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TOP 500 SUPERCOMPUTERS
top 500 supercomputer sites ^ | june 2012 | top 500

Posted on 06/18/2012 7:14:05 PM PDT by mamelukesabre

MANNHEIM, Germany; BERKELEY, Calif.; and KNOXVILLE, Tenn.—For the first time since November 2009, a United States supercomputer sits atop the TOP500 list of the world’s top supercomputers. Named Sequoia, the IBM BlueGene/Q system installed at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieved an impressive 16.32 petaflop/s on the Linpack benchmark using 1,572,864 cores.

(Excerpt) Read more at top500.org ...


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: computer
By my count, The USA has 36 or the top 100.
1 posted on 06/18/2012 7:14:10 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: mamelukesabre

http://www.top500.org/list/2012/06/100


2 posted on 06/18/2012 7:14:52 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: mamelukesabre

I bought a Pita the other day. Slipped out of my hand. Pitaflop. Didn’t care for it much.


3 posted on 06/18/2012 7:18:57 PM PDT by jdsteel (Give me freedom, not more government.)
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To: mamelukesabre
using 1,572,864 cores

Dang! I'll bet it's a hoot surfing the web on that baby!

:)

4 posted on 06/18/2012 7:23:57 PM PDT by 2111USMC (Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.)
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To: 2111USMC

Makes ya wonder what the computers we DON’T know about are like...


5 posted on 06/18/2012 7:32:36 PM PDT by Michael Barnes (Obamaa+ Downgrade)
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To: mamelukesabre

For all the good it does. The system is still down too often and chokes routinely.


6 posted on 06/18/2012 7:39:15 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: mamelukesabre

And they all run an ancient operating system developed 40 years ago called EUNUCHS!


7 posted on 06/18/2012 7:41:05 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: 2111USMC

How would you like to pay the bill for 12,660 KW of power consumption for Japan’s #2 Fujitsu?


8 posted on 06/18/2012 7:59:56 PM PDT by uncommonsense (Conservatives believe what they see; Liberals see what they believe.)
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To: mamelukesabre

Where are all the Russian super computers?


9 posted on 06/18/2012 8:00:53 PM PDT by uncommonsense (Conservatives believe what they see; Liberals see what they believe.)
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To: Revolting cat!

I’m still trying to figure out how a cell phone has more processing power than the Lunar Module.

It boggles the mind that today you can run an entire manned mission to the moon using a laptop. Ok, maybe 2 laptops.


10 posted on 06/18/2012 8:01:57 PM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (ABO 2012)
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To: EQAndyBuzz

True enough, but much of that processing power today is committed to useless tasks. I wonder if my i5 laptop could run the batch processing of the Honeywell 500 (?) machine that I worked with 30 years ago, and it certainly couldn’t do with the Win 7 OS the work of an Alpha DEC machine of 15 years ago, that was serving a couple of hundred terminals, two dozen printers and a good amount of batch processing. That’s to keep in mind. Our laptops, each on its own, are single user machines. Am I wrong?


11 posted on 06/18/2012 8:10:51 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: uncommonsense

they got one on the list...number 22


12 posted on 06/18/2012 8:12:54 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: EQAndyBuzz

how bout this one...

a current model scientific programmable calculator has more processing power and memory than a commodore 64 personal computer or the first mac.


13 posted on 06/18/2012 8:23:37 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: uncommonsense

You mean the “K” computer? yeah that’s nuts. I wonder if thats for the computer only, or for the entire facility?


14 posted on 06/18/2012 8:27:00 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: uncommonsense
How would you like to pay the bill for 12,660 KW of power consumption for Japan’s #2 Fujitsu?

You'd have to pump out one hell of a lot of Nigerian banking spams to keep up!

15 posted on 06/18/2012 8:33:30 PM PDT by 2111USMC (Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.)
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To: uncommonsense

Assume about 8 cents per KWH and you probably don’t shut the thing down:

$0.08 x 12660 KW x 8760 Hours per Year = $8,872,128.00 per Year

Peanuts. Our government spends that in about 10 minutes.


16 posted on 06/18/2012 8:41:13 PM PDT by 2111USMC (Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.)
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To: mamelukesabre

I think it’s just the unit vs the facility. The clock speeds are at the higher end of the list, so they throw off a lot more heat. Think of the AC needed to keep the heat under control! That watt to heat conversion could probably heat a village.


17 posted on 06/18/2012 10:00:14 PM PDT by uncommonsense (Conservatives believe what they see; Liberals see what they believe.)
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To: Revolting cat!
I wonder if my i5 laptop could run the batch processing of the Honeywell 500 (?) machine that I worked with 30 years ago

I'm pretty confident Cat that it could. One of my favorite technology stories as yours keeps evolving as the comparisons become more outrageous. The computer center where I worked in the late 80s had a DASD farm (direct access storage devices - or hard disks) of perhaps 40 devices - these were each a "cake box" containing eight 12-inch platters sitting on top of a base (with the drive circuitry) that looked like a small refrigerator.

The individual capacity was 5 gig per spindle (the 8 disks). You can get a 4 gig memory stick these days as a free promotional favor at a trade show. The floor required operations staff and serious A/C 24/7. The acquisition cost and operating costs were enormous by today's standards. The total storage capacity of the floor is common on the low-end notebook computers of today.

18 posted on 06/19/2012 1:59:57 AM PDT by jimfree (my tag is broken)
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To: Revolting cat!

You are right. These are batch processing machines that also dealt with Time Sharing and Queueing methodologies. The first AS/400 I installed could handle a couple of hundred users and run 6-8 batch jobs at the same time.

Someone on this forum has to be a rocket scientist or at the least knowledgeable in this so as to better inform the thread about this. I would definitely be interested in hearing more.


19 posted on 06/19/2012 4:57:17 AM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (ABO 2012)
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To: uncommonsense
Where are all the Russian super computers?


20 posted on 06/19/2012 9:35:56 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (My dog, yes. My wife, maybe. My gun....NEVER!)
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To: jimfree; EQAndyBuzz

Oh, I’m sure the i5 could handle what the Honeywell 500 did. Maybe not what a cluster of 3 VAX Alphas could do 15 years back, but my point was that it couldn’t handle it under the Windows OS, which is a single user OS (I do know that others can log in to my box), that can barely handle my typing and a couple of virus and malware scans going simultaneously. We’re talking about the CPU power, storage, yes, but also about the capabilities of the operating system. I suppose that a Mac OS being based on UNIX can match some of the older Sun, DEC minis.


21 posted on 06/19/2012 12:08:25 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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