Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Cassini Images Reveal Spectacular Evidence Of An Active Moon
Space Daily.com ^ | Dec 07, 2005 | JPL, NASA

Posted on 12/07/2005 1:03:39 PM PST by tricky_k_1972

Cassini Images Reveal Spectacular Evidence Of An Active Moon


Recent Cassini images of Saturn's moon Enceladus backlit by the sun show the fountain-like sources of the fine spray of material that towers over the south polar region. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.
Pasadena CA (JPL) Dec 07, 2005

Jets of fine, icy particles streaming from Saturn's moon Enceladus were captured in recent images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The images provide unambiguous visual evidence that the moon is geologically active.

"For planetary explorers like us, there is little that can compare to the sighting of activity on another solar system body," said Dr. Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

"This has been a heart-stopper, and surely one of our most thrilling results."

The Cassini images clearly show multiple jets emanating from the moon's south polar region. Based on earlier data, scientists strongly suspected these jets arise from warm fractures in the region. The fractures, informally dubbed "tiger stripes," are viewed essentially broadside in the new images.

The fainter, extended plume stretches at least 186 kilometers (300 miles) above the surface of Enceladus, which is only 186 kilometers wide. Cassini flew through the plume in July, when it passed a few hundred kilometers above the moon.

During that flyby, Cassini's instruments measured the plume's constituent water vapor and icy particles.

Imaging team members analyzed images of Enceladus taken earlier this year at similar viewing angles. It was a rigorous effort to demonstrate that earlier apparitions of the plumes, seen as far back as January, were in fact real and not due to imperfections in the camera.

The recent images were part of a sequence planned to confirm the presence of the plumes and examine them in finer detail. Imaging team member Dr. Andrew Ingersoll from the California Institute of Technology, said, "I think what we're seeing are ice particles in jets of water vapor that emanate from pressurized vents. To form the particles and carry them aloft, the vapor must have a certain density, and that implies surprisingly warm temperatures for a cold body like Enceladus."

Imaging scientists are comparing the new views to earlier Cassini data in hopes of arriving at a more detailed, three-dimensional picture of the plumes and understanding how activity has come about on such a small moon. They are not sure about the precise cause of the moon's unexpected geologic vitality.


False-color views of Saturn's cratered, icy moons, Rhea and Dione. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.
"In some ways, Enceladus resembles a huge comet," said Dr. Torrence Johnson, imaging team member from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

"Only, in the case of Enceladus, the energy source for the geyser-like activity is believed to be due to internal heating by perhaps radioactivity and tides rather than the sunlight which causes cometary jets." The new data also give yet another indication of how Enceladus keeps supplying material to Saturn's gossamer E ring.

Cassini's Photo Album From A Season Of Icy Moons
Pasadena CA (JPL) Dec 07 - Wrapping-up a phenomenally successful year of observing Saturn's icy moons, the Cassini mission is releasing a flood of new views of the moons Enceladus, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus.

The moons and their intricacies are being highlighted today at a news briefing held today at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Several new images of Rhea, a moon measuring 1,528 kilometers (949 miles) across, were taken during Cassini's most recent close flyby on November 26. During the encounter, Cassini dipped to within 500 kilometers (310 miles) of Rhea's surface.

Additional new images include two "zoomable" mosaics of Rhea and Hyperion at high resolution; false-color views revealing compositional variation on the surfaces of Hyperion, Dione and Rhea; two movies reproducing Cassini's exciting encounters with Iapetus and Hyperion; and dazzling new images of the plumes of Enceladus, including a time-lapse movie.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Extended News; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Technical
KEYWORDS: cassini; catastrophism; enceladus; saturn
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last
Yet another body in this Solar System with liquid water on it or in it.

Can anyone possibly argue with 4 possible bodies within our own Solar System that life exists nowhere but Earth and that in all the other Solar Systems throughout just one Galaxy that no other intelligence besides us exists in the Universe?

It has been proven time and again on our own planet that life can exist in the most inhospitable places imaginable.

1 posted on 12/07/2005 1:03:40 PM PST by tricky_k_1972
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: KevinDavis; Frank_Discussion; unibrowshift9b20; RightWhale; El Sordo; SauronOfMordor; ...

