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Ferroelectric-Graphene-Based Chips Could Lead to Higher-Performance Storage.
Xbitlabs ^ | 6/25/2013 11:40 PM | 0 Anton Shilov

Posted on 06/27/2013 9:04:10 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Researchers at MIT have proposed a new system that combines ferroelectric materials – the kind often used for data storage – with graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon known for its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties. The resulting hybrid technology could eventually lead to computer and data-storage chips that pack more components in a given area and are faster and less power-hungry.

The new system works by controlling waves called surface plasmons. These waves are oscillations of electrons confined at interfaces between materials; in the new system the waves operate at terahertz frequencies. Such frequencies lie between those of far-infrared light and microwave radio transmissions, and are considered ideal for next-generation computing devices. The findings were reported in a paper in Applied Physics Letters by associate professor of mechanical engineering Nicholas Fang, postdoc Dafei Jin and three others.

The system would provide a new way to construct interconnected devices that use light waves, such as fiber-optic cables and photonic chips, with electronic wires and devices. Currently, such interconnection points often form a bottleneck that slows the transfer of data and adds to the number of components needed.

“The team’s new system allows waves to be concentrated at much smaller length scales, which could lead to a tenfold gain in the density of components that could be placed in a given area of a chip,” said Mr. Fang.

The team’s initial proof-of-concept device uses a small piece of graphene sandwiched between two layers of the ferroelectric material to make simple, switchable plasmonic waveguides. This work used lithium niobate, but many other such materials could be used, the researchers say.

“Light can be confined in these waveguides down to one part in a few hundreds of the free-space wavelength, which represents an order-of-magnitude improvement over any comparable waveguide system. “This opens up exciting areas for transmitting and processing optical signals,” said Mr. Jin.

Moreover, the work may provide a new way to read and write electronic data into ferroelectric memory devices at very high speed, according to researchers from MIT.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: hitech

1 posted on 06/27/2013 9:04:10 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Dang, we could have saved millions on NSA's Utah Data Center.

2 posted on 06/27/2013 9:08:44 AM PDT by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Graphene - pretty amazing stuff.
Not too long ago (might’ve been you) it was posted here as being used in desalination.
I’d love to see that!

Bucky Fuller was one of a kind. The Leonardo of our age.


3 posted on 06/27/2013 9:27:45 AM PDT by spankalib ("I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.")
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