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How To Save an Hour (Or More) On XP Installs
Information Week ^ | September 20, 2004 | Fred Langa

Posted on 09/20/2004 12:41:57 AM PDT by Stoat

Pre-patch your XP Setup CD once; never have to install SP2 again. Fred Langa walks you through a 16-step process.

Our recent discussions about Windows XP's SP2 show that the huge patch is working fine for most users; and that with caution (make a full backup or image beforehand; read and follow all of Microsoft's pre-SP2 installation tips), even potentially troublesome installations can be handled smoothly.

But not swiftly: The update process can take a considerable chunk of your workday, even if you don't count the download time or install from the free SP2 CD. Twenty to 40 minutes seems about the norm for installs on faster PCs; older, slower systems can take well over an hour.

There's not a lot that can be done about that, but you can achieve a huge time savings on future installations and reinstallations of XP by integrating SP2's files with those of your original XP setup CD. Your hybrid install CD will work exactly as the original one did, even to the point of using the same 25-character Product Key, but it will be completely up to date with all patches and updates, up to and including SP2. Any system you set up with the hybrid CD will be pre-patched to current levels, in one step. You'll be totally up to date from the start, rather than facing maybe an hour or more of additional downloads to bring the new installation or reinstallation to SP2 levels.

Creating a new hybrid installation CD is surprisingly easy--a point and click exercise with only a few geeky parts. And it works very well. In fact, in most ways, this method of pre-patching an installation CD is basically the same process software vendors use to produce an updated version of their installation software; indeed, starting this fall, Microsoft will offer for sale fully prepatched versions of XP on CD. But you don't have to wait: You can create your own totally legitimate prepatched copy of XP on CD today.

Before you begin, you'll need the following:

1) A legitimate XP setup CD (almost any variation will work: Pro or Home; retail or OEM; full install CD or upgrade CD; etc.)

2) A CD burner, blank CD, and software capable of creating a bootable CD (eg. Nero, Roxio, etc.)

3) About a gigabyte of free space on your hard drive for temporary file storage. (This space can be recovered after you've made your new CD.)

Ready? Let's dig in, step by step: The Steps Required
Step One: Using Windows Explorer, navigate to the top level of your hard drive, or to some other suitable location that's easy to get back to.

Step Two: Create a new folder. We'll use this new folder to hold the components of your CD project. You can give it any name, but for clarity, let's call it XPSP2 in this working example.

Step Three: Open the newly created XPSP2 folder. Inside, create three new (empty) folders; name them Root, Boot, and SP2. These folders will house various components that later will be combined into a new, pre-patched setup CD.

Create a working folder for your CD project in a convenient location (e.g. c:\) and with an obvious name. The disk you select to host the project should have at least about one gigabyte free.

(click image for larger view)

 

 

 
Create these three empty folders inside your main project folder. These subfolders will be used to store the working pieces of the new CD you're building.

(click image for larger view)

Step Two:

Create a working folder for your CD project in a convenient location (e.g. c:\) and with an obvious name. The disk you select to host the project should have at least about one gigabyte free.

Step Three:

Create these three empty folders inside your main project folder. These subfolders will be used to store the working pieces of the new CD you're building.

Copying Files, Folders
Step Four: Put your original, unpatched XP installation CD in the CD drive; copy all of its files and folders to the new "Root" folder you just created in Step Three. (i.e. C:\XPSP2\ROOT )

Step Five: Open the Root folder; you'll see the files that have just been copied from the installation CD. Click to open the Support folder; then click to open the Tools folder inside that. Delete the file named "deploy.cab" inside the Tools folder. (In other words, delete: C:\XPSP2\ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\DEPLOY.CAB )

Copying the contents of your original read-only setup CD to a normal read/writable hard drive makes the setup files patchable. Getting the files off the CD can take a long time on older, slower systems, but isn't too onerous on newer PCs.

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The original Deploy.Cab, in the \ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\ folder, must be deleted. Later, we'll replace it with an updated Deploy.Cab.

(click image for larger view)

Step Four:

Copying the contents of your original read-only setup CD to a normal read/writable hard drive makes the setup files patchable. Getting the files off the CD can take a long time on older, slower systems, but isn't too onerous on newer PCs.

Step Five:

The original Deploy.Cab, in the \ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\ folder, must be deleted. Later, we'll replace it with an updated Deploy.Cab.

Step Six: Download the (free) "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Deployment Tools" from Microsoft.

Download an Install Package
Step Seven: The file you download In Step Six will have a name like "WindowsXP-KB838080-SP2-DeployTools-ENU.cab". Rename this to "deploy.cab" and copy it into the C:\XPSP2\ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\ folder, replacing the "deploy.cab" you previously deleted there.

Microsoft's free ''Windows XP Service Pack 2 Deployment Tools'' can be downloaded for free, and will become the basis of the new ''Deploy.Cab'' you'll need for your prepatched setup CD.

(click image for larger view)

 

 

 
The original Deploy.Cab, in the \ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\ folder, must be deleted. Later, we'll replace it with an updated Deploy.Cab.

(click image for larger view)

Step Six:

Microsoft's free "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Deployment Tools" can be downloaded for free, and will become the basis of the new "Deploy.Cab" you'll need for your prepatched setup CD.

Step Seven:

Rename the Deployment Tools to "deploy.cab" and copy them to the \ROOT\SUPPORT\TOOLS\ folder.
Step Eight: Download the (free) "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Network Installation Package for IT Professionals and Developers" from Microsoft. Download the file to the C:\XPSP2 folder; or if you downloaded it elsewhere, copy it into the C:\XPSP2 folder. Once it's there, rename the downloaded file (which is named something like WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-ENU.exe ) to "SP2.EXE"

Download a (free) copy of the complete SP2 patch from Microsoft.

(click image for larger view)

 

 

 
Rename the downloaded SP2 file to ''SP2.EXE'' and place it in the C:\XPSP2 folder.

(click image for larger view)

Step Eight:

Download a (free) copy of the complete SP2 patch from Microsoft.

Step Eight:

Rename the downloaded SP2 file to "SP2.EXE" and place it in the C:\XPSP2 folder.

Step Nine: Extract the Service pack files to the SP2 folder: Click Start/Run, and then type this command in the Run box: C:\XPSP2\SP2.EXE /U /X:C:\XPSP2\SP2

Click OK, and the self-extracting SP2.exe file will unpack its contents into the SP2 folder.

Step Ten: Use XP's built-in "Update" tool to apply the SP2 patches to the original XP setup files. Click Start/Run and type the following command in the Run box:

C:\XPSP2\SP2\I386\UPDATE\UPDATE.EXE /S:C:\XPSP2\ROOT

Windows will open an "Updating Your Windows Share" dialog, and will show you the progress of the patching. When it's done, the SP2 patches will be seamlessly integrated with the original XP setup files.

The SP2 patch will self-extract to the folder of your choice. See the Step Nine text for specifics on how to get the files ready for integration with the original setup files.

(click image for larger view)

 

 

 
A single command typed on the

(click image for larger view)

Step Nine:

The SP2 patch will self-extract to the folder of your choice. See the Step Nine text for specifics on how to get the files ready for integration with the original setup files.

Step Ten:

A single command typed on the "Run" line (see Step Ten) merges the SP2 files with those on the original setup CD, making the setup files fully up to date and ready for use.
Making It Bootable
Most original XP setup CDs are bootable; and your new patched setup files will be most useful if they likewise reside on a bootable CD. Then, you can use the prepatched setup CD on any PC--- even one where the hard drive is completely unformatted. (Of course, the PC must be capable of booting from a CD in the first place; we'll assume that's a given.)

Different CD-burning tools have different ways of setting up a bootable CD. I'll walk you through using Roxio's CD Creator, as it's one of the most widely used CD-burning tools. Many of the concepts will apply to other tools, although the menu items and dialog names will be different. (I'll also link to additional step-by-step guides for other CD tools at the end of this article.)

Step 11: In addition to the content files, which you created in steps 1-10 above, you also need the actual boot code. The good folks at TackTech, in addition to offering a wealth of information, also make available, free, CD boot code files. Grab a copy at http://www.tacktech.com/pub/microsoft/bootfiles/bootfiles.zip . It's a standard ZIP file; open the file and copy the compressed file inside, called "boot.ima" to the folder C:\XPSP2\BOOT you previously created.

Step 12: Start your CD burner utility--- in this example, Roxio's CD Creator:

Step 13: Select File/New Project/Bootable Disc. When the dialog opens, set Bootable Disc Type: to No Emulation. Click the ">>Advanced" button, and set the Load Segment: to 0x000 and the Sector Count: to 4. Now click "Browse" where the dialog asks you to "locate the image file that contains the bootable image." Browse/navigate to C:\XPSP2\BOOT. Click on the "boot.ima" file you placed there in Step Eleven, and then click "Open" and "OK."

Step 14: Click to File/Project Properties. This opens one dialog with several tabs, and many choices and sub choices. Basically, you use this dialog to set up the new CD to match the characteristics of your original XP setup CD. For example, if your original XP setup CD is an unpatched, retail, full-install version, its volume label is probably "WXPFPP_EN," so that's what you'd enter in the "Volume Label" portion of the dialog box. You can simply check your original CD with Windows Explorer to see the volume label, or you can figure it out from the comprehensive list at http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm?ttid=342

Likewise, set the other features in this dialog to match that of the original setup CD:

File System = Joliet
Physical format of CD = Mode 1: CDROM

Click Advanced, and enter the following:

Publisher Name = MICROSOFT_CORPORATION
Prepared By = MICROSOFT_CORPORATION

The remaining default settings are probably OK, but to be sure:

Select "Use original file date."
Select "All Files" under the "File Filter" tab.
Uncheck "Do not add Hidden files" and "Do not add System files."

When you're done, click OK.

Step 15: You're almost ready to burn. You already added the boot image files to the project in Step thirteen; now select and add all the files and folders in the C:\XPSP2\ROOT folder to the burn project, and click "Burn to disc."

Step 16: The final dialog then opens, and offers a few last choices. If they're not already selected, select "Record CD" under "Record Options," and "Disc-at-Once" under "Record Methods." Click OK, and you're done!

Note that the burning software may complain about the "folder depth" being too many levels deep--ignore this warning, as it has no effect on the usability of this CD. More Options and Alternatives
Of course, there are many variations on the process, and these sites cover most of them:

Other ways to produce a prepatched ("slipstreamed") setup CD:
 

Create a Bootable CD:

What ways have you used to "slipstream" or prepatch a CD? What pitfalls have you encountered that you might share with the rest of us? What sites have given you the best advice on the process? Join in the discussion!

 


To discuss this column with other readers, please visit Fred Langa's forum on the Listening Post.

To find out more about Fred Langa, please visit his page on the Listening Post.



TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Technical
KEYWORDS: computer; computing; fredlanga; langa; microsoft; sp2; windows; xp

1 posted on 09/20/2004 12:41:58 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: Stoat

Buy a Mac... then never worry about Windows wasting your time again. ;-)


2 posted on 09/20/2004 12:53:13 AM PDT by coconutt2000
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To: Stoat

Before you go through this process ask yourself how many times you reinstall windows? That is the only benefit touted as the reason to make up this monster CD. For most of you, it won't be worth the trouble.

I updated my sister's XP system two weeks ago and it took almost 3 hours even though I was connected to high speed cable. This is due to the sloooooow download from Microsoft. I updated my father-in-law's laptop yesterday using a CD. It took between 35 and 45 minutes. Definitely download SP2 and cut a CD! (1) The install is faster and (2) you have the software on your own media in case you can't get it from Microsoft later.

I checked both systems for firewall safety before and after the install of SP2. Both were found to be totally "stealthy" by Gibson Research [www.grc.com]. They were actually better protected than either my DLINK or Netgear router firewalls without further hand tuning!


3 posted on 09/20/2004 12:57:12 AM PDT by the_Watchman
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To: Stoat
i did this like 3-4 weeks ago or whenever Sp2 was first released
4 posted on 09/20/2004 1:06:32 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: Stoat

One more reason Linux is king...


5 posted on 09/20/2004 1:06:51 AM PDT by Gerasimov (tag lines bore me)
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To: FesterUSMC

"i did this like 3-4 weeks ago or whenever Sp2 was first released"

Thank you for serving our country :-)

Did you use a similar method as what is described in this article?

Was it fairly easy to produce the CD?

Do you feel that the time spent in making the CD was time well-spent?


6 posted on 09/20/2004 1:11:56 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: Stoat

Thanks for the public service.


7 posted on 09/20/2004 1:13:03 AM PDT by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: tallhappy
"Thanks for the public service" You're quite welcome! I hope that it will be of some help :-)
8 posted on 09/20/2004 1:15:09 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: Stoat
slipstreaming a cd is worth the effort.. I really didn't look threw your steps but you can goto this web page and follow these

Windows Help

9 posted on 09/20/2004 1:27:21 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: FesterUSMC; All
Thanks very much for your link! I'll post it here so that people can compare the different methods more easily on the same page and decide what's best for their own situation:

Slipstreaming Windows XP Service Pack 2 and Create Bootable CD

Slipstreaming a Service Pack, is the process to integrate the Service Pack into the installation so that with every new installation the Operating System and Service Pack are installed at the same time.

Slipstreaming is usually done on network shares on corporate systems. But with the advent of CD burners, it does actually make some sense for the home user or small business user to do the same.

Microsoft added the ability to Slipstream a Service Pack to Windows 2000 and Windows XP. It not only has the advantage that when you (re)install your OS, you don't have to apply the Service Pack later, also if you update any Windows component later, you'll be sure that you get the correct installation files if Windows needs any.

 

Slipstream Windows XP Service Pack 2

 

Download the (full) "Network Install" of the Service Pack (English version [266 MB]), and save it to a directory (folder) on your hard drive (in my case D:\XP-SP2). Other languages can be downloaded from the Microsoft Download Web site.

Next copy your Windows XP CD to your hard drive. Just create a folder (I used \XP-CD), and copy all the contents of your Windows XP CD in that folder.

Next, open a Command Prompt (Start > Run > cmd), and go to the folder where you downloaded SP2 (cd \foldername). Type the command: servicepack filename /integrate:drive/path. In my example the command is WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-ENU /integrate:D:\XP-CD.

 

Extract SP2 files

 

If you get the error:

 

This service pack can't be integrated error

This is caused by the fact that your Windows XP CD contains updates that will be automatically installed when you run setup. This type of CD's will usually be from larger OEM suppliers (like Dell, HP, or others).

You cannot use this type of CD to create a slipstreamed SP2 install.

First, the files will be extracted, and next they will be integrated in your Windows XP files:

 

Updating Windows Share

When ready, you should get a confirmation. Windows XP Service Pack 2 has now been Slipstreamed into your original Windows XP files.

 

Slipstream Completed


 

 

Creating a Bootable CD

For this part I used IsoBuster and Nero Burning ROM 6 (make sure you have the latest version, but at least 5.5.9.0).

After you install IsoBuster, you can choose to use only the product's free functionality for what we want to do, IsoBuster will look like the image below (you need to have your original Windows XP CD in the CD-ROM drive).

Start to extract the boot loader from the original Windows XP CD. Using IsoBuster, select the "folder" Bootable CD, and right-click Microsoft Corporation.img. From the menu choose Extract Microsoft Corporation.img, and extract it to the folder on your hard drive where you have your Windows XP files (D:\XP-CD in my case).

 

Extract Boot Image

Next, start Nero Burning ROM, and choose CD-ROM (Boot) in the New Compilation window. On the Boot tab, select Image file under Source of boot image data, and browse to the location of the Microsoft Corporation.img file. Also enable Expert Settings, choosing No Emulation, and changing the Number of loaded sectors to 4 (otherwise it won't boot!)

 

Nero Boot Settings

The ISO tab should be configured correctly as shown below:

 

Nero ISO Settings

 

If you have an older version of Nero you won't have the option Do Not Add ";1" ISO file version extention under Relax ISO Restrictions. You won't be able to boot your new CD, so update Nero!
You can configure the Label tab to your liking, I would however recommend that you keep the Volume Label the same as on your original Windows XP CD. Here are some (English) Labels:
  • Windows XP Professional: WXPCCP_EN
  • Windows XP Home: WXHCCP_EN
  • Windows XP Professional OEM: WXPOEM_EN
  • Windows XP Home OEM: WXHOEM_EN

 

Nero Label Settings

Next press New, and from the File Browser window, select the files and folders from your slipstreamed location (in my case D:\XP-CD). Now drag & drop the selected files in the ISO1 window.

 

Copy Files

Next, burn your new CD.

 

Burn

You now have a Bootable, Slipstreamed Windows XP Service Pack 2 CD!
 


10 posted on 09/20/2004 1:34:37 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: Stoat

bttt


11 posted on 09/20/2004 1:36:41 AM PDT by SeeRushToldU_So (Some days I am more rednecked than other days. Not there is anything wrong with that.)
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To: FesterUSMC

You smarter than the average bear.


12 posted on 09/20/2004 1:40:57 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: dennisw

HUH? I no professional computer training.. If that is what your talking about.


13 posted on 09/20/2004 1:44:26 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: the_Watchman

I updated my father-in-law's laptop yesterday using a CD. It took between 35 and 45 minutes. Definitely download SP2 and cut a CD! (1) The install is faster and (2) you have the software on your own media in case you can't get it from Microsoft later.
____________________


http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=049C9DBE-3B8E-4F30-8245-9E368D3CDB5A&displaylang=en

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=323166


14 posted on 09/20/2004 1:46:22 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: FesterUSMC

HUH? I no professional computer training.......

Me neither, but I did read some Windows 95 books to learn cut and paste and other basics. Credit goes to Microsoft for creating visually intuitive operating systems. Operating systems for dummies.

I don't even have XP service pack one (SP1) on this computer. But I do use Zone Alarm, anti virus and anti adware programs.


15 posted on 09/20/2004 1:52:19 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: dennisw

oh, I slipstreamed Sp1 like a LONG time ago when did that come out? like over a year ago? Then i just did SP2 ... It would be in your best interest to get the updates...


16 posted on 09/20/2004 1:57:30 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: FesterUSMC

SP1 slowed down my computer. I'll try it again sometime and with SP2...... slipstreamed which I haven't done. For me, the best thing about XP is the cleartype option which makes text on LCD monitors very sharp. If not for that, any OS from Windows 98 on up is OK with me.


17 posted on 09/20/2004 2:04:53 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: coconutt2000

ping


18 posted on 09/20/2004 2:08:38 AM PDT by krogers58
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To: dennisw

if you download SP2 you DO NOT need SP1


19 posted on 09/20/2004 2:09:07 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: FesterUSMC
if you download SP2 you DO NOT need SP1

Really? You don't need to install SP1 before SP2? (I ask because I haven't installed SP1 yet.)

20 posted on 09/20/2004 2:15:57 AM PDT by BlessedBeGod
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To: FesterUSMC

if you download SP2 you DO NOT need SP1.....


I know. I'll try and slipstream SP2 and load it onto unused hard drive as an experiment.


21 posted on 09/20/2004 2:16:56 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: BlessedBeGod

Really? You don't need to install SP1 before SP2?......


Yup


22 posted on 09/20/2004 2:18:05 AM PDT by dennisw (There)
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To: BlessedBeGod
Really? You don't need to install SP1 before SP2? (I ask because I haven't installed SP1 yet.

If you downlaod SP2 you have NO need to download SP1 as SP2 will have all the stuff inside of it...

23 posted on 09/20/2004 3:16:22 AM PDT by FesterUSMC
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To: Stoat
I followed your directions precisely and now everything looks like this.
24 posted on 09/20/2004 3:38:19 AM PDT by billorites (freepo ergo sum)
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To: Gerasimov; coconutt2000; Stoat
Dear linux and mac bigots (ps that's me too): This may shock you but some folks have a perfectly reasonable need to use windows xp and apply SP2 in an efficient way - that's what this article is all about. Your advocacy is trivial and clueless...please stifle it unless you have something valuable to add to the conversation....

Thank you Stoat! I am the de-facto system administrator for my clan and I will be sure to burn an updated XP install cd soonest to save myself from all of the pestering of "can you fix my computer (without installing linux)?"...

25 posted on 09/20/2004 3:39:11 AM PDT by no-s
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To: no-s

Awww... I don't think humor constitutes calling someone a bigot, even if you are including yourself. I sometimes have a need for Windows XP, usually to run some random program.

I understand that, but this thread didn't leave much room for discussion since it was a how-to, not a how-do-i.


26 posted on 09/20/2004 3:41:37 AM PDT by coconutt2000
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To: billorites

My screen looks like this. Did I do something wrong?

27 posted on 09/20/2004 3:49:45 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (Heinz-Kerry: The common man doesn't look at me as some rich witch)
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To: Stoat

placemarker


28 posted on 09/20/2004 3:58:50 AM PDT by js1138 (Speedy architect of perfect labyrinths.)
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To: coconutt2000

Sorry...I see Coconutt2000 and and had a flashback to Bush2000 (see his posting history), don't want to go there again from the contrarian direction...


29 posted on 09/20/2004 4:01:53 AM PDT by no-s
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To: no-s

Eheh, I'll look... but just so you know, I've been using this particular handle since 2000, just not here.


30 posted on 09/20/2004 4:17:33 AM PDT by coconutt2000
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To: FesterUSMC

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!


31 posted on 09/20/2004 4:22:39 AM PDT by BlessedBeGod
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To: Stoat

Bump!


32 posted on 09/20/2004 4:29:34 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: Stoat

Okay....someone tell this dummie why I need SP2.....I have a hardwired firewall (this is a home where we have a router set up for a couple of computers).....


33 posted on 09/20/2004 7:52:55 AM PDT by goodnesswins (VICTORY...........brings peace.)
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To: goodnesswins
"Okay....someone tell this dummie why I need SP2.....I have a hardwired firewall (this is a home where we have a router set up for a couple of computers)....." Most computer industry writers and pundits that I have read on this issue have agreed that if you have been pretty much up to date with previous patches, upgrades and fixes you are not facing any imminent danger or major threat that is addressed solely by SP2. Actually, I've been extremely aggressive about keeping up to date up to this point but I'm waiting with SP2 because one of my favorite programs is on Microsoft's list of programs that "may" experience conflicts with SP2. The developer of this program promises that the next release will be fully compliant, so I'm holding off for the moment. One big reason for SP2 is it's default activation of the XP firewall (an "okay" firewall....better than nothing but easily surpassed by third party products). Microsoft feels that by unleashing a giant marketing campaign for SP2 which will reach lackadaisical users, the users who are completely lax about security will at least have this minimal protection activated, which will probably help a lot in the grand scheme of things. If you're a coherent person who already has firewalls in place, you can easily deactivate the SP2 firewall after your SP2 install. Below is a list of reasons to install SP2 from Microsoft....as for myself, my biggest interest is in improvements to Outlook Express, as I'm managing a puter for someone who has barely learned OE and can't be expected to learn a different email client. Any security upgrades for OE will mean less worry for me in this instance. I'm guessing also that some future patches, security fixes and upgrades may be dependent upon the user having first upgraded to SP2. Anyway, here's Microsoft's rationale for SP2: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/sp2/topten.mspx

Top 10 Reasons to Install Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2)

 

Help protect your PC from harmful attachments. Help protect your PC from harmful attachments.
 

By alerting you to potentially unsafe attachments, Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) helps guard your computer from viruses that can spread through Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, and Windows Messenger.

Improve your privacy when you’re on the Web. Improve your privacy when you’re on the Web.
 

SP2 helps protect your private information by applying the security settings that guard your PC to the files and content downloaded using Internet Explorer.

Avoid potentially unsafe downloads. Avoid potentially unsafe downloads.
 

Internet Explorer download monitoring and the Internet Explorer Information Bar warn you about potentially harmful downloads and give you the option to block files that could be malicious.

Reduce annoying pop-ups. Reduce annoying pop-ups.
 

Internet Explorer Pop-Up Blocker makes browsing the Internet more enjoyable by helping you reduce the unwanted ads and content that pop up when you’re browsing the Web.

Get firewall protection from startup to shutdown. Get firewall protection from startup to shutdown.
 

The powerful, built-in Windows Firewall is now turned on by default. This helps protect Windows XP against viruses and worms that can spread over the Internet.

Take control of your security settings. Take control of your security settings.
 

The new Windows Security Center allows you to easily view your security status and manage key security settings in one convenient place.

Get the latest updates easily. Get the latest updates easily.
 

Enhancements to Windows XP’s Automatic Updates feature make it even easier to access Windows updates. Plus, new technology has been added to help dial-up customers download updates more efficiently.

Help protect your e-mail address. Help protect your e-mail address.
 

Improvements to Outlook Express help reduce unwanted e-mail by limiting the possibility of your e-mail address being validated by potential spammers.

Take action against crashes caused by browser add-ons. Take action against crashes caused by browser add-ons.
 

The new Add-On Manager in Internet Explorer lets you easily view and control add-ons to reduce the potential for crashes and enjoy a more trouble-free browsing experience.

Go wireless without the hassle. Go wireless without the hassle.
 

SP2 improves wireless support and simplifies the process of discovering and connecting to wireless networks in your home or on the road.


34 posted on 09/20/2004 11:23:58 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: billorites

LOL


35 posted on 09/20/2004 11:26:41 AM PDT by sweetiepiezer (We have to stop Kerry for our grandkids sake!!!!!!!! GO W)
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To: Stoat

BTTT


36 posted on 09/20/2004 11:28:23 AM PDT by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: no-s
"Thank you Stoat! I am the de-facto system administrator for my clan and I will be sure to burn an updated XP install cd soonest to save myself from all of the pestering of "can you fix my computer (without installing linux)?"..." You're quite welcome, and thank you for your kind words. I hope that this will be of some help :-)
37 posted on 09/20/2004 11:35:09 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: billorites

"I followed your directions precisely and now everything looks like this."


ROTFLMAO!!!

Are you sure that a Mac or Linux file didn't get into your install CD by mistake? (((evil grin))))


38 posted on 09/20/2004 11:38:33 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: Stoat

bttt


39 posted on 09/20/2004 11:40:32 AM PDT by techcor
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To: coconutt2000

Rofl. Mac, Linux, 386BSD, .... many options for saving time and trouble.


40 posted on 09/20/2004 11:49:22 AM PDT by Havoc (.)
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To: no-s
...please stifle it unless you have something valuable to add to the conversation....

OK, here is a valuable suggestion from a fellow home system admin - one I learned from personal experience in installing SP2:
Make sure you have easy alternate access to the Internet before upgrading. If something goes terribly wrong, there is no substitute for having ready access to the net's helpful resources.

I upgraded two systems. One seemed to go well (but had problems that showed up later) and the other resulted in a BSOD. As it was, it was a major pain in the rear but if I hadn't had the other system with a working Internet connection, it would have graduated to an absolute nightmare.

If you have a single point of access to the net, do yourself a favor and burn a bootable system CD that will give you a lifeline to the Internet. Something like Knoppix come to mind.

41 posted on 09/20/2004 12:28:40 PM PDT by LTCJ (CBS, all your Boyd Cycles are belong to us.)
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