Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

FreepeR input about Medicare
self | September 29, 2012 | knarf

Posted on 09/29/2012 5:43:18 AM PDT by knarf

I'll be 65 in March and the fliers have started to come enticing me to contact this one or that one about parts A, B, C, D, .... LMNOP....


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: medicare; vanity
I spoke last to the SS about 2 months ago and the subject was approached and all I remember is that signing up for Medicare would cost almost $100 (automatically debited, of course)

I've tried to search out what Medicare is and, I must be stoopid, 'cause it seems to me Medicare is a word to describe various access to plans ... but not a plan itself.

Am I misreading, suffering from sometimers or what?

I'd appreciate FreepeR's input about what it all means.

I've lost my part time job so all I have at the moment is less than a thou a month SS.

(which serves because I planned years ago, by realistically looking at my wasted years and adjusting my lifestyle to live adequately .. own my home and land, garden, can, etc .. )

1 posted on 09/29/2012 5:43:26 AM PDT by knarf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: knarf

You don’t have to sign up for medicare....it automaticly takes place...you have NO choice!


2 posted on 09/29/2012 5:45:35 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ontap

I was told I COULD opt out.


3 posted on 09/29/2012 5:49:15 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: knarf

If OsamaObamaCare comes into force none of us will have any real choices.


4 posted on 09/29/2012 5:49:53 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Ambassador Stevens Is Dead And The Chevy Volt Is Alive!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: knarf

Not so....opting out doesn’t not compute with Socialism. I’ve already gone down this path and it’s all automatic. That’s not the bad part, at present it’s about $100 a month but thanks to Obamacare that amount will go to over $200 in the next five or six years.


5 posted on 09/29/2012 5:54:00 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: ontap
OK, but what does 100 bucks actually DO ?

From what I hear .. next to nothing.

I apologize, but I'm really trying to figure it out.

6 posted on 09/29/2012 5:55:34 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: knarf
It's a fair standard insurance type program Medicare pays 80% you pick up the 20%. I bought a supplement policy that pretty much picks up what Medicare doesn’t pay. I don't use Medicare much right now because I'm fairly healthy but my wife has congestive heart failure so when she comes on line she will use it more so we will have to get a supplement for her too. Medicare will pay less and less as time goes on. It's not sustainable.
7 posted on 09/29/2012 6:02:49 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: knarf
It's a fair standard insurance type program Medicare pays 80% you pick up the 20%. I bought a supplement policy that pretty much picks up what Medicare doesn’t pay. I don't use Medicare much right now because I'm fairly healthy but my wife has congestive heart failure so when she comes on line she will use it more so we will have to get a supplement for her too. Medicare will pay less and less as time goes on. It's not sustainable.
8 posted on 09/29/2012 6:03:14 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: knarf

If you have private insurance and want to keep it, sign the back of the SS card you’ll get in the mail and send it back. There are two parts; A and B.
A is for hospitalization which you should sign up for. Don’t sign up for B and you won’t get the $100/month for doctors.
If you want both, follow the instructions on the card and SS will take $100 from your monthly SS payment. Check with your doctor to see if he/she is accepting new Medicare patients.


9 posted on 09/29/2012 6:04:48 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: knarf

I’ll be 65 in Feb . Last night I went on line to look for additional insurance plans that evidently we will need to have. Do I get a supplemental, an advantage? Does it cover part A or part B? Why is there still a $5000 yearly out of pocket even though I have an additional insurance plan? Finally gave up for the time being.


10 posted on 09/29/2012 6:07:21 AM PDT by heylady (“Sometimes I wish I could be a Democrat and then I remember I have a soul.”( Deb))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: knarf

About 80% of their designated cost for a particular visit or procedure. Getting a doc to accept will become more difficult with time. Then, you will need the prescription add on of some kind. Then, you will need a supplement to cover some or all of the 20% Medicare leaves off.

The basic cost, now $98/person/month will balloon to, I believe, $247 by 2014. The exact costs can be found on the internet...just google Medicare and it should give you the sites with more detail.

Once you see what they do to doctor’s office payments, you will understand why the very good ones tend to shy away from accepting patients with Medicare. We had one essential to life doc who opted out of Medicare coverage around 2008. That left us with paying the 80% with the supplement paying PART of the remaining 20%.

And, Palin was right about Death Panels...alas.


11 posted on 09/29/2012 6:08:38 AM PDT by jennings2004 (Dear Leader's new math: 1(brutalized, dead Ambassador)+2(dead seals)+...= 1(bump in the road))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: knarf

There is Medicare Part A (hospital insurance). That does not cost you anything for premiums.

There is Medicare Part B (outpatient physician coverage). That’s the part that costs about $100-$150 per month or so.

Then there is Medicare Part D (drug coverage). The costs for that are dependent upon which plan you take.

Then there are Medicare supplements, Medigap, etc.

Seriously, if you are physically capable of working, I would suggest trying to find a job with a company that has health insurance as a fringe benefit. I know of a whole lot of folks who work well into their 70s... they do so primarily so they can steer clear of the Medicare mess.


12 posted on 09/29/2012 6:09:57 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Eric in the Ozarks

The private insurance I have now is going up to $525 a month with a $3500 deductable so I doubt if I would want to keep it.


13 posted on 09/29/2012 6:12:01 AM PDT by heylady (“Sometimes I wish I could be a Democrat and then I remember I have a soul.”( Deb))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Eric in the Ozarks
I don't have private right now ... I started about 4 months ago when I was working and I found a fair (considering) major medical plan with a 1250 deductible (and some costs .. total OOP 2500 p/yr) for almost $400.

Then I started thinking about medicare and etc.

That's the reason for this post ... just trying to figure out which way to go.

I DO have a stand alone AFLAAK-type plan that's only 20 a month.

14 posted on 09/29/2012 6:12:15 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: knarf

“it seems to me Medicare is a word to describe various access to plans ... but not a plan itself.”

No, Medicare IS the gov’t insurance plan you get at 65. If you’re already drawing Social Security the $99 will be deducted automatically.

I’m kind of surprised Medicare didn’t send you the book they send to all recipients. If you haven’t, they will send it to you.

The various “access to plans” is what is called the “Medigap” plans..A, B, C, etc.

Those are sold by various private companies (Blue Cross/Blue Shield, for example) in your state to “fill in the gaps” (deductibles) Medicare does not pay for. You get Medicare part A and B at 65.

Medicare C is the Medicare Advantage Program (which has no additional premium other than the $99.00 from the SS check) Medicare C would be the equivalent to HMO type coverage. You don’t pay an additional premium, but you have to go to a certain hospital, or certain doctor.

Medicare D is the Prescription Benefit Program, and is administered by private companies. You pay a premium each month, and your drugs are discounted when you purchase them.

FYI, When I turned 65 in August I purchased a “Plan F” from Mutual of Omaha, and pay for it monthly with an electronic debit from my checking account. This is in addition to the $99 they withhold from my SS check. I chose that plan, as I want to be able to use any hospital, or use any doctor that accepts Medicare. “Plan F” fills in, and pays for, all of the deductibles of Medicare.

The Insurance Agent that sells you your auto or homeowners policy Might also be able to sell you a “medigap” policy. If you already know the differences in plans A, B, C, etc, then it’s just a matter of which company you want to purchase the insurance from, as all the plans each company sell is exactly the same, by law. It’s only a matter of premium.


15 posted on 09/29/2012 6:15:43 AM PDT by radioone ( Main Stream Media. The Government built that.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: knarf

I’m up for Medicare in a couple of years. I want to avoid any involvement with AARP but the F supplement has been recommended. I think this is AARP only. Anyone have experience with this?


16 posted on 09/29/2012 6:16:30 AM PDT by NewHampshireDuo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ontap
If you go to the SS website this is the information you get! How much does Part A cost? If you buy Part A, you'll pay up to $451 each month. But, most people get premium-free Part A. You can get premium-free Part A at 65 if: You already get retirement benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board. You're eligible to get Social Security or Railroad benefits but haven't filed for them yet. You or your spouse had Medicare-covered government employment. If you're under 65, you can get premium-free Part A if: You got Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board disability benefits for 24 months. You have End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and meet certain requirements.

In most cases, if you choose to buy Part A, you must also have Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) and pay monthly premiums for both.

17 posted on 09/29/2012 6:17:05 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: NewHampshireDuo

All companies offer plan F....as a matter of fact all plans are identical except for price. Companies may offer more on plans but cannot offer less. i.e. AARP offers free membership at a exercise spa!!!


18 posted on 09/29/2012 6:20:28 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: ken5050

BTTT


19 posted on 09/29/2012 6:24:31 AM PDT by ken5050
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: jennings2004
Once you see what they do to doctor’s office payments, you will understand why the very good ones tend to shy away from accepting patients with Medicare.

Unless they have a supplement!!

20 posted on 09/29/2012 6:25:18 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: heylady

My supplement picks up all co-pays and deductibles....get the best plan you can afford!!!


21 posted on 09/29/2012 6:27:28 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: knarf

I posted some information in this thread yesterday regarding Medicare and Medicare Advantage:

Rise in Medicare Rates - True or False?
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2937717/posts

==

Generally, depending on your state, you can sign up for regular Medicare OR one of several Medicare Advantage plans.

Under regular Medicare the billing goes to Medicare for processing, and Medicare determines the benefits.

Under Medicare Advantage, a private insurance company has contracted to be the billing and benefits agent. Medicare Advantage tends to offer a few benefits that regular Medicare does not offer.

Premium for Medicare is deducted automatically from your SS. If you elect a Medicare Advantage plan, you may pay no additional premium or you many select plans with additional premiums, depending on your situation.

Download the ‘Medicare and You 2012’ for general information from medicare.gov. ‘Medicare and You 2013’ should be available in early October.

http://www.medicare.gov


22 posted on 09/29/2012 6:39:43 AM PDT by TomGuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jennings2004
The basic cost, now $98/person/month will balloon to, I believe, $247 by 2014.

That $247 for 2014 is from a false email that has been going around for a long time.

SSA/Medicare has a brochure that shows 'expected' increases. IIRC, by about 2020, it could be around $203.

Unless you get cost figures either from SSA or Medicare, don't trust any circulating emails or political claims.
23 posted on 09/29/2012 6:45:15 AM PDT by TomGuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: knarf

I’ll be 65 in January and have been getting piles of stuff in the mail from Mutual of Omaha and nearly everyone else. The M of O looks good as a backup plan.
My mom had a BC/BS fall back plan to Medicare and her last years consumed quite a bit of med care. She passed in June, 2011 and we are still getting statements from BC/BS saying her bills were paid in full.


24 posted on 09/29/2012 6:52:50 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: NewHampshireDuo

AMAC a conservative opposite of AARP will give you the same deal.


25 posted on 09/29/2012 6:55:39 AM PDT by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: freekitty

To Freekitty and Ontap,

Thanks. Have been planning to join AMAC anyway. Last time I looked at their site there wasn’t too much on supplements but will dig deeper.

Mrs NHD has the AARP plan as that’s what was offered by the agent that’s got my current healthcare. We HATE HATE HATE the AARP and all of their stupid mailings.


26 posted on 09/29/2012 7:15:25 AM PDT by NewHampshireDuo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: ontap

For regular SS, they will not let you draw even what you have paid in unless you sign up for Medicare.

He, not yet being 65, is apparently on SSI disability. Would seem that Medicaid would go with SSI.


27 posted on 09/29/2012 7:21:10 AM PDT by X-spurt (It is truly time for ON YOUR FEET or on your knees)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: knarf
I went through this a year ago, and learned several things:
1 The Medicare website actually has some useful information.
2 Part A, hospitalization is the only thing that is "free".
3 Part B, Doctor care, is what costs $100 per month, but is optional.
4 Part D is the drug plan. It is a VERY GOOD idea to get an insurance supplement, which can cost as low as $20 per month, because that freezes you in at a lower rate for future plans where you could have higher drug costs.
Part ? is the Medigap, private insurer plan. Mine costs about $130 per month. AARP sucks you in at a lower monthly rate, but then raises it significantly in a few years. I refuse to use it on principle. Fortunately, my employer (I'm now retired) provides a free service which finds plans for this, with no agent fees. It saves me about $30 per month over friends with agents. I've had a couple of moderately high medical expenses in the last year (the first in my life), and have paid zero in non-insurance costs.
28 posted on 09/29/2012 7:39:23 AM PDT by norwaypinesavage (Galileo: In science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of one individual)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: knarf

bookmark


29 posted on 09/29/2012 7:53:07 AM PDT by squarebarb ( Fairy tales are basically true.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: freekitty

We just signed up for AMAC.


30 posted on 09/29/2012 8:21:07 AM PDT by NewHampshireDuo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: knarf

Get a good Midi-Gap policy (type F) $0 deductible, $0 co-pay go to the Hospital for a week for heart Surgery $0.


31 posted on 09/29/2012 8:24:27 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Take two Aspirin and call me in November - Obama for Hindmost.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ontap
You don’t have to sign up for medicare....it automaticly takes place...you have NO choice!

Uumm no.. part A is automatic but not part B. Many people continue to work after age 65 and on their co's group health insurance so no need to sign up for part B until you actually retire.

32 posted on 09/29/2012 8:41:23 AM PDT by trailhkr1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: trailhkr1
Obviously I was referring to Part A since Part B is a supplement.
33 posted on 09/29/2012 9:27:56 AM PDT by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: TomGuy

Uuuuhhh, you will note that I suggested the person with the question to refer to an official site for the correct information.


34 posted on 09/29/2012 10:32:55 AM PDT by jennings2004 (Dear Leader's new math: 1(brutalized, dead Ambassador)+2(dead seals)+...= 1(bump in the road))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: NewHampshireDuo

So far; so good.


35 posted on 09/29/2012 10:40:42 AM PDT by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: NewHampshireDuo

Go with AMAC


36 posted on 09/29/2012 10:48:33 AM PDT by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: knarf
"so all I have at the moment is less than a thou a month SS"

If you are on a budget the cheapest way to go is the HMO Medicare Advantage Plan. SS gives the $100 deducted from you SS check to the insurance company and you have a choice of plans such as HMO, PPO, or FFS. Depending on where you live there might be an HMO plan without any monthly premiums, including prescriptions. But you have copays. Doctor copay might be $7. Specialist might be $15. Emergency room might be $50, unless you are admitted and the copay is waived.

Go to the SS website, then to the advantage plan page, type your zip code number in and they will display all the companies and the advantage plans offered in you location.

37 posted on 09/29/2012 8:03:43 PM PDT by Ben Ficklin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson