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Getting into the world of firearms
Townhall.com ^ | September 27, 2005 | Mike S. Adams

Posted on 09/27/2005 5:35:15 AM PDT by beaureguard

Thanks for your following letter, Matt, which I received this afternoon:

Do you think at some point you could write a column on some of the basics of getting into the world of firearms? Specifically, I'm looking for tips on acquiring weapons for home defense and hunting. While I'm not a survivalist weirdo, I have no intention of waiting for any level of government to ride to the rescue, should bad times come along.

Since I have been hit with numerous requests (mostly post-Katrina) from people looking for that first firearm, I am pleased to respond with a column on the topic. Since you used the word “weapons” (plural) and spoke of “getting into the world of firearms” (again plural) I have a number of recommendations for you. And here they are:

Marlin .22 Magnum, Model 25 MN. We are going to start you off with an inexpensive gun you can easily pick up at WalMart. I bought my Model 25 five years ago for just $150, although they cost about $170 now. Take your new .22 magnum out to the country and fire a few shots at a paper plate taped on the side of a tree stump. Start out at 25 yards. When you get confident, you can put an inexpensive Simmons scope on it for those 50-yard raccoon shots. I have a big back yard and, for me, a part of home defense is getting rid of those raccoons that tear up everything in sight. Your varmint problems will soon be a thing of the past with this little bolt action rifle. It will also teach you patience and shot discipline better than a .22 semi-automatic. Remember, Matt, every shot counts so don’t waste ammo. In fact, make sure that you always buy more than you just shot after a day at the range. Some people call that stockpiling. I call it an investment in your future.

Smith and Wesson .357 Magnum, Model 686. I usually recommend a four-inch barrel but I want you to get a six-inch stainless model. This will help you in the realm of hunting and self-defense. For example, a 145-grain Winchester silver tip will stop that coyote you run into while deer hunting. It will also help stop any intruder (it will even stop his pit bull, for that matter). Keep this gun under your bed and loaded at all times.

Also, this is a great revolver for your wife (assuming you are married, which is another choice I recommend) to get used to shooting. Put some light 110-grain .38 Special rounds in it and see how she likes it. With a big six-inch barrel, it will be easy to handle with hardly any recoil.

Benelli Nova 12-gauge. I have a couple of Remington 870 pump shotguns. But, recently, I bought a 24-inch barrel Nova with Advantage Timber camouflage. I will use mine – a super magnum that takes 3 ½-inch loads – to hunt a turkey this Thanksgiving. You can use yours for varmint hunting, quail hunting, and a number of other purposes with the right 2 3/4 –inch load. Some light buckshot will also make this a good home defense weapon, provided you are in an open space (the barrel is a little long for this particular function).

Stoeger Double-barreled 20-gauge Supreme Coach Gun. If you really want your wife to get into this (to make it a family affair), she needs her own shotgun. I recommend the nickel-plated version because it’s so darned pretty. Let her keep it under her side of the bed and, please, stay on her good side. For more details, see this link: http://www.stoegerindustries.com/firearms/coach-supreme.tpl.

Ruger Mini-14 Ranch Rifle. A lot of people who saw what recently happened in New Orleans have concluded that every man needs an assault rifle. I came to that conclusion years ago. Go to WalMart and get this nice .223 semi-automatic for around $500 (I got mine when they were $375). Then get a scope (the rings are included with this model). I would also recommend several 30-round magazines by Thurmold. I have fired hundreds of rounds through mine without a single jam – even when firing as rapidly as possible. You might also want a flash suppressor, which will keep the muzzle low while you fire away. This is a fun gun that helps explain why I never picked up golf.

Browning A-bolt .270. And, of course, you will need a long-range bolt action rifle when you start bagging deer. My 30.06 Browning A-Bolt Medallion is probably my favorite weapon. Deer, black bear, and boar like it much less. I recommend the .270 to the novice because it has less recoil and will still get the job done. Winchester Power Point rounds (130-grain bullets) are very cheap and more than adequate. Mail me later for venison recipes.

Ruger Super Redhawk .454 Casull. I have no business recommending this gun to you, Matt. Nonetheless, buy it anyway. This gun takes Colt 45 rounds that are great for home defense. When, somewhere down the road, you feel like handling a very powerful handgun, this will provide some great entertainment with the .454 Casull rounds. Get the model with the 9 ½-inch barrel and kill a wild boar. Then kill a black bear. Then put a scope on it (the scope rings are included) and kill a deer at 100 yards. After you are done with your assignments, call me and let me know whether I have given you good advice.

Thanks for writing, Matt. And welcome to my world.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: bang; banglist
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 09/27/2005 5:35:16 AM PDT by beaureguard
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To: beaureguard

Bump for reference!!!!


2 posted on 09/27/2005 5:39:22 AM PDT by Rummyfan
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To: beaureguard

Life is good when you own more than ten firearms.


3 posted on 09/27/2005 5:40:54 AM PDT by satchmodog9 (Murder and weather are our only news)
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To: beaureguard
I'm sure that you're going to get a lot of people disagreeing with his choices.

I would recommend a 12 gauge pump as the first gun. You can use it for home defense and hunting.

I don't think a 22 magnum is a very practical choice. It's only good for plinking and small game. A 22 long rifle is cheaper to shoot.

A 454 Cassull is not practical for anything but medium size game hunting. It's not a good weapon for a beginner because it's expensive and kicks pretty hard.

4 posted on 09/27/2005 5:43:25 AM PDT by mbynack
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To: beaureguard
"Ruger Mini-14 Ranch Rifle. A lot of people who saw what recently happened in New Orleans have concluded that every man needs an assault rifle."

Too bad the Mini-14 isn't an assault rifle.

5 posted on 09/27/2005 5:46:43 AM PDT by holymoly ("A lot" is TWO words.)
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To: beaureguard
Do you think at some point you could write a column on some of the basics of getting into the world of firearms? Specifically, I'm looking for tips on acquiring weapons for home defense and hunting. While I'm not a survivalist weirdo...

Dear Mike,

Seeing as you're already sneering and labelling the folks who are expert in the information you seek; No, go to hell.

6 posted on 09/27/2005 5:47:47 AM PDT by papertyger
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To: beaureguard

Pretty good recommendations. I personally prefer the Mossberg 12 gauge pump (18 1/2" barrel) for the home and my .357 is a Ruger sp 101, good for concealed carry. Just got a .270 Savage bolt action with the accu trigger for hunting.

I wouldn't touch a .454 Casull though. That's too much gun for the average gun owner and is really only needed for very special applications, like grizzly at close range. I much prefer a standard 1911 .45 which will be my next purchase. Since I can't afford a Kimber I've got my eye on a Springfield Arms milspec 1911 .45.


7 posted on 09/27/2005 5:48:40 AM PDT by saganite (The poster formerly known as Arkie 2)
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To: beaureguard
Banglist added to "Keywords"..

Adding Banglist to keywords insures that it gets to the "interested parties"...

And Thanks for the post..

8 posted on 09/27/2005 5:58:18 AM PDT by Drammach (Freedom; not just a job, it's an adventure..)
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To: saganite
454 Causal, and 357 Mag are both a lot of gun for beginners, how about a Browning 9MM High Power, the cream of the 9MM's and easy to control.
9 posted on 09/27/2005 5:58:44 AM PDT by BooBoo1000 (Some times I wake up grumpy, other times I let her sleep/)
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To: beaureguard

I agree that a good .357/.38 revolver in stainless steel is the best choice of handgun for the casual shooter, but I long ago gave up on revolvers with barrels longer than 4" (I like a 3" SP-101, my son prefers a 4" GP-100, and neither one of us can convince the other to change). Be that as it may, I've selected the Glock 19 as the family SHTF handgun- no manual safety levers to fumble with, easy to strip for maintenance, nearly unbreakable, utilizes common-as-dirt (and cheap) ammunition... and is eminently affordable.


10 posted on 09/27/2005 5:59:30 AM PDT by niteowl77 (Want to be part of an elite? Join the armed forces. Want to be part of a herd? Go to college.)
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To: saganite

Glock makes very nice .45s.


11 posted on 09/27/2005 6:01:38 AM PDT by ElTianti
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To: saganite
I am a survivalist weirdo.....and I think the New Orleans fiasco proved us right..who are you going to rely on..the government to help you out ...our yourself...I choose myself....I am much smarter than a government bureaucrat.....I am SMART enough to get out of Dodge if I need to...or if I was going to stay...buy enough food, water, and supplies to survive...and not to do what the idiots did in New Orleans...and don't answer back that they were poor....they were DUMB...period..and evolution works....
12 posted on 09/27/2005 6:03:30 AM PDT by Youngman442002
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To: beaureguard
Well, there are as many favorite firearms as there are shooters, but here are my main beefs with this writer:

He has a thing for oddball calibers. Now, I myself have nothing to brag on in that department, seeing as how I have a couple of Lee Enfields in .303 British, a .455 Webley revolver, a Webley in .38 Smith (NOT .38 special) and a .41 mag. BUT, oddball calibers are not good for first guns because ammo is expensive and not readily available.

I would stick to 12 ga., .308 Win (7.62 NATO), .22 rimfire, and .38/.357 Magnum because if ANY ammo is available, those will be. (I am personally prejudiced against 9mm, and I prefer .45 ACP to the .38, but again not for a first gun.)

Everybody should begin with a .22 rifle (not a .22 magnum - talk about difficult finding ammo!). Ammo is available everywhere and dirt cheap, zero recoil, ample accuracy with the right selection. I wouldn't bother with a bolt action though, if you need discipline in placing your shots just load one at a time. I am very happy with my Ruger 10/22 Stainless, although the rotary magazines are a bit fiddly (I would buy a couple of spares).

A reliable .308 rifle is a good thing to have, my hubby swears by the FN-FAL but I find it too heavy and bulky to tote around. I have a little Ruger M-77 with a 4x Leupold scope on top, and it does everything I need for it to do. Probably a semi-auto would be better than a bolt action, but the M-77 has a very smooth and quick operating action. I love my Ruger and I can drive tacks with it all day long.

A good pump shotgun is the best first shotgun. Our hunting club has eight Remington 870s that we use day in and day out in training and during hunt tests. Some of them are older than I am . . . they get battered around and treated pretty roughly, but they remain reliable and accurate.

I agree with a .357 because you can feed it .38 sp for practice, but a six inch barrel is going to be very awkward for a new shooter. Four inch to me is a better compromise between recoil and ease of handling. Once this shooter gets comfortable with a revolver, he ought to look into the 1911A1.

Just my

13 posted on 09/27/2005 6:05:18 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: BooBoo1000

I agree the .357 in a short barrel (which is what I have) is hard to control. That's why the author recommendeds a longer barrel. I simply use .38 special ammo in my Ruger if I want more control, but only for practice. When I carry it I load .357. I personally consider it the minimum caliber for sure stopping power so I wouldn't recommend a 9 mm. Each to his own though!


14 posted on 09/27/2005 6:05:56 AM PDT by saganite (The poster formerly known as Arkie 2)
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To: holymoly
Too bad the Mini-14 isn't an assault rifle.

No matter what it looks like, no rifle you're going to buy without "special dispensation" from the BATF is a real "assault rifle". No full auto or burst capability - no assault rifle.

If someone's got some breath to waste, he may want to pass that little nugget along to the likes of Feinstein, Schumer, etc.

15 posted on 09/27/2005 6:07:07 AM PDT by AngryJawa (NRA)
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To: beaureguard
Nothing wrong with his choices but mine would have been different.

That is the nice thing about guns. Just about all of them are useful.

I ran into a bargain on .22 magnum ammo around 20 years ago and bought 100 boxes. I had a Thompson Center Contender with a .22 mag barrel at the time.

Well that magnum barrel turned out to be a dog. The only bad barrel I have ever had with the contender. I eventually traded the contender and all barrels off.

With all that ammo, I have been wanting a .22 mag for some time. I settled on the CZ automatic rifle. While saving up for the purchase, I noticed someone advertising a Marlin model 25 for only $100 in the local paper. I phoned him and he came over immediately. I think he really needed the money, anyway the rifle had a cheap but good scope and three mags.

The rifle is not particularly well made. It looks ok but nothing extra. The good thing is the accuracy. Using CCI hollow points, it consistently put all shots into one large hole at 50 yards. Really unusual accuracy.

That rifle is very useful for varmints, wild dogs etc.

All in all, tho a good .22 LR repeater is the best gun to start with, either rifle or pistol.

16 posted on 09/27/2005 6:10:14 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: mbynack
I'm sure that you're going to get a lot of people disagreeing with his choices.

I would recommend a 12 gauge pump as the first gun. You can use it for home defense and hunting.

I don't think a 22 magnum is a very practical choice. It's only good for plinking and small game. A 22 long rifle is cheaper to shoot.

A 454 Cassull is not practical for anything but medium size game hunting. It's not a good weapon for a beginner because it's expensive and kicks pretty hard.

I agree with you. The 22 LR is the way to go. Mossberg Maverick is an excellent way to get into the shotgun world for a reasonable price. I'd go with a 30-06 rather than a 270. And finally a 1911 or clone for personal defense. If a semi-auto "assault" style is desired, an SKS is cheap and reliable.

The bonus is that these firearms use the least expensive ammo.

17 posted on 09/27/2005 6:10:38 AM PDT by CPOSharky (The more I'm around people the better I like my dogs.)
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To: saganite
Since I can't afford a Kimber...

Been there, done that. You're not missing anything, and saving money, to boot!

18 posted on 09/27/2005 6:12:22 AM PDT by papertyger
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To: mbynack
For home defense I have a Mossberg Maverick 88 12 gauge pump with 18.5 inch barrel, pistol grip, and tactical sling. I have a second one just like it in the tool box of my truck. It's cheap and fun to shoot clays from the hip at close range. I keep a Ruger P95DC in 9mm in the truck. The wife also carries a P95DC in 9mm. 9mm is cheap. I carry a Ruger P97DC in 45 ACP. I have a Marlin 22 semi auto in 22LR for plinking and rabbits and a Ruger Mark II for the same purpose. I have a Charter Arms 38 snubby I carry in ankle holster. The Browning A Bolt in 270 with 3X10 50mm Leupold Gold Ring scope is my favorite of all my long rifles. I have a smith and Wesson Model 3000 12 gauge pump (no longer in production) for turkey, quail, and dove. Then in my second gun safe are a variety of wheel guns, assault guns, and other goodies. The third safe is in the basement with my collectibles in it. You know like beanie babies and such. I do play golf but not often.
19 posted on 09/27/2005 6:15:35 AM PDT by Conspiracy Guy (Ponce de Leon is coming here to look for the fountain of dumb. The DNC is his first stop.)
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To: beaureguard
Reasonable recommendations. No heartburn with the .270, 686 and Benelli Nova, but the rest are a little eccentric.

And the Ruger is not a top choice in .223 semiautos.

20 posted on 09/27/2005 6:16:07 AM PDT by xsrdx
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To: saganite

Bingo.


21 posted on 09/27/2005 6:16:45 AM PDT by Conspiracy Guy (Ponce de Leon is coming here to look for the fountain of dumb. The DNC is his first stop.)
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To: satchmodog9
I've got 15 "survivalist weirdo" firearms here... all of them in relatively common calibers (except that pesky K31 Swiss chambered in 7.5 Swiss).

