11 PM PDT by Melas (u)
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