Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Beef cuts renamed steak...premium names on inexpensive cuts to entice buyers
Charlotte News Observer ^ | 7/13/05 | Vicki Lee Parker

Posted on 07/13/2005 1:24:10 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana



Published: Jul 13, 2005
Modified: Jul 13, 2005 5:27 AM
Beef cuts renamed 'steak'
Stores, restaurants put premium names on inexpensive cuts to entice buyers



Butcher Ruben Pineda cuts slices of beef from a sirloin tip knuckle for the display case at Cliff's Meat Market in Carrboro. Meat prices at the shop have increased between 50 cents and $2 a pound over the past two years.
Staff Photo by Harry Lynch

Is a steak by any name other than T-bone, ribeye or N.Y. Strip still a steak? Many beef sellers say yes.

A stroll down the meat aisles of local grocers offers proof. They are stocking an array of newer cuts of beef, with names such as "beef chuck thin steak" at Food Lion and "ranch steak" at Lowes.

As beef prices have hit record levels -- with filet mignon averaging nearly $14 a pound -- the beef industry has turned to less expensive steak cuts.

These cuts come from the chuck or shoulder and the round or hindquarters of the cow and typically cost 20 percent less than premium steaks, according to the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. Filet mignon comes from the center part of the animal.

"The prices Food Lion pays for beef have increased since the first of the year," said Jeff Lowrance, spokesperson for the Salisbury-based grocer. "We, however, have not raised our retail prices." Instead, in May, Food Lion started offering its own Butcher's Brand Premium Beef, which includes at least a dozen of the older and newer cuts of beef.

One of the most popular new cuts showing up in supermarkets is the "shoulder top blade flat iron steak." It comes from the cow's top shoulder, which traditionally is used for roasts or ground beef. At Food Lion, the flat iron steak is called the "boneless upper blade steak," while at Lowes, it's simply called a "flat iron steak."

Some restaurants are starting to offer the different steaks at lower prices. According to the cattlemen's group, about 20,000 restaurants serve the new steaks, twice as many as last year.

Chris Hudson, assistant general manager of Ruth's Chris Steak House in Cary, said the restaurant added the flat iron steak to its lunch menu about two months ago. "It took a while for our food surveyor to get us to taste it." he said. "We cooked it up and it's got a pretty good flavor to it."

A blue-cheese-crusted, 8-ounce flat iron steak on its bar menu sells for $15.95, compared to a 16-ounce ribeye steak from the dinner menu for $31.95.

Hudson said the lower prices help to generate repeat business. "Instead of spending $40 to $65 on cocktails and dinner," he said, "you can have a couple of cocktails and order from the [bar menu] and spend about $35 or $40."

Despite the rising costs, some steak restaurants have resisted adding the lower-cost meats to their menus.

"We have heard of them but it's not something we have considered. We have the traditional cuts and that's what we have stuck with," said Bob Lyford, comptroller at The Angus Barn, a Raleigh steakhouse.

High beef prices

Beef prices have remained high since hitting a record of $4.32 a pound in November 2003. In May, beef was selling for $4.26 a pound. Prices started to peak two years ago when a Canadian cow was found to be infected with mad cow disease, which led to restrictions of the cattle supply.

Despite the scare, demand continued to climb, pushing prices up. Last year as the popularity of low-carbohydrate diets increased, the demand for beef became even stronger. The Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service estimates that in 2004, the average person ate 66.1 pounds of beef. That is expected to climb to 68.2 pounds in 2006.

Tony Mata, executive director of new products and culinary initiative for the cattlemen's association, said that many of the new cuts of meat came from an extensive study by meat scientists that the association, the University of Nebraska and University of Florida released in 2000.

He said the research was in response to declining sales of pot roast, stew meat and other cuts from the shoulder and hindquarters. "We needed to do something to regain the market share," Mata said.

The scientists reviewed more than 5,600 muscles in three parts of the cow -- the shoulder near the blade, the round above the kneecap and the bottom round near the back side of the leg. After testing and processing for tenderness and taste, they found eight key cuts that have since helped to boost beef sales. The cuts come from the most tender parts of the cow and include the petite tender, the sirloin tip center steak and the flat iron, which is second in tenderness to the filet mignon.

Some butchers say they didn't need a study to tell them about the different ways to cut beef.