I agree with every comment made thus far. Putting me in the "survivalist weirdo" category, while evoking a need to thank, really isn't fair. I'm more concerned with the well-being of my family, friends and myself. NOLA has proven that the Feds can't affect adequate protection in the aftermath of a national tragedy.

22 posted on 09/27/2005 6:16:54 AM PDT by rarestia ("One man with a gun can control 100 without one." - Lenin / Molwn Labe!)
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To: beaureguard

And a Ruger 10/22 in 22LR is a better choice in a .22 rifle than the Marlin 22 MAG.


23 posted on 09/27/2005 6:17:18 AM PDT by xsrdx
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To: ElTianti; saganite
I have both the milspec Springfield .45 auto and the Glock model 21 .45 auto. I like both of them but here are a few things to consider. The Glock of course has more ammo available at 13 rounds in the magazine. However, that makes for a very thick grip. I have very large hands so it does not bother me. out of all the other people who have tried it usually only men who are at least 5'10" will have hands big enough to wrap around the grip. The Glock shoots adequately as far as accuracy and is utterly reliable when it comes to functionality.

The Springfield armory pistol has 7 or 8 in the magazine depending on whose magazine you buy. It also is utterly reliable in function. The thing that stands out with the Springfield is the accuracy. I have shot some very tight groups with this pistol. 25 yards under 2 inches weaver stance. I can't do that everytime, but that is more of a function of the shooter not the pistol. The only frawback that I see with the Springfield is if you want to reload. The glock tends to toss its empties in a nice little pile. The Springfield chunks them everywhere. Also the Springfield tears the mouth of the case on at least one case in every magazine.

With all of that said I usually keep my Glock as my primary home defence pistol. The main reason being is that it has tritium night sights.

24 posted on 09/27/2005 6:18:23 AM PDT by Fellow Traveler
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To: yarddog

I've always owned a .22 rifle and pistol. My current ones are both Rugers. I have 30 year old Mark I ( I know, they didn't call them that when they were new but since they've come out with the Mark II and III I feel like it's appropriate) and I've put thousands of rounds through it. I recently had to buy a new magazine because the original had a weak spring (after 30 years) and I was having feed problems. It's a very accurate pistol. The rifle is a 10-22. I recently added a cheap Simmons scope and bought a 25 round after market magazine. Lots of fun and an excellent way to learn to shoot.


25 posted on 09/27/2005 6:18:50 AM PDT by saganite (The poster formerly known as Arkie 2)
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To: xsrdx
nd a Ruger 10/22 in 22LR is a better choice in a .22 rifle than the Marlin 22 MAG.

GMTA. I started both my kids on this rifle.

26 posted on 09/27/2005 6:19:50 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: beaureguard
You might also want a flash suppressor, which will keep the muzzle low while you fire away.

Ok, this guy is inept. A flash suppressor/hider is just that - it does not serve as a muzzle brake or compensator.

27 posted on 09/27/2005 6:20:19 AM PDT by xsrdx
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To: saganite
Those Ruger .22 auto pistols are great guns. I once had the exact same gun you have. It was bought used and rusted.

I had my dealer return it to Ruger and they refinished it to where it looked new for only $25. They even included a new box.

I like the 10/22 and there are so many accessories for it that it is pretty much the standard. They can be made to shoot great by experts but as they come are usually just so-so. The little Marlin model 60 is much cheaper and usually a lot more accurate. I do like the Ruger mag system better tho.

28 posted on 09/27/2005 6:23:35 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: edskid
"I've selected the Glock 19 as the family SHTF handgun - no manual safety levers to fumble with, easy to strip for maintenance, nearly unbreakable, utilizes common-as-dirt (and cheap) ammunition... and is eminently affordable"

And a consistent trigger pull - no needing to pull harder on the first round out the pipe.

29 posted on 09/27/2005 6:31:25 AM PDT by Fudd
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To: holymoly
"Too bad the Mini-14 isn't..."

Years ago during a show, I spotted a Mini-14 Ranch on a table with a $1500 price tag.

I asked the guy what was so special about this this rifle and he said to look on the side. There was a selector switch. This was the first Law enforcement version I had seen.

30 posted on 09/27/2005 6:37:18 AM PDT by Deguello
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To: xsrdx

My tag line went AWOL.


31 posted on 09/27/2005 6:38:28 AM PDT by xsrdx (Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas)
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To: yarddog
They can be made to shoot great by experts but as they come are usually just so-so.

A point I forgot to make. The trigger on my 10/22 was particularly awful, but fortunately we have a gunsmith that we trust who has done work for us for 20 plus years, and he did a great job on the trigger and tuned everything else up while he was at it.

32 posted on 09/27/2005 7:00:20 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: satchmodog9

I once had a conversation with a cousin who is rabidly anti-gun. We were talking about the MO "shall issue" CCW law, and she was shocked to hear that the guy she was dating kept a handgun at his place of business for protection. After berating him for a while, she looked at me and sneered, "And you have a gun too, don't you..." I answered, "no, I don't have 'a gun.' I've got 17 guns!"

Since then, I've sold one that I really didn't have any use for... It was a PPC competition handgun that a buddy of mine who was interesting in starting PPC and Action Shooting wanted to try.

Handguns

.22 Ruger Mk2
9mm Taurus PT-99
.357 Ruger Security Six (DA only w/ Douglas Airgauge barrel)
.40S&W Star Firestar
.41Mag S&W Model 57
.44Mag S&W 629 Power Custom Grand Master
.44Mag Ruger Redhawk
.45LC Ruger Vacquero (sp?)
.45ACP S&W 625-5 w/ Power Custom combat action job
.45ACP Springfield Armory 1911-A1
.45ACP Springfiled Armony 1911-A1 "USPSA Race Gun" by Leanord Beatty

Shotgun

12 ga Bennelli Super 90 Defender

Rifles

.22 Remington 571 pump
.223 Ruger Mini-14
.223 Colt CAR-15 (w/ a spare govt contract AR15-A2 upper)
.308 Federal Ordanance M-14S


33 posted on 09/27/2005 7:07:11 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: AnAmericanMother
fortunately we have a gunsmith that we trust

Kind of like a fountain of youth, or gold at the end of the rainbow. Or Bigfoot.

I've heard of them, but never seen one. You are indeed fortunate!

34 posted on 09/27/2005 7:10:45 AM PDT by xsrdx (Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas)
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To: satchmodog9
Life is good when you own more than ten firearms.

If you know the exact number you have, you don't have enough.

35 posted on 09/27/2005 7:11:46 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim (Now that taglines are cool, I refuse to have one.)
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To: mbynack
I agree with your instincts to go for a shotgun first. If you are looking for the "utility" tool for home defense a shotgun is hard to beat. Either a 12 or 20 gauge. I like a 20 guage because my wife and daughter can, and most importantly WILL shoot it. A tool is only useful if it can be USED! It also meets the criteria of someone who otherwise has no interest in the world of firearms. It takes very little time, money or skill to acquire and operate.

Now, what if you have to go mobile and leave your home? It would certainly be prudent to have at least one type of "carry" weapon to have and to hold until something or someone needs to be blown apart. Here is where the user needs to evaluate themselves and the level of commitment they do (or don't) have to develop the skills necessary to become proficient with their "tool" of choice.

What level of investment (time and money) are you willing to put into defending yourself and your family? I really think this is much like buying a car. Are seatbelts good enough for your safety concern? How about air bags all around? How about the vehicle itself? Are you interested in a design that affords better safety over a longer period of operation in more varied operating conditions? Perhaps you are interested in a "speciality" vehicle that is designed to meet your specific needs. How important is the ease of operation, maintenance, and cost of ownership? If you buy your vehicles based upon the perceptions of others, then you may end up doing the same with firearms. You can expect the same results in both cases. Paying for the bling instead of the bang.

In the final analysis we make our purchases and then we live with them. We really don't know how that vehicle will perform until we take it out and put it through the paces. If they don't work out we trade them in for something that will do the job. As we gain more experienced, more money, etc. we may purchase additional vehicles or trade up.

Remember that you should only purchase what you are willing to use. Having the tool is one thing, using it is another! If your purpose is to own and operate a "carry" weapon then make sure you WILL carry it and operate it. The biggest baddest dudes are often found near death (or dead) in the wilderness with their packs full of survival gear that could have saved their lives if they had only USED it.

A pocket knife in your pocket is way more useful than a 7" hunting knife left in a bag in the back of a truck that is now drifting down a flooded river.... get the picture? It won't peform like that really nice knife would have, but it is there for you when you need it. Could you have, should you have carried that other knife? Perhaps. That is another facet of preparation and something each person must determine for themselves. What is pratical for some is not for others.

It is your choice, your family, your life and your tool! No one can make the right choice for you. Educate yourself as much as you can about the various strengths and weaknesses of various firearms. As much as possible, take some out for a test drive! Find a friend or someone you know that has that model and take it for a spin! Some ranges let you rent the firearm for an hour so you can at least get a "feel" for the operation of a particular firearm.

My last recommendation is that if you are new to firearms it would be smart to take a course from a certified instructor(sort of like drivers ed)that is designed to teach you the basics in firearm safety.

36 posted on 09/27/2005 7:13:16 AM PDT by Mobilemitter (We must learn to fin >-)> for ourselves..........)
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To: MarkL

Since you own quite a few .45's I wonder what you think of the relatively new GAP round?


37 posted on 09/27/2005 7:14:40 AM PDT by saganite (The poster formerly known as Arkie 2)
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To: MarkL

I noticed you have the little Firestar in .40 S&W. I have one and like it. It is very compact but when loaded it literally feels like a chunck of lead. Nothing wrong with it's performance.


38 posted on 09/27/2005 7:15:08 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: xsrdx

I would say, in addition, get a good hunting knife with a 6" blade, and a couple of good pocket knives with a 3 or 4 inch blade. Also teach all your children how to shoot when they are big enough.

I also like to keep one or two scout axes around. They seem to be rare these days so a good hatchet works also.

Keep one or two good flashlights around where you can find them in the dark.


39 posted on 09/27/2005 7:15:39 AM PDT by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
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To: xsrdx
He's a good egg -- he mostly does custom competition pistols, but he'll do oddball stuff for us 'cause we've known him so long.

My grandfather was a diminutive man, our gunsmith lengthened the stock and raised the comb on his old Browning "humpback" shotgun for my 6'6" husband. Did a splendid job matching the wood. (it still kicks like a mule though, he couldn't do anything about that. ;-) )

40 posted on 09/27/2005 7:18:01 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: saganite
Since you own quite a few .45's I wonder what you think of the relatively new GAP round?

I don't know anything about it, other than what I've read. It sounds pretty nice, with the possibility of building a pistol with a more compact grip for people with smaller hands.

Mark

41 posted on 09/27/2005 7:21:29 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: yarddog
I noticed you have the little Firestar in .40 S&W. I have one and like it. It is very compact but when loaded it literally feels like a chunck of lead. Nothing wrong with it's performance.

I bought it years ago, the first time the CCW law was floated here in MO. It is tiny, compared to anything else I owned. It's about the size of a Colt Mustang .380! But it's all steel, and heavy! And that's a good thing, too. The recoil on it is rather brutal, and it is not a particularly fun gun to shoot. My only regret is that I had to run out and buy it as soon as I read about it... Shortly thereafter, Star came out with a .45 version of the Firestar... Nothing against the .40, but I didn't (and still don't) have reloading dies for it. As it is, I've got too many tool-heads for my Dillon 550, and hardly enough room for them! Besides, I don't shoot the Firestar all that often. It is a nice gun, but it's very much a "working gun."

Mark

42 posted on 09/27/2005 7:26:35 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: Tijeras_Slim
Life is good when you own more than ten firearms.

If you know the exact number you have, you don't have enough.

I had to revise my list 3 times before I gave up and went downstairs to open up the gunsafe and take a head count! lol

Mark

43 posted on 09/27/2005 7:29:18 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: satchmodog9
Life is good when you own more than ten firearms.

Ten?

You set your standards awfully low.

44 posted on 09/27/2005 7:30:35 AM PDT by P8riot (Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.)
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To: Fudd
And a consistent trigger pull - no needing to pull harder on the first round out the pipe.

No small consideration when every shot is suppose to count.

45 posted on 09/27/2005 7:33:23 AM PDT by papertyger
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To: Citizen Tom Paine
I would say, in addition, get a good hunting knife with a 6" blade... Keep one or two good flashlights around where you can find them in the dark.

Oh, that's a whole 'nother thread.


46 posted on 09/27/2005 7:33:52 AM PDT by xsrdx (Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas)
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To: beaureguard

Personnally my SHTF rifle is a Sprinfield M1A. The .308 NATO round is my favorite in a long gun.


47 posted on 09/27/2005 7:34:24 AM PDT by P8riot (Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.)
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To: xsrdx; AnAmericanMother
fortunately we have a gunsmith that we trust

Kind of like a fountain of youth, or gold at the end of the rainbow. Or Bigfoot.

I've heard of them, but never seen one. You are indeed fortunate!

I've been very lucky too. Actually, I've found a number of excellent gunsmiths that I recommend highly... There's Bill Laughridge (sp?) up in Nebraska, who owns Cylinder and Slide. I have it on good authority that he's one of the very best (if not THE best) at working on Colt Pythons and Browning High Powers. While they're best known for those, believe me, they do excellent work on anything you can send them. He did some terrific work for me some years ago, with an action job on a competition .38 revolver, as well as an action job (and spring kit) in my Taurus PT-99. And then there's Leonard Beatty (I hope I got that right... It's been years). He was in North Carolina, and he did an amazing job on a 1911 "Race Gun" for me. I would estimate that I've put over 60,000 rounds through it, and it's NEVER malfunctioned, and the trigger pull, while extremely light (just a hair over 25 oz), is perfectly safe.

I've also got two friends who are both master tool and die makers, and they got into gunsmithing as a hobby, and have become excellent gunsmiths. One even built his own custom chambered revolver, sort of based on the .44 Automag, using full moon clips, and the cut down cases of a .308. I don't think that they'd want me mentioning their names.

And I was extremely luck to have been introduced to Ron Power, one of the finest gunsmiths around today. Not only is he a master craftsman, but he happens to be an extremely nice gentleman, and he's a lot of fun to be around. He had already retired to the Ozarks, but a friend introduced us, and my friends convinced Ron to do a bit of work on one of my revolvers.

Mark

48 posted on 09/27/2005 7:40:18 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: AnAmericanMother
(it still kicks like a mule though, he couldn't do anything about that. ;-) )

Talk to your gunsmith about one of those mercury filled recoil surpressors. It fits in the stock. If you don't mind the extra weight, and it doesn't upset the balance, you'll be amazed at what it does to the recoil.

Mark

49 posted on 09/27/2005 7:43:19 AM PDT by MarkL (I didn't get to where I am today by worrying about what I'd feel like tomorrow!)
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To: MarkL
You KNOW things are getting bad when you have to invest in a second gun safe . . . and that's just for the ones that aren't junk guns for the pickup, house guns, or carry guns . . . < ouch! >

One of the judges in that Fifth Circuit case on the 2nd Amendment remarked during oral argument that he and one of the other judges on the panel "had between them more firearms than most Latin American countries." We're working on it . . .

50 posted on 09/27/2005 7:43:39 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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