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Survival Hygiene
SHTF School ^ | 10/5/12 | Selco

Posted on 10/07/2012 12:20:20 PM PDT by Kartographer

There are some topics that people maybe sometimes do not want to read or hear about, or other folks just thinking that is not too important when SHTF. Hygiene is something that we all agree is important, but how dirty is gonna be is other thing.

If you look for example to definition of Cholera you can see this: „Cholera is an acute enteric infection caused by the ingestion of bacterium Vibrio cholerae present in faecally contaminated water or food. Primarily linked to insufficient access to safe water and proper sanitation, its impact can be even more dramatic in areas where basic environmental infrastructures are disrupted or have been destroyed.„

I already mentioned that I suffered (together with lot of folks from that time) few serious cases of diarrhea, I mean cases when you can not lift your head up for days, i was so exhausted.

Did I have Cholera? I do not have clue, no hospitals, no labs, no doctors. Probably yes. All what I could do is to take fluids, menthol tea, chamomile tea and „Rosa Canina“ tea.

(Excerpt) Read more at shtfschool.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: bedcare; hygiene; preparedness; preppers; shtf
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When Selco speaks wise preppers listen.
1 posted on 10/07/2012 12:20:22 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!

Bonus to storing Sodium Hypochlorite you can make gallons of bleach!


2 posted on 10/07/2012 12:25:06 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Please add me to your list. Thanks!


3 posted on 10/07/2012 12:27:57 PM PDT by ryan71
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To: Kartographer
And VINEGAR
4 posted on 10/07/2012 12:47:31 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Stand Up and Be Counted ... Or Line Up and Be Numbered ...)
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To: Kartographer
I carry imodium with me when I travel. I have it in my go bag and in all the first aid kits.

Dehydration can be fatal.

/johnny

5 posted on 10/07/2012 12:49:56 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Kartographer

There are several things to look out for: Hantavirus, Cholera, Giardia, Rocky mountain spotted tick fever.


6 posted on 10/07/2012 12:52:47 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: Kartographer

Not sure that everyone knows bleach has a rather short self life. About 9 months.


7 posted on 10/07/2012 12:52:59 PM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: Drango

hydrogen peroxide is good also, altho it too has a short shelf life


8 posted on 10/07/2012 12:55:55 PM PDT by goodnesswins (What has happened to America?)
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To: Kartographer

Until I was 5 we lived in the country in the Florida Panhandle. There was no electricity so we had to get our water from a well. There was also an artesian spring not far away which was probably more pure than well water.

It was not possible to keep as clean as we do now with an easy shower or tub bath every day but it was not difficult to stay reasonably clean either.

Mother always kept a bucket of water, a dipper and a pan on the back porch. Anyone coming in or after using the outdoor toilet would wash their hands then rinse. Daily baths were just with a washcloth and water. Once a week you took one in a tub and really scrubbed.

If one were thirsty and did not mind walking a hundred yards the flowing spring was better. Daddy always kept a glass on a stob of wood. You would drink from the flowing part then wash the glass for the next person.

My ggrandparents were affluent and had hot and cold running water and a huge old bathtub. They did this without electricity, tho it did require some ingenuity from GGrandpa who was an inventor.


9 posted on 10/07/2012 12:57:28 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: B4Ranch

Vinegar and hydrogen peroxide are both good, but how much can you store? A 2 pound bag of Calcium Hypochlorite using 7 grams per two gallons of water I could make better than 250 gallons of bleach. A 2 pound bag fits easily fits in a plastic coffee can.


10 posted on 10/07/2012 1:00:38 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
Bonus to storing Sodium Hypochlorite Calcium Hurpchlorite you can make gallons of bleach!
11 posted on 10/07/2012 1:02:58 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Drango

That’s why you make your own.

How to Make Homemade Chlorine Bleach

http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/how-to-make-chlorine.htm

Better than Bleach: Use Calcium Hypochlorite to Disinfect Water

http://readynutrition.com/resources/better-than-bleach-use-calcium-hypochlorite-to-disinfect-water_19062010/


12 posted on 10/07/2012 1:05:42 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: yarddog

“Stob,” lol. I haven’t heard that word in decades.

My dad had a funny story, he’d enlisted in the Navy after his folks ran out of money and he had to drop out of Guilford College in the late forties. He was up in Rhode Island as a result, and befriended a fellow enlistee of Polish descent whose family also farmed, actually in Rhode Island I believe.

My dad usually went home with him on leave other than major holidays, and was helping them set out tomatoes one spring. The soil was hard and rocky, and the mother was having a hard time setting stakes. My dad just blurted out “ well, just whang ‘atair stob with the mattock” and they had no clue what he meant, but thought it was the funniest thing they’d ever heard.

He and my dad remained friends for many years afterwards, and he’d always ask him to say it when they spoke.


13 posted on 10/07/2012 1:09:55 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Kartographer

Mark


14 posted on 10/07/2012 1:11:34 PM PDT by sport
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To: Kartographer

Bookmarked.


15 posted on 10/07/2012 1:16:05 PM PDT by Mortrey (Impeach President Soros)
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To: Kartographer

bfl


16 posted on 10/07/2012 1:18:14 PM PDT by hellinahandcart
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To: Kartographer

Drinking fluids isn’t sufficient for re-hydration from diarrhea, etc. You also need to rebalance your electrolytes. One of the replies to the article contains this recipe, which looks like it would do the trick.

“Here’s a recipe for a rehydration solution (homemade Gatorade) if you do get dehydrated.

2 quarts (liters) Water
5-10 Tsp. Sugar (to taste)
1 Tsp. Salt
1 Tsp. Baking Soda
1/2 Tsp. Salt Substitute (Potassium Chloride)
1 Pack unsweetened drink mix (Kool Aid) optional for flavoring”


17 posted on 10/07/2012 1:18:49 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: Kartographer

Since the time Of Moses the simplest way of dealing with waste was burial. If a person can add lime all the better but the goal is keeping flies away from contact with waste.

Next using a small amount of lime in a hand washing rinse will help if soap is not available.


18 posted on 10/07/2012 1:19:46 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: RegulatorCountry

I think it may be spelled “staub” but the spell checker didn’t like either one.


19 posted on 10/07/2012 1:21:18 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Kartographer

A major part of our preps is to get and store the same soaps and cleaners we normally use. Keeping clean just as we do today is extremely important, regardless of any medical preps we may have. People often underestimate the actual level of cleanliness they live in and would be very surprised by the dirt and filth they would otherwise have without such things as soap and vacuum cleaners.


20 posted on 10/07/2012 1:24:03 PM PDT by CodeToad (Padme: "So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.")
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To: yarddog
It does sound German, but I've never thought to try to trace the etymology. 18th century settlers here were largely German to the point of being the majority for a while, with the balance being English or Scotch-Irish for the most part, so that would make sense as a colloquial survival. From what areas did the people who settled the Florida panhandle originate?
21 posted on 10/07/2012 1:28:46 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: yarddog
Well, I went and looked for it online. Not German. 14th century Scottish.

late 14c., first attested in Scottish English, apparently a dialectal variant of Scottish stob "to pierce, stab," of uncertain origin, perhaps a variant of stub (n.) "stake, nail." Figurative use, of emotions, etc., is from 1590s. Related: Stabbed; stabbing.

22 posted on 10/07/2012 1:31:27 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

This part of the Florida Panhandle was settled by highland Scots. In fact the area around DeFuniak Springs was composed of 70% Scots names on maybe the 1960 census but not certain which one.

I do know all my class mates had names like McDonald, Campbell, Douglass, McDuffie, Morrison, McClean and so on. I once saw a census of the Island of Colonsay in the Inner Hebrides and the names were just about identical to those around here. I think that census was around 1700.


23 posted on 10/07/2012 1:36:30 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: NewJerseyJoe

P4L


24 posted on 10/07/2012 1:44:36 PM PDT by NewJerseyJoe (Rat mantra: "Facts are meaningless! You can use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!")
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To: Drango

Not sure that everyone knows bleach has a rather short self life. About 9 months.

I did not know that ! Thanks


25 posted on 10/07/2012 2:08:48 PM PDT by onona (Taglines R Us)
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To: Kartographer

Karty,

Where does one buy that calcium h stuff ?


26 posted on 10/07/2012 2:12:46 PM PDT by onona (Taglines R Us)
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To: Kartographer; JRandomFreeper; Old Sarge
Hygiene:

Body Functions:
I have a portable potty, has metal frame with seat and seat cover, and plastic bucket underneath seat – put plastic bag in bucket, putting down the seat holds bag securely in bucket. That potty is for bowel movement only. Adding water causes more smell. After a bowel movement, add a bit of Arm and Hammer cat litter. That absorbs moisture, cuts down on smell and makes a more solid mass. After removing plastic bag, bury in ground below any outlet for water you are using if using ground water and not piped in town water.

Use another potty for urine such as a house potty that isn’t working. Put a plate in bottom of potty. That sounds strange, but a plastic bag tries to slide down into the potty and a plate will prevent that. Use only for urine. After using, put a bit, just a bit is all it takes, of Pine Sol into the bag. That prevents odor from developing. When bag is full, whatever you want full to be, take bag out and bury as the potty bag is buried. If you have two regular potties, you can use one for bowel movement and other for urine. Be sure to plug that potty so the bag cannot go down the toilet. The portable potty I have can be placed anywhere it needs to go and, of course, the stationary potties are there to stay.