Space Ping! If you want on or off this list please Freepmail me.
My Home Page

2 posted on 12/07/2005 1:04:05 PM PST by tricky_k_1972 (Putting on Tinfoil hat and heading for the bomb shelter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
It has been proven time and again on our own planet that life can exist in the most inhospitable places imaginable.

This is true, once life has formed. However, the conditions for life to form are far far more specific.
3 posted on 12/07/2005 1:07:31 PM PST by z3n
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
Astroflatulence?


4 posted on 12/07/2005 1:09:59 PM PST by add925
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

Looks like a hole in the Ozone layer...dang those SUV's.


5 posted on 12/07/2005 1:12:09 PM PST by Deguello (When she told me she liked pick-ups, I thought she meant trucks.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: z3n

So what if we find life in existence on any of these solar bodies, does that crush the world view of uniqueness or does it not in fact enhance the awe of the Creator.

For me it is the later.


6 posted on 12/07/2005 1:12:25 PM PST by tricky_k_1972 (Putting on Tinfoil hat and heading for the bomb shelter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

Until we get our life-detectors out there and actually detect life, the arguments must continue. It is possible there is life on the moon, on Mars, and on Titan since our robots have landed and might have carried life on them in spite of efforts to make them as sterile as possible.


7 posted on 12/07/2005 1:12:53 PM PST by RightWhale (Not transferable -- Good only for this trip)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
Can anyone possibly argue with 4 possible bodies within our own Solar System that life exists nowhere but Earth and that in all the other Solar Systems throughout just one Galaxy that no other intelligence besides us exists in the Universe?

The thing is, if life exists elsewhere then so should technology-using intelligences -- lots of technology-using intelligences. And we don't see 'em.

So that's a pretty good argument that Earth is unique. It wouldn't surprise me to be wrong on this, but the argument is there.

8 posted on 12/07/2005 1:13:23 PM PST by Grut
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: add925

Err.. Yes most defiantly a bad gas problem.


9 posted on 12/07/2005 1:13:57 PM PST by tricky_k_1972 (Putting on Tinfoil hat and heading for the bomb shelter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Grut

>The thing is, if life exists elsewhere then so should technology-using intelligences -- lots of technology-using intelligences. And we don't see 'em.

Do bacteria 'see' us?


10 posted on 12/07/2005 1:18:04 PM PST by chipengineer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Grut

> The thing is, if life exists elsewhere then so should technology-using intelligences -- lots of technology-using intelligences. And we don't see 'em.

Yes... because *lots* in a universe this big means *very* far away.

What makes you think we'd know about another humanlike species that's, say, a mere 1500 light years away?


11 posted on 12/07/2005 1:18:56 PM PST by orionblamblam ("You're the poster boy for what ID would turn out if it were taught in our schools." VadeRetro)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
I absolutely believe that there is life elsewhere in the universe, however, I don't believe that intelligent life could possibly develop based on these results without a number of variables that are consistent with our own planet, then again I'm arrogant :)

Having said that, I can't show you the math myself, but the intuition based on sheer numbers I think proves that we ain't so special, though special enough to keep looking for others like us.

Personally I'm a fan of the "why is there life on earth? Because of the moon" sort of argument, but it's bigger than that. That photo of Saturn's moon doesn't validate that life CAN exist on it any more than it confirms that any life on that moon must be very specialized, and hardy to survive on a planet/moon being torn apart by Saturn's gravity.

But ain't a scientist, I just love Asimov :)
12 posted on 12/07/2005 1:20:08 PM PST by wickedpinto (The road map to peace is a straight line down an Israeli rifle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
Can anyone possibly argue with 4 possible bodies within our own Solar System that life exists nowhere but Earth and that in all the other Solar Systems throughout just one Galaxy that no other intelligence besides us exists in the Universe?

Yes.

It has been proven time and again on our own planet that life can exist in the most inhospitable places imaginable.

The question is not whether life can live in an inhospitable place. The question is whether the more specialized conditions required for life to first form and prosper is present or not. And the conditions required for life to first form from inanimate matter is most certainly more specialized thant he conditions to which life, once formed, can adapt.

Just because humans can life in orbit around Earth does not mean that life could first evolve there. Just because bacteria can exist in Antarctic ice does not mean that life could first evolve there.

13 posted on 12/07/2005 1:26:20 PM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
Actually, the truth about Enceladus is much deeper.
14 posted on 12/07/2005 1:26:39 PM PST by billybudd
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
No, and I would like to stick my neck out and state that I believe if our solar system has this life ability(earth included) the odds are against the idea of life does not exist elsewhere in our galaxy, and the millions of others. Additionally, if a question you could only answer yes or no to were posed, "Is there life like on Earth elsewhere in the universe?" the only logical answer would be yes. Why? because the probability rate is higher than a no....

Asbestos suit donned...

15 posted on 12/07/2005 1:30:53 PM PST by sit-rep (If you acquire, hit it again to verify...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Grut

Their might be some other limiting factor such that precludes technological development, but not intelligence. Their maybe some cultural or another hindrance we aren't taking into account.

The Idea that we and we alone or sole intelligence in the entire Universe seems to me to be an expression of utter hubris.

Maybe Einstein is right and there is no way to bend the rules and achieve faster than light travel, although I would not bet on it.

The Jews were God's chosen people, which did not limit the Creation to them or only allow them the spark of intelligence.


16 posted on 12/07/2005 1:31:45 PM PST by tricky_k_1972 (Putting on Tinfoil hat and heading for the bomb shelter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: wickedpinto
The Moon may have allowed life on Earth but not for the reason most people used to site (i.e., tides). I think the Moon, is important because the Moon-formation collision that is now the leading candidate for how it formed reliquified the Earth and likely contributed heavy elements, iron, and water to the young Earth. This has kept our core molten all these billions of years so we have a magnetic field. That means that unlike Venus or Mars, we aren't being directly hit by the solar wind and other radiation and crust isn't collapsing and cracking as the planet solidifies. In fact, the evidence of the other rocky planets in our solar system suggests that core solidification in the first billion or two years is the norm and Earth is unusual in that it still has a molten core and magnetic field. The Moons of Jupiter retain liquid and warmth through gravity deformation and radiation, not necessarily the most life-friendly energy sources for a world to have. Do any of the big outer moons have magnetic fields?
17 posted on 12/07/2005 1:35:00 PM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
The Idea that we and we alone or sole intelligence in the entire Universe seems to me to be an expression of utter hubris.

And one would arge that the Idea that we share the universe with countless other intelligent beings may simply be an expression of hope and a desire to not be alone in the universe. The only thing anyone can say without expressing wishful thinking or pessimism is that we just don't know if we are alone or not. Everything else is a guess.

Maybe Einstein is right and there is no way to bend the rules and achieve faster than light travel, although I would not bet on it.

The odds are likely that we'll never travel faster than light. See the "light cone" and causality. This isn't like claiming that no car will ever go over 60mph or no plane will ever break the sound barrier.

As a fan of science fiction, I'm not saying this because I like it. It's just what I see when I look at the evidence. Of course I also feel the same way about science fiction energy sources.

18 posted on 12/07/2005 1:41:50 PM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Grut
So that's a pretty good argument that Earth is unique.

If there was one "intelligent" life form per major galaxy in the Universe, the nearest one would be 2 million light years away. That would make it somewhat difficult for them to look us up.

Plus, we don't know how long technically-advanced civilizations can survive. Others could have existed in our own galaxy and gone extinct before we learned how to make wheels.

19 posted on 12/07/2005 1:45:17 PM PST by cogitator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Question_Assumptions
Well, The collision itself isn't the cause for the mantle, as I understand, the tidal forces, like a slow moving blender on the mass of the earth maintain the tasty liquid center of the earth.

Once life was established, the tidal affect also helped create a more constant dynamic of atmosphere and sea. The manipulation of the oceans, allowed for a renewal of the surface waters, as well as a significant source of oxygen dissolution within the waters. Also the tidal forces of the moon pull on ALL mass on the earth, likely we wouldn't have tectonic forces on earth to the degree we do, allowing a continuous exchange. The effect of the moon are innumerable on all things concerning life on the planet.

So I agree, but there are a LOT of things worth agreeing about when it comes to the moon being the real reason for life on earth.
20 posted on 12/07/2005 1:47:06 PM PST by wickedpinto (The road map to peace is a straight line down an Israeli rifle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

One of Saturn's moons, Enceladus, shown in this recent image captured by the Cassini
spacecraft, is spraying icy particles into space from the area around its south pole,
a sure sign of geologic activity. Photo: Reuters

21 posted on 12/07/2005 1:47:41 PM PST by dead (I've got my eye out for Mullah Omar.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: billybudd

And it's neighboring moon, Boorido.


22 posted on 12/07/2005 1:49:57 PM PST by Daus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Grut
So that's a pretty good argument that Earth is unique.

What are the boundries you consider unique?

23 posted on 12/07/2005 1:50:00 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer

I would think the earth's history of mass exticntion events is unique. It would be interesting to have some additional histories of planets with life to help assess the probability of species having language.


24 posted on 12/07/2005 1:53:15 PM PST by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer

I hope this summer's "what have we ever gotten for our investment in NASA" crowd are watching. . .


25 posted on 12/07/2005 1:53:35 PM PST by coolconsideratemen ("All right Franklin, out with it - what new intrigue are you working on?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: js1138
I would think the earth's history of mass exticntion events is unique.

I disagree. In a dynamic solar system (and I would put money down that is the norm) those kind of events would be typical for a world with a viable ecosystem.

26 posted on 12/07/2005 1:56:59 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: coolconsideratemen

Thanks. :-)


27 posted on 12/07/2005 1:57:15 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

186 kilometers does not equal 300 miles...maybe it was supposed to be 300 kilometers (186 miles).


28 posted on 12/07/2005 2:27:47 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Verginius Rufus

Good catch! :-)


29 posted on 12/07/2005 2:33:42 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: chipengineer
Do bacteria 'see' us?

And to think... until the last century or so, we couldn't see them or even recognize that they existed. Yet they surely existed.

30 posted on 12/07/2005 2:44:50 PM PST by TN4Liberty (American... conservative... southern.... It doesn't get any better than this.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer
Asteroid impacts might be common, but the timing could be important. I don't think that human like behavior is inevitable. Of course I could be wrong. Sure would be nice to see at least one example of non-terrestrial evolution.
31 posted on 12/07/2005 3:24:20 PM PST by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: js1138
I don't think that human like behavior is inevitable.

Neither do I. Hard to make a curve with only one data point. :-)

I certainly do not "believe" in ET. I suspect ET is out there due to the huge number of stars and galaxies, however, I most certainly do not "buy" we have been visited. It's possible, just very unlikely.

32 posted on 12/07/2005 3:35:34 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer

I mistyped. I meant human like physiology, not behavior, but I think you got the point I intended. First, I don't think evolution is directed toward anything in particular. Intelligence is an obvious advantage, but big brains don't necessarily possess the requisites for language. I could see a world stabilized on something like reptiles or insects or fish.


33 posted on 12/07/2005 3:41:21 PM PST by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer

You don't listen to Coast often enough. There has been an exchange student program between the US Army and the [I forget which star system] for over twenty years. The first dozen soldiers have just got back. They aren't allowed to talk, of course.


34 posted on 12/07/2005 3:41:35 PM PST by RightWhale (Not transferable -- Good only for this trip)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Daus
If they find another moon, it's got to be called Shaloopa.

Maybe we could drop (in on) the (moon) Shaloopa.

L

35 posted on 12/07/2005 4:32:03 PM PST by Lurker ("Son, there's only two things you need in this world; love and a .45.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

Well, we must remember that Europa is in a band of heavy radiation, so humans might never land there. We needed another good moon


36 posted on 12/07/2005 9:38:14 PM PST by GeronL (Leftism is the INSANE Cult of the Artificial)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972

It has no effect on my religion, I just need to find a good translator =o)


37 posted on 12/07/2005 9:39:26 PM PST by GeronL (Leftism is the INSANE Cult of the Artificial)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: cogitator
Plus, we don't know how long technically-advanced civilizations can survive.

Since technological progress seems to proceed exponentially once it begins I don't think that's a concern.

38 posted on 12/07/2005 9:51:08 PM PST by Moonman62 (Federal creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: RadioAstronomer

The Earth is unique until we discover otherwise. It's unlike anything we've discovered so far.


39 posted on 12/07/2005 10:02:49 PM PST by Moonman62 (Federal creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: tricky_k_1972
that no other intelligence besides us exists in the Universe?

