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Keyword: agriculture

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  • Potential Origins of Europeans Found

    11/11/2005 1:09:32 AM PST · by AlaskaErik · 109 replies · 3,276+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | November 10, 2005 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    A study of DNA from ancient farmers in Europe shows sharp differences from that of modern Europeans — results that are likely to add fuel to the debate over European origins. Researchers led by Wolfgang Haak of Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, argue that their finding supports the belief that modern residents of central Europe descended from Stone Age hunter-gatherers who were present 40,000 years ago, and not the early farmers who arrived thousands of years later. But other anthropologists questioned that conclusion, arguing that the available information isn't sufficient to support it. Haak's team used DNA from 24...
  • Texas floods and commodities: Farms face 'total loss for year'

    05/31/2015 2:52:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies
    CNBC ^ | May 29, 2015 | Robert Ferris
    Texas' farmers were among the first to applaud the rain that abruptly halted a grueling multiyear drought that had tormented the region. But what began as a blessing has turned quickly into a disaster, as corn and wheat crops rot in flooded fields. "I think it is not all farmers, but some farmers are looking at a total loss for this year," said Mike Barnett, a spokesperson for the Texas Farm Bureau. "You have some situations where farmers had a bumper crop, and now they have next to nothing for the season." The downpour has doused Texas with 35 trillion...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 22 MAY 29, 2015

    05/29/2015 1:57:25 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 79 replies
    freerepublic | 5/29/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • A century on, experts crack mystery of holes in Swiss cheese

    05/28/2015 10:05:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-28-2015 | Staff
    Eureka! After about a century of research, Swiss scientists have finally cracked the mystery of the holes in Swiss cheese. Despite what you may have been told as a child, they are not caused by mice nibbling away inside cheese wheels. Experts from Agroscope, a state centre for agricultural research, said the phenomenon—which marks famous Swiss cheeses such as Emmental and Appenzell—was caused by tiny bits of hay present in the milk and not bacteria as previously thought. They found that the mystery holes in such cheeses became smaller or disappeared when milk used for cheese-making was extracted using modern...
  • Bird Flu Spreading as Scientists Look Everywhere for Clues

    05/24/2015 2:30:04 PM PDT · by SatinDoll · 32 replies
    NBC and TODAY ^ | May 23, 2015 | Maggie Fox
    [The following is an excerpt.] Could it be blowing from farm to farm in the dirt? Could determined starlings and pigeons be carrying it into poultry houses on their feet? Is it spreading in feed, or being carried on truck tires? Federal agriculture officials are looking everywhere they can think of for H5N2 bird flu, which has spread to poultry flocks in 14 states and killed or forced the slaughter of more than 39 million birds. Highly pathogenic avian influenza has never spread like this before in the United States, and it's flummoxed the U.S. Department of Agriculture, farmers and...
  • 500 protesters march against ag giant Monsanto

    05/23/2015 7:33:43 PM PDT · by artichokegrower · 62 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | May 23, 2015 | J.K. Dineen
    Beekeepers. Physicians. Organic farmers. Preschool teachers. Parents of autistic kids. Those were some of the groups represented Saturday in a march against the controversial biotech and agricultural giant Monsanto, which is often cast as Public Enemy No. 1 by those opposed to genetically modified foods. As many as 500 people — many dressed like bumblebees and butterflies — filled Justin Herman Plaza around noon and then marched down the Embarcadero to Fisherman’s Wharf. Many held signs with slogans like “Evil Seed of Corporate Greed” and “GMOs Cause Autism and Cancer.”
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 21 MAY 22, 2015

    05/22/2015 1:05:17 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 150 replies
    freerepublic | 5/22/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Family Tree of Dogs and Wolves Is Found to Split Earlier Than Thought

    05/21/2015 10:13:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    New York Times ^ | MAY 21, 2015 | JAMES GORMAN
    The ancestors of modern wolves and dogs split into different evolutionary lineages 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, much earlier than some other research has suggested, scientists reported Thursday. The new finding is based on a bone fragment found on the Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia several years ago. When scientists studied the bone and reconstructed its genome — the first time that had been done for an ancient wolf, or any kind of ancient carnivore — they found it was a new species that lived 35,000 years ago. Based on the differences between the genome of the new species, called the...
  • Dogs have been man's best friend 'for 40,000 years'

    05/21/2015 10:15:08 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | May 21, 2015 | Staff
    Dogs have been man's best friend for up to 40,000 years, suggests new research. The study shows dogs' special relationship with humans might date back 27,000 to 40,000 years. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, come from genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone.
  • World’s Largest Indoor Farm In Japan Produces 100 Times More Food Than Other Farms [Video]

    05/21/2015 12:41:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    The Inquisitr News ^ | January 27, 2015 | Jan Omega
    When it comes to farming, there is no better time than now to get into the field. Thanks to technological advances ushered in by the green movement, farming has evolved from a traditional means to sustain a personal living to a science with the potential to feed millions. The Inquisitr previously reported on how technology-assisted farming has become a blessing to others. Former NFL football player, Jason Brown, watched DIY videos on Youtube to learn how to grow 46,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and 10,000 pounds of cucumbers, which he donated to pantries and kitchens. In Irvine, California, an entire...
  • Subsidizing and price fixing us into the poorhouse

    05/18/2015 4:58:07 AM PDT · by HomerBohn · 9 replies
    Personal Liberty ^ | 5/18/2015 | Bob Livingston
    The whole of economics can be reduced to a single lesson, and that lesson can be reduced to a single sentence. The art of economics consists in looking not merely at the immediate but the longer effects of any act or policy; it consists in tracing the consequences of that policy not merely for one group but for all groups.” — Henry Hazlitt, “Economics in One Lesson” One of the greatest fallacies of recent generations is the argument that free market capitalism has failed and that said failure is responsible for America’s moribund economy, the ongoing destruction of the middle...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 20 MAY 15, 2015

    05/15/2015 1:19:16 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 88 replies
    freerepublic | 8/15/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Almonds Not the State's Worst Water Offender

    05/13/2015 10:01:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/13 | Sam Brock and Rachel Witte
    The California almond is getting a bad reputation. At least that’s what the numbers show. According to an April report released by the Pacific Institute, a non-profit research firm based in Oakland, almonds are not the most water intensive crop grown in the Golden State. In fact, almonds tie with pistachios for fourth place in the ranking of California’s water intensive crops and require on average four acre-feet of water per acre. One acre-foot is approximately 326,000 gallons of water. Alfalfa and rice are the top two water users, averaging five acre-feet of water per acre a piece, though alfalfa...
  • Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake

    05/09/2015 8:12:29 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 31 replies
    Alaska Dispatch ^ | Yereth Rosen
    Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake. When an aquatic ecologist was surveying shallow lakes in Northwest Alaska three years ago, she and the pilot who traveled with her came upon an unusual sight in the treeless Arctic region: a pair of terns that kept flying around and perching on what appeared to be a log sticking out of a muddy area. The protruding object, it turns out, was no log. It was the large and well-preserved leg bone of a woolly mammoth. Right by it was another bone, perfectly articulated, that was clearly from the...
  • Goat Removed from USS Lake Erie Along with CO

    05/09/2015 5:40:23 PM PDT · by QT3.14 · 60 replies
    Military.com ^ | May 4, 2015 | Tom Perry
    Navy Capt. John Banigan is no longer aboard the San Diego-based guided missile cruiser Lake Erie. Neither is a goat named Master Chief Charlie. Banigan was ousted from command last week after the brass lost confidence in his ability to lead, the standard explanation when a commanding officer is removed. Banigan has been reassigned to a desk job. Master Chief Charlie is also ashore, though it remains unclear whether he is on Navy property or civilian property. He is, however, in excellent health, the Navy said. The fate of the captain and the goat became mixed when the Navy began...
  • Tales teeth can tell: Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civ...

