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How Clutter Affects Your Brain (and What You Can Do About It)
Lifehacker ^ | 7/5/2013 | Mikael Cho

Posted on 08/24/2014 7:35:06 PM PDT by CharlesOConnell

clutterBrain

A few years ago, I worked at a web design agency as a product manager. The part of the job I loved the most was working on product with our design team and clients. Unfortunately, this was only about 10 percent of the work that I actually got to do. The majority of the time, I was trying to control the constant flow of stuff–keeping track of meeting notes, searching for files, and trying to stay up-to-date with the latest technology news.

I was mentally exhausted. I’d get home feeling that I hadn’t really accomplished anything. Once I left the agency and started ooomf, I wanted to fix how I approached consumption in my life. Over the last few years, I’ve discovered ways to reduce the noise of stuff around me so I can focus on creation and have more time for the things that matter most. The last year has been the most productive of my life and I owe a lot of it to understanding the importance of decreasing how much I consume and coming up with ways to cut clutter.

How Clutter Happens

You collect things for a number of reasons–maybe you think you’ll need to use it later, it has sentimental value, or you spent good money on it so you feel you need to keep the item, even if you haven’t touched or used it in weeks, months, or years. You might be holding on to that book you bought a year ago that you swear you’ll read or those killer pair of shoes that you’ll bring out for just the right occasion.

But the reality is, you probably made a mistake in buying those things and it literally hurts your brain to come to terms with that fact. Researchers at Yale recently identified that two areas in your brain associated with pain, the anterior cingulate cortex and insula, light up in response to letting go of items you own and feel a connection towards:

brainPain

This is the same area of the brain that lights up when you feel physical pain from a paper cut or drinking coffee that’s too hot. Your brain views the loss of one of your valued possessions as the same as something that causes you physical pain. And the more you’ve commited emotionally or financially to an item, the more you want to keep it around.

Why Apple Wants You to Touch Their Stuff

When it comes to physical things, merely touching an item can cause you to become more emotionally attached to it. In this study, researchers gave participants coffee mugs to touch and examine prior to participating in an auction. The researchers varied the amount of time the participants were able to handle the mugs to see if this would have an effect on the amount of money participants would be willing to spend on the mugs during the auction.

The results of the study showed that participants who held the mugs longer, were willing to pay over 60 percent more for the mugs than participants who hed the mugs for shorter periods. The study concluded, the longer you touch an object, the greater the value you assign to it.

Apple is familiar with the effect of touch on your psychology and has brilliantly designed its retail stores to help you build an emotional attachment to their products. Here’s a shot of an Apple Store:

appleStore

Author Carmine Gallo is writing a book about the ins and outs of the Apple Store. Gallo explains that everything in the Apple Store is designed for you to touch and play with, to make you feel like it’s your own. Gallo states:

The main reason notebook computers screens are slightly angled is to encourage customers to adjust the screen to their ideal viewing angle…The ownership experience is more important than a sale.

When you introduce new items into your life, you immedietely associate value with these items,making it harder for you to give them up in the future. This psychological connection to things is what leads to the accumulation of stuff.

Clutter’s Impact on Your Brain

Whether it be your closet or office desk, excess things in your surroundings can have a negative impact on your ability to focus and process information. That’s exactly what neuroscientists at Princeton University found when they looked at people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment. The results of the study showed that physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention, resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

A team of UCLA researchers recently observed 32 Los Angeles families and found that all of the mothers’ stress hormones spiked during the time they spent dealing with their belongings. Similar to what multitasking does to your brain, physical clutter overloads your senses, making you feel stressed, and impairs your ability to think creatively.
Clutter Isn’t Just Physical

Files on your computer, notifications from your Twitter and Facebook accounts, and anything that goes “ping” in the night competes for your attention. This creates a digital form of clutter that erodes your ability to focus and perform creative tasks. Mark Hurst, author of Bit Literacy, a New York Times best seller on controlling the flow of information in the digital age, put it best when he said:

Bit Literacy: Productivity in the Age of Information and E-mail Overload

Bits are a new material.

When you have to-do items constantly floating around in your head or you hear a ping or vibrate every few minutes from your phone, your brain doesn’t get a chance to fully enter creative flow or process experiences. When your brain has too much on its plate, it splits its power up. The result? You become awful at:

  1. filtering information
  2. switching quickly between tasks
  3. keeping a strong working memory

The overconsumption of digital stuff has the same effect on your brain as physical clutter.
Finding Your Perfect Storm

I like to keep things neat but when I used to clean my room to perfection, my mom would still see that same room as a disaster. Everyone’s tolerance for clutter is different. Researchers have even found that certain people need a bit of a mess in their surroundings to feel inspired and get work done, stating that:

A clean desk can be seen as a dormant area, an indication that no thought or work is being undertaken.

For instance, if you look at this photo of the home office of Steve Jobs, it’s not exactly the picture you’d expect of a zen-like visionary obsessed with less:

jobsMess

On the other hand, there’s TreeHugger founder Graham Hill, who traded in his million dollar mansion for a 420 square foot apartment that only has the bare essentials. His kitchen consists of 12 salad bowls and utensils:

grahamHill

In an interview with the New York Times, Hill stated:

I like material things as much as anyone. I studied product design in school. I’m into gadgets, clothing and all kinds of things. But my experiences show that after a certain point, material objects have a tendency to crowd out the emotional needs they are meant to support.

While clutter has been shown to negatively effect your performance, it is your perception of clutter that matters, not someone else’s.

If having a notebook, pen, or a photo of your significant other on your desk, doesn’t feel like clutter to you, then it’s not.

You should seek to create spaces that make you feel at ease.
Editing the Noise: 4 Ways to Master Clutter

There are millions of sources of information and things for you to consume so it’s important to figure out a way to control these streams so you have more time to do things that matter.

Here’s 4 things that have been working for me:

1. Apply Constraints

One of the principals of good design is constraints. You can apply this same theory to create a system for mastering consumption. For instance, set a limit for how many people you follow on Twitter, how many books you buy, or how many apps you own. I set a limit of 200 people I follow on Twitter and I don’t buy any books until I’ve finished the current book I’m reading. I also don’t purchase or download any apps until I need them.

There will always be more information available than you can consume so set limits so you’re no longer simply trying to just get through it all but rather enjoying more of what you consume.

2. Use Small Storage Spaces

Cutting down on your storage space can do wonders for limiting consumption. Try cutting your closet down to 10 hangers or force yourself to use a small bag when you travel. Do you really need a walk-in closet or a rack for all your shoes? Try constraining your storage spaces and you’ll quickly identify what you really need.

3. Conduct a Monthly Review of Your Closet

Every month, review your closet looking for items you haven’t worn. If it’s summer and you have t-shirts, shorts, or shoes that you aren’t using, put them in a bag to sell on eBay or Craigslist or give them away.

Another option is to try and get rid of one item a week until you’ve cut your belongings down to the things you actually use.

4. Remove All Files From Your Desktop Daily

If you work on a computer, having a cluttered desktop every time you turn on your computer can give you a constant uneasy feeling. At the end of each day, remove every file from your desktop. If you don’t have an immediate place to move the file, create one folder on your desktop and drop the stray files in there. Here’s a screenshot of my desktop screen with one “Home” folder:

poling

Clutter, whether physical or digital, is something you’ll always have to deal with but it can be controlled. Finding ways to stear the streams of consumption in your favor will give you a sense of power and a freed mind, leaving room for you to create and experience life without constantly filling your cup to the top with someone else’s sugar.456

How clutter affects you and what you can do about it | Ooomf

Mikael Cho is the co-founder of ooomf, a creative marketplace connecting mobile & web projects with vetted, first class developers and designers from around the world. Mikael writes more posts on psychology, startups, and product marketing over on the ooomf blog. Find him on Twitter @mikaelcho.


TOPICS: Education; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: brain; clutter; pain; psychology
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13+ Secrets Personal Organizers Would Never Tell You for Free (Actually, 26)

March, 2014 | Michelle Crouch | rd.com/slideshows/personal-organizers-secrets-free/

1) Create 5 piles. When you’re organizing, you should sort everything into five piles: move to another room, donate, give to a specific person, throw away, and, finally, the “marinating” pile. Pack up the marinating items, and label the box with a date that’s six months to a year later. If you never open the box before that date, you can safely discard those items.

2) To make an organizing project go faster: Create rules about what you’re keeping and what you’re discarding. In your closet, for example, you can decide to give away any clothing that’s not between size x and size y, that’s stained, or that needs to be repaired. With periodicals, you can decide not to keep anything that’s more than a year old.

3) It will always take you at least five times longer to sort through a box of personal papers than you think it will.

4) Avoid lids on laundry baskets, bins, and other containers. They just make it harder to put things away. For other items, I’m a huge fan of clear sweater boxes. Not only do they hold sweaters in your closet, but they’re perfect for holding beans, rice, and pasta in your pantry, Legos in your playroom, the stuff you collect at trade shows, and more. They fit on almost any shelf in any home and can hold most of the stuff in your house. I order them by the case.

5) Your goal should be to remove the clutter, not create more storage space. People who think they’re disorganized always run out and start buying baskets, containers and hooks. You come home and try to use them, and they’re not the right type or size, because you didn’t sort through your stuff first. That’s just backward. All those new containers just end up adding to your clutter.

6) The number one problem for all my clients? Too much paper. The whole idea of a paperless society is a complete myth. People are seriously scared to get rid of it. Remember, 80 percent of the paper you get you don’t need to keep. So it’s imperative to keep weeding out every single day, whether that’s magazines, catalogs, mail, receipts, or anything else.

7) Are you holding on to a big piece of the past? If you’re keeping something that doesn’t fit in your home for sentimental reasons—say, Aunt Jenny’s blue recliner or Grandma’s chandelier—recognize it’s the memory you cherish, not the item. Then take a picture of it and give it away to someone who actually has space for it who will love it. That said, if you really love that paperweight collection, grandma’s old photographs, or that heirloom quilt, why are you letting them get ruined, moldy, or eaten by moths in cardboard boxes in the attic? Honor your favorite keepsakes by getting them out and displaying them.

8) Sure, you could sell that item on eBay. But are you interested in finishing your organizing project or starting a new career hocking used stuff? Unless you sell online all the time or need the money, I recommend just giving things away so you can move on.

9) Watch out for flat surfaces, which can quickly become drop zones for clutter. When my clients have a dining table that is always getting covered with junk, I’ll have them clear it off, put a flower arrangement in the middle, and set it with place settings. That usually prevents them from parking stuff there.

10) Anything that needs to go somewhere should be in your car not in your house. Keep your coupons there in a clear folder so you have them if you need them. Get an errand basket to hold items that need to be returned. Use crates to store kids’ toys and emergency supplies. Also, a car trash bag is a simple thing—get one!

11) Put everything on your calendar. Even errands, exercise, cleaning the house should go on it. Then make sure you prioritize the things that are important to you. If it’s not on your schedule, it’s not on your life.

12) My biggest secret? Don’t procrastinate. If you postpone things that take a few minutes, it adds up and suddenly you’re looking at several hours to clear your clutter. Always open your mail right away, do dishes right after you use them, and put things away as soon as you’re done with them.

13) If you have lots piles of papers you’re always looking through, that’s a big time waster. Here’s what I suggest: every time you look at a piece of paper, put a red dot on it. If you’re ending up with 10 or 20 dots on one piece of paper, you need a new system to deal with your paperwork.

14) Please, get rid of that storage unit. You could buy all the stuff that’s in there for the price of the annual rental fee—and that doesn’t include the cost of the moving truck and your time. Plus I’m sorry, but the items you own are almost never worth as much as you think. And even if they are, who cares? That’s still not a good excuse to hold onto things you don’t use.

15) My favorite tip for a roomier kitchen is to adjust cabinet shelves; it can create a lot more space. Also, get that popcorn machine, bread machine and the other huge appliances off your counter. If you don’t use it every week, store it in the attic or basement and get it out only when you need it. And do you really need all those plastic containers? Most people have cabinets full of them, but they only ever use a few. Figure out which ones you really use and donate the rest.

16) Here’s my favorite little kitchen tip: Always load the dishwasher in an organized way. So instead of throwing all the silverware into the utensil box, put the forks in one area, the spoons in another, and the knives in another, and then when you’re unloading you just grab all the spoons and put them in the drawer.

17) Go into your closet today and hang everything backward on the rod. the normal way. A year from now, if you still have some things still hanging backward, you’re obviously not wearing them, so get rid of them.

18) Here’s a simple way to transform your closet: Switch to one type of hanger. It makes a huge difference. If you have varying kinds, they get caught on each other, they’re not the same height and you can’t see everything as well. I especially love the thin hangers that are covered in velvet. Because they’re super slim, you can fit more into your closet, and your clothes won’t slip off them.

19) Maximize your closet space by putting in an extra tension rod so you can hang shirts on top and skirts on the bottom, and always add hooks to hang jewelry and scarves if you have extra wall space. You can even put a chest of drawers in there if you have the room.

20) I love hanging shoe bags. In addition to shoes, I use them for gloves and hats in winter, for sunblock, sunglasses and goggles in summer, and for crafts, toiletries and makeup.

21) You’re going to be more motivated to get an area organized if you make some changes you can get excited about. When you’re doing your closet, for example, throw up a coat of new paint, put down some cool floor tiles or a rug, or add a beautiful fixture. It will make you want to keep it organized.

22) Ditch the cardboard. One client asked me to help carry a bunch of cardboard storage boxes into her newly renovated house. As I opened the first one, out came hundreds of cockroaches. That’s why you should never use cardboard. You name the pest; I assure you it loves cardboard.

23) I swear I’m not a neat freak. Being organized doesn’t mean everything is in its place; it means everything has a place. If you can get your house ready for a surprise guest in 30 minutes, then you’re organized. Believe it: I have not one, but two junk drawers in my kitchen—and I sleep just fine at night.

24) Your kids will be so grateful if you label and organize your photos now and if you stick a note on keepsakes explaining their significance. We settle a lot of estates, and it’s frustrating to the next generation when they don’t understand why something was 
left to them.

25) Parents feel so guilty about throwing away their children’s artwork. My solution? A Li’l Davinci art cabinet. It’s a beautiful frame that you can hang up, but you can also store up to 50 pieces of art inside it.

26) My biggest motivator for being organized: I have more time to have fun and be spontaneous.

Sources: Professional organizers Kate Brown, owner of Impact Organizing in Sarasota, Florida; Laurie Martin, 
owner of Simplicity in Charlotte, North Carolina; Julie Isaacs, founder of The Uncluttered Home in Scotch Plains, New Jersey; Melissa Picheny, owner of declutter + design in New York City; and Maria Gracia, author of Finally Organized, Finally Free and owner of getorganizednow.com.

1 posted on 08/24/2014 7:35:07 PM PDT by CharlesOConnell
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To: CharlesOConnell

bookmark for sorting later


2 posted on 08/24/2014 7:44:22 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: CharlesOConnell
4. Remove All Files From Your Desktop Daily

LOL. No.

3 posted on 08/24/2014 7:45:03 PM PDT by FreeReign
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To: CharlesOConnell
Here’s a screenshot of my desktop screen with one “Home” folder:

Unfortunately the Home folder has 600 subfolders and 1200 other files.

4 posted on 08/24/2014 7:46:18 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (The IRS: either criminally irresponsible in backup procedures or criminally responsible of coverup.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

Into my “Mark 4 Later” Stack.


5 posted on 08/24/2014 7:46:26 PM PDT by Scrambler Bob (/s /s /s /s /s, my replies are "liberally" sprinkled with them behind every word and letter.!)
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To: Rodamala

Bookmarking for the day I clean my bookmarks.


6 posted on 08/24/2014 7:48:50 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: CharlesOConnell

Brain clutter and physical clutter? I am beyond salvation.


7 posted on 08/24/2014 7:54:22 PM PDT by Rockpile
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To: CharlesOConnell

oh boy..too much info! www.antidoteforall.com has a much simpler and highly effective way to declutter!


8 posted on 08/24/2014 7:58:26 PM PDT by felixandbowinkle (let irritations pass and become truly happy and strong..fhu.com!)
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To: CharlesOConnell

And then there are some people, of which I am one, who have to have things just as complex as they can be. ;-)


9 posted on 08/24/2014 8:01:20 PM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (Why does every totalitarian political hack think that he knows how to run my life better than I do?)
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To: KarlInOhio
Re: "Here’s a screenshot of my desktop screen with one “Home” folder: Unfortunately the Home folder has 600 subfolders and 1200 other files."

Effective File Search is a utility I can't do without. I've used it for years, it's one of my most useful utilities. It searches better than the default search utility on many Windows operating systems, it will output a data file of all your files, that can be opened in Excel or Microsoft Access. I paid $30 for it in 2007, but it's free now at https://www.google.com/search?q=effective+file+search

10 posted on 08/24/2014 8:01:22 PM PDT by CharlesOConnell (CharlesOConnell)
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To: FreeReign
4. Remove All Files From Your Desktop Daily

Piece of cake. I shove them in here...


11 posted on 08/24/2014 8:07:12 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise
Re: "And then there are some people, of which I am one, who have to have things just as complex as they can be. ;-)"

That's another subject.

https://www.google.com/search?q=drama+queens

12 posted on 08/24/2014 8:09:12 PM PDT by CharlesOConnell (CharlesOConnell)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

I’ve got an audiobook (somewhere) that I highly recommend, it completely destroys the whole manic “get organized” cult.

One example that comes to mind, from the book, is how penicillin was discovered because the discoverer took a trip for a few weeks, and as usual had left the remains of his lunch on the workbench. Years later, when his cluttered mess of a lab was made an exhibit, he was asked what he might have accomplished if he’d just kept everything neat and organized. “Nothing.”

A Perfect Mess
http://www.audible.com/pd/Business/A-Perfect-Mess-Audiobook/B002V016QE


13 posted on 08/24/2014 8:10:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: CharlesOConnell
Whether it be your closet or office desk, excess things in your surroundings can have a negative impact on your ability to focus and process information. That’s exactly what neuroscientists at Princeton University found when they looked at people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment. The results of the study showed that physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention, resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

A team of UCLA researchers recently observed 32 Los Angeles families and found that all of the mothers’ stress hormones spiked during the time they spent dealing with their belongings. Similar to what multitasking does to your brain, physical clutter overloads your senses, making you feel stressed, and impairs your ability to think creatively.

Ping to read THOROUGHLY

14 posted on 08/24/2014 8:12:24 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("the defacto Leader of the FR Calvinist Protestant Brigades")
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To: CharlesOConnell

Complete crap. Messy, disorganized, chaotic piles of it.


15 posted on 08/24/2014 8:30:21 PM PDT by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: 1rudeboy

You totally get it.

I am at a point (and I have been here for a while now) that modern life is just sucking my soul. I am lucky to remember when bills are due because my mind is completely full with a jumble of userids and online passwords.

I am ready to just burn everything and find a nice (legitimately) Amish girl to marry.


16 posted on 08/24/2014 8:33:17 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: Monkey Face; Tax-chick; Darksheare; NoCmpromiz; no-to-illegals; NicknamedBob

interesting ping.


17 posted on 08/24/2014 8:34:31 PM PDT by moose07 (the truth will out ,one day. Doggies Rock.)
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To: IncPen; Nailbiter

decrapify ping


18 posted on 08/24/2014 8:43:27 PM PDT by Nailbiter
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To: moose07; Monkey Face; Tax-chick; Darksheare; no-to-illegals; NicknamedBob
Orgnamizatian? Orgnamizatian? We don't need no steenkin' orgnamizatian.

Um.. did you see where I put my glasses?

19 posted on 08/24/2014 8:47:08 PM PDT by NoCmpromiz (John 14:6 is a non-pluralistic comment.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

Send everything to the IRS. They will destroy it for you consequence free?


20 posted on 08/24/2014 8:48:13 PM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: NoCmpromiz

On the Miss Marple chain around your neck. Where you left them. :)


21 posted on 08/24/2014 8:49:06 PM PDT by moose07 (the truth will out ,one day. Doggies Rock.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

I can be a pack rat if I allow myself to do it. But, I can also be an over the top neat freak, again if I allow myself to do it. Sanity dictated that I begin chucking anything that had sat long enough to gather dust, and to develop something of a blind spot for that dust. I have two decent sized dogs. I love them and without question they’re going to be with me wherever I go, whenever possible, but they do generate dust in spades.

Twice annual top to bottom cleaning, one around the arrival of spring, the other between Christmas and New Year’s Day. Just light maintenance cleaning and occasional organizing in between. I’d hire it out if I were in a position to do so, to put distance between me and that task.

As far as work, I’m a firm believer in the pile management system. You’ve got your today pile, your tomorrow pile and your whenever pile. Everything else goes straight to the trash. Computer desktop is strewn with folders and downloads. Friday afternoons, after the phone calls slowly come to a halt, I consolidate and discard. If I haven’t touched it in a month but anticipate still needing it, it’s compressed and put onto a backup hard drive.

Is this perfect? No. But it de-stressed several areas that were leading to frustration, and it works for me.


22 posted on 08/24/2014 8:51:38 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: NoCmpromiz
Oh...

I see...

Nevermind. < /Emilylatella>

23 posted on 08/24/2014 8:52:21 PM PDT by NoCmpromiz (John 14:6 is a non-pluralistic comment.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

I once worked at a company with a President who was a clean desk freak. I worked in a small HR department where we did everything....so...one day he comes to my desk to retrieve his Executive Assistant’s Performance Review file which was under review or something....anyway....I had on my desk multitudes of Files and papers...and he kinda looks at the desk with his “Oh, what a mess” look....and I reached right to where the file was and handed it to him...I didn’t tell him...SOME of us don’t have Exec Assistants, and we HAVE to multi-task!...but I sure wanted to that day.


24 posted on 08/24/2014 8:54:25 PM PDT by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevrens, Woods)
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To: CharlesOConnell

My clothes are in big piles on the bedroom floor. Winter kind of to one side and summer to the other. I do put dirty stuff in the hamper, though.


25 posted on 08/24/2014 8:55:26 PM PDT by steve86 ( Acerbic by nature, not nurture)
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To: goodnesswins

A clean desk is a sign of a sick mind, or of someone who has nothing else to do.


26 posted on 08/24/2014 8:58:34 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: CharlesOConnell
I thought Clutter dissolved in alcohol ?
27 posted on 08/24/2014 9:03:02 PM PDT by jcon40
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To: CharlesOConnell

When I worked at Fluor in Lost Angeles, we were told that our competitor C.F. Braun in Pasadena had very strict rules; dark suits and ties, white only shirts, only one piece of paper on the desk.

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/do-your-employees-dress-for-failure/d/d-id/1113285


28 posted on 08/24/2014 9:05:30 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: jcon40
I thought Clutter dissolved in alcohol ?

That only works if everybody does it, sort of like not smelling of garlic if everybody eats it.

29 posted on 08/24/2014 9:08:40 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: jcon40
Nope. I tried that. It gets worse.

Cordially,

30 posted on 08/24/2014 9:12:19 PM PDT by Diamond (He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people,)
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To: RegulatorCountry

My desk is always clean—I have this computer thingy that stores all my work. The coolest thing about it is that I no longer have to try to decipher those illegible notes that used to litter that old analog surface. :p


31 posted on 08/24/2014 9:45:47 PM PDT by antidisestablishment (Islam delenda est)
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To: CharlesOConnell
Problem: Flat surfaces, which can quickly become drop zones for clutter.

Solution: Replace all flat surfaces with tilted ones similar to the following:


32 posted on 08/24/2014 10:05:26 PM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
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To: Rodamala

>> I am lucky to remember when bills are due because my mind is completely full with a jumble of userids and online passwords.

That is something there is a solution for:
http://keepass.info/
Just invest 30 minutes in learning how to use it properly.


33 posted on 08/24/2014 10:12:56 PM PDT by expat1000 ("If you're explaining, you're losing." Ronald Reagan)
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To: CharlesOConnell

Bookmark for later


34 posted on 08/24/2014 10:21:20 PM PDT by right way right (America has embraced the suck of Freedumb.)
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To: Rodamala

bookmark to re-read ten times and figure out if I need to keep all the crap in my garage that I haven’t used in years but know I will need the day after I get rid of it.


35 posted on 08/24/2014 10:23:05 PM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

Good grief...

I have enough to think about without forming bonds with objects.....

The only problem I have with objects is that I often won’t throw them away. Not because of a bond, but because I somehow think I might use it for something later, like a broken electronics and stuff.

So yeah...I’m a packrat but I only save stuff I can built something else out of.

But no emotional bonds...I save that for my wife. And I gave up organizing in 1978...


36 posted on 08/24/2014 10:28:45 PM PDT by Cold Heat (Have you reached your breaking point yet? If not now....then when?)
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To: CharlesOConnell

bkmk


37 posted on 08/24/2014 10:54:08 PM PDT by AllAmericanGirl44
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To: CharlesOConnell

I totally believe the “brain pain” part. I find sorting out all my junk and getting rid of some of it to be really painful, and have always felt silly for feeling that way. Hah! I was right! :)


38 posted on 08/24/2014 11:02:19 PM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert (FUBO, and the useful idiots you rode in on!)
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To: CharlesOConnell

I need to add this to my collection of stuff...


39 posted on 08/24/2014 11:05:12 PM PDT by Pelham (California, what happens when you won't deport illegals)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for the link.

I don’t do well sharing kitchens with others. The last time I shared a kitchen the only reason things went reasonably well is they let me be the boss of the kitchen. In exchange, they got to use my microwave and I did most if the kitchen cleaning. I am one of those people who likes to keep stuff out on counters and surfaces. Then this one guy moved in. He was the kind who wanted counters all free of clutter. He complained to the landlady, and she forwarded the complaints to me. He bitched about my little kitchen counter compost container. He was also a heroin addict who was bringing in girlfriends who were also addicts and sometimes shooting up in the bathroom and creating other problems. His rent got paid on time, though, because his dad was his payee ( he was on some sort of entitlement, probably Disability)and he took care of it. I wasn’t the only tenant who left because if him and the landlady finally figured this out. After I left, I found out that she told him “one more person leaves because of you—you’re out”. One more police call—she was good on her word.

So pardon me if I don’t have a lot of patience with these near freaks, especially when they’re also control freaks telling others how to live.


40 posted on 08/24/2014 11:09:34 PM PDT by crazycatlady
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To: Pelham

Or stack of stuff, as Rush would say.


41 posted on 08/24/2014 11:11:03 PM PDT by crazycatlady
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To: CharlesOConnell

bump


42 posted on 08/24/2014 11:18:28 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack (I lost my 80mm dual phased irridum plasma cannon in a tragic hover tank explosion.)
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To: crazycatlady

ccl, next time you have a neat-freak heroin addict trying to sort out your kitchen pin them down with your best santoku knife and force them to repeat ‘mise en place’ until it sinks in.


43 posted on 08/24/2014 11:47:40 PM PDT by Pelham (California, what happens when you won't deport illegals)
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To: Pelham

Kafkaesque sense of humor you’ve got there.


44 posted on 08/25/2014 12:23:15 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: CharlesOConnell

Bump for categorizing and saving to the appropriate folder later.


45 posted on 08/25/2014 12:40:09 AM PDT by TChad (The Obamacare motto: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.)
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To: Pelham
I need to add this to my collection of stuff...

LOL Good one!

46 posted on 08/25/2014 1:04:39 AM PDT by Veggie Todd (The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. TJ)
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To: CharlesOConnell

ping


47 posted on 08/25/2014 3:39:20 AM PDT by dennisw (The first principle is to find out who you are then you can achieve anything -- Buddhist monk)
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To: CharlesOConnell

bump for later


48 posted on 08/25/2014 3:47:10 AM PDT by Skooz (Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us)
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To: CharlesOConnell

I’m the technological equivalent of Charles Schulz’s Pig-pen character.

But instead of a cloud of dust, I am followed by a heap of electronics stuff. That heap will follow me until the day I die, then the heap will attach itself to whoever gets to clean out my house.

Life is great!


49 posted on 08/25/2014 4:02:20 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (The last remnants of the Old Republic have been swept away.)
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To: CharlesOConnell

50 posted on 08/25/2014 4:07:22 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (The last remnants of the Old Republic have been swept away.)
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