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An Oversold Weapon Against Breast Cancer
Townhall.com ^ | February 16, 2014 | Steve Chapman

Posted on 02/16/2014 12:50:25 PM PST by Kaslin

In 1999, newspaper columnist Molly Ivins was diagnosed with breast cancer and promptly exhorted her readers: "Go. Get. The. Damn. Mammogram. Done."

She also quoted a friend, columnist Marlyn Schwartz, who lamented, "If you have ever wondered what it would feel like to sit in a doctor's office with a lump in your breast trying to remember when you last had a mammogram, I can tell you. You feel like a fool."

Ivins' breast cancer killed her in 2007. She didn't say whether she had gotten regular mammograms before her diagnosis. If so, she was spared something many a dying breast cancer victim has endured: profound, awful regret at failing to undergo a procedure that would have saved her life.

It turns out now that this kind of regret is misplaced. Mammograms, as administered in advanced nations, do not save lives. Get one done, don't get one done -- either decision is very unlikely to affect your lifespan.

That's the verdict of Canadian medical researchers who followed thousands of women over 25 years and published their results in the British Medical Journal this past week. "Annual mammography in women aged 40-59 does not reduce mortality from breast cancer beyond that of physical examination or usual care," they found. An accompanying editorial carried the headline: "Too much mammography."

Mammograms do detect some cancers that can't be felt in a physical exam, and some of these are life-threatening. So how come finding some cancers earlier doesn't save lives? Two reasons: Most instances of breast cancer can be successfully treated even when caught later, and some can't be successfully treated even when caught early.

The proliferation of mammography has coincided with a decline in breast cancer deaths, which gives the impression that the former caused the latter. In truth, improved survival rates stem mostly from improved treatments.

With regard to routine mammogram screening, H. Gilbert Welch, a physician and professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, told me, "I genuinely believe that some women are helped, but the number is very small and getting smaller."

Mortality aside, early detection sometimes spares women aggressive treatments they would require if they were diagnosed later. But more often, it subjects patients to surgery and other measures they don't need.

If this process helped only a few women while doing nothing for the others, it would be easy to justify. The problem is that it harms far more women than it helps.

In a recent article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Welch and Geisel colleague Honor J. Passow calculated that for every 50-year-old woman who avoids death from breast cancer through annual mammograms, at least 153 (and likely far more) suffer false alarms and at least four are "treated needlessly with surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy."

In fact, over a decade of annual screenings, half or more of patients will be the victims of false positives that at best induce anxiety and at worst require surgery or other treatments for cancers that would not harm them. "My value judgment is that a population-based screening program that alarms half the population is outrageous," says Welch.

The point is not that the mass of American women should avoid annual mammograms. It's that they shouldn't do them without understanding that the procedure carries a small prospect of a large benefit and a large prospect of a small harm.

Women are not the only people who face this sort of dilemma. A widespread test for prostate cancer works almost identically. It detects a lot of cancers that are either unlikely to be fatal without treatment or very likely to be fatal even with treatment, while exposing many men to needless fear as well as treatments with serious side effects. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force now recommends against it for routine screening.

Annual mammograms for breast cancer are expensive. Putting every woman through it annually starting at age 40 would cost a total of $10 billion a year. Starting the screenings at age 50 and doing them every other year until age 69 would cost $8 billion a year.

That's about twice what the government's National Cancer Institute spends annually on cancer research. Money spent on mammograms could be used in ways that would save more lives.

How should we feel about a health care system that has long put so much faith in such a flawed instrument? At least a little foolish.


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: anotherstudy; avoidthesurgey; cancer; healthcarerationing; mammogram; rationing; socializedmedicine; takethepainpill; whodoyoutrust; whywait
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1 posted on 02/16/2014 12:50:25 PM PST by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvzDHGLEUyw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=givgNbs8amE

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gerson+diet

Since I heard about this years ago, and my wife recently acquired a friend who was cured of stage 4 cancer just last year through this treatment alone, I have even less respect for the pink ribbon than I used to.

It costs an average of $850,000 to die of cancer in the US. Or you can survive for almost nothing.


2 posted on 02/16/2014 12:58:31 PM PST by cuban leaf
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To: Kaslin

Good to know. I’ve spent most of the past thirty years feeling guilty about not doing mammograms or at least not very often. I’ve maybe had five and I’m 66. Regular breast exams however I think are good. Once a week and then my regular doc and my gynecologist each do one so that’s two or three times a year. Instead, do the colonopthingie. My docs also want me to do bone density testing but when we talk about what they would do if I had issues, they admit that the course of meds and supplements I take now would stay the same. Try to do 30 minutes of exercise per day (and if you try daily you’ll succeed about 5 times a week) and eat well. Do all that and you’ll die some day. LOL


3 posted on 02/16/2014 12:59:35 PM PST by Mercat
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To: Kaslin

My understanding is this research is seriously flawed. Given that this comes out of Canada ....


4 posted on 02/16/2014 12:59:49 PM PST by ChiMark (America no more)
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To: Kaslin

All I know is that a mammogram my wife had after our last son in April showed a very small lump in a milk duct. A biopsy later showed a malignancy that we quickly treated with surgery to remove her breast. She had reconstructive surgery and is cancer free. Early detection saved her much pain from radiation and chemotherapy.

That mammogram saved my 42 year old wife and mother to my five children. Get your mammogram. It is painless and paid for by insurance.

This is more propaganda to limit the cost of health care to those countries with government funded health care. Dead people don’t need health care and subsequently give a large chunk of their estate to the government.


5 posted on 02/16/2014 1:02:15 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: Kaslin

If you like your boobies, you can keep your boobies.


6 posted on 02/16/2014 1:07:21 PM PST by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: Jim from C-Town

You’re saying that they started this study 25 years ago to create propaganda for 0bamaCare?


7 posted on 02/16/2014 1:13:15 PM PST by TigersEye (Stupid is a Progressive disease.)
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To: Kaslin
I saw a discussion of this study on Fox News this morning by Drs Samadi and Rosen. While they said the study was interesting you had to consider that it looked at survival rates not detection rates and that the study was done up to 25 years ago when mammogram technology was not what it is today. They reasoned that it is still better to detect breast cancer as early as possible when the cancers are small and that manual exams cannot detect breast cancer as small as now is possible with the new technology. Dr Rosen made an interesting observation when he has his patients schedule a yearly mammogram they often procrastinate to where it is 18 months before they actually get one done. Scheduling every two years often meant that patients would not get the screening done for several more years.

The five-year survival rates for all forms of breast cancer in the US is 85 per cent. However in the UK with their socialized medicine system five year survival is under 74 per cent. In the UK their socialized medicine system allows mammograms every three years and don't start until age 50 compared to annual mammograms starting at age 40 in the US. If the breast cancer is caught early (stage 1) an American woman has a 97 per cent chance of being alive five years after diagnosis. In Britain with their socialized medicine system, five year survival for stage 1 breast cancer is only 78 per cent.

I fear these studies will be used by Obamacare bean counters to stop annual mammograms by saying see it doesn't make any difference in this large study, but ignore the details and the very high rates of survival and early rates of detection under our current system.

8 posted on 02/16/2014 1:44:56 PM PST by The Great RJ
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To: cuban leaf

Cuban leaf, Gerson is a crank and has cured nothing.

Yes, you can cure a lot of stuff by plain old fasting and praying and I wouldn’t give one thin dime to the medical professions cancer “cures”


9 posted on 02/16/2014 2:01:21 PM PST by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: TigersEye

I can remember having a conversation 25 years ago concerning the use of percentages while developing hospital policies. What test we did , how often we did them all seemed to depend on the “percentages of positive outcomes”. Unfortunately, according to the administration, some patients would fall through the cracks.


10 posted on 02/16/2014 2:18:13 PM PST by heylady (“Sometimes I wish I could be a Democrat and then I remember I have a soul.”( Deb))
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To: TigersEye

The meme for men and women has been to push off cancer screening another 5-10 years. Canada has its own socialized medicine, doesn’t need to do this just to prop up Obamacare.


11 posted on 02/16/2014 2:59:25 PM PST by a fool in paradise ("Health care is too important to be left to the government.")
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To: Kaslin

Many women with fibrocystic breasts get false positives with mammograms. They should also have a sonogram. Certain ethnic groups are especially susceptible to aggressive breast cancers prior to the age of 40. They would be dead if they waited to get mammograms until 50. I think that women should be allowed to get a “baseline” mammogram at any age, especially if there’s a family history. Actually, I’ve paid for several mammograms out of my own pocket, because I had a skin cancer on my breast, and I didn’t want the government telling me when I’m “allowed” to have a mammogram.


12 posted on 02/16/2014 3:08:07 PM PST by toothfairy86
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To: Jim from C-Town

My mother died because she had a normal mammogram. Her doctor told her she could stop worrying about the lump in her breast because the test was normal.

We know that the mammogram helps some and does some harm to others. What we should be doing is figuring out how to identify the two groups.


13 posted on 02/16/2014 4:40:10 PM PST by dangerdoc (I don't think you should be forced to make the same decision I did even if I know I'm right.)
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To: Jim from C-Town

What I know is that the efficacy of mammograms was never in question ... until we were faced with ObeyMeCare. About a year before it was finally signed we started hearing, oh, nobody really needs one yearly.... oh, 40 year olds should just wait til they’re 50 for a baseline.... oh, maybe insurance companies should drop coverage for annual screens...

All ju$t coinkydink, I’m $ure.


14 posted on 02/16/2014 4:48:27 PM PST by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1!)
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To: Jim from C-Town

“That mammogram saved my 42 year old wife and mother to my five children. Get your mammogram. It is painless and paid for by insurance.”

whoa. Skippy, whatever mammography is —it is FAR from “painless.” I want you to strip naked. Now, put your “member” on a flat surface. Next, take a large book and put it over your “member.” Next lean on that book as hard as you can for a few minutes, then get back to us how “painless” that is.


15 posted on 02/16/2014 6:43:36 PM PST by gemoftheocean (...geez, this all seems so straight forward and logical to me...)
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To: Jim from C-Town

“That mammogram saved my 42 year old wife and mother to my five children. Get your mammogram. It is painless and paid for by insurance.”

whoa. Skippy, whatever mammography is —it is FAR from “painless.” I want you to strip naked. Now, put your “member” on a flat surface. Next, take a large book and put it over your “member.” Next lean on that book as hard as you can for a few minutes, then get back to us how “painless” that is.


16 posted on 02/16/2014 6:43:37 PM PST by gemoftheocean (...geez, this all seems so straight forward and logical to me...)
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To: Kaslin

Standard mammo couldn’t detect my wife’s lump ultrasound did only other option would have been MRI - we biopsied off the ultrasound and are now 9 years from the event.


17 posted on 02/16/2014 7:12:55 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothings)
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To: Kaslin; AllAmericanGirl44; Armen Hareyan; B4Ranch; Ban Draoi Marbh Draoi; bayareablues; ...
CANCER WARRIORS PING

This is a ping list for cancer survivors and caregivers to share information. If you would like your name added to or removed from this ping list, please tell us in the comments section at this link (click here). (For the most updated list of names, click on the same link and scroll to the end of the comments.)

18 posted on 02/16/2014 8:15:23 PM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: dangerdoc
The problem was not the mammogram but that she had a bad doctor.

I had one who told me ovarian cysts were normal and I should quit complaining about the pain.

I went to another doctor. He had me in surgery in six weeks.

Too much damage had been done by my prior doc's cranial rectal inversion to be totally corrected but at least I didn't die.

19 posted on 02/16/2014 8:23:17 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Kaslin

Pap tests are only needed every two years now and PSAs are not useful. Recommendations for Colonoscopies are morphing too. IMHO it has everything to do with the cost.


20 posted on 02/16/2014 8:41:09 PM PST by GILTN1stborn ( #rememberbenghazi #extortion17 #impeachobama)
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To: Kaslin
How should we feel about a health care system that has long put so much faith in such a flawed instrument? At least a little foolish.

Pretty much the whole article applies to colonoscopies as well.

A very, very small number actually avoid early death because of the procedure. The incidence of colorectal cancer if you do nothing is only 25/100,000. So only some fraction of 25 could be saved even if 100,000 go through the useless unpleasantness of colonoscopy prep and procedure.

21 posted on 02/16/2014 8:48:21 PM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
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To: workerbee
What I know is that the efficacy of mammograms was never in question ... until we were faced with ObeyMeCare.

You're right. For years and years, doctors, the media, and everyone else insisted that women should have yearly mammograms starting at age 40. In those days, I read an article warning that yearly mammograms could cause cancer, and it convinced me not to have one. But, believe me, it didn't matter what I read - Back then, those of us who wouldn't have a mammogram were accused of being irresponsible and stupid.

Now, all of a sudden, out of the blue come all of these articles on how mammograms are harmful or, at the very least, not really helpful at all. Hmmm...

In reality, mammograms catch some tumors and miss others. IMHO, based on personal experience, we each should be vigilant about our own health, but what that means for one person may be very different from what that means for another.

22 posted on 02/16/2014 8:57:14 PM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: yldstrk; cuban leaf

That’s what I was thinking. Follow the money indeed. All it’s trying to do is sell that book, it told me nothing about the method, NOTHING. All it did was put down current treatment. Ok, put it down, but tell me something instead!!!


23 posted on 02/17/2014 5:26:40 AM PST by Shimmer1
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To: dangerdoc

I’m sorry, but your mother died because she believed her doctor, not just because of a mammo.

The same thing happened to me, same exact thing. “oh it’s a benign cyst” Yeah, like you know!!!! You don’t know! I wanted that thing OUT of my body, so went to a surgeon and it was cancer. Liars. I don’t allow my drs to treat me with “i think....”

I’m really sorry you lost your mom though. God bless.


24 posted on 02/17/2014 5:34:22 AM PST by Shimmer1
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To: Shimmer1

I insisted a lump come out and my doctor was livid

He turned out to be right, but the insurance would pay for lumpectomy but not mri so I made him take it out.

It was benign but at least we knew


25 posted on 02/17/2014 5:43:22 AM PST by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: yldstrk

Cuban leaf, Gerson is a crank and has cured nothing.


Sorry, but I’ve seen it happen. You can’t convince a man in a flooded house that there is no flooding.


26 posted on 02/17/2014 5:49:55 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: Shimmer1

Interesting thing is that even people who have something real to say are “selling a book”.

I’ve read “How to Win Friends And Influence People” by a guy that was “selling a book”.

Etc.


27 posted on 02/17/2014 5:51:35 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: dangerdoc

The radiologist who saw the first images of my lung cancer told me it was probably just pneumonia, which I was already being treated for, but he also said it was important for me to follow up immediately with an oncologist, to be sure.
I followed his advice.

The doctor who diagnosed my lung cancer told me to write out my will, go home, and wait for death.
I ignored his advice.

The doctor who treated my lung cancer insisted that my world needed to revolve around getting rid of the cancer.
I took his advice.

I’ve been cancer free over six years, and counting.


28 posted on 02/17/2014 6:38:05 AM PST by BykrBayb (Somewhere, my flower is there. ~ Þ)
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To: Shimmer1

Thank goodness you followed your own instincts, Shimmer1.


29 posted on 02/17/2014 8:31:43 AM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: Tired of Taxes

Yes. I find that some still try to treat me with “i think....” and I don’t stand for it.


30 posted on 02/17/2014 9:10:26 AM PST by Shimmer1
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To: TigersEye

No. But the Canadians have been backing health care at a government level for thirty five years and dead Canadians use less health care than live ones. It is a Canadian study.


31 posted on 02/17/2014 3:14:14 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: gemoftheocean

Mammograms are significantly less painful then end stage cancer and a damn sight more comfortable than an early grave!


32 posted on 02/17/2014 3:15:45 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: dangerdoc

If the doctor found a lump and dismissed it because of a mammogram without doing a biopsy, he is a quack who should have not only been sued into the poor house, he should have lost his license to practice medicine.


33 posted on 02/17/2014 3:17:26 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: Mercat
I only had one mammogram in my life. It just seemed to me that acquaintances who got breast cancer were the ones who were most faithful about mammograms. Besides that, there's no family history of the disease and I've not been involved in any of the suspected risk factors.

But you know what? It isn't easy. I've gotten in near-screaming arguments with doctors who were insisting that I was killing myself by not getting mammograms. With one doctor, I had to make appointments and not show up, just to shut him up.

34 posted on 02/17/2014 3:22:41 PM PST by grania
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To: Jim from C-Town

He was a family friend, a very good man and suing him would not have brought our mother back.

Coincidentally do you remember hearing about a pharmacist in Kansas City diluting chemo to increase his profits? That was where she was getting her chemo, for him we signed the paperwork. No money to speak of, but he didn’t make a mistake, he committed a crime.


35 posted on 02/17/2014 5:16:33 PM PST by dangerdoc (I don't think you should be forced to make the same decision I did even if I know I'm right.)
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To: dangerdoc

I had a friend who died because of that pharmacist. That was about the most evil thing a pharmacist could do.


36 posted on 02/18/2014 4:42:38 AM PST by Mercat
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To: Mercat

His excuse was he was donating a lot of money to his church. He must not have been paying attention.


37 posted on 02/18/2014 6:43:01 AM PST by dangerdoc (I don't think you should be forced to make the same decision I did even if I know I'm right.)
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To: dangerdoc

There’s a really good Law and Order episode (might have been Criminal Intent - yes, with Denofrio) that tracks this story exactly. Her widower and I share a manicurist so I see him occasionally. There ended up being a settlement. She was a good person. Very sad. It was a big story here in the metro area.


38 posted on 02/18/2014 6:48:50 AM PST by Mercat
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To: Shimmer1; yldstrk

Looking back on the posts I realize I should clarify where I was coming from regarding Gerson. I see the whole Gerson thing as one of many examples of folks trying to tell us that cancer is not inevitable and can even be treated naturally. And diet is a HUGE part of both the causes and cures for it.

And medication is not always the best answer. The movie, “Curing cancer from the inside out” Is interesting. Also, if someone devotes their life to discovering information that can help people, there is really nothing wrong with paying them for their time and effort. i.e. a person is not automatically a quack simply because they want payment. That would destroy the credibility of pretty much every human being that ever lived except Jesus.


39 posted on 02/18/2014 7:22:29 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: cuban leaf

I certainly don’t mind him or her making money off of his knowledge, but the video puts others down for that, so I was pretty much just pointing out the hypocrisy.


40 posted on 02/18/2014 9:20:13 AM PST by Shimmer1
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To: Shimmer1

Fair point. But I believe they are saying the same thing is happening to them, and in spades (i.e. the death of the senior Gerson looks like murder).

Thing is, somebody is right. It may be a little of both, or it may be mostly one, but somebody is right.


41 posted on 02/18/2014 9:36:43 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: cuban leaf

MRI are 100% accurate, no false positives

DIL is CNA nursing home min wage no health ins full time only nurses are offered over priced ins.

She got kicked in the breast by a patient, filed the WC report. Next day she wakes up to large mass in that breast, hematoma likely suspect since it was a very hard bruising on skin, ER run, CT, WC covered. Rest is not. She is sent to Evansville IN Women’s health center, after several mammos + MRI they found a walnut size tumor, milk ducts. Lobule, nipple involvement, biopsy next, stage 3, both HER 2 & hormone receptors, Mascetomy only recourse, followed by 12 months Chemo she is on # 6, + 6 was of another drug then 5 yrs hormone suppressants.

Had to get their conservative Stat Rep to cut through Medicaid BS to get her covered. Son lost his 40 hr+ health ins 1.5 yrs ago works PT. no one wants to hire a type 2 diabetic, Medicaid does not cover US makes, only Illegals! Ind spends $1.30M per yr on Illegal Medicaid adult men included!
I have bad Fibro cystic breast pain along with fibromyalgia, mammos are not designed for large DD boobs, last 1 I had left bruised on both that took 2 wks to go away, + the pain over rode10mg LoreTabs, promethizine & 10 mg Valium I nearly passed out from the pain! This was the new “comforts style” medieval torture machine.

Every male Gyn who orders 1 should have to stick their “jewels” under it just once to find out how painful those tortute machines really are!


42 posted on 02/18/2014 9:47:47 AM PST by GailA (IF you fail to keep your promises to the Military, you won't keep them to Citizens!)
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To: Jim from C-Town

It is NOT painless if U have 34 DD boobs with Fibro cystic breast disease & fibromyalgia I weigh all of 120 lbs, over gifted. They have to mash them in a device not designed for that size I had bruises 4 two weeks & nearly passed out even with 10mg lore tabs, promethizine, & 10 mg Valium to me it is a midEvil torture devise! Use a painless 100% accurate MRI


43 posted on 02/18/2014 9:56:48 AM PST by GailA (IF you fail to keep your promises to the Military, you won't keep them to Citizens!)
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To: GailA

I pray that your DIL does well with treatments and that she will be blessed with many healthy years to come. Thank goodness the cancer was caught.

Mammograms are not 100% reliable. On the other hand, MRIs are known to give many false positives - that’s what doctors told me. In my case, the MRI caught two other spots of cancer that the mammogram never detected. But, in many other cases, the “spots” on the MRI turn out to be benign.

So, mammograms miss spots sometimes, and MRIs give many false positives. What to do? Unfortunately, insurance won’t cover an MRI every year unless the woman has tested positive for one of the BRCA genes. So, IMHO, because there are no guarantees with any test, each woman should do what she thinks is best.

Btw, after finding “the lump” myself, I went for my first mammogram. It had to be taken 6-7 times in order to get it on the picture. Haha - BRUTAL. Fortunately, I didn’t have the problems that you had - probably because I found a place that uses a newer, digital “soft-touch” mammogram with immediate results. That might be one you’d want to try.

Blessings to you!


44 posted on 02/18/2014 11:30:48 AM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: GailA

Well, do as you wish.

My wife was well endowed when she had breasts. They where removed to save her life because the Mammogram found a small malignancy that her doctor didn’t find with a breast exam just two weeks earlier.

As I said, bruised breasts are much more comfortable than a coffin. As for an MRI. If you can get your health insurance to pay for a $4,500 MRI instead of a $400 Mammogram, good for you. I doubt they will be that understanding.


45 posted on 02/18/2014 8:33:51 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: Jim from C-Town

May you and your wife and children be blessed with many more years together. Those are beautiful photos on your profile page, by the way.


46 posted on 02/18/2014 8:53:59 PM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: cuban leaf

MURDER???!!! oh my gosh!!!


47 posted on 02/18/2014 9:00:30 PM PST by Shimmer1
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To: Tired of Taxes

Thank you.

We have had a half decade of serious trouble and we hope the latest cancer scare is the last for the next, well, forever.


48 posted on 02/18/2014 9:20:45 PM PST by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: Shimmer1

MURDER???!!! oh my gosh!!!


Actually, yes. There is evidence to strongly suggest it. Frankly, on a related note, the history of the AMA and its creation is interesting. Human beings and their suffering have become a profit center. A BIG one.


49 posted on 02/19/2014 5:33:28 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: Mercat

My DEXA score is bad, first drug was Fosamax, horrible side effects, and if you look all the OP drugs they have about the same ones. The new one they are pushing is Foreto, it comes in a diabetic style pen, 18 month program. My co-pays would amount to $1K. A daily shot, needles cost more than the med, and the promised bone regrowth of 9% DISAPPEARS once the drug is withdrawn after 18 months and you are put back on the other non bone regrowth meds. Where do I gain from it if it just disappears after the treatment is stopped. Waste of my money is all that weighing cost and benefits are balanced against each other.

I would prefer to see a standardized Vit/Min all in one Bone Supplement made that women can begin taking daily at age 30. Bones are made up of more than Calcium and Vit D. Which is why you see no great improvement in your Dexxa scores.

And with the cuts to Medicare they have moved Bone Density test to every 2 yrs. Unless your doc finds a ‘needed’ reason to do it every year. Same goes for men’s PSA testing.

Gotta read those first few pages of your Medicare or Tricare Life booklets to find out about those loss of services and test.


50 posted on 02/19/2014 6:53:23 AM PST by GailA (IF you fail to keep your promises to the Military, you won't keep them to Citizens!)
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