    05/09/2015 6:20:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    University of Florida ^ | April 29, 2015 | Gigi Marino [Sources: John Krigbaum, George Kamenov]
    When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local environment -- the food one eats, the water one drinks, the dust one breathes. When the researchers looked at remains from the ancient city of Harappa, located in what is known today as the Punjab Province of Pakistan, individuals' early molars told a very different story than their later ones, meaning they hadn't been born in the city where they were found... The text of the Indus Valley Civilization remains undeciphered, and known and excavated burial sites are rare. A new study, published in today's PLOS ONE, illuminates the lives...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 19 MAY 8, 2015

    05/08/2015 1:13:04 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 142 replies
    freerepublic | 5/8/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • New Cold Climate to Devastate Global Agriculture within Ten Years

    05/03/2015 9:55:53 AM PDT · by citizen · 168 replies
    Space and Science Research Corporation ^ | April 30, 2015 | John L. Casey
    The Space and Science Research Corporation (SSRC) announces today that the predicted new cold climate will soon begin to end the historic era of growth in US and global agricultural output that began after the end of World War II. Specifically, as a result of recent events on the Sun and changes in the Earth's climate, the SSRC again warns that record crop yields and volume in the US and Canadian corn, wheat, and soybean belts are about to end. The SSRC expects the first substantial damage could be observed at any time but certainly within the next ten years....
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 18 MAY 1, 2015

    05/01/2015 12:41:21 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 121 replies
    freerepublic | May 1, 2015 | greeneyes
    Good afternoon Gardeners! We have the most beautiful day so far this week. Temps in 60s and beautiful sun shine and blue sky. Truly a gift from God. I just wanted to mention to those who may have missed JRandomFreeper's post yesterday, that he has started his Chemo Therapy today, and needs your prayers. Thank you all in advance for helping with this request. Not much has changed here. I have been taking the tomatoes in and out. Yesterday, I forgot and left them outside, but they seem to be ok. Hubby plans to plant corn this weekend. I'll wait...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 17 APRIL 17, 2015

    04/24/2015 1:22:35 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 148 replies
    freerepublic | 4/17/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Robots Step Into New Planting, Harvesting Roles

    04/24/2015 7:28:14 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 77 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | April 23, 2015 | ILAN BRAT
    OXNARD, Calif.—A 14-arm, automated harvester recently wheeled through rows of strawberry plants here, illustrating an emerging solution to one of the produce industry’s most pressing problems: a shortfall of farmhands. Harnessing high-powered computing, color sensors and small metal baskets attached to the robotic arms, the machine gently plucked ripe strawberries from below deep-green leaves, while mostly ignoring unripe fruit nearby. Such tasks have long required the trained discernment and backbreaking effort of tens of thousands of relatively low-paid workers. But technological advances are making it possible for robots to handle the job, just as a shrinking supply of available fruit...
  • Carter's Arab Financiers

    12/21/2006 8:52:59 AM PST · by venizelos · 25 replies · 1,781+ views
    The Washington Times ^ | December 21, 2006 | Rachel Ehrenfeld
    To understand what feeds former president Jimmy Carter's anti-Israeli frenzy, look at his early links to Arab business. Between 1976-1977, the Carter family peanut business received a bailout in the form of a $4.6 million, "poorly managed" and highly irregular loan from the National Bank of Georgia (NBG). According to a July 29, 1980 Jack Anderson expose in The Washington Post, the bank's biggest borrower was Mr. Carter, and its chairman at that time was Mr. Carter's confidant, and later his director of the Office of Management and Budget, Bert Lance.
  • Shriveled grapes, shriveled liberty

    04/19/2015 1:59:34 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 4 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 4-19-15 | George Will
    In oral arguments Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear the government defend its kleptocratic behavior while administering an indefensible law. The Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 is among the measures by which New Dealers tried and failed to regulate and mandate America back to prosperity. Seventy-eight years later, it is the government’s reason for stealing Marvin and Laura Horne’s raisins. New Dealers had bushels of theories, including this: In an economic depression, prices fall, so a recovery will occur when government compels prices to stabilize above where a free market would put them. So Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “brains trust”...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 16 APRIL 17, 2015

    04/17/2015 1:08:22 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 175 replies
    freerepublic | April 17, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Green Jackfruit: is ‘Pulled Pork for Vegetarians’ the Next Big Food Craze?

    04/13/2015 9:43:31 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies
    Late last year, after 18 years of litigation, a senior government official in Kerala, south-west India was given a prison sentence after being convicted of theft. The object he stole was government property, and it was so large he had to have it cut up to get it home. A piece of art, perhaps? A precious metal? Actually, it was a 40-year-old jackfruit tree, and, once you’ve tasted its fruit, you begin to understand why he did it. To say the jackfruit is big is an understatement. It is the largest tree-borne fruit on the planet – it isn’t unusual...
  • Agriculture poses immense threat to environment, German study says

    04/12/2015 12:37:01 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 04/10/2015 – 08:12 | Nicole Sagener
    Conventional agriculture is causing enormous environmental damage in Germany, warns a study by the country’s Federal Environment Agency, saying a transition to organic farming and stricter regulation is urgently needed. EurActiv Germany reports. Spanning over 50% of the country, agriculture takes up by far the biggest amount of land in the country, and is one of its most important economic sectors. But intensive farming still harms the environment to an alarming extent, according to a study conducted by the Federal Environment Agency (UBA). The use of pesticides and fertilizers, as well as intensive animal husbandry, have a negative impact on...
  • High-tech vertical farming facility taking shape in north Pasadena (Texas)

    04/11/2015 7:29:53 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    The Pasadena Citizen ^ | April 10, 2015 | Kristi Nix
    Pasadena city officials recently signed a letter of intent to develop a vertical farming facility and education center in north Pasadena through an agreement with Indoor Harvest Corp., a Houston-based company that designs and sells hydroponic systems and specializes in high-tech urban farming techniques. “We were looking for low-impact development projects for north Pasadena and came up with the idea of vertical farming, which seemed to be a perfect fit for that area,” Pasadena Publications Manager Wayne Holt said. “We also hope to eventually add a farmer’s market and educational programs in partnership with Pasadena ISD. This type of project...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD APRIL 10, 2015

    04/10/2015 8:14:14 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 120 replies
    freerepublic | April 10, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Lab-Grown Burgers Become So Cheap, They Might be in Supermarkets Soon

    04/10/2015 7:44:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 48 replies
    Sputnik International ^ | April 7, 2015
    Scientists in the Netherlands are one step closer to producing a viable lab-grown alternative to the conventional beef burger patty. Last year, Professor Mark Post and his team of scientists at the Maastricht University in the Netherlands produced the first prototype of a lab-grown burger. Benefits of this new burger production method include a decrease in animal slaughter, savings in land, water, and energy use required for livestock, and a reduction in greenhouse gases. The project has faced several hurdles, though, not the least of which was the enormous price tag of 250,000 Euros, or $273,000. That was roughly how...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, APRIL 3, 2015

    04/03/2015 1:24:44 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 139 replies
    freerepublic | 4/3/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Tree Grown From 2,000-Year-Old Seed Has Reproduced

    03/29/2015 5:41:32 PM PDT · by EBH · 44 replies
    Smithsonianmag.com ^ | 3/26/2015 | Laura Clark
    et out the cigars—Methuselah, a Judean date palm tree that was grown from a 2,000 year old seed, has become a papa plant. Elaine Solowey, of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies at Kibbutz Ketura in Israel, recently broke the good news to National Geographic: “He is over three meters [ten feet] tall, he's got a few offshoots, he has flowers, and his pollen is good," she says. "We pollinated a female with his pollen, a wild [modern] female, and yeah, he can make dates." Methuselah sprouted back in 2005, when agriculture expert Solowey germinated his antique seed. It had...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 13 MARCH 27, 2015

    03/27/2015 1:25:20 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 188 replies
    freerepublic | 12/27/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 12, MARCH 20, 2015

    03/20/2015 12:49:03 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 233 replies
    freerepublic | 3/20/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas

    03/28/2014 9:09:21 AM PDT · by Theoria · 68 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Mar 2014 | SIMON ROMERO
    Niede Guidon still remembers her astonishment when she glimpsed the paintings. Preserved amid the bromeliad-encrusted plateaus that tower over the thorn forests of northeast Brazil, the ancient rock art depicts fierce battles among tribesmen, orgiastic scenes of prehistoric revelry and hunters pursuing their game, spears in hand. “These were stunning compositions, people and animals together, not just figures alone,” said Dr. Guidon, 81, remembering what first lured her and other archaeologists in the 1970s to this remote site where jaguars still prowl. Hidden in the rock shelters where prehistoric humans once lived, the paintings number in the thousands. Some are...
  • A Carpet of Stone Tools in the Sahara

    03/14/2015 4:01:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 11, 2015 | editors
    A new intensive survey of the Messak Settafet escarpment, a massive outcrop of sandstone in the middle of the Saharan desert, has shown that stone tools occur "ubiquitously" across the entire landscape: averaging 75 artefacts per square metre, or 75 million per square kilometre. Researchers say the vast 'carpet' of stone-age tools -- extracted from and discarded onto the escarpment over hundreds of thousands of years -- is the earliest known example of an entire landscape being modified by hominins: the group of creatures that include us and our ancestral species. The Messak Settafet runs a total length of 350...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 11, MARCH 13, 2015

    03/13/2015 12:27:32 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 126 replies
    freerepublic | 3/13/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Paying fealty to farmers: When Ted Cruz is the only person talking sense, something is wrong

    03/12/2015 2:10:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The Economist ^ | March 14, 2015 | The Editors
    A FEW years ago, while reporting on the madness that is European farm subsidies, this columnist came up with a “Richard Scarry” rule of politics. Most politicians hate to confront any profession or industry that routinely appears in children’s books (such as those penned by the late Mr Scarry). This gives outsize power to such folk as farmers, fishermen, doctors, firemen or—to cite a fine work in the Scarry canon—to firms that build Cars and Trucks and Things That Go. The rule is seldom good news for taxpayers, and there is a logic to that too: picture books rarely show...
  • Ancient Africans used 'no fly zones' to bring herds south

    03/12/2015 7:02:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Washington University ^ | March 9, 2015 | Gerry Everding
    Once green, the Sahara expanded 5,500 years ago, leading ancient herders to follow the rain and grasslands south to eastern Africa. But about 2,000 years ago, their southward migration stalled out, stopped in its tracks, archaeologists presumed, by tsetse-infested bush and disease. As the theory goes, the tiny tsetse fly altered the course of history, stopping the spread of domesticated animal herding with a bite that carries sleeping sickness and nagana, diseases often fatal for the herder and the herded. Now, isotopic research on animal remains from a nearly 2,000-year-old settlement near Gogo Falls in the present-day bushy woodlands of...
  • Researchers: We know secret of Joseph's biblical pest control

    04/21/2008 3:57:10 PM PDT · by Between the Lines · 17 replies · 124+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 4/21/08 | Ran Shapira
    The remains of a burnt beetle found in a grain of wheat about 3,500 years old provided a group of researchers from Bar-Ilan University with a key to a question the Bible left without a definite answer: How did Joseph the Dreamer, who became the viceroy to the king of Egypt, succeed in preserving the grain during the seven lean years and prevent Egypt's population from starving? According to the description in the book of Genesis, during the seven years of plenty in Egypt, Joseph had all the wheat collected in silos. "And he gathered up all the food of...
  • Bill Nye now agrees with Ted Cruz that GMOs are good things

    03/09/2015 5:08:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The Houston Examiner ^ | March 9, 2015 | Mark Whittington
    Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas told the Iowa Ag Conference that it was time to “push back” on “anti-science zealotry” concerning GMOs or genetically modified organisms, according to a Saturday story in the Washington Times. GMOs are crops that have been modified to have desirable traits, such as resistance to pests or to contain certain helpful vitamins and nutrients that they otherwise would not have. Oddly enough, Bill Nye, the former “science guy” and former GMO opponent has come around to Cruz’s point of view. Nye, who is not a scientist but played one once on Children’s television, has joined in...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 10 MARCH 6, 2015

    03/06/2015 12:47:33 PM PST · by greeneyes · 100 replies
    freerepublic | 3/6/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Determining recipes for some of the world's oldest preserved beers

    03/04/2015 10:20:58 AM PST · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-04-2015 | Provided by American Chemical Society
    Some breweries have taken to resurrecting the flavors of ages past. Adventurous beer makers are extrapolating recipes from clues that archeologists have uncovered from old and even ancient brews found at historical sites. Now scientists have analyzed some of the oldest preserved beer samples from an 1840s' shipwreck to try to provide insight into how they were made. They report their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Brian Gibson and colleagues explain that in 2010, divers discovered an old schooner at the bottom of the Baltic Sea near Finland. Archeological evidence suggested the ship went down about...
  • How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

    02/28/2015 7:20:56 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 80 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 02/28/2015
    Dogs are humanity’s oldest friends, renowned for their loyalty and abilities to guard, hunt and chase. But modern humans may owe even more to them than we previously realised. We may have to thank them for helping us eradicate our caveman rivals, the Neanderthals.
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 9 FEBRUARY 27, 2015

    02/27/2015 12:35:01 PM PST · by greeneyes · 96 replies
    freerepublic | 2/27/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Britain Imported Wheat 2,000 Years Before Growing It

    02/26/2015 6:45:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    scientificamerican.com ^ | Cynthia Graber
    Early farming began in the Near East about 10,500 years ago. Farming first reached the Balkans in Europe some 8 to 9,000 years ago, and then crept westward. Locals in Britain, separated from the mainland by the relatively newly formed English Channel, did not start farming until about 6,000 years ago. But an analysis of sediment from a submerged British archaeological site called Bouldner Cliff found something unexpected. “Amongst our Bouldner Cliff samples we found ancient DNA evidence of wheat at the site, which was not seen in mainland Britain for another 2,000 years.” Robin Allaby of the University of...
  • Forget Pizza Delivery: How Drones in Construction and Agriculture Help Save Time and Money

    02/24/2015 1:49:12 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Autodesk ^ | February 12, 2015 | Jeff Walsh
    When people discuss business uses for drones, they tend to jump to the novelty end of the consumer market—from the drone hobbyist with a GoPro camera to a complete overhaul of delivery services. “In the press, you always hear that Amazon will deliver a book, or pizzas will come to your house,” says Amar Hanspal, senior vice president at Autodesk, during a recent discussion on drones at Gigaom Structure Connect. “That is a cute thing to talk about, but the real action is in B2B industrial applications. That is where we’re watching the democratization of a broad use of drones...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 8 FEBRUARY 20, 2015

    02/20/2015 12:51:08 PM PST · by greeneyes · 190 replies
    freerepublic | 2/20/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachtaí fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • Ancient artefacts at Tullaghoge [Ireland, 5000 BC]

    02/19/2015 1:31:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | February 15, 2015 | unattributed
    An archaeological bid to discover more about the hilltop where Ulster chieftains were crowned 700 years ago has uncovered artefacts dating back more than 7,000 years. Tullaghoge Fort in rural Co Tyrone was the place leaders of the dominant O'Neill clan came to be crowned from around the 14th Century to just before the arrival of the planters at the start of the 17th Century. Targeted excavation work around the picturesque tree encircled earthen mound ahead of the planned development of new visitor facilities hoped to find and preserve buried artefacts from that period -- but it ended up unearthing...