I have stacks of hand sanitizer packets to use after going to potty. Make sure everyone uses them. Also have big bottles of hand sanitizer for that purpose and anytime someone comes in from the outside.

Buy a stack of N95 facemasks. If someone has a bad cold or especially flu, have the ill person wear a mask before you approach him/her. That is to keep spittle from a cough landing on you. Wear a mask yourself as double protection to keep spittle from invading your nose or mouth. If you wear glasses, your eyes have some protection from spittle. One can guy cheap clear plastic goggles for this and other reasons at Walmart for less than $3-4. I saw them on line a few months ago.

Buy medical gloves and wear them when approaching the sick person. To take off gloves, pull them down and off so the inside is now on the outside, and do this stripping them off into a plastic bag.

Sewer lines:
If you are on a city sewer line, you sewage may back up after several days when power to water/sewage goes off. If your house is higher than other houses around it, their sewage backs up before yours does. If you are the lower side, you get backup before others do. Know where to cut off the sewer line to your house.

Re-hydrating:
I have Gatorade powder and Pedialyte powder for re-hydrating.

27 posted on 10/07/2012 2:14:31 PM PDT by Marcella (Republican Conservatism is dead. PREPARE.)
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To: onona

Swimming-pool section of stores like WalMart and swimming-pool speciality stores.


28 posted on 10/07/2012 2:47:57 PM PDT by expat2
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To: Drango
"Not sure that everyone knows bleach has a rather short self life. About 9 months."

I've been told that it loses 50% of its strength in about a year.

That's why I stopped trying to store household bleach and just got some of the Calcium Hydrochlorite...I'll make my own bleach when the time comes.

29 posted on 10/07/2012 3:15:15 PM PDT by blam
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To: yarddog

I would love to know how your grandparents rigged the hot and cold running water


30 posted on 10/07/2012 3:19:38 PM PDT by goosie
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To: goosie

Great Grandpa Bill as I called him was a very resourceful man. He owned a large steam powered sawmill and also a single locomotive and a rail line.

They had a really nice two story house. It sat below a natural spring. The spring water was channeled into a cement reservoir. This gave it pressure to flow into the house. The plumbing system was basically a standard one like houses have today.

One water line was run through a steam boiler then to the house. Water was also run through the kitchen stove which also had a hot water reservoir.

The house also had a carbide light system which was as bright as electric lights.

Also had a battery and generator powered telephone system which ran to his relatives houses.

The house won an award from the “Progressive Farmer” magazine as the most modern rural house in the country.

Gradnpa Bill died in the early 50s and all the children eventually moved away. The house sat abandoned for many years. My Great Uncle actually caught a guy trying to steal the ornate old bath tub.

It finally got to where it was dangerous to go in and was demolished.


31 posted on 10/07/2012 3:34:28 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Marcella; Kartographer; Old Sarge
Don't forget laundry.

My little shotgun shack here doesn't have a washer/dryer (or room for them). I either hire my laundry out, or go to a laundromat, or hand wash.

When I was a mountain man, I handwashed.

Handwashing clothes takes some special tools, and lots of hot water and patience.

I have a converted stainless steel keg that I used to boil clothes.

Soap for clothes washing is important to have. It can be made from scratch, but you need that skillset now, or have plenty of commercial soap on hand.

/johnny

32 posted on 10/07/2012 3:36:42 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: onona

Pool Supply stores are the best. Make sure it’s pure and as high a chlorine continent that’s available.

I from this on line I am sure there are others:

http://www.hydropool.com/cgi-bin/hydro/item/Pool-Chemicals/HTH-POOLIFE-TurboShock-78-1-lb-bag-Pool-Chlorine/22405.html


33 posted on 10/07/2012 3:40:22 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: expat2; onona

Not all pool shock is the same. Many are made with other chemicals which will not perform the same way. They can also contain algeacides which can poison you if consumed in high enough concentrations.

This place sells it online at a 57% concentration. http://www.poolgeek.com/BioGuard-Burn-Out-3-P9506.aspx

As with other chemicals its important to store this stuff correctly. Its an oxidizer and will contaminate any food it comes into contact with or is stored with. It also will rust metals quickly. Store it in a mylar bag or a glass jar and keep it clean. Do not store it in the same cabinet or space as any food products.

As an oxidizer it also represents a fire hazard and it will create an oxygen rich environment in a fire.


34 posted on 10/07/2012 3:42:44 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Kartographer
Bonus to storing Sodium Hypochlorite Calcium Hurpchlorite Calcium Hypochlorite (A red faced Kart "Third time pays for all!") you can make gallons of bleach!
35 posted on 10/07/2012 3:43:32 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: JRandomFreeper
For laundry, I will use dishwashing soap- a small amount goes a long way. Will use my two kitchen sinks, one for washing, the other for rinsing. Will use a new plunger to use to stomp the clothes around in the soapy water, then wring and put in rinse water and use plunger to move clothes in that. Have a metal folding cloths dryer. The end sticks in an outside umbrella holder and unfold the arms for the clothes lines.

For hot water, I use camp showers - put the bags in the sun and get hot water fairly fast. There is a tube on the camp showers and a cut off, so use them for running water when there is no running water. Use those for regular body showers, too.

36 posted on 10/07/2012 3:49:44 PM PDT by Marcella (Republican Conservatism is dead. PREPARE.)
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To: Marcella
Sounds like a plan.

I boil mine, in 1700s-1800s era style. It is very hard on clothes over time, though.

While I have used homemade lye soap to wash with... I prefer the modern stuff. ;)

/johnny

37 posted on 10/07/2012 3:54:38 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

>> “It can be made from scratch...” <<

.
But only if you happen to have ‘scratch.’

Everything could be equally hard to come by in any sort of disruption; doesn’t have to be TEOTW.


38 posted on 10/07/2012 3:56:07 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: editor-surveyor
Wood ashes and fat. And the skillset.

I can burn wood, in fact have stored wood ashes anyway for other uses. We have way too many feral hogs around here. Fats I can get.

/johnny

39 posted on 10/07/2012 4:01:23 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Drango

>> “Not sure that everyone knows bleach has a rather short self life. About 9 months.” <<

.
That is only when srored in sunlight.

If you’re buying bleach at Costco, or Sam’s club, you would be wise to keep it in the cardboard boxes that it comes in.

If that cannot be done, aluminum foil works even better.


40 posted on 10/07/2012 4:02:40 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: goosie

Endless hot water without power!

http://ncrenegade.com/editorial/endless-hot-water-without-power/


41 posted on 10/07/2012 4:06:04 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: yarddog

>> “but the spell checker didn’t like either one.” <<

.
The FR spell checker is a bit lame.

It has difficulty with all contracted words, and many verbs in anything but present tense.


42 posted on 10/07/2012 4:12:50 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Yes, but serious washing requires a strong enough base to break water’s surface tension, and most wood ash is a bit weak in that area.

Anyway, for the wise, preparation.


43 posted on 10/07/2012 4:16:51 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: JRandomFreeper
“Wood ashes and fat. And the skillset.”

I AM NOT MAKING SOAP, FOR GOODNESS SAKES! There is liquid soap available cheap in almost every store in the US. I have enough to wash the whole country. I AM NOT MAKING SOAP!

See, I remember my mother making soap. I remember her saving animal fat. I remember a huge black iron kettle outside for boiling clothes and/or making soap. I remember a black lady coming to help her do all those chores. I will do everything I can to prepare so I never have to do that. As Patrick Henry said, “Give me bought soap or give me death.”

44 posted on 10/07/2012 4:22:55 PM PDT by Marcella (Republican Conservatism is dead. PREPARE.)
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To: Marcella

My wife and I just bought a big supply of dish soap and hand soap. You’re going to use it anyway and it doesn’t get old. Just keep a good supply on the shelf and you’ll never run out and be prepared for the worst.


45 posted on 10/07/2012 4:29:00 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: editor-surveyor
You have never used homemade lye soap if you think it can't break water surface tension.

The wood ash is used to make lye. The lye and the fat are used to make soap.

/johnny

46 posted on 10/07/2012 4:30:47 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Marcella
LOL! it is a little bit of a chore, if you are making a lot. It can also smell somewhat unpleasant.

I have mondays set aside as 'wash day'. ;)

/johnny

47 posted on 10/07/2012 4:32:54 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: driftdiver

Good point — the contents label is your friend. However, pool water can be swallowed in large quantities, so algeacides are at low levels, only. The chlorine is the primary algeacide.


48 posted on 10/07/2012 4:36:09 PM PDT by expat2
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To: editor-surveyor
>>bleach has a rather short self life. About 9 months.” <<
That is only when stored in sunlight.

Not an expert. Not at all. But the Clorox page or any other page I can find, doesn't say word much about sunlight other than high temperature accelerates the decrease. Do you have a source?

http://www.clorox.com/blogs/dr-laundry/2010/10/07/shelf-life-of-clorox-bleach/

http://chemistry.about.com/b/2012/04/03/chlorine-bleach-shelf-life.htm

49 posted on 10/07/2012 4:36:41 PM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: driftdiver
Not only is having a bunch on hand a good idea, if you can find it on sale, I will bet that in 2 years, it won't be as cheap as it is today.

When I can find stuff that won't go bad on sale, that I normally use... I buy what I can afford. I'll store it, and be money ahead over the years it takes to use it.

/johnny

50 posted on 10/07/2012 4:36:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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