Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Insulting the memory of FDR [were Japanese internment camps wrong?]
WorldNet Daily ^ | March 20, 2004 | Les Kinsolving

Posted on 05/09/2004 7:01:00 AM PDT by risk

This is a WorldNetDaily printer-friendly version of the article which follows.
To view this item online, visit http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=37671

Saturday, March 20, 2004



Insulting the memory of FDR


Posted: March 20, 2004
1:00 a.m. Eastern

By Les Kinsolving


� 2004 WorldNetDaily.com

The Associated Press reporter in the House of Representatives told me, "we didn't report the passage of the Honda resolution because it was done with a voice vote, with just a handful of members on the floor."

But this resolution was introduced by Rep. Michael Honda, a Democrat of California, whose website advertises him as having "spent his early childhood with his family at Amache, Colo., concentration camp during World War II."

This is an insult to the U.S. Supreme Court's liberals such as Felix Frankfurter, Hugo Black and Willaim O. Douglas, who, in the 1944 Korematsu case, ruled emphatically against the "concentration camp" libel. They also ruled constitutional the relocation of all Japanese resident aliens and Japanese-Americans from the three West Coast states and parts of Arizona.

This resolution, passed by that device of non-accountability the voice vote, also insulted the memory of our great wartime president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, as well as Johns Hopkins University President Milton Eisenhower, director of the War Relocation Authority.

This resolution calls for a "National Day of Remembrance to increase public awareness of the events surrounding the restriction, exclusion and internment of individuals and families during World War II."

Congressman Honda claims this is a "shameful chapter in U.S. history," ordered by President Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066 signed on Feb. 19, 1942 � the day this Honda resolution designates as a National Day of Remembrance.

What is really shameful is the fact that most of U.S. media today refuses to report the historical fact that our U.S. intelligence code-breakers who broke the Japanese code discovered hundreds of Japanese aliens and Japanese-Americans in those West Coast states who were functioning as spies for Imperial Japan.

They were watching all of our Naval shipping and had infiltrated many of our defense plants. But had they been arrested, this would have compromised and ended our breaking of that Japanese code � which later helped the United States win the decisive Battle of Midway.

The hundreds of Japanese spies on our West Coast had to be stopped without any revelation that we had broken the Japanese code.

For this reason, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 � for which the Honda resolution is now defaming him.

Dr. Roger McGrath has been professor of history at both UCLA and California State University at Northbridge. He is also a major in the U.S. Marine Corps, Reserve Intelligence. He has also been a technical adviser and participant on television's A & E, the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, TNT, ABC and Disney.

He has written for the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Harpers, the Encyclopedia of the American West and the American Conservative, in which he wrote the following in the March 15th issue about Honda's resolution passed by the House:

Honda's resolution contains a series of misrepresentations that have passed for fact for so many years that they are now generally accepted without question. Moreover, the resolution posits President Jimmy Carter's Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment and its report, "Personal Justice Denied," as the final authority on the subject. After "20 days of hearings" and "over 750 witnesses," the commission concluded that E.O. 9066 was not justified by military necessity but was the result of "race prejudice, war hysteria and a failure of political leadership." That conclusion, however, is contrary to the facts as revealed by MAGIC, the decryptions of coded Japanese transmissions. The commission ignored MAGIC entirely in its original report, as it did witnesses who were available to proffer information supporting Roosevelt's order. The few witnesses who attempted to testify in support of E.O. 9066 were drowned out by an unruly mob of spectators.

This commission's incredible behavior, as well as the reparations voted by Congress of $20,000 to each of 82,000 evacuees ($1.6 million) were termed "shameful" by California's U.S. Sen. S.I. Hayakawa. He also described "a wolf pack of dissident young Japanese-Americans making an unconscionable raid on the U.S. Treasury."

(The senator was, in turn, denounced by these people as "a banana: yellow on the outside, white on the inside.")

Dr. McGrath also reports:

John J. McCloy, the assistant secretary of war in 1942, who monitored the evacuation and relocation, said the proceedings were "a horrendous affront to our tradition for fair and objective hearings. ... Whenever I sought in the slightest degree to justify the action ... ordered by President Roosevelt, my testimony was met with hisses and boos such as I have never, over an experience extending back to World War I, been heretofore subjected to. Others had similar experiences ... it became clear from the outset of my testimony that the commission was not at all disposed to conduct an objective investigation."

The officer in charge of the evacuation, Karl R. Bendesten, was subjected to similar treatment and simply stopped in the middle of his testimony. "I knew it would be fruitless," said Bendesten. "Every commissioner had made up his mind before he was appointed."

One of U.S. media's most inexcusable wrongs is the widespread confusion of the words "internment" and "relocation."

There were only 17,000 Japanese aliens and Japanese-Americans interned. They were quite justifiably interned, because those who were U.S.-born declared their loyalty to Emporor Hirohito. One-third of these were Japanese-Americans who renounced their American citizenship.

There was no need to relocate any Japanese aliens or Japanese-Americans from the Territory of Hawaii � because immediately after Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Army quite justifiably imposed martial law.

Dr. McGrath reports:

The great majority of Japanese were not interned but required only to relocate outside of the Western Defense Zone, an area that included California, the western halves of Oregon and Washington, and a small portion of Arizona. Those who were not able to move were eventually taken to relocation centers, built with the same materials and on similar patterns as Army bases.

Japanese could leave a relocation center if they could re-establish themselves outside of the Defense Zone, and some 35,000 did so. Those who relocated on their own by the end of March 1942 did not go to the centers.

Among those who relocated on their own and never went to any relocation center were the Toguris of California. They moved to Chicago and opened a food store.

Their daughter, Iva, UCLA Class of 1940, had moved to their homeland along with thousands of other U.S.-born Japanese. This daughter is still alive. She was known to many as "Tokyo Rose." She was found guilty of treason. But instead of being hanged (like the British hanged "Lord Haw Haw"), she was sent to the Women's Federal Prison in Alderson, W.Va. � from which she was released after being pardoned by President Gerald Ford on his last day in the White House.

The relocation centers to which the great majority of Japanese resident aliens or citizens were sent were relatively easy to leave if one could obtain a job anywhere outside the West Coast states. Dr. McGrath reports:

More than 4,300 Japanese left to go to college at government expense and thousands left to work on farms. Meanwhile, in the relocation centers the death rate was lower and the birth rate higher than that of the general American population. So, too, was the graduation rate from high school. At the time, the Japanese-American Citizens' League (JACL) praised the government for providing the relocation centers. Dillon Myer, the director of the War Relocation Authority, said, "Nothing was done regarding the relocation centers without the approval of the JACL."

And by contrast to the wonderfully humane treatment of those in relocation centers � who, later, received $20,000 apiece -- U.S. prisoners of the Japanese, including survivors of the Bataan Death March, were paid just $1 per day for being in that Hell-On-Earth.

One of the many references which thoroughly discredit Congressman Honda's defamatory resolution is "MAGIC: The Untold Story of U.S. Intelligence And The Evacuation of Japanese Residents From The West Coast During World War II."

The author is the late David Lowman, former special assistant to the director, National Security Agency.

Dr. McGrath also notes that the American Japanese Claims Act of 1948 led to the provision of $35 million paid on thousands of Japanese-Americans claims for lost or damaged homes, or even crop loss, as a result of their being called away from their homes during a national emergency -- just as so many millions of American men were called away from their homes to serve in our armed forces where half a million of them were killed fighting our national enemies.

McGrath concluded his article with a notation I hope the U.S. Senate will use in seeking to set aside and properly expose Congressman Honda's defamatory and history-distorting Day of Remembrance resolution:

If I were a loyal American of Japanese descent, I would not have been pleased with the evacuation order. Nor would I have been thrilled with having to uproot myself from my home on the Pacific Coast. However, as an emergency wartime sacrifice, it is hardly the greatest.

Just ask those Marines who regard February 19 as their Day of Remembrance. On that date in 1945 they stormed ashore on Iwo Jima, where more than 6,000 of them died. That's a sacrifice to remember -- and honor.



Les Kinsolving hosts a daily talk show for WCBM in Baltimore. His radio commentaries are syndicated nationally. He is White House correspondent for Talk Radio Network and WorldNetDaily. His show can be heard on the Internet at www.wcbm.com 8-10 p.m. Eastern each weekday. Before going into broadcasting, Kinsolving was a newspaper reporter and columnist -- twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for his commentary.



TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; Israel; Japan; News/Current Events; US: Alaska; US: California; US: Hawaii; US: Oregon; US: Washington; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: fdr; fifthcolumn; internment; japanese; kinsolving; michaelhonda; wot; ww2; wwii
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-102 next last
Honda was in the news here in Kaliforniastan over the weekend "reaching out" once again to potential victims of racism and discrimination due to our war on terror. This article seemed to be an appropriate response. The difference between the way we fought WWII and how we're "fighting" now is that in 1941 we aimed to win at any cost.

We could lose this war thanks to people like Honda who think it isn't serious enough to warrant an all out effort to win.

1 posted on 05/09/2004 7:01:01 AM PDT by risk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet; Grampa Dave; Travis McGee; Eurotwit
ping
2 posted on 05/09/2004 7:03:36 AM PDT by risk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: risk
Locking up Americans was wrong but why is this being discussed now? Two entirely different wars in two very different times.
3 posted on 05/09/2004 7:04:38 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: risk
Sometimes an article is full of total B*S*. For example: "Dr. McGrath also notes that the American Japanese Claims Act of 1948 led to the provision of $35 million paid on thousands of Japanese-Americans claims for lost or damaged homes, or even crop loss, as a result of their being called away from their homes during a national emergency -- just as so many millions of American men were called away from their homes to serve in our armed forces where half a million of them were killed fighting our national enemies."

This is of little comfort to any individual Japanese-American citizen family which LOST over $35,000,000 in property while their sons were serving and dieing in the American armed forces overseas.

Just give me this Kinsolving guy, Manzanar, and I'm in the guardtower with a firearm and he wants to come too close to the fence. I'll show him what a concentration camp is like. You'd better believe buddy! Let me at him.

4 posted on 05/09/2004 7:10:38 AM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Locking up Americans was wrong but why is this being discussed now? Two entirely different wars in two very different times.

Go back and read the Los Angeles and San Francisco newspapers from that time. There were numerous articles about a Japanese fifth column in this country. Maybe they were all planted stories? But if they were not, Roosevelt was absolutely right to do what he did. And let's not forget: We won that war.

The main reason this war is different is that we have more than one fifth column active here now.

ML/NJ

5 posted on 05/09/2004 7:14:14 AM PDT by ml/nj
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
Well there were large contingents of Nazi sympathizers here on Long Island during the same time and they were never locked up. Actually, the neo-nazis still have a small presence here on LI. I don't make excuses and pretend that racism didn't play a part in making it MUCH easier to lock up Japanese people. FDR would NOT have won friends if he started locking up white people. I'll bet money on that one.
6 posted on 05/09/2004 7:18:31 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: risk
were Japanese internment camps wrong?

Yep, they sure were.

7 posted on 05/09/2004 7:20:31 AM PDT by AntiGuv (When the countdown hits zero - something's gonna happen..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
I'm with you. This was a national disgrace but it was over 60 years ago----let's move one.
8 posted on 05/09/2004 7:21:09 AM PDT by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Correction---let's move on!
9 posted on 05/09/2004 7:22:25 AM PDT by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Mears
Part of a lot of people's problems on the left is their seeming inability to MOVE ON which is why I find the name moveon.org humorous. How on earth anyone can make this comparison is beyond me.
10 posted on 05/09/2004 7:24:55 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
The newspapers then were the same as they are now,they printed what they wanted to print and ignored what they wanted to ignore.

The Japanese Americans were treated poorly and German Americans were treated well.

It was racism,pure and simple.
11 posted on 05/09/2004 7:25:28 AM PDT by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: risk
Of course they weren't wrong.

Now, if they had been set up during the administration of a Republican president, they would have been the most grevious crime ever committed in human history.

Who doesn't understand this? Its just logic.

(steely)

12 posted on 05/09/2004 7:27:43 AM PDT by Steely Tom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Is it true that Yaphank actually has some streets named after high-ranking Nazi/German officials? I don't know where I heard this, and probably dismissed it as a baseless rumor when I first heard it, but somehow it got stuck in my head.
13 posted on 05/09/2004 7:27:53 AM PDT by The Scourge of Yazid (Where did they get all those American Flags to burn? Is there a store or something over there?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ItsonlikeDonkeyKong
I don't know but I can check. Sounds like a Long Island legend though but the people are very real. I do know that my mother had God on her side when her car broke down waaaaaaaay out that way. Certain parts of LI make Deliverance look citified.
14 posted on 05/09/2004 7:31:22 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: risk
Outstanding article, finally stating what so few Americans understand about this chapter of WW2.
15 posted on 05/09/2004 7:34:22 AM PDT by Travis McGee (----- www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com -----)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ItsonlikeDonkeyKong
Is it true that Yaphank actually has some streets named after high-ranking Nazi/German officials?

Chicago has a street named after an Italian-Fascist aviator - Balbo.

16 posted on 05/09/2004 7:35:16 AM PDT by reg45
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah; cyborg
Did you bother to read the article before posting?

Would you have preferred to have lost the "Magic" code breaking advantage, and hence lost (among many battles) the Battle of Midway and WW2 in the Pacific?

17 posted on 05/09/2004 7:36:07 AM PDT by Travis McGee (----- www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com -----)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Travis McGee
I read the article. You and I have a disagreement. Sorry.
18 posted on 05/09/2004 7:45:55 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: risk
He forgot major portions of McGrath's article in "Chronicles" namely about the Tule lake camp where the internees celebrated Pearl Harbor day. And of course he forgets to mention how many Japanese took off for the homeland and how many who couldn't get out of the states renounced their American citizenship. Or that a large portion of the second generation Japanese were propagandized to think of themselves as just that Japanese not Americans (think Mexicans today) and a large program existed to take these kids back to Japan for proper education in being Japanese. Or how many Japanese-americans served the empire.
19 posted on 05/09/2004 7:47:59 AM PDT by junta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
FDR would NOT have won friends if he started locking up white people.

Lincoln has a lot of friends.

ML/NJ

20 posted on 05/09/2004 7:49:46 AM PDT by ml/nj
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
?
21 posted on 05/09/2004 7:52:14 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Certain parts of LI make Deliverance look citified.

Really?

Is this something recent?

I grew up there in the 50's, and pretty much got to every place on the Island except the eastern part of the North Fork. There were lots of potato farms out east but not much inbreeding that I was aware of.

ML/NJ

22 posted on 05/09/2004 7:54:32 AM PDT by ml/nj
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
Certain parts...not many...maybe it's recent. I won't go out there to find out *LOL* But actually the eastern part of the North Fork is where my mother got lost. I don't know about inbreeding but the nazis are alive and well there.
23 posted on 05/09/2004 7:57:38 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
I post Lincoln has lots of friends, in response to your FDR would NOT have won friends if he started locking up white people, and the best you can do is respond with a question mark?

I assume you are aware that Lincoln had many white people imprisioned. (Some of these people were even on the side of the Union, but of course many were not.) And I assume you know that many hold Lincoln in high regard, so I provided Lincoln as a counterexample to your assertion.

ML/NJ

24 posted on 05/09/2004 8:02:16 AM PDT by ml/nj
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
I am speaking about the social times during the world war. I had a feeling you were referring to Abraham Lincoln but I just wanted more explantion. That's all.
25 posted on 05/09/2004 8:04:02 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: risk
"Just ask those Marines who regard February 19 as their Day of Remembrance. On that date in 1945 they stormed ashore on Iwo Jima, where more than 6,000 of them died. That's a sacrifice to remember – and honor."

One of those 6,000 was a boyhood friend of my mother. I remember when I was about five and looking through the family photo album, there was this 8x10 picture of a young marine and I asked who it was. She said it was a boy who used to live in the apartment up stairs and died on Iwo Jima.

She also told me that he had a closed casket wake because - HIS BODY WAS BUTCHERED by the japanese.

26 posted on 05/09/2004 8:04:52 AM PDT by Condor51 ("Diplomacy without arms is like music without instruments." -- Frederick the Great)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Why was it wrong? We were attacked by Japan without a declaration of war. Japan had a God Emperor. Many Japanese were loyal to their God Emperor and provided information to
infiltrators that would have been detrimental to this country. This was true then especially in Hawaii. We did not shoot or gas them, FDR simply put them somewhere where they could not hurt us. Not fair? Oh well, lots of things are not!
27 posted on 05/09/2004 8:08:35 AM PDT by wingnuts'nbolts (Keep your eye on the donut not on the hole!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
Just give me this Kinsolving guy, Manzanar, and I'm in the guardtower with a firearm and he wants to come too close to the fence. I'll show him what a concentration camp is like. You'd better believe buddy! Let me at him.

Interesting comment. Can you expound?
And who's 'Manzanar'?

Thanks

28 posted on 05/09/2004 8:09:27 AM PDT by Condor51 ("Diplomacy without arms is like music without instruments." -- Frederick the Great)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
okay.
29 posted on 05/09/2004 8:09:34 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Travis McGee
"Did you bother to read the article before posting?"

that was my thought too?
maybe there is something to that "ozone hole theory"...

30 posted on 05/09/2004 8:17:50 AM PDT by hoot2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: risk
IMHO, those concentration camps were illegal, FDR and the Supreme Court's tyranny notwithstanding.

I'm not aware of a single Japanese American who was charged with any war-related crime during that period.

They were simply presumed to be potentially disloyal because of their ethnicity, in disregard of their American citizenship and INDIVIDUAL rights.

The internment camps were an abomination, and so was FDR.

How could anyone endorse such statist, anti-individual, hysterical Tyranny?

Contrast this with the present day, where those who are "rounded up," at least, are individuals, and who have raised, at a minimum, some level of reasonable suspicion.

Methinks there are some around here who would like to put all American Muslims in concentration camps.

It was wrong then, and it would be wrong now...
31 posted on 05/09/2004 8:18:28 AM PDT by sargon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mears
German Americans were treated well. It was racism,pure and simple.

With all due respect, that's incorrect. Germans were interned and sent to camps as well - and so were Italians. The untold story of German-American internment

That's only one reference, and here's a quote from another source, "The World War II experience of thousands of German Americans, to most, is an unknown."
World War II - The internment of German American civilians

32 posted on 05/09/2004 8:18:57 AM PDT by Condor51 ("Diplomacy without arms is like music without instruments." -- Frederick the Great)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: risk
I judge FDR on the results.

At a time when the country was in total and complete War in 2 countries, how many japaneese terrorist attacks did we suffer on our soil ?

None. Thus I guage the decision as a sound wartime decision.

33 posted on 05/09/2004 8:21:09 AM PDT by ChadGore (Vote Bush. He's Earned It.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: risk
No.
34 posted on 05/09/2004 8:26:48 AM PDT by G.Mason (A President is best judged by the enemies he makes when he has really hit his stride…Max Lerner)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Condor51
That was wrong. Even so, a German could pass as a regular white American if they so chose to do and avoid such internment. I don't get the mentality of people who justify locking up people who have nothing to do with a war.
35 posted on 05/09/2004 8:27:06 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: sargon
I find the hypocrisy of some amazing with regard to locking up Americans based upon their ethnicity esp. those that espouse gun rights, property rights,etc.
36 posted on 05/09/2004 8:29:41 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Condor51
If I recall the Germans that were held were mostly adult aliens.

Many of the Japanese were citizens and the entire family was interned,including children.
37 posted on 05/09/2004 8:32:34 AM PDT by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Mears
The Japanese Americans were treated poorly and German Americans were treated well.

I remember hearing that FDR wanted to round up the German-Americans too but that there were too many of them.

While relocation was far from an ideal solution, there were ways of avoiding it, moving out of the exclusion zone. War is always Hell and mistakes are always made. However, my husband's great-uncle ran one of the relocation camps in AZ. His wife tells of the excellent treatment those living there received. They weren't marched to death and they weren't put in ovens.

Nothing is ideal in this world, but life could have been much worse for those who were relocated.

38 posted on 05/09/2004 8:36:22 AM PDT by pbear8 (Save us from the liberal media O Lord!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

I posted this two years ago...
60th Anniversary of Japanese Internment by FDR - Executive Order 9066
39 posted on 05/09/2004 8:37:27 AM PDT by CounterCounterCulture (Remember, name and town, name and town, if you wish to opine)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pbear8
Well, they wanted to relocate all the Japanese-Americans on Hawaii, but found out it was 1) Logistically impossible and 2) Hawaii couldn't function without them.

Even J. Edgar Hoover was opposed to the internments, and he was hardly some namby-pamby do-gooder.

There was actually a Japanese intel network among some Japanese-Americans, and it's true you could leave the internment camps at any time if you could find a job or school not on the West Coast, but still; you had American citizens forced to sell their farms and businesses on the west coast and moved to camps without any SPECIFIC evidence against them. Just can't do that under any circumstances.
40 posted on 05/09/2004 8:41:36 AM PDT by John H K
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
This was true then especially in Hawaii.

None of the Japanese-Americans on Hawaii were ever moved.

41 posted on 05/09/2004 8:42:38 AM PDT by John H K
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Mears
That may be true (haven't checked), but I was just pointing out that the Japs weren't the only ones interned.
42 posted on 05/09/2004 8:51:54 AM PDT by Condor51 ("Diplomacy without arms is like music without instruments." -- Frederick the Great)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Condor51
Why are you using a racial epithet? You've already made your point and stated your opinion.
43 posted on 05/09/2004 8:58:01 AM PDT by Chip the Cat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Travis McGee
"Would you have preferred to have lost the "Magic" code breaking advantage, and hence lost (among many battles) the Battle of Midway and WW2 in the Pacific?"

That is a BS argument. How would Japanese spies find out about MAGIC when it wasn't even known to military commands below the theater level? Why couldn't the U.S. have been as successful at turning Japanese agents into double agents as the British were with the Germans?

The Battle of Midway was fought in early June 1942. The legislation enabling relocation of Japanese-Americans was passed on Feb. 19, 1942. How many of them were actually relocated before Midway occurred? It's not like the U.S. had the relocation camps prepared and ready upon enactment of the relocatin statute.

As far as compromising MAGIC, the Japanese had to know something was amiss when the U.S. Navy was able to conveniently have all of its available combat power on location to fight the Battle of the Coral Sea and then Midway without sending any significant forces to react to the Japanese diversionary attacks. The enemy guessing correctly twice in a row where to position aircraft carriers in the expanse of the Pacific Ocean would arouse suspicion in even the least competent communications and intelligence officers.

44 posted on 05/09/2004 9:00:00 AM PDT by Poodlebrain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
Well there were large contingents of Nazi sympathizers here on Long Island during the same time and they were never locked up. Actually, the neo-nazis still have a small presence here on LI. I don't make excuses and pretend that racism didn't play a part in making it MUCH easier to lock up Japanese people. FDR would NOT have won friends if he started locking up white people. I'll bet money on that one.

It may well have been racism, but it may also have had something to do with the fact that Japan directly attacked and killed people on United States territory, whereas Germany never did.

Most of us today barely even acknowledge that Pearl Harbor happened anymore, but don't ever underestimate the amount of outrage it stirred up within America at the time it actually happened.

45 posted on 05/09/2004 9:07:20 AM PDT by jpl ("You can go to a restaurant in New York City and meet a foreign leader."- John Kerry)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: jpl
Most of us today barely even acknowledge that Pearl Harbor happened anymore, but don't ever underestimate the amount of outrage it stirred up within America at the time it actually happened.

*** I will take your word for it.
46 posted on 05/09/2004 9:10:51 AM PDT by cyborg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

The above article includes the following:
Dr. McGrath also notes that the American Japanese Claims Act of 1948 led to the provision of $35 million paid on thousands of Japanese-Americans claims for lost or damaged homes, or even crop loss, as a result of their being called away from their homes during a national emergency -- just as so many millions of American men were called away from their homes to serve in our armed forces where half a million of them were killed fighting our national enemies.


Some of the soldiers mentioned above killed fighting our national enemies were Americans of Japanese descent. 11,000 of them served in the 442nd, 100th Infantry Battalion. They are the most decorated unit in the US army for size and length of service. 18,000 individual decorations for bravery, 9,500 Purple Hearts, 7 presidential unit Citations, 20 Congressional Medals of Honor, 560 Silver Stars.I haven't found a single instance of any of them cashing in on a 3 Purple Hearts and your're sent home rule. This at a time when Americans of Japanese descent eligible for the draft were classified as enemy aliens, in spite of being American citizens. These men served at a time when their families were locked up for no reason other than being of Japanese ancestry. How many freepers would watch their homes, businesses and farms taken away by the government, their families imprisoned, and than serve and sacrifice on the front lines of a war for a country in which they were often confused with the enemy? Internment was wrong then, and its wrong now. If relocation orders are ok, if we ever have an administration that declares war on conservatives, don't start bellyaching when you are relocated,your patriotism questioned, your life turned upside down, your children imprisoned behind barbed wire.After all, it's for your own good.
47 posted on 05/09/2004 9:32:06 AM PDT by Chip the Cat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: risk
This is an insult to the U.S. Supreme Court's liberals such as Felix Frankfurter, Hugo Black and Willaim O. Douglas,

I take it that's supposed to be some kind of scathing indictment.

48 posted on 05/09/2004 9:35:26 AM PDT by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ml/nj
But if they were not, Roosevelt was absolutely right to do what he did. And let's not forget: We won that war.

Wonder why FDR didn't lock up Dwight Eisenhower to help the war effort.

49 posted on 05/09/2004 10:07:37 AM PDT by Oztrich Boy ("Despise not the jester. Often he is the only one speaking the truth")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Condor51; muawiyah
And who's 'Manzanar'?

John 11:35

50 posted on 05/09/2004 10:13:55 AM PDT by Oztrich Boy ("Despise not the jester. Often he is the only one speaking the truth")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-102 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson