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Trey Spiece: Socialism is left's agenda
Arizona Daily Star ^ | 11/26/04 | Trey Spiece

Posted on 11/26/2004 6:47:42 AM PST by SandRat

Throughout the 2004 campaign, Sen. John Kerry maintained his proposed health-care plan could not be labeled as "socialized health care."

Arguably, his plan would have at least partially de-privatized the American health-care system. Only through massive insurance pools in which everyone had a vested interest would Kerry have been able to fulfill his bold promise to expand coverage to "96 percent of Americans and 99 percent of all children." But a majority of voters refused to buy into Kerry's health-care plan.

This plan introduced us to the "collectivist" ideology that acts as the driving force behind so many socially liberal policies.

An examination of the manner in which the left wing justifies this, and other moves toward socialism within governmental policies in American society, reveals a commonality in almost all liberal thinking.

As nationally syndicated radio host Dennis Prager points out, "At the heart of liberalism is the naive belief that people are basically good.

"As a result of this belief, liberals rarely blame people for the evil they do. Instead they blame economics, parents, capitalism, racism and anything else that can let the individual off the hook."

Prager is correct; it is a key component of the liberal agenda that it is almost always the system at fault and never the individual.

A prime example of this kind of thought can be found in the perception of the events of 9/11. The terrorists can be seen in one of two ways: as brutal, coldblooded murderers or simply as "victims" of the teachings of Islamic fundamentalism. Take your pick; I'll go with the first one.

Taking Prager's thoughts one step farther, there is even an underlying motivation behind the naive belief that people are essentially good. If people are basically good, as liberals maintain, then socialism can work.

Liberals, fully aware that their goal of socialism in the United States is unattainable because it will never be widely accepted, are content with knowing smaller steps in the direction of socialism can still be taken.

This mentality was seen following the election, when many students at my school looked on Canada as a better option than another term under President Bush.

By indirectly attacking the American system - a system of capitalism and free markets that conflicts with the interests of socialism - liberals can successfully evade such labels as "unpatriotic" while still advancing a socialist agenda.

Diverting blame from the individual to the system is not progressive or new at all. Thomas More (1478-1535) believed the key to reform of the individual was the reform of the social institutions that shape the individual.

More's "Utopia" described the perfect socialist society. This society was far from utopian, as it was forced to prevent wars by buying off its enemies. Where is the perfection in that?

Centuries later, liberals still advance their agenda under the same premise. Perhaps the real system at fault is that found in liberal thinking.


TOPICS: Editorial; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: agenda; capitalism; delusions; economics; healthcare; kerry; lefts; parents; socialism; socializedmedicine
Trey Spiece is a sophomore at Catalina Foothills High School.
1 posted on 11/26/2004 6:47:42 AM PST by SandRat
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To: SandRat
Moore's "Utopia" did not describe the Utopia of Thomas Moore. A common misconception.
2 posted on 11/26/2004 6:55:01 AM PST by agere_contra ( "Sheep are eating men". - Thomas Moore)
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To: SandRat

Impressive article for a High School sophomore!


3 posted on 11/26/2004 6:59:33 AM PST by MWS
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To: agere_contra
still pretty good insight for a 10th grader!
understands the liberal agenda better than many adults that I know
4 posted on 11/26/2004 7:00:14 AM PST by socialismisinsidious ("A government that is big enough to give you all you want is big enough to take it all away.")
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To: SandRat
"At the heart of liberalism is the naive belief that people are basically good.

It's doubtful liberals think wealthy Christian Republican property owners are basically good. Still, this great piece from a high school sophomore shows that liberals might have to stop depending on the public schools to hide basic economic truth.

5 posted on 11/26/2004 7:02:13 AM PST by alrea (Help wanted: Dir. of Homeland Security, State of New Jersey. Must be willing performer, & Democrat.)
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To: SandRat
... liberalism is the naive belief that people are basically good

This sums it up quite nicely.

good enough to be somebody's tagline

6 posted on 11/26/2004 7:03:51 AM PST by rllngrk33 (The fourth estate is now the propaganda wing of the Democratic Party.)
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To: SandRat

Redistribution of wealth away from the producers and the "can-doers" in our Nation toward the weak, apathetic slackers, (and toward the nanny state's coffer for building more self-perpetuating programs), is pure evil at the core.

That's why America will reject socialism. It creates a dependent society and stifles initiative by encouraging the status quo.


7 posted on 11/26/2004 7:03:56 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: SandRat

A sophomore? I'm impressed. Perhaps there IS hope!


8 posted on 11/26/2004 7:04:46 AM PST by t2buckeye
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To: SandRat
The whole health care issue is a leftist fabrication. How often did anyone even hear about a "health care crisis" before Hillary Clinton barged onto the scene? How did a function that the private sector had been handling comfortably for hundreds of years suddenly become a "crisis" that needed to be "managed" (read: controlled) by government?

The first step of the left is to create a problem. Then they rush in to solve it. Of course, their "solution" does nothing but create more problems, which they must then solve as well.

This kid nailed it perfectly.

9 posted on 11/26/2004 7:09:05 AM PST by IronJack (R)
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To: Don Simmons
That's why America will reject socialism. It creates a dependent society and stifles initiative by encouraging the status quo.

A Communitarian Ethos

The Groton influence of Endicott Peabody showed in a speech Roosevelt gave at the People's Forum in Troy, NY in 1912. There he declared that western Europeans and Americans had achieved victory in the struggle for "the liberty of the individual," and that the new agenda should be a "struggle for the liberty of the community." The wrong ethos for a new age was, "every man does as he sees fit, even with a due regard to law and order." The new order should be, "march on with civilization in a way satisfactory to the well-being of the great majority of us."

In that speech Roosevelt outlined the philosophical base of what would eventually become the New Deal. He also forecast the rhetorical mode by which "community" could loom over individual liberty. "If we call the method regulation, people hold up their hands in horror and say ‘un-American,' or ‘dangerous,'" Roosevelt pointed out. "But if we call the same identical process co-operation, these same old fogeys will cry out ‘well done'.... cooperation is as good a word for the new theory as any other."

If we're going to reject it, we ought to be getting started.

10 posted on 11/26/2004 7:11:08 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: IronJack
How did a function that the private sector had been handling comfortably for hundreds of years suddenly become a "crisis" that needed to be "managed" (read: controlled) by government?

PR, courtesy of the Robet Wood Johnson Foundation.

11 posted on 11/26/2004 7:13:01 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: SandRat

But think how many life saving techniques and life saving drugs come out of countries that have socialized health care.

1)There is the abortion pill. oops that is life taking.
2) ?


12 posted on 11/26/2004 7:14:45 AM PST by HuntsvilleTxVeteran (Dan Rather called Saddam "Mister President and President Bush "bush")
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To: IronJack
With thinking like his the correct closing would be This young-man nailed it perfectly.
13 posted on 11/26/2004 7:18:06 AM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: Don Simmons

Why America will reject it? You mean vote against medicare, social security? They are both socialist programs.


14 posted on 11/26/2004 7:30:45 AM PST by notigar
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To: tacticalogic

"If we're going to reject it, we ought to be getting started."


In the post-Depression era, the widespread change that Roosevelt's policies brought about was needed. Welfare, his five-year plan, New Deal, the TVA and other governmental "get to work" projects, etc. were much-needed shots in the arm in order for our Nation to recover.

None were actually intended to become permanent, however.

We haven't needed those kinds of sweeping and over-reaching programs in decades. We have risen to our position in the World via individual initiative and the spirit of capitalism - which drives people to make their own improvements in their own lives.

Dependence is a self-perpetuating cycle because it easily quenches thirst for quick comfort.

The hard right course is best for long-term progress: self-reliance.


15 posted on 11/26/2004 7:39:15 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: SandRat

His age is certainly no argument against him, nor did I intend any offense. In fact, to the degree he sees so much more clearly than, say, a certain cadaverous Massachusetts senator with aspirations for the presidency, his age recommends him highly.


16 posted on 11/26/2004 7:42:08 AM PST by IronJack (R)
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To: notigar

"You mean vote against medicare, social security? They are both socialist programs."


Yes, they are. Again, never intended to become permanent fixtures. Just because we have SOME socialist programs, doesn't mean we're a full-blown socialism. That's what this whole thing is addressing.

Any government will have some inherent programs to address social woes. It states in the Preamble to our Constitution: "....ensure domestic tranquility....promote the GENERAL welfare...".

Nowhere does it state that we'll fill every outstretched hand.

The more hands we quickly and easily fill, the more we'll find being stretched out.


17 posted on 11/26/2004 7:46:17 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: Don Simmons
In the post-Depression era, the widespread change that Roosevelt's policies brought about was needed. Welfare, his five-year plan, New Deal, the TVA and other governmental "get to work" projects, etc. were much-needed shots in the arm in order for our Nation to recover.

Conservative historians seem to agree that Roosevelt's New Deal programs did little to alleviate the Depression, and in many cases exacerbated it's effects.

His pursuit of socialism was not driven out of a sense of necessity due to the economic conditions, although he did use them as a justification. The speech I excerpted from was given 17 years before the crash of '29.

18 posted on 11/26/2004 7:48:48 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: SandRat

hope for the next generation alert.


19 posted on 11/26/2004 7:50:50 AM PST by the invisib1e hand (if a man lives long enough, he gets to see the same thing over and over.)
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To: tacticalogic

OK - I guess I'm missing the point you're trying to make then.

Are you agreeing with me that socialism is evil - or are you disagreeing with me when I say that America will not accept full-blown socialism?


20 posted on 11/26/2004 7:56:16 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: Don Simmons

I disagree that we with the assertion that we will never accept (unqualified) socialism. We already have. "Full blown", or absolute socialism is another matter, and I will agree that it will not be accepted in the forseeable future.


21 posted on 11/26/2004 8:02:10 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: tacticalogic

I will also agree wholeheartedly that socialims is evil. Socialism is a perfectly good, workable system - for ants and bees. It doesn't work worth a damn for people.


22 posted on 11/26/2004 8:03:40 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: Don Simmons

I defy you to define socialism in a way that doesn't include at least one MAJOR US program. Its already here, in spades.


23 posted on 11/26/2004 8:09:53 AM PST by notigar
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To: tacticalogic

Roger that!

Reminds me of the story of the "Ant and the Grasshopper". A commentary on one person's ability to plan ahead and work hard (the ant) versus the other's tendency to just float with the wind, lay around, do no planning -- and then get handed part of the fruits of the ant's labors.

Someone should re-post that story. It demonstrates the backwardness of socialism in terms that even idiot, simpleton liberals can understand....well, almost. :-)


24 posted on 11/26/2004 8:10:33 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: notigar

NOTED!

Move on....


25 posted on 11/26/2004 8:11:40 AM PST by Don Simmons (Annoy a liberal: Work hard; Prosper; Be Happy.)
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To: gibsosa

bump for sophomore who made it through the libs reeducation camp unscathed.


26 posted on 11/26/2004 8:14:17 AM PST by lilmsdangrus
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To: IronJack

The health care issue is not a fabrication. First, something must be done to contain the costs, which are increasing at approximately 16 percent per annum. (On a personal note, my health care insurance has increased from $2,500 for 2000 to $4,500 for 2004.) Second, according to the US Census (2000), 43 million Americans are without health care.

The crisis exists; the solution does not necessarily involve the system being "managed" by government. For instance, tort reform, as proffered by President Bush, is one way, in conjunctions with other measures, to slow down the cost increases.


27 posted on 11/26/2004 8:41:01 AM PST by kiwiexpat
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To: kiwiexpat
The health care issue is not a fabrication. First, something must be done to contain the costs, which are increasing at approximately 16 percent per annum.

IF -- and I'm only granting this for the sake of argument -- "something must be done to contain the costs," why is that "something" necessarily a public-sector initiative? Is increased health care cost driven by the same market constraints as any other commodity? Namely, demand? In the days when health insurance existed to cover catastrophic injuries or sickness, those costs were under control. But nowadays, when Safety Sandy takes Johnny to the doctor every time he scrapes a knee, costs are skyrocketing. Coincidence? I think not.

Secondly, the quality of medical care has increased substantially from the days when a doctor was a barber, and the best treatment he could offer was "cupping" or bleeding his patient. The new machinery and chemicals are expensive, and someone has to pay for them.

And yes, malpractice run amok has also contributed to exorbitant costs. Tort reform is an excellent start.

... according to the US Census (2000), 43 million Americans are without health care.

I suspect you mean that 43 million Americans are without health care INSURANCE. First of all, so what? How is it my concern whether people have insurance or not? Isn't that THEIR responsibility? Or did I suddenly adopt 43 million children I didn't know about?

Secondly, that number sounds grossly inflated. I recall reading an article that said many of these statistics include people who have had a lapse in their insurance in the last six months, but may be covered now.

And finally, the fact that they have no insurance doesn't mean they won't get the care. It may not be as extravagant as care given those who can pay for it, but that doesn't mean they'll be tossed out in the street to die.

Make no mistake: the "crisis" is fictional, invented by the same socialist ilk that created Social Security and other failed entitlements. Only this time it's our nation's health they're tampering with.

28 posted on 11/26/2004 8:55:19 AM PST by IronJack (R)
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To: SandRat

What "the left" is after is power. They have actually given up the main tenet of socialism: the nationalization or collectivization of production. Nationalizing medicine is just a romantic vestige.


29 posted on 11/26/2004 10:20:36 AM PST by jordan8
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To: IronJack

Something must be down to contain the costs - otherwise they will eventually bankrupt the country or at the very least the average guy won't be able to afford health care insurance. The "something" doesn't necessarily have to be a public sector initiative. My guess is that the solution will be primarily a market solution with some public sector tinkering at the margins. Yes, demand does drive the cost, but so does corruption, the overuse of technology, excessive lawsuits, antiquated and overstaffed billing practices, slothful, unhealthy lifestyles, and the cost of covering the uninsured.

You're right - I do mean the number of Americans without healthcare insurance. There are myriad reasons why Americans don't have healthcare insurance, and putting it down to a lack of responsibility is too reductionist.

I read somewhere that since 2000, the number of uninsured Americans has grown by about five million, so the 43 millions might be a conservative figure. You're right - they usually do end up getting care. But the taxpayer ends up footing the medical bill for the uninsured in one way or another, so that's one reason to be concerned about the fact that there are millions of these people. It is cheaper to intervene early than it is to let things go to the point that these people end up in emergency rooms at vast expense.

I don't think the crisis is fictional. The system needs overhauling. The question is, are the reforms going to market driven or state-centered?


30 posted on 11/26/2004 12:45:26 PM PST by kiwiexpat
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To: IronJack

Future Senator? Maybe.

Republican/Conservative? Yep!


31 posted on 11/26/2004 1:50:45 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: kiwiexpat
My guess is that the solution will be primarily a market solution with some public sector tinkering at the margins.

It's the "tinkering" that worries me. Never has the government been content to just tinker. Sooner or later, it forces its way in and takes over everything, to the detriment of all involved.

Yes, demand does drive the cost, but so does corruption, the overuse of technology, excessive lawsuits, antiquated and overstaffed billing practices, slothful, unhealthy lifestyles, and the cost of covering the uninsured.

Corruption? Where? And surely you don't think corruption of all things is going to be REDUCED if the government gets involved??!! Overuse of technology? That does seem to be a problem, one that is being addressed by the HMO model. Antiquated billing? I can't say I know much about that, but it seems to me that modern computerized recordkeeping would invalidate much of that.

As to lifestyles, unless the government regulates everyone's behavior, certain lifestyles are going to be riskier than others. One of the purposes of insurance is to collectivize the risk. It seems to do that well.

And the cost of insuring the uninsured will be borne either in the private or the public sector, the only difference being that a public-sector "solution" will also fund innumerable parasites and fellow travelers.

Health care is best left to the free market, imaginary "crisis" or not.

32 posted on 11/26/2004 1:51:13 PM PST by IronJack (R)
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To: HuntsvilleTxVeteran
But think how many life saving techniques and life saving drugs come out of countries that have socialized health care.

One of the shortest books in the workd has to be Great Advances In Soviet Pharmacology.

33 posted on 11/26/2004 2:03:55 PM PST by Morgan's Raider
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To: IronJack

I don't where you are getting the idea that I'm advocating a public sector solution to the problem of out-of-control healthcare costs. I'm not.

Corruption? Over billing/jacked-up prices is endemic in the healthcare industry. Hospitals regularly over charge Medicare and private insurance providers for one thing.

The billing system in the healthcare industry is out of date - there's too much bureaucracy, its over staffed, and it's technology is out of date. You're right - an update in technology is part of the cure. But there's so much time spent figuring out who pays for what...

In my experience, government only forces its way in (and then stays in) when there is market failure. To avoid this, the healthcare industry and those who advocate free-market solutions to health care better put their collective heads together and apply the correct market and legal solutions to the cost issue and the unisured issue before its too late. Bush is probably on the right track with tort reform, medical savings accounts, and tax credits to the unisured poor who can't afford health insurance.

Lastly, the health care insurance industry needs to do a better job in penalizing insurance users who increase costs by engaging in at-risk behaviors and by rewarding low risk clients. I recently read that the cost of smoking to the health care system per packet of cigarettes is $40. Obesity is another risk. If people want to keep on smoking and don't do anything about the fact that they weigh 400 pounts that's their business, but why the hell should I end up paying for their stupidity?


34 posted on 11/26/2004 3:01:43 PM PST by kiwiexpat
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To: SandRat

Trey is only a high school student? There is hope for us afterall.


35 posted on 11/26/2004 5:02:13 PM PST by ladyinred (Congratulations President Bush! Four more years!)
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To: ladyinred

And in a county that went Blue (Pima (City of Tucson)).


36 posted on 11/26/2004 5:29:44 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat
[ Trey Spiece is a sophomore at Catalina Foothills High School. ]

GET OUT... a high school kid....WoW...
This piece is enough to give a jaded curmudenous icehole like MYSELF HOPE for Americas recovery... Thanks for this post.. thanks a lot.. I needed this..

37 posted on 11/26/2004 5:40:16 PM PST by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to included some fully orbed hyperbole....)
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To: hosepipe

And in a county that went Blue (Pima (City of Tucson)).


38 posted on 11/27/2004 6:47:12 AM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat
Yep he's got some skill, excellent peice of writing. More of his stuff at his blog I found: RightOfWay Toodles.
39 posted on 11/28/2004 7:48:54 PM PST by proph3t
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To: jordan8

The Socialist like the power all right, however, If I know human nature, that money trough looks awfully attractive too.


40 posted on 11/28/2004 8:14:21 PM PST by jonrick46
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