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For Techies Only: What is the Best Programming Language to Learn in 2013?
Site Point ^ | 01/25/2013 | By Craig Buckler

Posted on 01/31/2013 6:50:58 PM PST by SeekAndFind

An interesting article caught my eye at jobstractor.comthe programming language trends review. The company analyzed more than 60,000 job vacancies during 2012 to produce a chart of the most sought-after technologies:

Language Jobs
PHP 12,664
Java 12,558
Objective C 8,925
SQL 5,165
Android (Java) 4,981
Ruby 3,859
JavaScript 3,742
C# 3,549
C++ 1,908
ActionScript 1,821
Python 1,649
C 1,087
ASP.NET 818

programming language vacancy statistics

Despite developer complaints, demand for PHP and Java (server/Android) remains strong. You would also expect those jobs to require some SQL knowledge although that has a strong showing in its own right. ActionScript is a dying art so it’s rapidly falling off the chart.

(Excerpt) Read more at sitepoint.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet; Society
KEYWORDS: computers; it; programming; software
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1 posted on 01/31/2013 6:51:00 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

My experience with computer programmers is that they would be much better served by learning ENGLISH!


2 posted on 01/31/2013 6:52:51 PM PST by MIchaelTArchangel (Have a wonderful day!)
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To: SeekAndFind
The article cautions....

Never use job vacancy statistics as a reason for learning a language!

If demand for a particular technology is low, fewer developers are willing to learn it and the market adjusts accordingly
3 posted on 01/31/2013 6:53:08 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Ummm...Pascal? No, wait...BASIC. Yeah......definitely BASIC.


4 posted on 01/31/2013 6:53:20 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (Here once the embattled farmers stood... And fired the shot heard round the world.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Why is BASIC not on the list?


5 posted on 01/31/2013 6:53:36 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: MIchaelTArchangel

MORE HERE:

http://www.itjungle.com/tfh/tfh012113-story08.html

Data Skills Crashes Dice Top Five Hiring Demands

by Dan Burger

The sun has just eased over the horizon of calendar year 2013, but those up-at-the-crack-of-dawn, career-minded folks at Dice are already predicting steady growth in the hiring of tech talent in the first half of the year. Recruiting priorities are essentially unchanged with Java professionals leading the way, but a new skill category has slipped into the top 10.

Hiring managers and recruiters say data skills are a hot—and getting hotter—ticket in the job market. Not quite on the radar last year, data wranglers are considered a necessary investment, especially when those talents are tied to communication skills.

Just a little more than two years ago, DB2 for i expert Mike Cain predicted the importance of what he calls database engineers in the IBM i environment. Cain has had numerous conversations with executives concerning the staffing and skills required to analyze database performance and scalability, create new features and functionality, recognize what not to change, and identify where changes are appropriate.

The roles and responsibilities of a database engineer change depending on the company and the size of the staff, IBM’s Cain said, but education and training of existing staff will be necessary, or companies will have to hire database experts on the open market.

Dice reports the number of job postings for data analysts and database professionals has more than triple in year-to-year comparisons.

Dice also noted a continuing demand for developers, with application developers feeling the most love in a stronger job market. The biggest demand is for Java/J2EE developers. More than one in five of the 77,000 jobs posted on Dice contained some mention of the need for java know-how.

Mobile application developers are the second most desired hire on the early 2013 most wanted list. That should come as no surprise. If you watch the Four Hundred Monitor calendar of events, there is a steady stream of webinars on this topic and the tech conferences are loaded with sessions on mobile app dev. With smartphone business use on a fast upward trajectory, mobile development skills should continue to see demand for several years, at least.

Rounding out the current hiring priorities list are .NET professionals and software developers.


6 posted on 01/31/2013 6:54:52 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Thanks for that list — my son is studying software engineering (he’s a freshman) — and has started on Python, C#, C ++. I think Java starts up next year. I’ll ask him about PHP.


7 posted on 01/31/2013 6:55:44 PM PST by Bon of Babble (Instant Human....Add Coffee)
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To: Jonty30

SOURCE:

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/kavaliro-releases-2013-employee-outlook-salary-guide-showing-employment-trends-job-growth-1748232.htm

This year the top three trends are:

1. Job seekers love their mobile devices

People looking for jobs are using their iPads and iPhones more than ever. A majority of visitors to the Kavaliro site use Apple iPhones, followed by iPads. Getting to the job first allows applicants a better shot at having their resume seen by hiring managers.

2. Robotic and .NET skills are in high demand

During the hiring process, employers generally look for job seekers with good communication and technical skills. .NET qualifications topped the list in 2011, but this past year we found another highly desirable skill as well. In the IT, engineering, healthcare and medical device repair industries, recruiters are hunting for candidates with robotics skills. Robotics engineer is our hot job in this edition of our handbook.

3. The hottest jobs command high salaries

According to the CareerBuilder Talent Compensation Report, a survey of 1,000 .NET developers and employers across the country revealed an average annual salary of $85,863, with top salaries reaching well into the six figures. Yet despite the lofty compensation on the table, employers continue to report difficulties in hiring and retaining top .NET Developer talent in the midst of unprecedented demand for these services. Much of that demand is driven by the explosion of web-based services and applications, as more and more business is conducted via computer systems.


8 posted on 01/31/2013 6:57:06 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

RAMUS?


9 posted on 01/31/2013 6:57:21 PM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: Bon of Babble

SOURCE:

http://www.zdnet.com/uk/it-skills-in-2013-whats-really-in-demand-7000009291/

EXCERPT:

... the top technical skills demanded by employers over the past year include classics such as Windows, SQL, .Net, C#, Java, Oracle, JavaScript and HTML.

More specifically, it identifies a number of areas where demand has been rising for more than two years. These include skills based around popular mobile operating systems such as Android and Apple iOS.

Expertise with CSS3 (used to control the style and layout of web pages) and HTML5 are also considered important.

Meanwhile, there is increasing demand for IT professionals with expertise of RESTful (Representational State Transfer), an architectural style that is used to design web services.

Skills around MongoDB, a scalable open-source NoSQL database, are also becoming more desirable.

Finally, E-skills said that PowerShell, which is used to write scripts that automate Windows tasks, are becoming increasingly popular, while Microsoft Certified IT Professionals are also in demand.

The high volume and most popular skills are still the mainstream development languages such as C#, ASP.Net and PHP,” John Lynes, director at IT recruitment company Ashdown Group, told ZDNet. He added that this demand is unlikely to change as the majority of companies have business applications that are dependent on these skills.

But there are also technologies that are rapidly being adopted that may cause an initial spike in demand for new skills, at least until they become mainstream, he said.

CLICK ABOVE LINK FOR THE REST...


10 posted on 01/31/2013 7:00:04 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: Jonty30

There will always be COBOL. ;-)


11 posted on 01/31/2013 7:02:05 PM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Bon of Babble
Thanks for that list — my son is studying software engineering (he’s a freshman) — and has started on Python, C#, C ++. I think Java starts up next year. I’ll ask him about PHP.

The article above gives a note of caution.

It asks a question and answers it...

But there are a number of surprises:

Part of this can be explained if we look at the relative changes in demand from the beginning of 2012 to the end:

Language Change
JavaScript 1.6%
Ruby 0.7%
Objective C 0.6%
Android (Java) 0.6%
C++ 0.5%
C# 0.3%
Python 0.1%
SQL -0.2%
C -0.3%
ASP.NET -0.5%
PHP -0.7%
Java -1.4%
ActionScript -1.6%

programming language vacancy changes

JavaScript demand has increased faster than any other language. iOS and Android have also increased at an identical rate. PHP and Java jobs are decreasing in relation to trendier languages such as Ruby.

Before you make too many judgments, consider how this data is collated. Jobs Tractor searches Twitter for developer jobs so results may be skewed. For example, I suspect Twitter is used by more web start-ups than blue-chip corporations — this could partly explain the lower .NET figures.

In addition, there can be significant regional differences. Ruby skills are highly-prized in Australia but less well-known in the UK.

If you were expecting this article to recommend the most lucrative language of 2013 you’ll be disappointed. This is the only fact you need learn:

Never use job vacancy statistics as a reason for learning a language!

If demand for a particular technology is low, fewer developers are willing to learn it and the market adjusts accordingly. QBasic and COBOL developers may earn more than Objective C colleagues because their skills are increasingly rare!

Ultimately, pick technologies which interest you and never stop learning. Programming skills are always transferable and it’ll make you a better candidate when a suitable job eventually arises.

12 posted on 01/31/2013 7:04:13 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Visual Basic 6 was most popular among primates:

http://www.newtechusa.com/ppi/main.asp


13 posted on 01/31/2013 7:04:18 PM PST by Voltage
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To: cuban leaf

We need a little FORTRAN.

And a few GOTOs.


14 posted on 01/31/2013 7:05:40 PM PST by Scrambler Bob ( Concerning bo -- that refers to the president. If I capitalize it, I mean the dog.)
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To: MIchaelTArchangel

Dittos.


15 posted on 01/31/2013 7:05:43 PM PST by CodeToad (Liberals are bloodsucking ticks. We need to light the matchstick to burn them off.)
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To: Jonty30

Uh...because no serious work is done in BASIC to any meaningful degree.

Or did you forget the /sarc ?


16 posted on 01/31/2013 7:09:01 PM PST by ctdonath2 (End of debate. Your move.)
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To: Bon of Babble
Raw numbers don't tell the whole story. The language you master can have a big influence on what industries you might work in, and how much you may get paid.

Think about a country with a billion people who are just itching for those Java and PHP jobs. He will have to compete with them and their lower wage expectations.

17 posted on 01/31/2013 7:09:01 PM PST by Woodman
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To: MIchaelTArchangel

bada bing

but then of course you assume that code writers actually want to interact with humans...BWAHAHAHAHHAA


18 posted on 01/31/2013 7:09:03 PM PST by Nifster
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To: SeekAndFind

C#.NET by far (if you want a job).


19 posted on 01/31/2013 7:11:38 PM PST by TheRhinelander
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To: SeekAndFind

It’s all dialect in the end. I learned BASIC on a Commodore PET in fifth grade in 1983, and have been programming in one form or another ever since. The important thing is whether you can think logically and systematically about a problem and devise clever and efficient ways of solving it taking all the parameters into account. The language in which you solve it is secondary, once you can accomplish that.


20 posted on 01/31/2013 7:12:00 PM PST by mvpel (Michael Pelletier)
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To: TheRhinelander
C#.NET by far (if you want a job).

Yep. That's where the job market is.

There are maintenance jobs for COBOL slingers. The old mainframers are dying off or retiring.

21 posted on 01/31/2013 7:14:03 PM PST by gitmo ( If your theology doesn't become your biography it's useless.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Objective c is crap. Java and C# will be around for.a.long time. They are very similar and you can cover both bases. If you think apple has peaked and beginning a long decline you won’t be off much. If you are smart enough the real money and cutting edge will be and.has been C++ which produces native code. Its the core of all the languages listed except objective c which is templatized c.


22 posted on 01/31/2013 7:14:12 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Scrambler Bob

What?

No respect for ALGOL?

What about keypunch operators?


23 posted on 01/31/2013 7:14:51 PM PST by BwanaNdege ("To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize"- Voltaire)
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To: SeekAndFind

Spanish!


24 posted on 01/31/2013 7:16:10 PM PST by aMorePerfectUnion (Gone rogue, gone Galt, gone international, gone independent. Gone.)
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To: MIchaelTArchangel

If you had an IQ higher than your d!ck is long you could understand them. /h


25 posted on 01/31/2013 7:16:48 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

COBOL forever!!!!


26 posted on 01/31/2013 7:18:43 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: SeekAndFind

Assembly language?

List of programming languages.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_programming_languages


27 posted on 01/31/2013 7:19:00 PM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: Jonty30

I lost my dos 3.1 disk with the interpreter.


28 posted on 01/31/2013 7:20:24 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: SeekAndFind

Actually, as always, it is the next C based write-only brain damaged monstrosity dated back to Kernighan and Ritchie whose main aim was not to be understood by their bossess at the time.


29 posted on 01/31/2013 7:20:36 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: SeekAndFind

Why isn’t FORTRAN on that list?


30 posted on 01/31/2013 7:21:29 PM PST by doorgunner69
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To: gitmo

We still run COBOL on unix. Mostly we use PL/SQL.

But the real question is “How many languages do you know?”

I routinely write Unix shell scripts, SAS, SQR, PL/SQL, COBOL, C, VBScript, Office VB and Javascript. Java programmers are the most highly sought but Java has become a security nightmare.


31 posted on 01/31/2013 7:21:29 PM PST by AppyPappy (You never see a massacre at a gun show.)
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To: mvpel

Amen brother! When you believe this, the only answer to the question, “...which languages do you know...” is “All.” There is no need to play alphabet soup when you understand the fundamentals of problem solving using a computer. It’s not conceit, it’s confidence.


32 posted on 01/31/2013 7:22:41 PM PST by kdot
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To: Bon of Babble

Keep him stocked with 5 hr energy.


33 posted on 01/31/2013 7:22:41 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Scrambler Bob

Hahah! That’s hardcore!


34 posted on 01/31/2013 7:25:02 PM PST by kdot
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To: Voltage

When the alternative was C++ you could make some money cranking out VB 6 apps of good quality .


35 posted on 01/31/2013 7:26:18 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Woodman

Nobody worth their salt knows only 1 language.


36 posted on 01/31/2013 7:28:07 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Scrambler Bob

And a few GOTOs.


GOTO’s are for weenies. I’m all about the “alter goto”!

I had to convert some DYL260 programs to COBOL once. Dyl280 is easy, but the only way I was able to convert the DYL260 programs was to decipher parts of them that I could and complete the task by running the programs against small input data sets and compare the output. It actually worked pretty well.


37 posted on 01/31/2013 7:29:16 PM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I have never met a COBOL programer that could not find a job.


38 posted on 01/31/2013 7:29:21 PM PST by taxcontrol
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To: AppyPappy

Once you have a few good languages under your belt, picking up another is fairly simple.

I have the same list, minus Java but adding PowerShell scripting. Used to write Speed code. Have dabbled in PL/N and IBM assembler.


39 posted on 01/31/2013 7:30:11 PM PST by gitmo ( If your theology doesn't become your biography it's useless.)
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To: Scrambler Bob
FORTRAN will be around forever... at least in the scientific community

nothing fancy and not pretty, but in many cases, a few lines worth can still do whats needed to be done

40 posted on 01/31/2013 7:31:23 PM PST by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Nailbiter

bflr


41 posted on 01/31/2013 7:33:57 PM PST by Nailbiter
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To: SeekAndFind

Every language is a tool. Decide what you like to create first, then learn which tool is best for that. But keep in mind that if you really want to master programming, learning the basic tools first (C, Java) can help you understand the intricacies of the more high-level tools. PHP has a gentle learning curve, but there’s a reason it’s not used in freshman programming courses; it’d be like learning to play pop songs on a synthesizer before learning to play classical music on a piano.


42 posted on 01/31/2013 7:40:43 PM PST by dangus
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To: SeekAndFind
Does this mean I can finally get rid of my JCL manual?

-PJ

43 posted on 01/31/2013 7:41:38 PM PST by Political Junkie Too (If you are the Posterity of We the People, then you are a Natural Born Citizen.)
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To: SeekAndFind; Jack Hydrazine

Ah, the language du jour, with a big side of buzzwords served over a huge pile of minutiae.


44 posted on 01/31/2013 7:44:23 PM PST by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: SeekAndFind
1) HTML/CSS/PHP/JavaScript.

2) SQL stored procedure development for SQL Server, Oracle, or MySQL.

3) Python, Perl, or as similar cross-platform scripting language.

4) Java or C#.

As a working corporate developer, you need to master all four areas to rise above foreign competition.

45 posted on 01/31/2013 7:44:48 PM PST by Mr. Jeeves (CTRL-GALT-DELETE)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

Assembly language? Planning on adapting C to a new operating system?


46 posted on 01/31/2013 7:46:06 PM PST by dangus
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To: SeekAndFind

Objective C? Please.

Our most common language for mobile is JQuery Mobile with Phonegap. I’m still using Perl.


47 posted on 01/31/2013 7:46:29 PM PST by Azeem (There are four boxes to be used in the defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury and ammo.)
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To: Political Junkie Too

just concatenate it with all the others...in some STEPLIB somewhere


48 posted on 01/31/2013 7:48:36 PM PST by MarDav
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To: SeekAndFind

PDP 10 or 6502 anyone?


49 posted on 01/31/2013 7:50:48 PM PST by ConservativeInPA (Molon Labe)
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To: ImJustAnotherOkie

How true. The real question is do you pick JAVA or C for your data structures and algorithms courses. Once you learn one of those, you’ll pick up the others as you start following your interests. Client-side programming? Javascript. Server-side programming? PHP, Python or Ruby. Database interfacing? SQL for traditional databases, or MongoDB for high-volume databases with large amounts of data per record.

What’s more interesting is what’s NOT on the list, or dropping off like mad: Perl (dying, faced with competition from Python and Ruby; employers learned that Perl code meant no-one but the original programmer could work on a module), VB.NET and JAVA.NET (People who use .NET use C#.NET), ActiveScript (even if you use .NET, there’s no reason not to use JavaScript), FORTRAN and COBOL (anyone who uses them still has their employees from BEFORE the economic crash; no-one was dumb enough to lay the off.)


50 posted on 01/31/2013 7:57:30 PM PST by dangus
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