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Homeowners Draw a Line in the Sand Over Dunes
Wall Street Journal ^ | May 20, 2013 | Josh Dawsey

Posted on 05/20/2013 9:13:49 AM PDT by BlueStateRightist

Many coastal New Jersey residents are resisting a $1 billion state plan to shield shore-front towns from storms with towering dunes and a mix of protective measures. As some cite fears the sand-replenishment projects would drag down their property values, about 1,800 landowners have declined to sign agreements to allow construction on their property, said Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection. The state Supreme Court last week heard arguments on a resident's lawsuit seeking more money for the agreement, known as an easement, and Gov. Chris Christie called dune opponents "knuckleheads."

(Excerpt) Read more at online.wsj.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Local News
KEYWORDS: dunes; newjersey; sandy
Unfortunately, like most Americans, many of these landowners want it both ways: less government now when not needed, but more later during a crisis. In the end, why are we encouraging the protection of fragile living environments that periodically are destroyed, with the taxpayer picking up the check?
1 posted on 05/20/2013 9:13:49 AM PDT by BlueStateRightist
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To: BlueStateRightist

I say let them have it both ways. Only, the won’t be allowed to have any insurance policy that is provided by the US Government. If they want to live in an area that is prone to disaster or such, then they should have to pay the capitalist price based on risk, not government subsidy.


2 posted on 05/20/2013 9:16:13 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: Gaffer
Is it a red line?
3 posted on 05/20/2013 9:19:53 AM PDT by mbarker12474
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To: Gaffer

I think they already are paying the price. Their insurance reflects the cost for their property and they aren’t responsible for the town, just their own property.

I can see the homeowner’s viewpoint. Their home is worth a lot more with an ocean front view, instead of a backside of a dune view.

So if you are going to take from the homeowner in order to protect the town property, then you should compensate the homeowner.

The town has to pay the price too. They built where there was known risk and now they want to mitigate that risk by taking the beach front homeowner’s property and decimating it with dunes.

(I live in TN and own no water front property of any kind.)


4 posted on 05/20/2013 9:21:50 AM PDT by DannyTN
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To: Gaffer

Absolutely. Let them buy insurance at market rates. One day we get to rebuild California at a trillion or so. By that point it won’t even be wholly American any longer in all likelihood.


5 posted on 05/20/2013 9:25:01 AM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: wiggen

If I were an insurance provider in California, I’d make all correspondence, calls and other interactions be conducted solely in ENGLISH...that should cut down some of the crap.


6 posted on 05/20/2013 9:27:30 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: DannyTN

Reading and you’re correct.
Simple. Build flood walls behind them. The water will then turn back and flood the house from a second direction.
Of course they’ll sue over this probability as well.


7 posted on 05/20/2013 9:29:48 AM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: BlueStateRightist
Speaking for myself, I'm sick and tired of subsidizing rich liberal a**holes (for the most part) who insist on building multi-million dollar homes in beachfront hurricane vulnerable areas.

Yeah, I know it is nice to have a home on the beach, but I can walk the extra 15 minues or so that it takes to climb over a dune for an ocean dip.

I have a modest $120K or so home with the nearest large body of water being Lake Erie, 200 miles or so to the north. Somehow, I survive without the taxpayers picking up the tab for my insurance.

8 posted on 05/20/2013 9:30:30 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

How ever do you manage?


9 posted on 05/20/2013 9:34:11 AM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: BlueStateRightist

The other issue is the dunes would help protect houses that aren’t on the oceanfront and don’t have an ocean view from flooding.


10 posted on 05/20/2013 9:36:49 AM PDT by Strategerist
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To: BlueStateRightist

.

If you’re lucky enough to live at the beach, you’re lucky enough.


11 posted on 05/20/2013 9:37:59 AM PDT by Roccus
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To: BlueStateRightist

The answer here seems pretty simple to me. Build dunes on the other side of the houses where people already have no view of the ocean. Stop subsidizing homeowners insurance to the beach dwellers and let them pay a market rate based on the risk. The town is protected, nobody loses the view, and the beach houses pick up all the financial risk for living where they want to.

Why is this so hard?


12 posted on 05/20/2013 9:45:10 AM PDT by RightOnTheBorder
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To: BlueStateRightist

In my opinion those homeowners have a right to reject use of their property. But they should be made to sign a release freeing the local, state and federal governments from any responsibility for death or destruction and waive any subsidies on their insurance premiums.

They should also be held responsible for any damage to adjoining or nearby properties caused by their refusal.


13 posted on 05/20/2013 9:52:02 AM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed &water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: BlueStateRightist

in powerful storms, sand gets washed away. that’s why they bag it. then it stays together. a hurricane sweping across large sand dunes would decimate large free standing sand dunes. and not being bagged the remaining sand would be water-logged. sand is porous. good grief.


14 posted on 05/20/2013 9:52:21 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: wiggen

nope, won’t rebuild ca, because we’ll lose a whole chunk under the ocean, and will have nothing left to rebuild on.


15 posted on 05/20/2013 9:53:56 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: BlueStateRightist
Chris Christie called dune opponents "knuckleheads."

This is what our would-be masters think of property rights.

16 posted on 05/20/2013 10:02:38 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: DannyTN
Back in the days of self-responsibility, beachfront homeowners, at their own expense and using their own labor, put up storm fence every fall to build the dunes up to protect their property.

The government did not subsidize insurance nor did they pay to build the dunes.

Harvey Cedars (where the one couple whose comments were cited have a home) is about 3 blocks wide - ocean to bay. These are barrier islands, shifting naturally if no human intervention is used.

Despite what the global warming souls tell us, these storms are not more frequent nor more destructive.

17 posted on 05/20/2013 10:07:42 AM PDT by Abby4116
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To: Secret Agent Man

Is that a promise?


18 posted on 05/20/2013 10:27:26 AM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: DannyTN
South Jersey News

Press of Atlantic City

These are some articles with pictures from the 1962 storm that hit Harvey Cedars. Only difference is now there are MORE houses.

19 posted on 05/20/2013 10:35:01 AM PDT by Abby4116
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To: BlueStateRightist

Nature batts last.

Dunes are not going to solve the problem of people buidling in high risk areas.


20 posted on 05/20/2013 11:14:42 AM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: DannyTN
Their insurance reflects the cost for their property

Not in most states, certainly not in Florida, which is what I'm familiar with.

What the bureaucrats setting the rates do is lump a very large chunk of homes inland in with the few immediately on the waterfront to calculate rates. This results in much lower rates for the few rich people on the water, who are of course much more politically powerful per capita, and considerably higher but not exorbitantly so rates for the on average much less wealthy homeowners inland.

I've lost track of the numbers, but apparently if risk were calculated individually by home, nobody would actually build expensive homes "on the water," at least not in Florida. Insurance rates would be much too high.

21 posted on 05/20/2013 2:34:29 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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