I will argue that in our galaxy, we could very well be the only planet with a electro magnetic technology. Earth is about as perfect for life as a planet can be. Yet the dinosaurs had hundreds of millions of years to develope technology and failed. This says that understanding tech is not easy. Further dogs and chimps are both pretty smart in a lot of ways, but neither could pass 2nd grade math.

40 posted on 12/08/2005 12:25:14 AM PST by staytrue (MOONBAT conservatives are those who would rather lose to a liberal than support a moderate)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Question_Assumptions
I think the Moon, is important because the Moon-formation collision that is now the leading candidate for how it formed reliquified the Earth and likely contributed heavy elements, iron, and water to the young Earth. This has kept our core molten

I think the moon is important too and the moon/earth system is a billion to one chance against. Further, you are right about keeping the core liquid but maybe not for the right reason. The moon has no iron core. Most likely the iron core of the incoming object merged with earth while the lighter stuff got blasted into orbit to form the moon. This left earth with a bigger than normal core than mars or venus and this made it slower to crystallize.

41 posted on 12/08/2005 12:33:39 AM PST by staytrue (MOONBAT conservatives are those who would rather lose to a liberal than support a moderate)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: RightWhale
They aren't allowed to talk, of course.

Yeah, that makes for great radio.

42 posted on 12/08/2005 2:42:00 AM PST by TN4Liberty (American... conservative... southern.... It doesn't get any better than this.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: staytrue
I think the moon is important too and the moon/earth system is a billion to one chance against.

It could be higher than that. Robin Canup and others have done simulations of the sort of collision needed to create our moon and it's a fairly specific range of speeds and angles. Even when that's correct, about a third of their simulations produced an unstable two moon system that broke down after about a century.

Further, you are right about keeping the core liquid but maybe not for the right reason. The moon has no iron core. Most likely the iron core of the incoming object merged with earth while the lighter stuff got blasted into orbit to form the moon. This left earth with a bigger than normal core than mars or venus and this made it slower to crystallize.

That's actually a large part of what I had in mind. I think the collision did add heat but I think the bigger contribution was, as you point out, the addition of iron and heavy (possibly radioactive) elements to the Earth's core that are necessary to drive the magnetic field. Of course it's also possible that the off-center collision that Canup and others speciulate about set the whole thing spinning faster, too. If the poles are about to reverse (or the magnetic field is about to disappear, as some real alarmists speculate), we'll get a good lesson in just how important our magnetic field is to life on Earth the hard way.

43 posted on 12/08/2005 8:34:27 AM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Question_Assumptions

Past Magnetic field reversal does not appear to have bad effects on life. I suspect that most animals adapted by taking a siesta from 10 am to 2 pm and underwater animals had no problem.


44 posted on 12/08/2005 9:10:45 AM PST by staytrue (MOONBAT conservatives are those who would rather lose to a liberal than support a moderate)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Question_Assumptions

A couple proponents of the artificial moon idea were on Coast last night. For some reason which I do not know, Hoagland showed up to hog their time, but they did make their point, which is that the chances of such an extreme moon are so small that the superior and more likely idea is that the moon was built by time travellers from our near future about 600 million years ago to make earth habitable.


45 posted on 12/08/2005 9:57:56 AM PST by RightWhale (Not transferable -- Good only for this trip)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: RightWhale
I think you should post that on the thread discussing the similarities between Intellgent Design and SETI. :-)
46 posted on 12/08/2005 10:10:19 AM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: RightWhale
I think you should post that on the thread discussing the similarities between Intell[i]gent Design and SETI. :-) Ooops. The tread title is "SETI and Intelligent Design"
47 posted on 12/08/2005 10:11:20 AM PST by Question_Assumptions
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Daus

And a taco to go.


48 posted on 12/08/2005 10:16:25 AM PST by lexington minuteman 1775
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Deguello

....Looks like a hole in the Ozone layer...dang those SUV's....

And my wife says.."why do you spend so much tome on Free Republic"

I would have to live without this outstanding observation by Deguello. The atmosphere must definitely have a discontinuity where the matter is being ejected.


49 posted on 12/08/2005 10:17:54 AM PST by bert (K.E. ; N.P . Chicken spit causes flu....... Fox News)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: add925

Astronipple?


50 posted on 12/08/2005 10:19:30 AM PST by BikerNYC (Modernman should not have been banned.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson