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Keyword: wwii

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  • Navajo Code Talker Alfred K. Newman dead at 94

    01/16/2019 9:00:05 AM PST · by EveningStar · 33 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 16, 2019 | Travis Fedschun
    Alfred K. Newman, one of the last surviving Navajo Code Talkers, died at the age of 94 on Sunday in New Mexico. Newman, who used his native language to outsmart the Japanese in World War II by helping to create an uncrackable code, died at a nursing home in Bloomfield, New Mexico. “Navajo Code Talker Alfred Newman was a hero, and he stood amongst giants,” tribal President Russell Begaye told the Arizona Republic. “We will be forever grateful for his contributions and bravery, as well as that of each and every one of our Navajo Code Talkers. They are national...
  • What's feared more than a Sniper Lurking in the Darkness?

    01/16/2019 4:42:22 AM PST · by w1n1 · 25 replies
    Am Shooting Journal ^ | 1/16/2019 | C Raleigh
    A sniper that shoots an exploding bullet, sounds far fetched out of a James Bond movie. Exploding rounds have been around since World War II. The Germans made an 8mm rifle ammunition which exploded upon impact. Though the round was banned by the Hague Convention this didn’t stop the usage of it. During World War II both Russia and Germany were firing exploding bullets from sniper rifles. These vicious projectiles were used horrifically on human targets during the war. Originally these exploding rounds concepts were used for sabotage operations which were left behind for enemy forces, generally insurgents, to find...
  • Stalin’s NKVD and Hitler’s Gestapo Cooperated Closely Even Before Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact

    01/13/2019 1:57:56 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 23 replies
    Eurasia - New Series ^ | Jan 12, 2019
    Perhaps the only thing that outrages Russian defenders of Stalin more than the obvious parallels between his regime and Hitler’s is any reference to the alliance the two dictators formed in 1939 with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, one that opened the way to war in Europe and lasted until Hitler turned on his former ally in June 1941. But now there may be something even more offensive to such defenders of Stalin and his system: the discovery of documents which confirm that the NKVD cooperated closely with the Gestapo well before the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed and that may have paved...
  • Soviet war memorials in Eastern Europe continue to strain relations with Russia

    01/03/2019 5:03:23 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 7 replies
    The Conversation ^ | Aug 2018 | Antony Kalashnikov
    Decades after the fall of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe, Soviet World War II monuments continue to arouse significant controversy in many former Eastern Bloc countries where they are either being dismantled by law or vandalised by activists. In certain countries the past few years have seen a spike in these activities. The Ukrainian “decommunisation law” which passed on April 9, 2015 opened the way for the removal of public art bearing communist symbolism. While war monuments were officially exempt... In Poland, the process of dismantling Soviet war monuments was accelerated by an amended “decommunisation” law, which came into...
  • Richard Overton, America's oldest man and WWII vet, dies at 112

    12/27/2018 4:58:04 PM PST · by Blue House Sue · 24 replies
    Austin American Statesman ^ | 12/27/18 | Katie Hall``
    Austin resident Richard Overton, who was America’s oldest man and oldest war veteran, has died. Overton, who was honored for his military service and beloved for his propensity to enjoy his supercentenarian status with a cigar in one hand and a glass of whiskey in another, was 112 years old. He died this evening at a rehab facility in Austin, said his cousin Volma Overton Jr. Overton was well-known to his neighbors, who often chatted with him on his East Austin porch in the 72 years that he lived there. Over the past few years, people from all over the...
  • The Deeper Meaning of "The Nutcracker"

    12/24/2018 6:03:06 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 24 replies
    Liberty.me ^ | Jan 2014 | Jeffrey Tucker
    Many people this holiday season will experience the joy of attending a local performance of “The Nutcracker” ballet by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. It’s the most implausible American tradition imaginable, an import from fin-de-siècle Russia straight to your hometown. It’s living proof of the capacity of music and the art of dance to leap the bounds of time and space and delight us forever. Perhaps some viewer’s own children will perform in it, and that’s part of the appeal. What theater goers don’t entirely realize is that they are watching something even more wonderful than what they see. In this one...
  • 'Payback' for love: WWII vet, 93, has visited wife's grave 1,300 times

    12/21/2018 7:44:11 AM PST · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    www.boston25news.com ^ | Updated: Dec 20, 2018 - 12:56 AM | By: Bob D'Angelo, Cox Media Group National Content Desk
    HONOLULU - Six days a week, World War II veteran Ted Richardson visits the Honolulu gravesite of his wife at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. He takes three buses from his Waikiki apartment to get there, but for the 93-year-old, it is a pilgrimage he enjoys. "I always tell her when I go up there, 'Payback time,'" Richardson told KGMB. Richardson is usually the first visitor when the cemetery opens at 6:30 a.m., the television station reported. He has visited his wife’s grave more than 1,300 times. “Payback” is usually in the form of flowers, which he lays...
  • FP-45 Liberator

