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Meet 'Gen Jones': Group was 2004's real swing vote
Denver Post ^ | 12/5/04 | Jonathan Pontell and J. Brad Coker

Posted on 12/09/2004 10:13:49 AM PST by qam1

During the 2004 presidential campaign, extensive media coverage was focused on all the usual suspects, like women, minority voters and evangelical Christians. But in their typical emphasis of demographic variables like gender, geography, socio-economics and race, the media largely ignored, again, the key issue of age in the electorate.

In doing so, they missed out on a major story: history will show that one generation of voters - Generation Jones - provided the decisive vote that re-elected George W. Bush on Nov. 2, 2004.

Not that age is ignored completely in politics; every election cycle sees coverage of the well-known fact that the youngest voters vote least, the oldest most, accompanied by the inevitable speculation about whether this will finally be the year when young voters turn out. But what about the big mass of the electorate in between these age extremes? To treat this big chunk of voters as if it is a monolith is to miss an important part of the political equation.

Political operatives and pundits would be wise to take a cue here from the advertising community, where age is the dominant demographic variable. Moreover, the advertising industry has seen, in the last couple of years, a surge of interest in generational variables that go beyond the fixed static-age categories. These traditional categories only tell us the similarities between, for example, twenty-somethings, but do not address the ongoing generational personalities that stay with people, regardless of their age.

It's odd that politics, with its huge reliance on advertising, has been so slow in learning this lesson, as the generational attitudes that so influence consumer behavior likewise influence voting behavior. Maybe the 2004 election will be the one that finally teaches us this lesson.

For the uninitiated, Generation Jones is the large, heretofore lost, generation between the baby boomers and Generation X. Born in the years 1954 to 1965, Jonesers are not a small cusp generation that slipped through the cracks but rather the largest generation in American history, constituting 26 percent of all U.S. adults today. Mistakenly, they were originally lumped in with boomers for one reason only: their parents and boomers' parents happened to have a lot of kids.

But generational personalities come from shared formative experiences, not head counts. This original flawed definition of the baby-boom generation has become widely discredited among experts, which is partly what's given rise to the emergence of Generation Jones, a cohort with significantly different attitudes and values than those held by its surrounding generations.

Why the name Generation Jones? Among its many connotations is that of a large anonymous generation, like a Generation Smith or Doe. But the connotation that's perhaps most relevant for politics arises from the slang term "jones'": a craving for someone or something. As children in the 1960s, Jonesers were given huge expectations, during, arguably, the peak of post-World War II American confidence and affluence, and then confronted, as they came of age during the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s with a very different reality, leaving them with a certain pending, unrequited, "jonesin"' quality.

Those huge expectations left unfulfilled are now strongly affecting this generation as it enters middle age, a life-cycle period when all generations feel that "now or never" feeling rumbling in the pit of the stomach - that realization that if you don't pursue your dreams quickly, you probably never will.

But for this unfulfilled generation, which is still jonesin' for the original big dreams they'd expected, that now-or-never feeling is more a growling hunger than a distant rumble in the stomach. So Jonesers are stepping back from their lives, taking stock, reassessing and experimenting. There is a mountain of statistical evidence showing that Jonesers are, right now, extremely open to trying new brands, products and services; that they are, to an unprecedented degree, switching careers, moving and changing lifestyles. In short, Jonesers are in play; they are persuadable.

This persuadability has become now well-documented in the business world, which explains a significant part of the recent buzz in those circles: many of the top global ad agencies have rushed to incorporate Jonesers into their strategic planning, numerous major ad conferences have recently included keynote speeches about Generation Jones, business trades talk up success stories about Jones-targeted ad campaigns. They're becoming the "swing voters" of the marketplace, but not yet recognized as such in politics.

Had the politicos been paying attention to this phenomenon, they would have seen how this generation's persuadability translated into volatility among Jonesers, particularly women, in 2004.

From the late spring through October, Joneser women were the only generation of women showing vacillation between Kerry and Bush, with the other generations of women staying relatively stable in support of Kerry. On Election Day, Joneser women swung to Bush, while all other generations of women voted for Kerry. Their strong support of Bush points to an even bigger story - the overall massive support of all Jonesers (men and women) for Bush on Election Day.

Of the 15 "battleground states" polled by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research Inc. in the week before the general election, Bush carried a majority of the Generation Jones vote in all 15 - from 51 percent in Michigan to 59 percent in Ohio. Bush consistently ran five to 10 percentage points better among Jonesers than he did statewide in every battleground state.

In fact, if not for his significant margins among Generation Jones voters, Bush would not have been re-elected. Bush's margins among Jones voters were responsible for his wins in five key states that provided him with his Electoral College majority - Florida, Ohio, Iowa, Nevada and New Mexico. In these five states, the majority of voters in all of the other age groups combined favored Democrat John Kerry.

In Florida, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined supported Kerry 50 percent to 49 percent, but Bush's 56-43 margin with Jonesers provided his five-point victory statewide.

In Ohio, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined supported Kerry 51-48 but Bush carried the state with his 59-40 advantage among Jones voters.

In Iowa, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined supported Kerry 51-48, but Jonesers went 56-43 for Bush.

In Nevada, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined supported Kerry 50-49, but the Jones vote went 56-43 for Bush.

Finally, in New Mexico, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined went for Kerry 51-48, but Jonesers backed Bush 54-45.

In total, these five states accounted for 64 electoral votes. Had they gone for Kerry, he would have won the presidency with 316 electoral votes to Bush's 222.

(The Jones vote for Bush was also heavy in Colorado, with 57 percent for Bush compared to 42 percent for Kerry. But it was not technically decisive, because the combined vote of other age groups was 50-49 in favor of Bush.)

Despite the decisive role it played in the 2004 presidential election, the full political impact of Generation Jones is yet to be felt, studied or understood. While the current baby-boomer political leadership generation is beginning to ebb, the Jonesers are increasingly assuming positions of power in government, business and the media. They will vote in even larger numbers, likely increasing their share of the national vote above its current 28 percent to 31 percent.

Having reached adulthood primarily during the Reagan era, Jonesers appear to offer a more conservative and less secular approach to politics than their older brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins. They also may be less divisive and less harsh in their rhetoric, having not had to deal with the major conflicts of the Civil Rights and Vietnam eras.

Their strong support for George W. Bush may indicate a continued increase in Republicans power. As Jonesers have increased as a percentage of the vote over the past 10 years, the GOP has taken control of both houses of Congress and captured more governorships and state legislatures nationwide.

Media talking heads and campaign strategists continue to focus their post-election analysis on younger voters, evangelical Christians, minority voters, senior citizens and women. While Jonesers make up slices of those blocs, little emphasis seems to be placed on the age of the voters in these key groups. In fact, it is the female bloc of Jones voters that is largely identified as "security moms." They are also a major part of the "evangelical vote," and Jones voters are a significant percentage of the "cross-over" ethnic voters that supported Bush.

Whether future political coverage and analysis increasingly focuses on Generation Jones remains an open question, but 2004 has already proved its standing as an important, if not the most important, voting group in the nation.

Jonathan Pontell is a Los Angeles-based social analyst who identified and named Generation Jones. J. Brad Coker is managing director of Mason-Dixon Polling & Research Inc. and works out of Jacksonville, Fla. (The Denver Post used Mason-Dixon for polling during the 2004 campaigns.)


TOPICS: Extended News; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: babyboomers; bushvictory; generationjones; genjones; genx; swingvoters; womenvoters
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1 posted on 12/09/2004 10:13:51 AM PST by qam1
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To: qam1; ItsOurTimeNow; PresbyRev; tortoise; Fraulein; StoneColdGOP; Clemenza; malakhi; m18436572; ...
Xer Ping

Ping list for the discussion of the politics and social aspects that directly effects Gen-Reagan/Generation-X (Those born from 1965-1981) including all the spending previous generations (i.e. The Baby Boomers) are doing that Gen-X and Y will end up paying for.

Freep mail me to be added or dropped. See my home page for details and previous articles.

2 posted on 12/09/2004 10:15:25 AM PST by qam1 (Anyone who was born in New Jersey should not be allowed to drive at night or on hills.)
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To: qam1

Generation Jones? Well, I was born in 1964, but I've always identified with Generation X. What's in a name?


3 posted on 12/09/2004 10:18:33 AM PST by Mr. Jeeves
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To: qam1

Fascinating. It's obvious from people I know that not all Boomers are Boomers. I'm sure a lot of Freepers belong to the Boomer generation but don't identify with Woodstock. I'd be interested to see further analysis of this thesis.


4 posted on 12/09/2004 10:19:04 AM PST by Cicero (Nil illegitemus carborundum est)
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To: qam1

Interesting. Usually 1946 to 1964 are all lumped together. This seems to make more sense, to the extent we're going to examine by age.


5 posted on 12/09/2004 10:19:56 AM PST by cvq3842
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To: qam1
I've never heard it put quite that way before. But during the 1980s there was a lot of talk about the "Reagan Kids", voters from 18-30 that went like 2-1 for Reagan. That would correspond to people born 1954-1966. The Dims were giving birth to porcupines (breech presentation) over this.

One thing the GOP needs to keep in mind: these voters are not neccesarily "cultural conservatives". 1980s popular culture was anything but. Indeed, one of the secrets to Reagan's success with young voters is the fact that he basically left the culture alone.

-Eric

6 posted on 12/09/2004 10:24:36 AM PST by E Rocc (Help a liberal beat "PEST": Loan them "Unfit For Command".)
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To: qam1
I'm a Joneser!

They also may be less divisive and less harsh in their rhetoric, having not had to deal with the major conflicts of the Civil Rights and Vietnam eras.

I am less divisive BECAUSE I remember the Vietnam era, and all those stupid hippy freaks...

7 posted on 12/09/2004 10:32:15 AM PST by Paradox (Occam was probably right.)
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To: qam1
For the uninitiated, Generation Jones is the large, heretofore lost, generation between the baby boomers and Generation X. Born in the years 1954 to 1965, Jonesers are not a small cusp generation that slipped through the cracks but rather the largest generation in American history, constituting 26 percent of all U.S. adults today. Mistakenly, they were originally lumped in with boomers for one reason only: their parents and boomers' parents happened to have a lot of kids.

But generational personalities come from shared formative experiences, not head counts. This original flawed definition of the baby-boom generation has become widely discredited among experts, which is partly what's given rise to the emergence of Generation Jones, a cohort with significantly different attitudes and values than those held by its surrounding generations.

Sorry but they are boomers. We (Gen-Reagan) are the Baby Bust generation (lower birth numbers).

Associate with whoever y'all wish and distance yourself from some of the "baby boom" but it is all a part of the same block that forever changed society's mores and social institutions.

A generation is typically ~20-25 years so 1946-1964 IS a generation. Deal with it.

8 posted on 12/09/2004 10:36:18 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: qam1

Well wudda ya know! I'm not a late boomer after all. I'm a Joneser!!


9 posted on 12/09/2004 10:39:02 AM PST by truthseeker2
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To: qam1

Never heard that term before, but I get the sense of it. I was born in late 53, and was really on the trailing edge of the boomers. (I was only 13 in the 67 "Summer of Love") My perspective of my so-called "generation" was not typical of most boomers. I was too young to join the Grateful Dead, but ended up too old for the Dead Kenedy's.


10 posted on 12/09/2004 10:39:19 AM PST by Chris_Shugart
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To: All; biblewonk
Born in the years 1954 to 1965, Jonesers are not a small cusp generation that slipped through the cracks but rather the largest generation in American history, ...

In Iowa, senior, baby-boomer and younger voters combined supported Kerry 51-48, but Jonesers went 56-43 for Bush.

Very interesting article. My wife and I are both Bush voters and what the authors call, "Jonesers."

Mistakenly, they were originally lumped in with boomers for one reason only: their parents and boomers' parents happened to have a lot of kids.

While that may be true, I have to admit I'm somewhat more of a boomer than is my wife, for the simple reason that both of my parents grew up during the Great Depression and turned 20 near the end of WWII. Obviously, those two periods shaped not only the people who lived through them, but also their children (e.g. me). My wife's parents being 14 years younger than mine, they have no recollection of the Depression and were too young to 'appreciate' WWII.

At any rate, the authors might be onto something with this "jonesin" thing.

11 posted on 12/09/2004 10:43:12 AM PST by newgeezer (...until the voters discover they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury.)
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To: qam1

Finally! My friends and I have known for YEARS that we are not Boomers. We have different music, movies, new events and values.

We are more traditional, less gullible (in terms of talking heads and "experts"), more stable, less trendy, more optimistic, less fearful and we're a lot more okay being outside the crowd.

We could have a better name, though.


12 posted on 12/09/2004 10:46:20 AM PST by Gingersnap
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To: qam1

bumping for later. I guess I'm one of these people, but hubby's still a boomer.

I always had my doubts about being a true boomer, primarily because I don't remember "howdy doody"!


13 posted on 12/09/2004 10:49:48 AM PST by jocon307 (Jihad is world wide. Jihad is serious business. We ignore global jihad at our peril.)
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To: cvq3842; Mr. Jeeves
Interesting. Usually 1946 to 1964 are all lumped together. This seems to make more sense, to the extent we're going to examine by age

I was born in 65 and never felt any affinity to the boomers, whom I basically got lumped in with by the MSM.

My growing up years was watching Vietnam, Scooby-Doo, All in the Family, the Brady Bunch, Walter Cronkite, and the Partridge Family(etc.etc).

The first political campaign I remember is Nixon trouncing McGovern, and then came Watergate, and then Carter barely winning over Ford, and then the awful Carter years(bad economy and impotent America).

Then in 80, Reagan appeared on the scene. Optimism personified, and I was hoping he would win(although the media was pushing Ed Clarke, Libertarian, as a conservative alternative(wedge), and actually supported Clarke and in a high school debate, debated for his candidacy, and it is also interesting that 1980 has been the highest vote total for the Libertarian party, but we all grow up, and I did so after that debate)

After that debate I threw my support to Reagan, due to his can do and eternal optimism, and I was actually scared that Reagan would not win, given the MSM coverage of the time.

Well the rest is history, the race was called at 8:15 EST, and Carter rode off to a bitter sunset(as acknowledged by Carter's lukewarm and tardy praise on hearing of President Reagan's death).

After Reagan's ascendency to the Presidency in 80, the press became even more partisan and in the most recent election, I've never seen them more partisan for their side, the democrats. I think it is becoming apparent to many non-political people that the MSM is nothing more than an organ for the democrats and the new political debate is on the internet and FR was a pioneer in the MSM's decline.

Sorry about the long tome going down memory lane, but it was refreshing to see an article that didn't lump me with the self-absorbed boomers.

14 posted on 12/09/2004 10:50:17 AM PST by Dane (Trial lawyers are the tapeworms to wealth creating society)
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To: weegee
Associate with whoever y'all wish and distance yourself from some of the "baby boom" but it is all a part of the same block that forever changed society's mores and social institutions.

Its pretty hard for most of them to accept this...seeing as they don't understand accepting responsibility, common sense, and consequences to their actions. They gave us victimhood, political correctness, "if it feels good...do it!", latch key kids, the feminist movement, a bloated national deficit to fund their entitlements, birth control/abortion, and gross degredation to the nations morality and innocence of our youth. Not suprising though...what would you expect out of a group of people who are flaming, "Me, Me, Me" anti-God, anti-life, anti-freedom, anti-truth and anti-American socialists.

15 posted on 12/09/2004 11:03:18 AM PST by BureaucratusMaximus ("We're going to take things away from you on behalf of the common good" - Hillary Clinton)
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To: Dane

Good post! I share a lot of your memories. I was actually a Democrat for a long time (it's almost genetic in my family), but that's a long time ago. I'm a "Zell Miller" democrat (i.e., a Republican) now. :)


16 posted on 12/09/2004 11:07:17 AM PST by cvq3842
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To: kalee

bump for later


17 posted on 12/09/2004 11:07:37 AM PST by kalee
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To: qam1

Props to Generation Jones BUMP!


18 posted on 12/09/2004 11:08:18 AM PST by Alkhin (A pox on both their houses!)
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To: Alkhin

bump


19 posted on 12/09/2004 11:09:51 AM PST by kalee
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To: weegee

A little harsh don't ya think? (Obviously not a Joneser)

Jonesers are the kids of the Korean War vets. There is a whole
different dynamic. I can tell you, as little kids, we all laughed at the whole
hippy peace and love crowd. FYI, most advertising and marketing firms
truncate generations at 10 years.


20 posted on 12/09/2004 11:11:57 AM PST by USMA83
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To: Cicero

See

http://www.generationjones.com/


21 posted on 12/09/2004 11:12:42 AM PST by qam1 (Anyone who was born in New Jersey should not be allowed to drive at night or on hills.)
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To: USMA83

Shorter than that now as they target to "tween" between "childhood" and "teenager" and now that "childhood" bracket has been further subdivided as a demographic they advertise to.

Figure a "generation" now is 3-4 years.


22 posted on 12/09/2004 11:15:58 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: qam1

I think it is ridiculous to associate boomers with their cultural values.

Boomers are simply people born between 46 and 64 when birth rates went to unprecedented levels. Period.

If you look at the birth rates they distinctively explode in 46 and continue on through 64.

To assign personality traits or voting habits means nothing. A boomer is a boomer if born between 46 and 64.


23 posted on 12/09/2004 11:23:16 AM PST by Pylot
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To: qam1

Never heard the term(except keeping up with) applied to my two kids ('62 and '65). Soon Kerry and Zogby will use this excuse.


24 posted on 12/09/2004 11:24:19 AM PST by larryjohnson (USAF(ret))
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To: weegee

Pretty amazing. My point is that, being born in 1961, I never remotely
identified or agreed with the "boomers". My family was conservative
and had utter distain for the whole group. By the time we hit high school
(late 70s) the hippy thing was long gone, Vietnam was over and Carter was
looking like a fool. I cast my first vote as a cadet at West Point for Ronaldus
Maximus. We were never "vexed" about much of anything. Just living life,
trying to do the right thing and succeed.


25 posted on 12/09/2004 11:30:12 AM PST by USMA83
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To: qam1; All
I've always called it the "Gen Fiber", pushing the $hit of those Boomers before me and clearing the way for the X-ers.
I really think it's those of us between 1958 and 1965 (I'm of '61) who were turned off by all the whining, pissing and moaning of the boomers. They act as if they were the first generation of humans who experienced everything. If I see another woman rubbing her pregnant belly as if she holds all of mankind within her, I'm going to puke. Wait until "Boomer Eve" hits menopause.
The Gen X isn't bad, they are the backlash against all the hippiedom ideas put into practice. Gen Y, I won't pretend to know that about them.
But yeah, we'll all pay for the boomers.
26 posted on 12/09/2004 11:30:20 AM PST by olde north church ("My nostrils have a right to flair, I'm in command." Major F. Burns)
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To: qam1
Here's a Jones from Gen. Jones:


27 posted on 12/09/2004 11:30:21 AM PST by Uncledave
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To: qam1

Born in late '53, I guess I qualify. People in our age group reached college well after the 60's "revolution" and the grad assistants and younger professors castigated us for being so "apathetic". We probably are more conservative than the "cadre" who are now in their late fifties to early sixties and are therefore one of history's antidotes to people like Al Gore and John Kerry.


28 posted on 12/09/2004 11:40:27 AM PST by katana
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To: qam1
I am glad that they are no longer lumping us in with the boomer culture. As someone born in 1964, I feel no affinity to those born in the late 1940s through the 1950s.

The first president I voted for was Ronald Reagan. John F. Kennedy was dead before I was born.

Vietnam was not a war I protested, but a war my father fought in.

I have no strong memories of Watergate, but came of age in the Carter malaise.

Woodstock is either Snoopy's friend or a movie.

In sum, all the boomer touchstones mean little to me.

29 posted on 12/09/2004 11:40:32 AM PST by writmeister
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To: qam1
I always put the "Tweeners" between the Boomers and the Xers. Basically people born in the mid-1960s. I can live with the name "Tweener". I can't stand "Generation Jones". Ugh.
30 posted on 12/09/2004 11:40:54 AM PST by Question_Assumptions
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To: Conspiracy Guy; CyberCowboy777

herewegoagain


31 posted on 12/09/2004 11:45:52 AM PST by stainlessbanner
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To: Cicero
I was born the same year as Rush: 1951. About as Boomer as you can get. Never had any use for the peace/love/Woodstock crowd -- I was a techno-geek. Guys like me wanted to work in the space program, which is as far from "dropping out" as can be imagined.

The Woodstock crowd is disproportionately represented in the mediacracy, and they skew everyone's perception of culture accordingly. But this, too, shall pass.

Can't wait. My kids are Xers, and all as conservative as you could wish. Let's bring it on!

32 posted on 12/09/2004 11:47:44 AM PST by thulldud (It's bad luck to be superstitious.)
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To: Uncledave

Is this a Maureen Dowd thread, or did I miss something?


33 posted on 12/09/2004 11:50:59 AM PST by Ogie Oglethorpe (The people have spoken...the b*stards!)
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To: Cicero

I would, too. Particularly the Boomer voters separately from seniors and younger voters.


34 posted on 12/09/2004 11:58:16 AM PST by rwa265
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To: qam1

please add me to the Xer Ping List :)

24Karet


35 posted on 12/09/2004 12:16:26 PM PST by 24Karet
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To: stainlessbanner

Well this explains a lot. I am now a leading edge Gen Joneser. Born Jan 15, 1954. I thought it was interesting that the newly redefined boomers and Gen Xers in Ohio had to be out voted by us Jonesers to win for Bush.

As a senior member of the Jonesers I must say, "Job Well Done" to my fellow Jonesers.


36 posted on 12/09/2004 12:19:24 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: international american; NicknamedBob; Laura Earl

We done got us a new label. Ping


37 posted on 12/09/2004 12:21:33 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: Conspiracy Guy

I'm jonesin'


38 posted on 12/09/2004 12:25:54 PM PST by Laura Earl (1/2way290)
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To: xJones

You defined a generation


39 posted on 12/09/2004 12:27:12 PM PST by stainlessbanner
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To: Uncledave

Too bad she is a Gen-Xer (September 25, 1969). Nice photo though.


40 posted on 12/09/2004 12:30:21 PM PST by Betis70 (I'm only Left Wing when I play hockey)
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To: Conspiracy Guy

I gotta Generation Jones
I gotta Generation Jones
I gotta Generation Jones
Oh Baby
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo


41 posted on 12/09/2004 12:30:32 PM PST by international american (Proudly posting without reading the article since 2003.)
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To: Conspiracy Guy

Now I feel younger for some reason:)


42 posted on 12/09/2004 12:31:34 PM PST by international american (Proudly posting without reading the article since 2003.)
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To: Laura Earl; international american; NicknamedBob

I went from being a mid term boomer to being an elder statesman for the jonesers in one day.


43 posted on 12/09/2004 12:35:42 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: international american

Yes I am a Generation Joneser,
Evah since I was a little baby,
I always be dribblin.


44 posted on 12/09/2004 12:36:49 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: international american

Me too. Now we are leading edgers too!


45 posted on 12/09/2004 12:37:22 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: Conspiracy Guy

I'm smack dab in the middle of Jones


46 posted on 12/09/2004 12:38:23 PM PST by Laura Earl (1/2way290)
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To: weegee; international american

These people are Americans just like you. Some are conservative and some are liberal. Guilt by age seems to be a new theme with Gen X'ers who also seem to be obsessed with some kind of inferiority complex that makes them beat their chests over nothing.

I'll call myself an American rather than a Gen Anything and you can deal with that.


47 posted on 12/09/2004 12:43:25 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: BureaucratusMaximus

That is so absurd it borders on stupid. Guilt by age the Gen X anthem. You talk like a victim.


48 posted on 12/09/2004 12:45:38 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: thulldud

Gen Xers on FR put us all in the Woodstock crowd which was a microscopic percentage. They believe Cronkite and blame you and me. My Gen X kids were raised by a stay at home mom and are as conservative as their dad. They never generalize either. Too many Gen X'ers are mad at their mommy and daddy.


49 posted on 12/09/2004 12:49:13 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (I'm a monthly donor and all I get is this stupid tagline.)
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To: Conspiracy Guy; Laura Earl; NicknamedBob; MeekOneGOP

"I went from being a mid term boomer to being an elder statesman for the jonesers in one day."

So did Meek n me!


50 posted on 12/09/2004 12:49:54 PM PST by international american (Proudly posting without reading the article since 2003.)
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