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PHOEBE HAS TWO BABIES (hummingbird live cam- new cam, very close up)
Phoebe the hummingbird live cam ^ | 3/30/14 | patriot08

Posted on 03/30/2014 12:13:38 PM PDT by patriot08



Flower Graphics for Myspace

New better live web camera!
Extremely up close view of Phoebe and her new babies.

A new camera has been installed very close up so we may have the rare privilege of observing the feeding, care and fledgling of hummingbird chicks.



Take a break from all the depressing news of the day.

Phoebe Allen, the adorable little hummingbird now has two new babies. HERE

Absolutely cute overload.




Phoebe is a Channel Island Allen hummingbird who lives in Orange County, California. She has been hatching 4 to 5 clutches per year and her nest has been on net webcam since 2007. She builds her nests in a rose bush, and the nest is about the size of a golf ball, with eggs being about the size of a tic-tac candy. The season for nesting is October through May/early June, and Phoebe will lay four to five clutches per season. Two eggs are laid per clutch, they hatch after 17 days, and the chicks typically fly three to four weeks later. Phoebe will sometimes build a new nest, but frequently repairs old nests.



Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Phoebe






The hummingbird; one of God's most beautiful and enchanting creations

Amazing facts about the hummingbird: 'MAGIC IN THE AIR' (PBS)















TOPICS: Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: hummingbirds; livecam
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1 posted on 03/30/2014 12:13:38 PM PDT by patriot08
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To: MeekOneGOP; Conspiracy Guy; DocRock; King Prout; Darksheare; OSHA; martin_fierro; NYC GOP Chick; ...

New, live cam very close up on the hummingbirds. The clarity is amazing.

Never realized they were so tiny.
The nest is about the size of a golf ball and the eggs were the size of tic-tacs!


2 posted on 03/30/2014 12:20:21 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08


3 posted on 03/30/2014 12:25:49 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Obamacare: You can't make an omelette without breaking a few eggs.)
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To: patriot08

Last year a mama hummingbird built her nest in the bamboo directly outside my living room window, 1 chick only. The nest was tennis ball sized and seemed kinda deep; the most I saw of the chick was it’s head sticking out the top.


4 posted on 03/30/2014 12:25:59 PM PDT by eclecticEel ("The petty man forsakes what lies within his power and longs for what lies with Heaven." - Xunzi)
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To: Jeff Chandler

5 posted on 03/30/2014 12:27:14 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Obamacare: You can't make an omelette without breaking a few eggs.)
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To: patriot08

“Miniscule”


6 posted on 03/30/2014 1:08:18 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: patriot08

Hummingbirds also have a severe Napoleon complex.
They will attack with minimal provocation.
“You’re under my tree! Feel my tiny feathery WRAAAAATH!”


7 posted on 03/30/2014 1:09:32 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: patriot08

Wow! I’ve only seen them flying, not in a nest.


8 posted on 03/30/2014 1:10:15 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: patriot08

WOW. That is really neat!


9 posted on 03/30/2014 1:11:12 PM PDT by ican'tbelieveit
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To: ican'tbelieveit; Star Traveler

Keep checking in. You’ll see Phoebe feed her babies.
She feeds them a mixture of nectar and bug slurry that she has stored in her crop.
Very cute.


10 posted on 03/30/2014 2:00:34 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

Really neat! Thanks for posting this.


11 posted on 03/30/2014 3:12:57 PM PDT by Bigg Red (1 Pt 1: As he who called you is holy, be holy yourselves in every aspect of your conduct.)
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To: All






Amazing hummingbird facts:.

>The average hummingbird weighs only about 3 grams (less than a nickel by comparison).

>Hummingbirds live on the edge of survival and can starve to death in 3 to 5 hours..

>Humming birds, on an average, beat their wings 80 times per second. However, in some species, it has been recorded that these creatures can beat their wings 200 times per second. Its heart rate is often more that 1,200 beats per minute.

>Hummingbird can perch on the tree. But these birds cannot hop or even walk.

>Each day hummingbird has to eat at least ½ of weight. It will use 5 till 8 hours a day to eat food.

>Of all bird species, hummingbirds have the largest known relative heart size. The heart represents 2.4 percent of their body weight.If the average man’s metabolism was comparable to that of a hummingbird, he would have to eat 285 pounds of hamburger every day in order to maintain his weight.An active hummingbird can starve to death in as little as two hours. 90 percent of the hummingbird’s diet is nectar. A hummingbird will visit between 1,000 and 2,000 blossoms each day. Hummingbirds do not have a sense of smell, as far as is known. They use their eyesight to help them locate nectar sources and to get insects out of the air or off leaves.

>There are 340 species of hummingbirds making them the second most diverse bird family on earth.

>Believe it or not, there are hummingbird predators such as the praying mantis, the dragonfly, the robber fly, certain spiders, some frogs, and larger predatory birds.

>An amazing fact about the humming bird is that it can fly up, down, forward, backward and even upside down. A humming bird can rotate its wings from its shoulder blades, which enables it to hover and fly in different positions. Only insects can fly like this.

>The vision of these tiny birds is so spectacular that they can see places much farther than any human being. Moreover, these birds can also see ultraviolet light.

See more at: http://www.hummingbird-guide.com/hummingbird- facts.html#sthash.4fVHV6ir.dpuf





12 posted on 03/30/2014 3:13:27 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Bigg Red

You’re very welcome!


13 posted on 03/30/2014 3:15:18 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Jeff Chandler

Thanks for the pics.
The babies with the pin feathers..quite funny looking. :)


14 posted on 03/30/2014 3:16:41 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

Thanks for posting, patriot 08. I’ve been watching for a couple of weeks now and love it.


15 posted on 03/30/2014 4:37:41 PM PDT by jch10 (Election Day, 2014. May be the most important day since Bunker Hill.)
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To: Darksheare

While the female is left to build the nest and raise the babies, the little male will fiercely guard her and his territory.


16 posted on 03/30/2014 4:53:13 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Darksheare

Glad it is not my imagination. There is one which hangs around the front porch. There are times when I duck because when it takes off, it seems to be coming right at me.


17 posted on 03/30/2014 5:02:39 PM PDT by Protect the Bill of Rights
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To: jch10

You’re welcome


18 posted on 03/30/2014 5:04:54 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: jch10; All

If you watch the ‘chat’ room, the administrator (guy who set up cam) comes on frequently to answer questions- like how he set up the cam, questions about the care of Phoebe re; filling hummer feeder and even putting out building material like fluff for her to find to build her nest.
Very interesting.


19 posted on 03/30/2014 5:13:25 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Protect the Bill of Rights; patriot08

A little, looked yellow, hummingbird charged my missus.
First sign something was up was this strange noise.
Sounded like “yeeeeeeet”, it rammed my wife and flew off with a parting “ Eeeeeeeeeeee!” noise.
Problem: we don’t normally have yellow hummers blatting about here.
So what was he?
(Looked kinda chubby, tail splayed in flight. Looked like a caffeine buzzed badminton shuttlecock with a needle nose and attitude problem.)


20 posted on 03/30/2014 5:42:45 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Darksheare

I’m sure they could scare you, but doubt if these tiny things could inflict any damage. :)


21 posted on 03/30/2014 7:03:39 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

“That beak hurts” I’m told.
Still was a surprise.
It didn’t attack after that either.
But it sure griped up a storm from the tree.


22 posted on 03/30/2014 7:20:56 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: All

.

So glad you enjoyed the thread, and thanks to each of you for your contributions.
((hugs))

Katy

PS:

If anyone would like to be on a ping list:
Very low volume
Subjects: Interesting animals, Texas history
(Coming up; Battle of San Jacinto)

.


23 posted on 03/30/2014 7:22:58 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: All

..and more ‘Texas Treasures’.


24 posted on 03/30/2014 7:24:42 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

Welcome!

As an aside, a tiny bird that can do an amazing amount of damage for the size: peachface lovebird.


25 posted on 03/30/2014 7:24:58 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Darksheare
Really? And who would have thought? They are so cute, though.

Parrots are cute, but make too much noise for me...besides they might not fit with all the cats. LOL

26 posted on 03/30/2014 7:39:51 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08
For those of us who live in the *eastern half of the US*.....this map of the Spring 2014 Migration of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds is an invaluable research tool.

It's been such a strange weather winter....but our little darlings are on their way. Usually, In Connecticut the guys arrive around April 15th ....it's fun to watch their progress up the coast.

I live for those rubys.

27 posted on 03/30/2014 7:40:19 PM PDT by Daffynition ("If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." ~ Henry Ford)
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To: Darksheare

“That beak hurts” I’m told.
‘Still was a surprise.
It didn’t attack after that either.
But it sure griped up a storm from the tree.’
________________________________________

One wouldn’t think they could hurt much with their beak ‘cause they’re so tiny. Guess they’re stronger than one would imagine.

Probably a male protecting his mate’s nest and territory.

Ever been ‘dived bombed’ by mocking birds protecting their nest? Now that is scary. :)

.


28 posted on 03/30/2014 7:45:16 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

Yup.
My peachface, imaginitavely named “Peaches”, is quite the little beak fiend.
I have a scar on my thumb from where she exacted her toll of blood.
(She subsequently decided she likes me. I must be delicious.)
Lovebirds specifically and all hookbills are noise machines from sunup to sundown.
They also have an ocd need to chew.
On everything.
So they must be provided with toys to satisfy the destruction desire.
I crack jokes about how mankind would be doomed if lovebirds were merely cockatoo size.

But, I love my beak monster and would not trade her for anything.
Even if she did get loose and set the cat into terror panicked fleeing to his hiding place.


29 posted on 03/30/2014 7:49:48 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: patriot08

I was lucky that the mockingbird we had locally liked me and would show off.
And “talk”.
He would get mad if you didn’t say “ hello”, he’d forgive you if you played new phone ringtones for him.
Which he’d later mimic at the unsuspecting.

He disappeared after five years.
How long do they live?


30 posted on 03/30/2014 7:53:46 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Daffynition

.

Beautiful little birds...one of God’s most beautiful and enchanting little creations.

I’m no authority on hummingbirds. I just stumbled upon the Phoebe site and became enthralled with her- seeing at so very close range how she feeds and cares for them on the nest- and even after they fledge.

We have some hummer feeders out and there always seem to be hummers around all year here in S Texas.
Have no idea what species they are, but they’re so pretty.

.


31 posted on 03/30/2014 7:56:59 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Darksheare

LOL Think I’ll just admire birds outside in the trees.
Couldn’t bear the noise and chewing up things.
Those birds are pretty and entertaining, though.

Love to see parrots talk. They’re so cute.

I think mockingbirds live like 2-3 years outside and up to 10 in captivity from what I’ve read.

Love to hear them ‘sing’. They really do imitate so many different birds- and sometimes even ‘things’.

Had a mocker build a nest outside my bedroom window last Spring..woke me up with her and/or her mate’s singing each morning.
Kinda glad when the little ones fledged and they all went away. :)

.


32 posted on 03/30/2014 8:12:29 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

Peaches tries valiantly to mimic.
But lovebirds are “not good mimics”.
(Understatement to the extreme.)
Female lovebirds are better mimics than males, males are more docile and easily handled.
Peaches says her name sorta, and a few other words.
But, being that lovebirds are terrible mimics, it is “ scratchy beaky noise that is oddly articulate in form.”

The local mockingbird would sing, pop into the air to display his wings, then sing some more.
He showed off his brood every time too.
We had to play sounds for them as well.
Somewhere there are a family of mockingbirds who mimic nextel ringtones.


33 posted on 03/30/2014 8:28:02 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Darksheare

.

I’ve heard of Mockingbirds even imitating odd things like a squeaky door or a car alarm. Mostly I hear them imitating cardinals or sparrows. LOL

It’s amazing that birds can imitate human speech.

When I was a kid, my father brought home a baby crow that had fallen out of its nest.
We raised him, feeding him using an eye dropper.
He followed us around like a puppy. And he was very QUIET.
He even learned to talk.
(Yes, crows really can mimic human words!) He could say, ‘Hello Joe’ (his name) and a few other words.
He was one of the best pets we ever had.
I’d take in another in a heartbeat.

If you ever find a baby crow, take him home and raise him.
Wonderful pets.

.


34 posted on 03/30/2014 9:08:19 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08
Perhaps you will find some info here on how to ID your hummies....

http://www.hummingbirds.net/species.html

You are very lucky to have year-round visitors! I am jealous.

Texas
Ruby-throated, Black-chinned, Broad-tailed, Anna's, Rufous, Magnificent, Lucifer, Buff-bellied, Blue-throated, Costa's, Green Violet-ear, Allen's, Calliope, Broad-billed, Violet-crowned, White-eared, Green-breasted Mango, Berylline. Antillean Crested, Rufous-tailed.

35 posted on 03/30/2014 9:16:04 PM PDT by Daffynition ("If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." ~ Henry Ford)
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To: patriot08

Heard our mocker mimic car door lock sounds, ringtones, and as close as he could get to some song bits from the radio.
Catbirds will also mimic, but not as much as a mocker.

Crows are very smart birds.
They recognize specific people, some they like and some they hate.
Had one who would caw at me before doing a mimicked laugh noise.


36 posted on 03/30/2014 9:38:28 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Daffynition; patriot08

I’m.in NY.
Mainly it’s rubythroats here.
But we’ve had some oddballs the past few years that just don’t look...right.
And they are very mindful of windows and cameras.
So trying to get pictures, you get a colored streak on the image.

Still wonder what that one was, I swear it looked yellow and had a largish splayed tail.
Which doesn’t match anything normal to NY.


37 posted on 03/30/2014 9:47:27 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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bfl


38 posted on 03/30/2014 9:53:35 PM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (Shall Not Be Infringed)
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To: Darksheare

You may have a wanderer. How fun!

Not sure what it could be.

A picture is a great help.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/hummingbird/

....is a great site [you have to sign-up] for meeting all sorts of experienced birders, who may have an idea for you.


39 posted on 03/30/2014 10:07:37 PM PDT by Daffynition ("If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." ~ Henry Ford)
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To: Daffynition

Weirder than anything.
Every time I’ve tried to get a pic, either the rubythroats start a feeder battle, or the oddball notices me trying to focus on him.
Result is the same every time.
This year we’re short a tree.
The hemlock came down during hurc sandy.


40 posted on 03/30/2014 10:11:17 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Daffynition

..or I’m standing outside nowhere near the camera.
Like the night we had a chuck wills widow sitting on a log in the side lot.
“Peent! Peent! *buzzing noise as the bird dives*”


41 posted on 03/30/2014 10:44:42 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Daffynition

Oops.
Common nighthawk.
*sigh*


42 posted on 03/30/2014 10:47:50 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9qpsyjmda5Q

This guy.
Peenting.
All night.
I’ll run across two tonight when I get home, they’ll be making various sounds from opposite sides of the yard.
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/common_nighthawk/sounds

It is a remarkably large bird.
Not exactly the size you expect when you finally see it sleepily sitting and watching you.
Cornell description could use some work.
“Medium sized” is roughly crow size to bluejay size.


43 posted on 03/30/2014 11:00:02 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: patriot08

We have ruby throated here but I’ve never seen one nesting. The most we’ve had at one time is eleven. They bring such joy and excitement each year.


44 posted on 03/31/2014 7:50:39 AM PDT by jch10 (Election Day, 2014. May be the most important day since Bunker Hill.)
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To: jch10

We have ruby throated here but I’ve never seen one nesting. The most we’ve had at one time is eleven. They bring such joy and excitement each year.

______________________________________

Then enjoy Phoebe. She’s a Channel island hummer but you can
enjoy the rare opportunity to see close up how they raise their young.


45 posted on 03/31/2014 9:21:05 AM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Daffynition

Thank you for the information.
I’ll see if I can identify some of them. :)

Here’s something you may be interested in:
(I had no idea about this fact about my city)

http://www.birdzilla.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3342&Itemid=

Explains all the hummers. :)


46 posted on 03/31/2014 9:31:46 AM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Darksheare

Thanks for the website:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/common_nighthawk/sounds

That’s great. You can type in any bird and hear the sounds it makes. Never knew such a site existed!


47 posted on 03/31/2014 9:36:16 AM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

That’s delightful! All the birds are using your area as a way station B4 their final push further south.

This winter, we have had sightings of snow owls.....they do not usually come this far south from the Artic.

I started my GD on her *life list* many years ago.....and would have liked to add a snowy to that list, for her and me!

We spent a day hiking in the area they were reported by had no luck...but being outdoors is reward enough!


48 posted on 03/31/2014 9:59:49 AM PDT by Daffynition ("If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." ~ Henry Ford)
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To: patriot08

Welcome!


49 posted on 03/31/2014 12:27:46 PM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Daffynition

You must be a real ‘birder’. :)
Had no idea Corpus Christi was elected the ‘birdiest’ city in the US ten times in a row.
Maybe one day you all came make a trip down here and fill out your lists. :)


50 posted on 04/01/2014 4:23:27 AM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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