Cliff Collins has been cutting meat for 38 years at his Cliff's Meat Market in downtown Carr-boro. Collins said he has been selling flat iron steak for quite some time, but has noticed that people are starting to ask for it more than they did in the past.

"They are selling like hotcakes now that the [beef] prices have gone up," Collins said.

Because of the price increase over the past two years, Collins said he has increased meat prices between 50 cents and $2 a pound, depending on the cut.

Tonia Gilmore has definitely noticed the higher prices. While shopping at Food Lion recently, Gilmore said she noticed the new cuts. But the Raleigh mother of three hasn't tried them yet.

"With three kids, I have to stick to hamburger and cube steaks," Gilmore said.

For diehard T-bone steak fans who have endured the high prices, there may be hope.

Ron Gustafson, beef analyst with the economic research service of the USDA, said that several factors will help to pull beef prices down over the next few years. One is that some cattle will continue to be kept in the feed house longer. He said the average now is about 140 to 160 days, compared to 120 back in the mid-1990s. The longer cattle are fed, the larger the muscles, which means more meat is produced per cow.

U.S. cattle inventory has slumped over the past few years, but is expected to rebound. In 1996, the count was 103.5 million heads of cattle, he said. But it dropped to 94.9 million in 2004. Gustafson said it was at 95.8 million at the beginning of this year and will continue to rise.

"As supply starts to increase, the price will move down to accommodate it," Gustafson said.

Staff writer Vicki Lee Parker can be reached at 829-4898 or vparker@newsoberver.com.



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: beef; cattle; food; steak
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-108 next last
I grew up on something called "chuck steak" and have wondered why I can't find it now or what it's now called. These cheaper cuts of meat aren't bad if they're prepared correctly. But I still loves me my ribeye.
1 posted on 07/13/2005 1:24:13 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

There's a steak I used to call a "mystery steak." It's oval, (beef!) and has a thin line of gristle right down the middle, parallel to the long axis of the oval. Haven't seen them in years. They were excellent grilled!


2 posted on 07/13/2005 1:28:25 PM PDT by coloradan (Hence, etc.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

"beef chuck thin steak" at Food Lion

Wasn't Food Lion the "grocer" busted for using chlorox to "freshen up" their yellowed chicken a few years ago?


3 posted on 07/13/2005 1:30:48 PM PDT by cweese (Hook 'em Horns!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

Flank Steak, that new here, too? In Europe, the the cow is cut into different parts........


4 posted on 07/13/2005 1:31:28 PM PDT by Red Badger (HURRICANES: God's way of telling you it's time to clean out the freezer...............)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cweese

ABC fakumentary......they paid dearly for it, ABC that is......


5 posted on 07/13/2005 1:32:14 PM PDT by Red Badger (HURRICANES: God's way of telling you it's time to clean out the freezer...............)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: cweese

Grosser?


6 posted on 07/13/2005 1:32:50 PM PDT by coloradan (Hence, etc.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

7 posted on 07/13/2005 1:33:02 PM PDT by Revolting cat! ("In the end, nothing explains anything!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

An article almost exactly like this was in the WSJ a few weeks ago. A cut called "Top of Iowa Sirloin" from Fareway Foods in DSM, IA beats anything hands down-Approx $6.00/lb.


8 posted on 07/13/2005 1:34:13 PM PDT by babaloo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: coloradan

Better!


9 posted on 07/13/2005 1:35:18 PM PDT by cweese (Hook 'em Horns!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
"16-ounce ribeye steak from the dinner menu for $31.95"

No way. For that kind of money they better sit someone next to me to cut that steak and feed me included with the price.

10 posted on 07/13/2005 1:35:47 PM PDT by BenLurkin (O beautiful for patriot dream - that sees beyond the years)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

Ribeye steaks > *


11 posted on 07/13/2005 1:35:55 PM PDT by kx9088
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

Looks gross but good stuff Gotta get sum

12 posted on 07/13/2005 1:36:49 PM PDT by al baby (Father of the Beeber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
I've been buying the flat iron steak at Lowe's after sampling it at a women's show last year. It's thinner so it cooks fast and it's tender and tastes great too.

I tend to grocery shop in the evening after 9 pm so I don't have to haul kids with me. I save a LOT of $$ on meat this way. They discount the meat that is due to expire within a couple of days and a lot of times I will get it for 50% off or more. Then I just take it home and throw it in the freezer.

MKM

13 posted on 07/13/2005 1:38:35 PM PDT by mykdsmom (What chance does Gotham have when the good people do nothing?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
while at Lowes, it's simply called a "flat iron steak."

Wait a minute here... isn't Lowes a hardware store?

14 posted on 07/13/2005 1:39:23 PM PDT by rattrap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
Chuck Roast maybe?

I love a good 7 chuck roast. Why do so many stores insist on taking the bone out? That is what makes it good!

15 posted on 07/13/2005 1:40:23 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Warning: May bite)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: coloradan

I'm from IL where corn-fed cattle is in abundance and you can get an awesome steak at any grocery store or any of many meat markets.

What is it about CO, where I currently live? Can't find a decent cut of meat anywhere without paying an arm and a leg for it? Grain-fed too, which they advertise as though it is something special.


16 posted on 07/13/2005 1:41:04 PM PDT by conservativebabe (Down with Islam)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
Never forget my first experience with ordering a chopped sirloin steak sandwich.

And I got fries with it!

17 posted on 07/13/2005 1:41:07 PM PDT by N. Theknow (If Social Security is so good - why aren't members of Congress in it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: N. Theknow

Ever had what Illinoians call a Maid-Rite?

Loose meat beef sandwiches with mystery spices that are simply delicious. No-one knows what the secrest spices are, but we have heard it's Coca-Cola.


18 posted on 07/13/2005 1:42:59 PM PDT by conservativebabe (Down with Islam)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: mykdsmom; Army Air Corps

I may be wrong, but I think the Flat Iron Steak might have been researched and developed at my alma mater, Texas Tech University. I've been looking for it in the grocery store, but I can't find it by that name. I did notice on my last grocery trip that there were several "new" cuts of steaks with names I'd never seen before.


19 posted on 07/13/2005 1:45:42 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

It wasn't a fakumentary. Food Lion never challenged the accuracy of the report and all the damning film footage. They sued, and won, because the reporter lied in order to get the job.


20 posted on 07/13/2005 1:47:08 PM PDT by Stump
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

Go to the Farmer's Market nearest you. They usually have the old fashioned cuts, and at a lower price than the supermarket.

I love "Golfer's Pot Roast" made with good thick-cut chuck steak. It's so easy. Set the oven at about 250*. Spray PAM on the bottom of a good heavy roasting pan. Lay the steak in the pan, and put over it 1 large sliced onion, a couple cloves of chopped garlic, a pack of baby carrots, and a pack of frozen peas. Salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle on top two packs of instant brown gravy mix, and a cup of hearty red wine. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 3-4 hours. Serve with a crusty French or Italian bread, or over egg noodles.

It's ready when you come back from your golf game!


21 posted on 07/13/2005 1:49:11 PM PDT by Palladin (America! America! God shed His grace on Thee.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
Surgeon General warning: Stake can be bad for the heart!


22 posted on 07/13/2005 1:50:03 PM PDT by Revolting cat! ("In the end, nothing explains anything!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stump

If I remember right, the reporter also was involved in setting up some of the very things that the report was exposing. IOW, it was a hit piece from the get-go. The reporter created the news just like the NBC gas tank on the chevy pick-up......


23 posted on 07/13/2005 1:50:45 PM PDT by Red Badger (HURRICANES: God's way of telling you it's time to clean out the freezer...............)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

"It's one of the very few cases where a news organization has been found liable for damages based not on the story but on the way they got the story," said Jane Kirkley, the executive director of the Reporter's Committee for Freedom of the Press.
http://www.cnn.com/US/9701/23/food.lion/


24 posted on 07/13/2005 1:53:37 PM PDT by Stump
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
A blue-cheese-crusted, 8-ounce flat iron steak on its bar menu sells for $15.95, compared to a 16-ounce ribeye steak from the dinner menu for $31.95.

No bargain here...an 8 ounce steak for $15.95, a 16 ounce steak for $31.95.

They're basically selling you both steaks for the same price, in fact if you buy the "cheaper" cut of steak you actually save a whole nickel, if you figure the cost per pound.

Smart marketing, I guess, LOL!

25 posted on 07/13/2005 1:57:38 PM PDT by dawn53
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mykdsmom; Army Air Corps
I was wrong about TTU. Here's the real story on the Flat Iron.

 

conversions.jpg (1909 bytes)
flat iron steak

Flat Iron Steak
Developed by the research teams of University of Nebraska and the University of Florida, the flat iron steak is gaining in popularity with  restaurants across the United States. You can thank the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association for funding research to make this tasty, tender economical steak available to us today.  (Read More...)

The beef cut is actually a top blade steak derived from the tender top blade roast. The roast is separated into two pieces by cutting horizontally through the center to remove the heavy connective tissue. 

 

steaks2.jpg (10071 bytes)
Top Blade Steak - aka Flat Iron Steak


26 posted on 07/13/2005 1:58:05 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

I can find chuck steak in Brookshire Bro's, Market Basket, HEB, Kroger's and the local grocers. It's a staple in this part of the country. I know that those stores are in parts of East Texas, just don't know how far west they go though.


27 posted on 07/13/2005 1:58:33 PM PDT by CajunConservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cweese
You have just demonstrated how horrible a crime slander really is.

You heard, saw, or heard of a report on ABC news making allegations similar to what you report. (The allegations actually involved fish.)

Those allegations were false ... the entire situation was contrived by ABC News to harm Food Lion during a labour dispute.

Food Lion sued ABC News ... and won.

This whole drama played out about 15 years ago ... but what has entered the popular culture? "Food Lion sells bad meat". What should have entered the popular culture is "ABC News is a bunch of liars."

Incidentally, CBS and NBC are also liars; the former presented obvious forgeries as legitimate military documents, the latter fabricated a dishonest demonstration of exploding pickup-truck fuel tanks.

28 posted on 07/13/2005 1:59:29 PM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilisation is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: CajunConservative

Mom used to pan-fry it, and then fry potatoes in the grease. She also used to make it into Carne Guisada.


29 posted on 07/13/2005 2:02:25 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: coloradan
I have raised & butchered cattle, hogs, lamb, and fowl for 40 years.....and I like all the cuts....regardless of what some marketing wiz-kid may call them...unless they are inerds....

Tripe is not Tip-Sirloin....and Chitterlings are not Fillet Mignon..... Inerds are for the cats or for burying...

30 posted on 07/13/2005 2:02:43 PM PDT by cbkaty (I may not always post...but I am always here......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger; Stump
The 'reporters' lied to get the jobs then filmed themselves doing bad stuff.

If you think this behaviour constitutes honest reporting, you have a bright future as Dan Rather's intern.

31 posted on 07/13/2005 2:03:32 PM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilisation is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

You could go to Pre-Chew Charlies where they'll chew the food for you too.








From SNL many many years ago.


32 posted on 07/13/2005 2:06:03 PM PDT by Lx (Do you like it, do you like it. Scott? I call it Mr. and Mrs. Tennerman chili.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: cbkaty
I have raised & butchered cattle, hogs, lamb, and fowl for 40 years

You'll appreciate this anecdote. I was raised in a small farming community, but I live "in town" now. Last night, the wind was blowing out of an unusual direction, and when I stepped outside, I said to Mr. HR, "It smells like hog sh*t out here." We then looked at one another and had a conversation about how our upbringing provided us with a previously undocumented and probably unneccessary skill: the ability to distinguish between hog, cow and sheep sh*t solely from the unique scent each possesses.

33 posted on 07/13/2005 2:07:14 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
I usually find chuck steaks at the Hispanic market chains - haven't ever found a better grillin' steak than those. Slap it on the grill, toss on some sauce, let it roast for 20 minutes with indirect heat, then toast the sucker for five minutes a side. Delicious every time.

Price is right too. Typically find them for under $4 a pound, which is really making me wonder about this article - there is a lot of beef at my local butcher under $4 a pound, yet wholesale beef is supposed to be over $4.50 a pound.. Maybe I just didn't read the article right, or some of that new math got involved.
34 posted on 07/13/2005 2:08:59 PM PDT by kingu
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ArrogantBustard

If what you say is true, why did Food Lion opt not to include that in the lawsuit? They were guilty as can be but put up a great smoke-screen with the "they lied to get jobs here" suit. Now they say, "See, we won a lawsuit." The issue of the terrible food-handling got buried. Great PR. Must have had a liberal lawyer.
Seriously, do a Google-search and you'll see what I mean.


35 posted on 07/13/2005 2:09:43 PM PDT by Stump
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
Last night, the wind was blowing out of an unusual direction, and when I stepped outside, I said to Mr. HR, "It smells like hog sh*t out here." We then looked at one another and had a conversation about how our upbringing provided us with a previously undocumented and probably unneccessary skill: the ability to distinguish between hog, cow and sheep sh*t solely from the unique scent each possesses.

Yes Sir....and make certain that the hog pen is "generally" down wind...from the house.... The cattle dung is less punget when one avoids stepping in it......

36 posted on 07/13/2005 2:13:40 PM PDT by cbkaty (I may not always post...but I am always here......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

That sounds good. The way they do it here is to season it with salt,pepper, creole seasoning and smother it down with garlic and onions and then make a gravy. My grandmother made this a lot for dinner and it was so good. My grandfather raised cattle so we always had any cut of meat we wanted.


37 posted on 07/13/2005 2:14:18 PM PDT by CajunConservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: kingu

That would explain my growing up on it. I'll look in some grocery stores outside my neighborhood. I remember being in elementary school during the late '70s economic crisis, and I'd say we had "steak" for supper if asked. Other kids and teachers would raise their eyebrows, but we were probably eating cheap cuts that my mom or the hispanic butcher filleted themselves, Mexican-style.
We also used to cook it like fajitas (before they became all the rage in restaurants".
It was a good little cut of meat. I bought "family steak" and tried to do the same things with it, thinking it might be the same cut as "chuck steak", but it was kind of tough.


38 posted on 07/13/2005 2:14:41 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: CajunConservative

substitue comino/cumin for creole seasoning
keep the garlic
add a can of rotel tomatoes, drained
and you've got yourself Carne Guisada


39 posted on 07/13/2005 2:16:59 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Stump
The 'reporters' actually did engage in horrible food handling practices.

So that much was not false ... but as employees of Food Lion they had an obligation not to engage in such. For this, they (and their bosses at ABC 'News") were successfully sued.

The liberals are over at ABCCBSNBC ... if you choose to believe the crap they shove down your throat, that's your problem.

I've caught them in 'way too many half-truths, distortions of the truth, fabrications, and outright lies to believe anything they have to say.

40 posted on 07/13/2005 2:17:14 PM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilisation is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

I most definitely will! That sounds great.


41 posted on 07/13/2005 2:18:38 PM PDT by CajunConservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: eastforker; ken5050

food ping


42 posted on 07/13/2005 2:21:33 PM PDT by hispanarepublicana (There will be no bad talk or loud talk in this place. CB Stubblefield.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana

We still can buy chuck steak. It's a little tougher than the good cuts, but has great flavor.


43 posted on 07/13/2005 2:23:46 PM PDT by brooklin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: coloradan

Your description sounds like a blade steak.


44 posted on 07/13/2005 2:25:09 PM PDT by brooklin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Lx
Heck. I'll have some fish prepared with a Bass-O-Matic instead.


45 posted on 07/13/2005 2:27:30 PM PDT by BenLurkin (O beautiful for patriot dream - that sees beyond the years)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: al baby

Why would any one put a pat of butter on an already greasey gob of hamburg?


46 posted on 07/13/2005 2:27:38 PM PDT by brooklin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: conservativebabe

The steaming helps keep it moist, too.


47 posted on 07/13/2005 2:29:42 PM PDT by null and void (You'll learn more on FR by accident, than other places by design)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

Mmmmm, that's good Bass!


48 posted on 07/13/2005 2:31:06 PM PDT by Lx (Do you like it, do you like it. Scott? I call it Mr. and Mrs. Tennerman chili.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
I grew up on flank steak - my Mom pounded the heck out of it to tenderize it. It was cheap and delicious.

It's been called London Broil for many years, and is now too expensive for my wallet, unless it's on sale.

49 posted on 07/13/2005 2:32:34 PM PDT by mombonn (íViva Bush/Cheney!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hispanarepublicana
The best steaks are fillet mignon , porterhouse and the loin cuts, I'm spoiled and loving it.
And I hate people who put anything on them to change the taste, loin cuts are the best whether beef or pork. ground
chuck or sirloin make tasteless hamburgers. ground round has more fat and flavor.
50 posted on 07/13/2005 2:45:27 PM PDT by LOCHINVAR
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-108 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson