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Quality Garden Tools - Sources?
Self | 06/10/13 | fwdude

Posted on 06/10/2013 1:23:55 PM PDT by fwdude

I'm needing some recommendations for brands, lines, suppliers of quality garden tools - spades, forks, hoes, etc. Not the flimsy cr@p that's sold at the big box garden and hardware centers (I bend/break those in no time flat), but quality stuff to last a lifetime.

I've read enough times to be believable that footing the bill up front for quality tools is more cost effective in the long run. I have heavy clay soil that turns to concrete in our Texas summers, so please be aware that I am talking about REAL QUALITY, INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH tools.


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: gardening; gardeningtools; vanity

1 posted on 06/10/2013 1:23:55 PM PDT by fwdude
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To: fwdude

You want a quality hoe that can stand up to a Texas beating?

This is going to be a good thread.


2 posted on 06/10/2013 1:25:28 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

Yeah, I anticipated the ribbing. Bring it on.


3 posted on 06/10/2013 1:26:07 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: fwdude

Try this...

http://www.cat.com/equipment


4 posted on 06/10/2013 1:26:41 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,)
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To: fwdude

Fwdude, your best bet is yardsale or farm auction. Get the old stuff, it’s much better then pretty much anything they make today and will last more than your lifetime.


5 posted on 06/10/2013 1:26:59 PM PDT by CJ Wolf
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To: fwdude

Maybe plumbing or landscaping warehouses. It used to be that I preferred to buy my shovels and such from the plumbing warehouses, but I don’t know what it is like today.


6 posted on 06/10/2013 1:27:09 PM PDT by ansel12 (Social liberalism/libertarianism, empowers, creates and imports, and breeds, economic liberals.)
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To: gov_bean_ counter

Should have specified “HAND” tools.


7 posted on 06/10/2013 1:27:25 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: fwdude

ROFLOL!!!


8 posted on 06/10/2013 1:27:55 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,)
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To: fwdude

Also for clay, pickaxe or digging bar works better then any shovel. Again any digging bar you will want should be very old and extremly heavy.


9 posted on 06/10/2013 1:30:06 PM PDT by CJ Wolf
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To: fwdude

What location:

http://www.roguehoe.com/stores.html


10 posted on 06/10/2013 1:30:26 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: fwdude
Try Brookstone - my wife has a set of heavy cast aluminum tools in a tote bag with a kneeling pad she got several years ago.

Comfort Grip Garden Trowel

11 posted on 06/10/2013 1:34:04 PM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: fwdude
I would start by looking in the Lehman's Non-Electric Catalog.
12 posted on 06/10/2013 1:34:52 PM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
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To: thackney

Thanks. Waco’s not too far.


13 posted on 06/10/2013 1:34:53 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: fwdude

I’ve never used them. Just found them web-surfin’.


14 posted on 06/10/2013 1:35:49 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: fwdude

Try garage sales, estate sales, etc.
Especially if the kids are selling off Grandpa’s pre-China makes everything tools.

I’ve found some fantastic stuff like this. Sometimes you might need to put a new wooden handle on some things, but the metal is quality, not cr@p made-in-China metal that breaks.


15 posted on 06/10/2013 1:36:20 PM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: fwdude

I would try some of the “made in India” cheapies from Harbor Freight. They’ll be WAY better than the “made in China” cheapies you find in your standard hardware store/department store.


16 posted on 06/10/2013 1:36:47 PM PDT by Slump Tester (What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh -Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
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To: fwdude

You might try Tractor Supply they have some heavy duty tools, but a shovel is pretty much a shovel no matter where you buy it.

There are garden supply online that have heavier hand forged tools one is Hoss and they also make the Planet Jr. wheel hoe.


17 posted on 06/10/2013 1:37:04 PM PDT by IMR 4350
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To: fwdude

Any tool that digs into clay should be sharpened with a file frequently. It works wonders on that stuff.


18 posted on 06/10/2013 1:39:20 PM PDT by buffaloguy
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To: fwdude

Just a side story. I probably pissed off some “Free marketers” here and other sites when I said we should ban ALL Chinese made tools.

The one time I needed a tool to do its job was a few months ago. Set fire to some of my forest to kill ticks and get rid of years of layers of leaves.

You need 2 tools. A Leaf Blower and an iron tooth rake. As the fires (yes plural)got going, of course the POS Chinese mad iron tooth rake broke. The metal that connects the rake to the handle just couldn’t handle 3 years of light duty.

I mean c’mon, who expects 3 years from a garden tool.


19 posted on 06/10/2013 1:55:22 PM PDT by roofgoat
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To: fwdude

I only have moderate New Jersey clay, but I suggest
1) raised beds/lasagna gardening
2) don’t dig in the summer
3) as long as the tool doesn’t exceed the gardener’s strength, it will do okay. It’s my strapping son who destroys the shovels and loppers, not me.


20 posted on 06/10/2013 1:59:38 PM PDT by heartwood
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To: heartwood

I said that backwards. If the tool-user exceeds the tool’s strength, he can destroy the tool.

But it would be good if we could buy strapping young man tools, and not little middle-aged lady gardener tools. Then I could put the strapping young men to more work.


21 posted on 06/10/2013 2:02:38 PM PDT by heartwood
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To: fwdude

I’ve heard good things about Johnny’s Seeds:

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/default.aspx?

I haven’t bought any myself as they’re kinda spendy but they appear to be well made.


22 posted on 06/10/2013 2:04:47 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: fwdude

Fiskers makes nice sturdy hand tools that are designed to fit your hands. I have a bunch of them and they hold up well.


23 posted on 06/10/2013 2:05:09 PM PDT by RS_Rider (I hate Illinois Nazis)
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To: fwdude

Julio’s Landscaping. They already have the tools. /sarc


24 posted on 06/10/2013 2:08:41 PM PDT by showme_the_Glory (ILLEGAL: prohibited by law. ALIEN: Owing political allegiance to another country or government)
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To: fwdude
A whole HERD of lawn mowers ...


25 posted on 06/10/2013 2:09:43 PM PDT by knarf (<p>Gimmee my share.)
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To: heartwood

Around the oilfields when a strapping young man breaks a handle on a shovel they weld a pipe to the shovel for a handle then give it back to him to use.

Ever had to use a shovel with a pipe for a handle after it was left laying in the Texas summer sun?

A few times doing that and they learn to appreciate a wooden handle.


26 posted on 06/10/2013 2:10:27 PM PDT by IMR 4350
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To: fwdude

Truper makes an excellent line of agricultural tools. Made in Mexico, NOT China!

Astounding quality for the money.

I did break one rake.......when I hit it with the Bush-hog.

I’m a poor dirt farmer, and I approve this message.


27 posted on 06/10/2013 2:13:26 PM PDT by noprogs (Borders, Language, Culture....all should be preserved)
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To: fwdude
Japanese digging tool

<

I think it may also be called a hori-hori tool. I use it all the time instead of a trowel. You're not going to break it.
28 posted on 06/10/2013 2:13:50 PM PDT by Girlene
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To: fwdude

Get Fiskars. I actually broke one of the blades on my ratcheting lopper, and they replaced the blade free of charge no questions asked. All their hand tools are the same quality. High quality. That’s for nippers, loppers, and the like.


29 posted on 06/10/2013 2:18:46 PM PDT by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will. They ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: fwdude

One of my favorite ever tools is a Soil Scoop. We also have clay soil and this works pretty well. It also has serrated edges and a point on the end of the scoop, so it’s pretty versatile in uses.
http://www.amazon.com/Burpee-Garden-Tool-Soil-Scoop/dp/B008WYK6VE/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1370898840&sr=8-3&keywords=soil+scoop


30 posted on 06/10/2013 2:21:21 PM PDT by Marmolade
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To: knarf

LOL! Yes, I’ve considered those, but then you need a mega-sturdy fence.

Goats can fly, you know.


31 posted on 06/10/2013 2:27:28 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: greeneyes

Garden ping list worthy?


32 posted on 06/10/2013 4:41:00 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Vote Republican! You can vote Democrat when you're dead...)
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To: fwdude

We have hard red clay in Oregon too. There is a local guy/company that makes hand forged tools...advertises as “Garden Tools and Blacksmith.” http://www.redpigtools.com/servlet/the-Hoeing/Categories


33 posted on 06/11/2013 12:57:54 AM PDT by WHATNEXT?
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To: fwdude
A good garden requires work and many tools.
Depending on the size garden you want to work and where you are I recommend a Massey Ferguson 35 or 135 tractor,
preferably an older tractor that's easy to maintain and get parts for, and one with a right foot pedal that will lock the rear axle into positive traction when you need it. Also one with a working PTO and a three point hitch.
The MF 35 and 135 tractors are shorter than the MF 50 or 165 tractors, and can work in tighter spots.
Next for the tractor you'll need a sub soiler, a 3-Point Disc Harrow, and a cultivator to lay out the rows.
Use the sub-soiler first to break up the ground 18 to 24 inches deep, about every 3 foot and crisscross at three different angles.
Then disk up the soil three or four times over several weeks to kill the grass and weeds and aerate the soil.
When you think you've got the ground ready to plant, use the cultivator to lay put your planting rows, normally 36 inches apart.

Planting, I like the "EarthWay ® Precision Garden Seeder, Model 1001B" and get all the attachments, the seed wheels in the box of six and the fertilizer attachment.
Next, I recommend a good post-hole diggers, which is great for planting tomato and pepper plants.
Buy the good pair, and not the cheap pair, and check your hand fit, because depending on the size of your hands, the size of the handles matters.

Now you need two different hoes, and always buy wooden handles.
Get a Hula Hoe because there are many different ways to use it.
Then get a regular hoe.

Now you need a tiller and I like the Husqvarna DRT900H because it's strong and fairly easy to use. (you can rent this, but it's better and cheaper to buy one).

Next you need a bean pole hole puncher *normally a heavy tool steel bar about 6 foot long and about 1 and 1/2 inches in diameter, with a sharp point on one end).
This is to make holes to ut bean sticks in if you plant climbing vine beans,
Some people use fence posts and 5 ft hog wire to let the vines crawl on, and there are many different sways to support climbing vines.
Finally, you need a machete to cut the bean poles with, and any 18" machete will do.
Then get some good quality garden hoses to water the garden with, or maybe a 25' 3-tube Sprinkler Hose.
And for watering corn get a Tripod Sprinkler.
From time to time I also use a round tipped shovel for laying the corn by when I put more dirt at the roots of the stalks to strengthen the plants.
I guess maybe a duster for dry bug poison and a 2 gallon sprayer for wet bug poison would be nice.
34 posted on 06/11/2013 3:25:17 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's Simple ! Fight, ... or Die !)
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To: fwdude

You can try here

http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/WhatsNew.aspx

All sorts of tools, hardware and garden supplies

Regards

alfa6 ;>}


35 posted on 06/11/2013 3:31:25 AM PDT by alfa6
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To: fwdude
You also need two hard rakes, and a large plastic bucket.
Get a regular width rake and a narrow 4-Tine Long-Handle Cultivator rake.
The best bucket I found is a cat little Tidy Cat 35 lb bucket.
The rakes are for removing weeds and grass out of the garden, and pick them up and put them in the bucket.
Then carry them well away from the garden and throw them away or bag them and throw them away, or burn them.
Those square buckets are great for hauling water to your plants in the garden if you mix liquid fertilizer into the water.
36 posted on 06/11/2013 4:12:24 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's Simple ! Fight, ... or Die !)
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To: Yosemitest

LOL! I have PLENTY of those large plastic cat litter buckets, and yes, they come in handy.

I like to compost, and usually put the weeds in the compost bin. If the pile gets hot enough (> 165º F) it should “pasteurize” everything in the pile and kill the weed seeds. I’ve gotten mine to over 180º F before! But it takes hot manure.


37 posted on 06/14/2013 12:57:41 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: Yosemitest
I like the power rotary tillers for quick work, but my area isn't that large, and I don't believe in ongoing tilling with them, only an initial tilling. Doing so repeatedly over time builds up "hardpan" and that restricts drainage and root penetration. I prefer to hand dig (great exercise) and double dig the bed. Afterward, with additions of lots of compost and mulch, it becomes a lot easier.

I'm looking at a tractor down the road, but haven't had the need so far.

Have a post hole digger and some spades/hoes, but need more durable ones. I really don't see the need in the specialty equipment you listed, at least not at the level of gardening I do. I just have a "kitchen" garden, not a farm.

38 posted on 06/14/2013 1:05:03 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: Marmolade

Yes, I’ve seen those before. Thanks.

Won’t order from Amazon, though. Off my list permanently.


39 posted on 06/14/2013 1:34:24 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: alfa6

Thanks!


40 posted on 06/14/2013 1:35:55 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: alfa6

Thanks!


41 posted on 06/14/2013 1:35:55 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: fwdude
The garden I normally work is about 100 ft by 250 ft, and that's barely enough to feed a family of 4.
Get an old tractor and learn how to maintain it.
Even if you have to completely rebuild it, you never regret it.
Then there's tractor shows you can go to.
Watch RFD TV.
42 posted on 06/14/2013 9:06:15 PM PDT by Yosemitest (It's Simple ! Fight, ... or Die !)
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To: fwdude
When the sun gets hot and the rows get long, a tiller can knock down a lot of unwanted grass and weeds in a hurry.
Then just take the two rakes and clean out the loose weeds and grass.
The narrow rake is for between the plants.
43 posted on 06/14/2013 9:10:33 PM PDT by Yosemitest (It's Simple ! Fight, ... or Die !)
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