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NanoBioEthics
Reason ^ | October 26, 2005 | Ronald Bailey

Posted on 10/26/2005 6:29:02 PM PDT by neverdem

Advancing past the "carbon barrier"

Humanity is about to "break the carbon barrier," and Alan Goldstein, professor of biomaterials science at Alfred University, is worried.

"Earth normal life" has depended on a constrained set of chemical reactions, centered on carbon atoms, for nearly 4 billion years. Now that’s going to change: Goldstein foresees that nanotechnology will enable us to use a much vaster array of chemical reactions and allow us to comprehensively integrate living and non-living matter. In fact, he believes that nanotech will erase the distinction between living and non-living matter.

So what is nanotechnology anyway? Nanotech is the development of a wide variety of precision manufacturing techniques at the atomic scale. Advanced nanotech will eventually enable the creation of computers and memory storage devices the size of sugar cubes to contain the entire information contents of the Library of Congress. It could allow the creation of space elevators that make possible cheap access to orbit and easier flights to the rest of the solar system.

As amazing as these achievements would be, they are still just faster better cheaper ways of doing things that people do now. Even medical devices—nanotech pacemakers and even electronic hippocampus brain prostheses—will be accepted by most people as just part of the normal march of medical progress. These sorts of nanotech devices and products will be seamlessly and unobtrusively integrated into the macro-sized products of everyday life such as cars, computers, and clothes. Such advances raise few novel ethical concerns.

Nevertheless, Goldstein is right. Nanotech integrated into the very cells of our bodies will dramatically lengthen our life spans, give us superhuman mental capacities, and enable to us manipulate literally every aspect of the material world including the material that makes us. Goldstein foresees that nanotech will transform humanity from Homo sapiens into a new species: Homo technicus. "Homo technicus won't see like us, breed like us, feed like us, or need like us," declares Goldstein.

Goldstein has put his finger on just what worries people when they first hear of the wondrous possibilities offered by advanced technologies. First, let’s stipulate that if any future nanobio products are not safe because, for example, they are toxic or somehow dangerously infectious, then appropriate regulations and limitations must be adopted.

Safety, however, is not what causes the greatest unease for some who contemplate nanobio. They fear that nanobio enhancements will dramatically change human nature. After all, visionary nanotechnologists have outlined a future in which vastly increased computational power installed in human brains, or advances such as the complete replacement of the human circulatory system with a sapphire vasculoid containing 500 trillion nanobots, are just the beginning of the radical transformations that are in store for us.

Goldstein complains that bioethicists have not done enough hard thinking about the ethical issues raised by the possibility of nanobio enhancements. He calls on us all to do a lot of very very very hard thinking before we go forward with the development of nanobio—before we break the "carbon barrier". Goldstein also wants researchers to begin a "dialogue" with the public about these impending revolutionary changes.

But this sober call for harder thinking and more dialogue is a characteristic move in much of what passes for bioethical thinking. Instead of providing final answers, academic and government funded bioethicists artfully protest, "I am just asking some hard questions here. It’s my job to ask hard questions." But the implication is that technologists and researchers should stop what they are doing until the bioethicists have come up with the answers to all the hard questions that they are asking. As for public dialogue, this usually means setting up some government committee or other that issues a weighty report suggesting that "we" need to think harder about whatever it believes the issues are.

Waiting until the ethicists catch up with scientific and technological progress is a recipe for technological stagnation. Slowing innovation is not cost free. It makes a difference to tens of millions of people whether a cure for cancer or heart disease is found in 2010 or 2020.

In general, human ethical advancements and understanding follow—and in fact have to follow—in the wake of scientific and technological progress. Why? Because humanity is just terrible at foresight. The plain fact is that bioethics has advanced by codifying what we have learned from our past ethical blunders rather than by anticipating and preventing immoral acts.

Forget trying to anticipate ethical problems. Even the smartest people cannot figure out how scientific and technological advances will play out over the next few decades, much less centuries. In 1960 the optical laser was described as an invention looking for a job. By 2005 ubiquitous lasers routinely cut metal, play CDs, reshape corneas, carry billions of Internet messages, remove tattoos, and guide bombs.

However revolutionary nanobiotech turns out to be—and I agree with Goldstein that it will be very revolutionary—the revolution will develop incrementally. Humanity will have lots of opportunities for course corrections as we go along. So rather than try to figure out every consequence of doing something in advance, we generally move ahead and if something does go wrong, we jump back and exclaim, "Oh, let’s not do that again." That's why we no longer use X-ray machines to measure shoe sizes or paint radium on watch dials. The very good news is that the history of the last two centuries has shown that technological progress has been far more beneficial than harmful for humanity. I see no reason why nanobiotech will not be another step along that beneficial trend line.

As for worries about nanobio's effect on human nature, it's worth remembering that human nature is not some property that inheres in the species in general: Human nature belongs to each individual human being, and each one of us has the right to change our own human nature. This means that we all have the right to choose to use or not use new technologies to help us and our families to flourish. If our descendants don’t "breed like us, feed like us, or need like us," then that’s because they will decide that they have better alternatives.

Finally, as much damage as future nanotech devices might cause, it’s nothing compared to the damage that bad policies or overly cautious ethical fatwas can make.

Is humanity ready to break the carbon barrier? We’re about as ready as we’ll ever be.


Ronald Bailey is Reason's science correspondent.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: nanotechnology

1 posted on 10/26/2005 6:29:03 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

I saw that guy on T2. Even when he was burned by fire he kept going. Yeah! Give me some of that to drink. I wanna be like him.


2 posted on 10/26/2005 6:36:49 PM PDT by BipolarBob (I'm really BagdadBob under the witness protection program.)
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To: neverdem
each one of us has the right to change our own human nature.

The thing you can change is not the thing known as Human Nature. Human Nature is the thing that is unchangeable.

Also: watch out! The Singularity approaches.

3 posted on 10/26/2005 6:37:18 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: neverdem
The lefties flipped over biotech, and they're going to flip BIG TIME over nanotech.

It presents a great opportunity to beat themselves on the chest about how CAUTIOUS they are, about how they're LOOKING OUT FOR US by holding all this R + D up.

Yes, they're going to save us from GREY GOO...!

And unable to contribute in a substantial way, they'll ask to be paid from the suffering and waiting that they put us to.

4 posted on 10/26/2005 6:41:57 PM PDT by gaijin
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To: ClearCase_guy
watch out! The Singularity approaches.

Who dat? I don't know no Singularity, but when I get some nano juice in me I'm ganna be all outta bubblegum.

5 posted on 10/26/2005 6:42:59 PM PDT by BipolarBob (I'm really BagdadBob under the witness protection program.)
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To: neverdem

Kool-aid y'all?


6 posted on 10/26/2005 6:43:32 PM PDT by WriteOn (Truth)
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To: El Gato; JudyB1938; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Robert A. Cook, PE; lepton; LadyDoc; jb6; tiamat; PGalt; ..
Engineers Report Breakthrough in Laser Beam Technology

What makes Kevlar® so strong? And how can it be so light at the same time?

Mother's milk helps to block HIV

Lewis X component in human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 transfer to CD4 T lymphocytes. (As opposed to a follower of Calypso Louie)

FReepmail me if you want on or off my health and science ping list. Anyone can post any unrelated link as they see fit.

7 posted on 10/26/2005 6:43:50 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: PatrickHenry; b_sharp; neutrality; anguish; SeaLion; Fractal Trader; grjr21; bitt; KevinDavis; ...
FutureTechPing!
An emergent technologies list covering biomedical
research, fusion power, nanotech, AI robotics, and
other related fields. FReepmail to join or drop.

8 posted on 10/26/2005 6:45:59 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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To: neverdem

later read/ping.


9 posted on 10/26/2005 7:18:07 PM PDT by little jeremiah
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To: AntiGuv

Damn the Luddite fearmongers! Full speed ahead!


10 posted on 10/26/2005 7:19:11 PM PDT by King Prout (many accuse me of being overly literal... this would not be a problem if many were not under-precise)
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To: neverdem
I don't like nanotechnology, too many frighting ways it can be used to the detriment of humans.

Here's a fairly good sight with so good links in it.

HERE

11 posted on 10/26/2005 7:53:27 PM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: pbrown

Sorry....sight=site


12 posted on 10/26/2005 7:54:35 PM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: neverdem

"...he believes that nanotech will erase the distinction between living and non-living matter."

Two words:

Pet rock.


13 posted on 10/26/2005 8:00:39 PM PDT by taxed2death (A few billion here, a few trillion there...we're all friends right?)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Direct attempts to prevent a singularity are mistaken, even dangerous. History has shown time and again that well-meaning efforts to control the creation of powerful technologies serve only to drive their development underground into the hands of secretive government agencies, sophisticated political movements, and global-scale corporations, few of whom have demonstrated a consistent willingness to act in the best interests of the planet as a whole. These organizations -- whether the National Security Agency, Aum Shinri Kyo, or Monsanto -- act without concern for popular oversight, discussion, or guidance. When the process is secret and the goal is power, the public is the victim. The world is not a safer place with treaty-defying surreptitious bioweapons labs and hidden nuclear proliferation. Those who would save humanity by restricting transformative technologies to a power elite make a tragic mistake.

Imagine what it would mean should the islamofacist get their hands on perfected nano...

here

14 posted on 10/26/2005 8:01:06 PM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: pbrown

Thanks for the links.


15 posted on 10/26/2005 8:17:52 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: BipolarBob; MAK1179; briansb
I might be a Luddite for thinking this way..... but... I don't believe nanotech or nanobio whatever they want to call it.... can ever come close to matching what is already the present reality under "the carbon barrier"

This is a man attempting to convince himself that we're as smart as God. The technology is cool and I hope they do pursue it as far as they can.... but this writer is nothing more important than a delusional atheist

Will still be neat to find out what we CAN do with nanotech, just don't lose sight of how wonderful "the carbon barrier" really is.

Cheers,
Lloyd

16 posted on 10/26/2005 8:24:34 PM PDT by Lloyd227
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To: neverdem

"Waiting until the ethicists catch up with scientific and technological progress is a recipe for technological stagnation. Slowing innovation is not cost free. It makes a difference to tens of millions of people whether a cure for cancer or heart disease is found in 2010 or 2020.

In general, human ethical advancements and understanding follow—and in fact have to follow—in the wake of scientific and technological progress. Why? Because humanity is just terrible at foresight."

This is not the problem. The fact is, we know that technological progress will not stop---because competition doesn't stop. Occasssionally, mankind can step back from the brink for awhile---witness 6 decades without anyone dropping a nuke on people---but that is a particularly obvious and horrible problem.

This nano stuff will creep forward into the world and no person or country can stop it. If the US stopped it in the US, we'd just fall behind everyone else, in defense, business, etc.

Frankly, I'm glad I'll be dead of old age before most of this stuff goes too far---or at least too old to give a hoot.

It all sounds like a nightmare.

But I will say this. The basics of life will change less than people imagine. There will still be some scarce resources---and people will still compete over them.


17 posted on 10/26/2005 8:26:11 PM PDT by strategofr (The secret of happiness is freedom. And the secret of freedom is courage.---Thucydities)
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To: neverdem

You're welcome.


18 posted on 10/26/2005 8:26:29 PM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: neverdem

"Poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide molecules behave like uncooked spaghetti, whereas other, less rigid molecules behave more like cooked strands of spaghetti."

OK, we're stupid and need a simple explanantion. But that is retarded.


19 posted on 10/26/2005 8:29:58 PM PDT by strategofr (The secret of happiness is freedom. And the secret of freedom is courage.---Thucydities)
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To: neverdem
Human nature belongs to each individual human being, and each one of us has the right to change our own human nature.

So it'd be OK for them to choose to become say psychopaths or homocidal maniacs?

20 posted on 10/26/2005 8:42:39 PM PDT by edsheppa
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To: strategofr
OK, we're stupid and need a simple explanantion. But that is retarded

How's this cross woven?

The dashed lines show hydrogen bonds.

21 posted on 10/26/2005 9:16:30 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem
Goldstein also wants researchers to begin a "dialogue" with the public about these impending revolutionary changes.

The one and only proper place for this "dialogue" to occur (given the stipulation that reasonable safety checking has been carried out) is between the creators and owners of the new technologies and their potential customers.

22 posted on 10/27/2005 8:39:10 AM PDT by steve-b (A desire not to butt into other people's business is eighty percent of all human wisdom)
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To: pbrown

"Once the first desktop nanofactory has been built, its first product likely will be another identical nanofactory. Then, following the simple math of exponential duplication, it's easy to see that within months millions or even billions of nanofactories conceivably could be in operation. A key understanding of MNT is that it leads not just to improved products, but to a vastly improved and accelerated means of production."

Hmm. Sounds like this stuff could reproduce itself faster than cockroaches. Once the self-replicating factories are created, how do you stop them from re-creating anymore?


23 posted on 10/27/2005 9:14:24 AM PDT by webstersII
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To: neverdem

Thank you.


24 posted on 10/27/2005 9:29:44 AM PDT by strategofr (The secret of happiness is freedom. And the secret of freedom is courage.---Thucydities)
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