    12/11/2018 5:04:57 AM PST · by w1n1 · 12 replies
    Am Shooting Journal ^ | 12/11/2018 | F Jardim
    Clandestine weapons like the World War II FP-45 pistol, later dubbed the Liberator by the Office of Strategic Services in 1944, have always intrigued me. It remains the rarest of American martial handguns from the conflict, with original examples usually starting in the $1,500 range for rusty, damaged pieces and the best examples, with their impossibly rare waxed shipping boxes, bringing over $7,000. Myths and misinformation hide the pistol's real story; they weren't wildly inaccurate junk guns that exploded after a few shots, and they were never tossed out of airplanes over occupied Europe en masse. THE FP-45 PISTOL was...
  • OPINION: Pearl Harbor Day One For Which Franklin Delano Roosevelt Shoulders Infamy

    12/08/2018 2:26:02 PM PST · by rktman · 102 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 12/7/2018 | Daniel Oliver
    On Dec. 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan bombed the U.S. Pacific Fleet which was stationed in Pearl Harbor on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. In addressing Congress the next day, President Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy.” But Roosevelt’s reputation should live in infamy too. The line that Roosevelt enthusiasts and left-wing historians have peddled for so many years is that the attack was a complete surprise. Here’s a sample from The American Pageant, a typical left-wing American history textbook widely used in American high schools: Officials in Washington, having “cracked” the top-secret code of...
  • 77 years ago, a date that still lives in infamy(snowflakes would-----)

    12/07/2018 9:55:33 AM PST · by rktman · 18 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | 12/7/2018 | Ethel C. Fenig
    On this day 77 years ago, Japan launched a surprise attack against a U.S. naval base in Pearl Harbor in the then-American territory of Hawaii. Over 2,400 Americans were killed, over 1,000 wounded on that day. The countries were not at war at the time. The next day, the U.S. Congress declared war against Japan. Speaking to a joint session of Congress, President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) called the day of the attack "a date which will live in infamy." Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war against the U.S.; the U.S. then declared war against Germany and Italy....
  • This date has forever lived in infamy (12/7/1941)

    12/07/2018 8:26:35 AM PST · by rktman · 48 replies
    wnd.com ^ | 12/7/2018 | Bill Federer
    On Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor was attacked. Three hundred fifty Japanese aircraft sank five American battleships and three destroyers. Four hundred U.S. aircraft were destroyed. Over 4,000 were killed or wounded. Subsequent investigations revealed warnings may have been disregarded, such as Four-Star Admiral H.E. Kimmel’s statement in a 1958 radio interview hosted by Notre Dame Law School Dean Clarence Manion: “General Short and I were not given the information available in Washington and were not informed of the impending attack because it was feared that action in Hawaii might deter the Japanese from making the attack. Our president had...
  • A German priest’s Advent reflections from World War II

    12/04/2018 6:13:57 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 1 replies
    CNA ^ | Mary Reza
    Father Alfred Delp was in the midst of his studies to become a Jesuit priest when Hitler took power in Germany in 1933. Despite increasing difficulties under the regime, he was ordained a priest for the order in 1937. The priest eventually was imprisoned in 1944 and executed in 1945 by the Gestapo, as he was falsely believed to be involved in the July 20, 1944 assassination attempt on Hitler. Even though he was able to prove his innocence, he was hung for high treason for his involvement in resistance activities. He was offered his freedom if he left the...
  • Russian Minister Says 'Amoral' To Investigate Veracity of Soviet Wartime Legend

    12/03/2018 12:11:29 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 25 replies
    RFE/RL ^ | Dec 3, 2018 | Matthew Luxmoore
    "Even if this story were made up from start to finish, even if there had been no Panfilov, even if there had been nothing at all,"... "this is a sacred legend, which simply cannot be touched. And those who do so are washed-up scumbags." Russia's culture minister has revealed historical records that he claims prove the authenticity of a World War II legend largely debunked by historians, delivering the latest salvo in a long-running dispute that challenges the official narrative of the Soviet Union's war experience. Commonly referred to as "Panfilov's 28 men," the legend is among the most controversial...
  • 80 years after Kristallnacht, German president lights massive Hanukkah menorah

    12/03/2018 11:57:30 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 2 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | Dec 3, 2018 | Toby Axelrod
    Eighty years after Kristallnacht, the “Night of Broken Glass,” in which Nazis terrorized Jews throughout Germany and Austria, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier was lifted in a cherry picker crane alongside Berlin community Rabbi Yehudah Teichtal to kindle what is billed as the Europe’s largest Hanukkah menorah, located at the iconic Brandenburg Gate. Thanks to a misty rain, the first night of Hanukkah was especially sparkly in Berlin this year. Raindrops settled upon several hundred onlookers gathered for the 15th annual candle-lighting ceremony, refracting the lights of Berlin’s giant Christmas tree and the illuminated 18th-century monument, just east of where the...
  • Hungarian Film 'Eternal Winter' set in Soviet camp Awarded 'Best Drama' in Florida

    11/30/2018 9:36:32 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 2 replies
    Hungary Today ^ | Nov 21, 2018
    Attila Szász’s new film Eternal Winter, based on Norbert Köbli’s script, bagged another prestigious honor last week when it took home the award for Best Drama at the 33rd Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival (FLIFF). The film previously won the award for Best European Movie of the Year in Berlin and Szász was chosen to receive the award for Best Director at the 42nd Montreal World Film Festival. Following the Soviet occupation of Hungary in 1944, local, Ethnic German women are taken from their small village, loaded into cattle wagons and forced to work in coal mines under inhuman conditions...
  • Harry Leslie Smith: War veteran has died

    11/28/2018 8:02:26 AM PST · by Trump20162020 · 8 replies
    BBC ^ | November 28, 2018 | BBC News
    A World War Two veteran who grew up in poverty and described himself as the "world's oldest rebel" has died. The son of RAF veteran and author Harry Leslie Smith tweeted to say his father had died while visiting him in Canada. The son of a miner, Mr Smith lived through the Great Depression and joined the RAF in 1941, serving in World War Two.
  • Picture Of The Day: Mugshot Of Benito Mussolini

    11/25/2018 5:29:43 AM PST · by gaggs · 26 replies
    Mugshot of Benito Mussolini, the socialist journalist co-founder of Fascism, after being arrested for his advocacy of a violent general strike in Switzerland where he was an illegal to avoid conscription in Italy. He was deported multiple times. With strong borders Fascism wouldn't have existed. Those eyes.... they all have those dead eyes!
  • World’s oldest nun, Holocaust hero, dies in Poland aged 110

    11/24/2018 9:17:30 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 7 replies
    Radio Poland ^ | 23.11.2018
    A Polish woman who was believed to be the world’s oldest nun has died at the age of 110. Born on March 25, 1908, Cecylia Roszak spent almost 90 years of her life in a convent, Poland’s PAP news agency reported. She died in the southern Polish city of Kraków last week, according to the local archdiocese. Roszak helped rescue Jews during World War II and was awarded the Yad Vashem's Righteous Among the Nations medal, according to the PAP news agency. The Righteous Among the Nations title, the highest Israeli civilian distinction, has been awarded since 1963 by the...
  • Berlin man, 95, charged over 36,000 deaths in Nazi camp

    11/23/2018 11:36:52 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 57 replies
    France 24 ^ | 23 Nov 2018 | Agence France Presse
    German prosecutors on Friday charged a 95-year-old man with more than 36,000 counts of accessory to murder over his alleged time as a Nazi concentration camp guard during World War II. The allegations against the accused, identified only as Hans H., concern atrocities committed at the Mauthausen camp in Austria. Hans H. is believed to have belonged to the SS-Totenkopfsturmbann (Death's Head Battalion) between summer 1944 and spring 1945 at Mauthausen, part of the Nazis' vast network of concentration camps. Prosecutors argue that by working as a guard at the site, the accused contributed to tens of thousands of prisoner...
  • How the Navy’s D-Day amphibious attack on Utah beach achieved 'tactical surprise'

    11/12/2018 1:30:47 PM PST · by DFG · 52 replies
    Warrior Maven via Fox News ^ | 11/12/2018 | Kris Osborn
    Battling rough seas with five-foot waves, thrashing wind gusts and heavy enemy fire, U.S. Navy amphibious landing craft attacking Utah Beach on D-Day actually managed to achieve total tactical surprise. Although amphibious forces eventually took heavy German artillery fire as they got closer, the amphibious landing force was well protected by Allied air superiority and cloudy weather. “As our forces approached the French coast without a murmur from the enemy or from their own radio, the realization that once again almost complete tactical surprise had been achieved slowly dawned,” said Sir Bertram Home Ramsay, Naval Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Naval...