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Stawberries Question (vanity)
me

Posted on 06/09/2014 10:23:55 AM PDT by Leaning Right

As a rookie gardener, I planted some strawberry bushes two years ago. I did not get any fruit that year, but I was told that was normal.

Last year I got fruit, but the strawberries were all no bigger than a thumbnail. What went wrong? Any advice would be appreciated.


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: strawberries; strawberry
And another question for you strawberry farmers. Do you protect your strawberries with netting to keep the birds out? Is that necessary?
1 posted on 06/09/2014 10:23:56 AM PDT by Leaning Right
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To: Leaning Right

Where do you live? That plays a lot into it.


2 posted on 06/09/2014 10:25:59 AM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: Leaning Right

Actually, little steel balls are quite effective when dealing with strawberries.

(Actually I do not have an answer for your question, but I suggest you try the “WEEKLY GARDENING THREAD” posted every Friday on FR. Everybody there is very helpful!)


3 posted on 06/09/2014 10:26:30 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: Leaning Right

Are they not being polinated?


4 posted on 06/09/2014 10:26:32 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: Leaning Right

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

5 posted on 06/09/2014 10:27:03 AM PDT by Servant of the Cross (the Truth will set you free)
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To: Leaning Right

Obamacare taxed


6 posted on 06/09/2014 10:27:11 AM PDT by FreeAtlanta (Liberty or Big Government - you can't have both.)
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To: Leaning Right

I planted a bunch of strawberry plants from cuttings when I was a kid. I got strawberries the first year. That was in Southern California in well-mulched soil.


7 posted on 06/09/2014 10:27:53 AM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Conservatism is the political disposition of grown-ups.)
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To: FreeAtlanta
Obamacare taxed

Or global warming, or climate change.

8 posted on 06/09/2014 10:29:01 AM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I holding this lantern? I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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To: Leaning Right

Plants have different fertilizing needs than it does in normal growing phases. When the plant is starting the flowering phase, give it the proper food.


9 posted on 06/09/2014 10:30:20 AM PDT by lormand (Inside every liberal is a dung slinging monkey)
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To: Leaning Right; fwdude

“Where do you live? That plays a lot into it.”

Yes, that is the first question that I would ask. Climate is the very first consideration.


10 posted on 06/09/2014 10:30:37 AM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (Why does every political hack think that he knows how to run my life better than I do?)
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To: fwdude
Where do you live?

Near Pittsburgh, PA.

11 posted on 06/09/2014 10:32:26 AM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I holding this lantern? I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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To: fwdude

This person needs to keep enriching her soil.

If my grandfather were still alive, I’d ask him. He could grow vegetables that you had to use wheelbarrows to carry out of the garden.


12 posted on 06/09/2014 10:33:14 AM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Leaning Right

http://www.provident-living-today.com/Growing-Strawberries.html


13 posted on 06/09/2014 10:33:55 AM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Leaning Right

You might consider joining a gardening club. Have your soil tested for mineral deficiencies or excesses by the county agent. Essentially I mulch almost everything. I use a wide variety of soil conditioners and fertilizers which I use in small amounts but over a wide period of time. I have several compost piles going all year long.


14 posted on 06/09/2014 10:36:26 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: Leaning Right

High nitrogen fertilizer encourages leaf growth. We use fertilizer with a high middle number, which encourages bloom.

We have a huge strawberry bed and are picking a quart or so a day at the start of the season. Later we’ll have to invite friends to come and pick. We can only use so many berries. We also mulch with straw and use netting to discourage the birds.


15 posted on 06/09/2014 10:38:36 AM PDT by IM2MAD (IM2MAD=Individual Motivated 2 Make A Difference)
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To: Leaning Right

Iron content in the soil plays a role.
Don’t overthink it though.


16 posted on 06/09/2014 10:40:35 AM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Leaning Right

If you planted bushes, you did not plant strawberries. Maybe you planted raspberries.


17 posted on 06/09/2014 10:42:07 AM PDT by ImNotLying (The Right To Bear Arms: Making good people helpless won't make bad people harmless!)
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To: IM2MAD

Forgot to add the variety we plant. It’s a June bearer named Honoye. The berries are large and flavorful. We end up with gallons in the freezer and lots to share with friends.


18 posted on 06/09/2014 10:43:45 AM PDT by IM2MAD (IM2MAD=Individual Motivated 2 Make A Difference)
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To: ImNotLying
If you planted bushes, you did not plant strawberries. Maybe you planted raspberries.

LOL oh man that's funny.
19 posted on 06/09/2014 10:45:00 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin.)
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To: ImNotLying
If you planted bushes, you did not plant strawberries. Maybe you planted raspberries.

Yes. Please post photos of these "strawberries". Lol

20 posted on 06/09/2014 10:47:38 AM PDT by Tenacious 1 (Tagline deleted at the request of an offended FReeper.)
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To: Leaning Right

Some varieties only grow small berries.


21 posted on 06/09/2014 10:53:39 AM PDT by Rannug ("all enemies, foreign and domestic")
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To: Servant of the Cross

Yes, you should be sorry. Because I was going to use a Caine Mutiny theme to make a lame joke.


22 posted on 06/09/2014 10:54:28 AM PDT by driftless2 (For long term happiness, learn how to play the accordion.)
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To: Leaning Right

Can you post an image of those strawberry bushes? That may help.


23 posted on 06/09/2014 10:58:35 AM PDT by deport
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To: Leaning Right

Natural, organic strawberries are small. And the small ones do best on their own, without needing a lot of maintenance.

The large ones are hybrid. And they may look impressive, but they don’t taste as good as the small, wild ones.


24 posted on 06/09/2014 11:03:31 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Leaning Right
If you fertilize with too much nitrogen, it will go wild with foliage and runners, but be disappointing in terms of fruit.

When the plants first start blossoming, make sure they're well-watered, do not give any more N and start giving them more phosphorus. If you compost, banana peels are excellent.Bone meal and rock phosphate are typical sources. If you can find them, fish bone meal and soy husks are other good sources. Everything is better if you compost it first.

Meats, poultry, eggs and dairy products are also phosphorus-rich (when cleaning out your fridge!), but you'd want to avoid these because they'll attract possums, rats, flies, maggots. You can, however, compost them successfully if you use an anaerobic bokashi composting method.

25 posted on 06/09/2014 11:04:45 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (When I grow up, I'm gonna settle down, chew honeycomb & drive a tractor, grow things in the ground.)
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To: Rannug
Some varieties only grow small berries.

I think they are called RINOs.

26 posted on 06/09/2014 11:08:27 AM PDT by RedMDer (May we always be happy and may our enemies always know it. - Sarah Palin, 10-18-2010)
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To: Leaning Right

If you actually see that you have many birds eating your berries, then netting may ultimately be the solution, as you prolly can’t shoot them all. Strawberries can be picky about their growing environment, some varieties more than others. IF you are doing pretty much everything right (not overwatering, but enough water, not pumping the nitrogen so high that the plant grows great but no berries, and you don’t have Verticillium fungus) then perhaps try scratching in some bone meal, applying a layer of compost, and covering the ground with mulch.

Then there is this article: 10 Reasons Strawberry Plants Don’t Produce Strawberries
http://strawberryplants.org/2010/08/strawberry-plants-producing-runners-but-no-strawberries/


27 posted on 06/09/2014 11:13:02 AM PDT by Carthego delenda est
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To: Leaning Right

Strawberry BUSH?. A few minutes with Google and I find this.

“WARNING
The fruits, though beautiful to look at, are reported to be poisonous if ingested.”

“Strawberry bush–Euonymous americanus. Naturalist refer to the plant as “ice cream” for deer. But it is poisonous to humans. It’s in the bittersweet family.”

Common Name(s):Burning bush, strawberry bush, hearts-a-bustin’, spindle tree, wahoo.

I have had and a neighbor has burning bushes. I had never heard them referred to as “Strawberry Bushes”. This is a misnomer. It does not produce strawberries. It produces red berries that may “look” like strawberries, but they are poisonous.

Burning bushes are a waste of time in my opinion. When planted as a hedge, they may not all turn red at the same time. Once reaching peak red, the leaves, very shortly, all fall off.

Forsythia and Honeysuckle bushes are best. The are the first bushes to leave and blossom. They are hearty and are the last to succumb to the frost.

Forsythia have beautiful, plentiful, yellow flowers while Honeysuckle have a beautiful fragrance that fills the air.

I know they are fairly common, but they give you a long season and are almost impossible to kill. As a hedge, they make a terrific privacy fence. They replace themselves by rooting their branches and can grow quite large if not pruned. You will need a big yard.


28 posted on 06/09/2014 11:16:15 AM PDT by faucetman ( Just the facts, ma'am, Just the facts)
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To: Leaning Right

1) Most if not all strawberries are tendril crawlers not bushes.
2) We keep netting over ours with most in a fenced areas due to: birds, squirrels, rabbits, chipmunks, skunks, racoons, deer, oppossum and the occasional neighborhood pets with a sweet tooth.
3) Our soil has a lot of clay, but we added some topsoil/manure to the garden and have had no issues since.
4) Put in our plants about 5 years ago. First year not much, but every year thereafter fruit has been bigger.
5) Remember I said they were crawlers - we have more plants now then we know what to do with they will self propogate.


29 posted on 06/09/2014 11:23:49 AM PDT by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothings)
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To: Leaning Right

When I was a about 60 years ago we used to pick wild strawberries from a field behind the military dependents’ housing complex. They were always very small, but very sweet.

Maybe you’ve got that variety.


30 posted on 06/09/2014 11:33:03 AM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed & water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: JimRed

When I was a kid, that is...


31 posted on 06/09/2014 11:36:58 AM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed & water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: Leaning Right

http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_euam7.pdf


32 posted on 06/09/2014 11:40:00 AM PDT by faucetman ( Just the facts, ma'am, Just the facts)
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To: ImNotLying

I thought the same thing. Strawberries grow on vines.


33 posted on 06/09/2014 11:50:59 AM PDT by autumnraine
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To: Leaning Right
"And another question for you strawberry farmers. Do you protect your strawberries with netting to keep the birds out? Is that necessary?"

I used to use netting till I found a dead bird caught it in. I did use those white floating covers which covered the vole activity.

Now, when I trim my pine trees, I place the branches over the berries. When the needles fall off, I remove the dead branches. This seems to have improved my strawberry quantity and makes it easier to weed. I also cover them with mulch during the winter.

I grow three varieties of strawberries. Size never was a concern. The smaller they are the sweeter they are. If I wanted big strawberries, I'd go to the store.

34 posted on 06/09/2014 12:15:08 PM PDT by 1_Rain_Drop
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To: Leaning Right

I’ve found the size of my strawberries depends on the amount of water they get. For birds, use a net or get some cats.


35 posted on 06/09/2014 1:01:27 PM PDT by aimhigh (1 John 3:23)
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To: autumnraine

No silly, strawberries don’t grow on vines, you’re thinking about dingleberries!


36 posted on 06/09/2014 1:53:13 PM PDT by ImNotLying (The Right To Bear Arms: Making good people helpless won't make bad people harmless!)
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To: Leaning Right

Cut off the runners. The more runners a strawberry plant sends out, the more energy it uses to produce new plants. This is energy it would be using to produce larger strawberries. If you are not trying to produce organic strawberries you could try adding a little 5-10-5 to the soil around the strawberry plants in the spring.

I have everbearing strawberries, and I live in roughly the same region as you Pen Argyl PA. I planted mine last year and got strawberries without any problem.

As for netting, you might want to use some, but not for the birds. Rabbits are your biggest problem. They love strawberries.


37 posted on 06/09/2014 3:13:34 PM PDT by EvilCapitalist (It's better to die free than live as a slave)
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To: Carthego delenda est; faucetman
Thanks for the links, Carthego and faucetman. Lots of good info there. And thanks to everyone who responded.
38 posted on 06/10/2014 10:14:43 AM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I holding this lantern? I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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