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WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 37 SEPTEMBER 13, 2013
Free Republic | September 13, 2013 | greeneyes

Posted on 09/13/2013 1:04:36 PM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!

NOTE: This is a once a week ping list. We do post to the thread during the week. Links to related articles and discussions which might be of interest are welcomed, so feel free to post them at any time.


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gardening; hobby
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Greetings from Missouri on a day that will never be repeated in history: Friday the 13th in the year 2013.LOL

A great day weather wise with temp of 77 degrees, and humidity of only 40%. Sorry to be late to getting the party going, but the Doctor's appointment was shifted from 1pm to 1:30pm, and even then didn't exactly start on time.

Well I have pretty much harvested everything-still have a few taters to dig. The weather is once again too dry, and the rainbarrels are empty. So IXnay on starting new plants outdoors. Just maybe plant a few for the indoor winter garden and a few for transplant if we get some fall rains.

Winter wheat and such won't be planted till Oct 15 or later, so we'll have to see whether the weather is favorable at that time or not.

Hope all is well with you. Have a great weekend, and God Bless.

1 posted on 09/13/2013 1:04:37 PM PDT by greeneyes
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To: greeneyes; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

Pinging the list.


2 posted on 09/13/2013 1:06:21 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
I now have two pint jars filled with ground paprika. Looks like I'm set for a few years, anyway.
3 posted on 09/13/2013 1:09:11 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: greeneyes

Yesterday when I had to spend time in the garden, it was 91 degrees at 7 pm. Had to be close to, or was, 100 or more when I was out there.

A day like you had is a dream here.


4 posted on 09/13/2013 1:09:19 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: greeneyes; All

THE WRONG EQUIPMENT CAN RUIN YOUR PLANS OR TOTALLY DESTROY THEM

Yesterday, Thursday, was major transplant day for all plants that were under the grow lamp, plus strawberry plants, into containers and they are all on the deck. After I got them all outside, I got the hose to water everything including the plants that have been out there for some time.

Enter plastic hose with plastic fittings and plastic sprayer with plastic fittings to attach to plastic fitting on hose. The assembly totally collapsed. A force of water hit my clothes which was jeans and old shirt and plastic garden shoes. I was drenched. Sometimes when things don’t go right, I get damned determined to finish what I started and it was a necessity to water those transplanted plants and the others. I jiggled the connection of the plastic parts and managed to get enough water through the sprayer to “kind of” get water in the containers as the excess kept hitting my clothes. I stayed at it until the containers had enough water.

Came in, pulled a “Johnny” and stripped off the wet clothes in the laundry room. Put on a “duster” that is like a dress length robe of a thing, got in my chair and pulled up the Sears website. I am through with sorry hoses, sorry plastic connections and sorry plastic sprayers. I have a lot of plants now on my deck and flowers in pots sitting in the dirt garden and walking onions in the planter toward the back of the garden, and I’ve got to have a dependable way to water. I bought a heavy duty Craftsman hose guaranteed not to kink, with brass fittings and a lifetime guarantee. Got the straight brass sprayer, the kind we used long ago except this new type has more settings in the twist function. Also guaranteed like the hose.

Got an email from Sears this morning and the hose and sprayer have been shipped. This morning, I worked with the plastic one and managed to get it working for right now. It will likely come apart the next time I water this evening. I’ll have to keep the water at fairly low force or the pressure of the water will blow the thing apart again.

Do any of you have hose problems? I know some of you have large gardens and use drip set-ups. My containers on the deck won’t accommodate that method.

I brought the squirrel cage in the house and will put larger amount of bait in there to catch squirrel no. 1 and take that killer to rightly’s house.

Except for being outside a little bit this morning to work with the sprayer and get the squirrel cage, I have stayed inside to have a cool day after all the planting and sweating outside yesterday. I took a shower after all that yesterday and I needed it - my hair was stuck together from all the sweat. Why in hell did I start gardening?

Three good accomplishments: The grow lamp did its job and I have turned it off, and all the plants have been transplanted and plans are underway to catch killer squirrel no. 1. :o)


5 posted on 09/13/2013 1:13:16 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: greeneyes

Still in the high 90s or 100 here. And sweaty. There was rain all around this week but not a drop here. I wanted to get out to do something with some weekds but it was just too muggy this morning. Next week it’s supposed to drop 10 degrees so we’ll see.

The tomatoes by where the neighbor cut down his tree are still in shock from the hot sun so maybe the cooler temps will help.

Nothing new to report. Armadillos digging under the fence and tearing things up. Deer eating the tomatoes and corn. Same ol’ thing.


6 posted on 09/13/2013 1:15:11 PM PDT by bgill (This reply was mined before it was posted.)
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To: greeneyes

http://healthland.time.com/2013/09/12/cilantro-more-than-an-herb-it-can-purify-water-too/

Interesting article on how cilantro pulls heavy metals out of drinking water.


7 posted on 09/13/2013 1:18:08 PM PDT by bgill (This reply was mined before it was posted.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Maybe. I use a lot of paprikda in just about everything.LOL


8 posted on 09/13/2013 1:20:26 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Marcella; JRandomFreeper

At least you didn’t do the “Johnny” outside for the whole neighborhood.


9 posted on 09/13/2013 1:21:28 PM PDT by bgill (This reply was mined before it was posted.)
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To: Marcella

Please don’t give up on gardening Marcella . . . I sure do enjoy reading about your gardening adventures . . . Smile!

. . . and believe it or not, I have learned so much from all your research. Thank you for sharing.


10 posted on 09/13/2013 1:21:30 PM PDT by HopeandGlory (Hey, Liberals . . . PC died on 9/11 . . . GET USED TO IT!!!)
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To: Marcella

Watch out for that heat, and avoid it as much as possible. What about 5 or 6 AM-what’s it like then?


11 posted on 09/13/2013 1:21:55 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Marcella

Hoses are Hubby’s responsibility. He keeps it working because he uses it.LOL


12 posted on 09/13/2013 1:25:15 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

Don’t blame you there. I can’t take the heat nor the humidity. I take refuge in the basement family room with an oscillating fan, and sometimes a wet washrag around my neck.

Works most of the time.


13 posted on 09/13/2013 1:27:24 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Paprika duh.


14 posted on 09/13/2013 1:28:00 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

Thanks for the link to an interesting article.


15 posted on 09/13/2013 1:28:41 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

“What about 5 or 6 AM-what’s it like then?”

I have no idea and will never know - I’m asleep. I could tell you what it is about midnight, 1, or 2 am. ‘cause I’m not asleep then, too busy doing stuff on computer and watching TV movie.


16 posted on 09/13/2013 1:31:50 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: greeneyes

We are having some locals planting wheat now, they seriously need the winter grazing.

I have not sold any wheat seed yet, but we have cleaned about 1/2 of our crop in preparation. We are certified seed growers, only produce registered seed for our own use.

Does anyone have experience growing SainFoin (Esparsette)? I am about to order some seed and do not know what to expect from it. Have wanted to try it for 3 years, but the extreme drought kept me from trying. Things look better now and soon will.


17 posted on 09/13/2013 1:39:11 PM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: greeneyes

I caught all of the jailbirds and clipped their wings a couple nights ago. If chickens had laser eyes like SuperMan I’d be a pile of ashes. They are not happy. LOL


18 posted on 09/13/2013 1:46:36 PM PDT by Augie
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To: Marcella

Two days ago it was 90 and humid here. Today it’s COLD and raining. I think my garden is done, except for the green beans. And carrots. It’s been switching around like this for a couple of weeks now - my still-green tomatoes are not liking it. I guess I’d better go get them and try to finish them up in the house. *sigh*


19 posted on 09/13/2013 1:48:39 PM PDT by Ladysforest
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To: HopeandGlory
Well, Hope, when I have a problem to solve, I beat it to death until I know it all. I figure I can do most anything, I just have to find the answer how to do it. Starting gardening meant do the research as problems came up. I write about those problems because I figure someone else may have that problem, too, and could be helped by the research.

I won't stop gardening since I am a prepper and if the SHTF, I need to know how to grow food plants and have the seeds and equipment to do it.

Johnny was right when he told me at the beginning that seeds and water and dirt doesn't mean you can grow food plants. I found out ground dirt is evil stuff harboring deadly insects and mold and other blights, and I found out cute squirrels and pretty birds are killers.

I started war against all those enemies after finding out the truth about some of nature's products, both moving creatures and organisms that kill.

Gardening is a mental and physical understanding of one’s surroundings and how they work. :o)

20 posted on 09/13/2013 1:49:29 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Marcella

I use a quality hose and brass fittings everywhere, but that is no guarantee. We have gone through 2 -3 sprayer heads per season, from the cheapest to the best, all are useless after a bit. We are currently use 2 of the $1 kind.

Drip systems are ideal for containers on a deck. That’s where I picked up on the drip idea 15 yrs ago. All our containers(about 30) are on drip with timers. We like to get away sometimes for a few days and have no one to water for us when we are gone.


21 posted on 09/13/2013 1:52:56 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: Marcella

Well, I am usually up at midnight to 2 or 3 am also. However, Monday through Friday I have to get up a 6am to get grand daugter off to school. Then I get the rest of my sleep, but while she is getting dressed, I can get my garden watered, and it is usually lots cooler then than the rest of the day.


22 posted on 09/13/2013 1:57:35 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Texas Fossil

I have no experience with that. The only winter wheat I have ever grown is hard red winter wheat.


23 posted on 09/13/2013 1:58:38 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Augie

Maybe you could sing a little jail house rock and that would make them happier.LOL


24 posted on 09/13/2013 1:59:36 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Ladysforest

If you dig some up and stick them in a pot, it can help to improve their chances of tasting good when ripe.


25 posted on 09/13/2013 2:00:47 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
SainFoin is a hay, similar to Alfalfa. It is an ancient plant. Has been produced for thousands of years.
26 posted on 09/13/2013 2:04:03 PM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: Racehorse
Which cover crop might you guys recommend?

I'm about 60 miles northwest of you. I'd use rye grass for a cover crop.

My garden did better this year than last year..probably due to adding 38 bags of miracle-gro garden soil to it.

27 posted on 09/13/2013 2:07:57 PM PDT by sockmonkey (Of Course I didn't read the article. After all, this is FreeRepublic..)
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To: Texas Fossil

Sounds great. Keep us posted.


28 posted on 09/13/2013 2:25:48 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Marcella

You are one hard-working woman!


29 posted on 09/13/2013 2:27:05 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: greeneyes

Lake Travis dropped below 620’ MSL this week. Lowest mark in over 50 years. Spreadsheet at the link below with August levels being the latest posted.


http://www.lcra.org/water/conditions/historical.html

We are already in stage two, which means we can water one day per week and our day is tomorrow. I’ll be outside from 7 - 11 AM tomorrow trying to water all areas of the yard.


Must get the garden cleaned out for the fall garden. I have onion and garlic seedlings that need to get in the garden. Other plants will have to wait until the temps drop.


30 posted on 09/13/2013 2:33:53 PM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (The Second Amendment is NOT about the right to hunt. It IS a right to shoot tyrants.)
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To: greeneyes

Ummm - the carrots or the tomatoes? LOL


31 posted on 09/13/2013 2:39:03 PM PDT by Ladysforest
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To: bgill; Marcella
Still in the high 90s or 100 here. And sweaty. There was rain all around this week but not a drop here.

Same here in NW Travis county. I really wanted to clean the old plants out of the garden, but it's too hot. Planted the garlic and onion seeds I harvested last year.

Got inside just after noon, and daughter called about one hour ago from Wichita KA. She said it is 75 and had the windows down on the way home from work. They've had over a foot of rain the past two weeks.

32 posted on 09/13/2013 2:40:45 PM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (The Second Amendment is NOT about the right to hunt. It IS a right to shoot tyrants.)
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To: Arrowhead1952

Man that is tough weather. Got to have water, you may have to start using desert growing techniques and edible vegetation that can survive drought(is their such a thing).


33 posted on 09/13/2013 2:45:10 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Ladysforest

LOL. Tomatoes.


34 posted on 09/13/2013 2:45:28 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Going to sink to 39 tonight here in west Michigan. Picked out most of the rest of the tomatoes, including the Russians which are late, don’t know if I will grow some of them next year. Out of the 7 varieties I tried I would probably do 4 again. Also picked a bunch of cayenne peppers, one last zucchini and a bunch of jalapenos. Don’t think my tomatillos will mature. I have lots but it doesn’t feel like there is much inside the blossom. Hubby taking off out of town for work so I hope to get caught up and there are a few nice pictures posted next week. I’ve been canning beeta and have a half bushel of tomato sauce on the stove and am going to break down and buy a foodsaver sealer. On mu bucket list is to use my Grandfather/Fathers cast iron sausage stuffer which I have had for years to actually stuff some sausage. I used it for many years as a hard cheese press but never did sausage. We’re going to smoke half and do half fresh and hen seal and freeze. Splitting the work with a family friend - 40 pounds total ground pork. I’m psyched. He used to work for a butcher and can get the casings from them. Been on FR since 98 and this gardening thread has been the most fun I have really enjoyed it so thanks to all for keeping it going.


35 posted on 09/13/2013 2:52:12 PM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read The Liberty Amendments by Mark Levin!)
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Does anyone here have experience growing potatoes from seeds?


36 posted on 09/13/2013 3:04:24 PM PDT by Nepeta
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To: MomwithHope

Bummer on the low temps. But kudos on all the rest. You have a lot of work ahead of you.


37 posted on 09/13/2013 3:04:35 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

I miss him terrible when he’s gone but I get SO MUCH done!


38 posted on 09/13/2013 3:05:39 PM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read The Liberty Amendments by Mark Levin!)
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To: greeneyes

Raining gently; just 1/3” so far, for the second time this past week.

Sent an infested sunflower with at least one beetle in it to County Weed & Pest Control; they in turn sent it to Rapid City, and I should hear back from the entomologist Monday or Tuesday. It looks like seed loss is secondary, rather than primary, as they burrow through the seeds into the heads, then proceed through the neck and into the upper stem. Not only are the seed where they directly burrow through lost, but the tunnels to get to the stem kills the seed bed, and those are lost as well.

We have canned more carrots, and right now there are 5 trays of diced carrots in the dryer. Have also canned more beans, and have another pickings worth to do something with. The bush speckled butterbeans need a couple more hot days, which NWS assures me will occur, starting Monday.

The dry beans are almost finished for the season. I picked some Wednesday, and didn’t have time to shell them until last night. They were in plastic bags, and some of the pods were not quite dry, though fully mature, and ‘sweated’ inside the bags. That was enough to let several actually pods full sprout! I have never shelled out bean sprouts from pods before; the sprouts were already up to an inch long, and trying to penetrate the pods. I put those into a sprouter to finish growing for the table.

We dropped off a load of pattypan, zucchini, and cukes at the local Ministerial Association food pantry yesterday while in town, but still have plenty for our own use.

A batch of pears got harvested, and are awaiting getting soft enough to process. Candied pears? Dried pears? Pear butter? Who knows at this point! And then there’s the apples. Oh, my, are there apples! Chickens and the wild turkeys have been getting the windfalls & damaged ones. We’ll be drying, freezing, saucing, and canning them, giving them away, and donating them and we’ll still not come close to using them all. Don’t suggest selling; that would be coals to Newcastle, assuming there were a market for small, often bug or bird damaged fruit.

Several of the Buttercup squash stems are becoming ‘corky’ as the fruit takes on color; should be ready sometime in the next week or so, along with their “squashkin” brethren that were born of seeds out of the same, single, Buttercup from last year’s garden. Not sure if they’ll be more squash-like, or pumpkiny; they are 12-16” in diameter, and ribbed; but the skin color is more like that of the Pink Banana squash the female parent was planted near, so suspect they will have a good flavor & texture.

The Jerusalem artichokes finally started forming flower buds beyond all reason; been busy pinching them off.

The Brussels sprouts are loaded, and the lower sprouts are finally starting to put on some size. Another month, and a couple for frosts should do wonders for them.

The volunteer grain milo may or may not mature before a killing frost, as there’s still some flowers open on it, while seed just forming on the rest. Also on the grains front, this coming week, as soon as it dries out enough, will see the wheat & rye planted.

Potatoes STILL are nowhere near ready to dig, though they are beginning to lay down, and lose some of their darker greens.

I’ll have a good crop of radish seed for next year, as the pods are turning color; also have some good candidates for pattypan seed.


39 posted on 09/13/2013 3:22:37 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

All in all, it sounds like a very successful planting season for you for the most part.


40 posted on 09/13/2013 3:35:55 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: MomwithHope

I heard that!LOL


41 posted on 09/13/2013 3:37:06 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

We’ll be married 35 years next month and when he has to go out of town for work I miss him like crazy. Do lots to pass the time. The ONLY 2 good things about him going is no ironing and I get the car while he is gone. Actually 3 - I also lose a few pounds.


42 posted on 09/13/2013 3:40:22 PM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read The Liberty Amendments by Mark Levin!)
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To: MomwithHope

LOL. I know what you mean. Been married 48 years. House just isn’t right with out the man.LOL


43 posted on 09/13/2013 4:02:00 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Marcella

For the critters in my yard I spread peanut butter on a piece of lettuce and slip it in the trap. Peanut Butter is a great bait because of it’s aroma. You could also spread it on peanuts in the shell...


44 posted on 09/13/2013 4:12:42 PM PDT by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
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To: tubebender

“Peanut Butter is a great bait because of it’s aroma.”

I used peanut butter but probably didn’t use enough. I’m redoing that and will put trap back out.


45 posted on 09/13/2013 4:20:14 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: greeneyes

Had baby Sylvia Monday evening so the gardening is going to have to wait. The hot peppers are growing like crazy too!


46 posted on 09/13/2013 4:20:34 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: MomwithHope

LOL...


47 posted on 09/13/2013 4:25:49 PM PDT by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
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To: Marcella
Gardening is a mental and physical understanding of one’s surroundings and how they work. :o)

WOW! First year, you learned a primary lesson that some never understand in a lifetime of killing plants, while involuntarily feeding the pests & vermin.

Speaking of pests and vermin, I shotgunned a squirrel off the roof today. It was trying to get at the drying sunflower heads under the porch roof, and ran up the wall when I stepped out the door. It made the mistake of sitting upright on the peak to chitter at me. Low power shells with small shot, and aiming a little high = no roof damage.

These buggers have chewed their way into the attic several times over the years, and are nearly inedible .

The red squirrel is a small arboreal squirrel, smaller than the gray squirrel or the fox squirrel, and weighing an average of only 11 ounces... they also taste terrible; nothing like a grey squirrel.

The article fails to mention they love the taste of electrical cable insulation; and that they love to chew holes in walls to enter barns and houses, then make nests by tearing up attic insulation.

48 posted on 09/13/2013 4:27:12 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: Marcella

It occurs to me that, depending on the traps design, if the squirrel manages to tip it over on its top, the door may automatically open, as that is how they can be designed to release the critter.

I discovered that the hard way with one of mine; it must be secured to prevent a frantic critter from escaping. Once that happens it is much harder to entice them back into it.


49 posted on 09/13/2013 4:48:20 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: greeneyes
Still having a banner year for tomatoes. Going to make some sauce tomorrow. Lots of green beans too!

Yesterday's pickings

And big boy finally ripened. Weighed in at almost 1-1/2 pounds. Will take center stage at tomorrow night's dinner


50 posted on 09/13/2013 4:53:26 PM PDT by KosmicKitty (WARNING: Hormonally crazed woman ahead!!)
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