Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $71,048
80%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $17k to go!! Thank you all very much!! Let's git 'er done!!

Keyword: catastrophism

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • ...Bizarre new pyramid ... opens in Pompeii to house volcano exhibition

    05/26/2015 7:03:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | By Jack Crone
    The 12-metre high pyramid allows visitors to walk along a track before entering it. It is built almost entirely out of wood with an inner dome made of fiberboard Inside, they will be find the casts of Roman citizens killed more than 1,900 years ago in 79AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted with devastating force destroying the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The plaster casts are placed in the centre, while the exhibition also features archival photographs documenting the work in the excavations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The photos are partly broken down into fragments and then reassembled...
  • The Biggest Extinction on Earth (Mother Nature is not your friend)

    04/04/2007 5:54:02 AM PDT · by Valin · 17 replies · 879+ views
    First Science ^ | 3/30/07 | Naomi Miles
    Around 250 million years ago, a huge volcanic eruption triggered a deadly series of events that wiped out 95% of all species on Earth. Scientists have been piecing together the story of what happened. Our planet has a troubled and turbulent past: five catastrophic natural events have caused mass extinctions of life on Earth. Perhaps the most famous one is the asteroid impact that caused the demise of the dinosaurs. But the most extensive extinction event occurred even before dinosaurs were around. In the Permian era, about 250 million years ago, a destructive volcanic eruption radically altered conditions on Earth...
  • Plague Helped Bring Down Roman Empire

    05/12/2013 6:14:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 88 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 10, 2013 | Charles Choi
    ...The bacterium that causes plague, Yersinia pestis, has been linked with at least two of the most devastating pandemics in recorded history. One, the Great Plague, which lasted from the 14th to 17th centuries, included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death, which may have killed nearly two-thirds of Europe in the mid-1300s. Another, the Modern Plague, struck around the world in the 19th and 20th centuries, beginning in China in the mid-1800s and spreading to Africa, the Americas, Australia, Europe and other parts of Asia. Although past studies confirmed this germ was linked with both of these catastrophes,...
  • Black Death Genetic Code "Built"

    10/13/2011 3:44:55 AM PDT · by Just4Him · 16 replies
    BBC ^ | 10/12/2011 | Matt McGrath
    The genetic code of the germ that caused the Black Death has been reconstructed by scientists for the first time. The researchers extracted DNA fragments of the ancient bacterium from the teeth of medieval corpses found in London. They say the pathogen is the ancestor of all modern plagues. The research, published in the journal Nature, suggests the 14th Century outbreak was also the first plague pandemic in history.
  • Cause of the big plague epidemic of Middle Ages identified

    10/20/2010 12:55:40 AM PDT · by neverdem · 50 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | October 11, 2010 | NA
    Geographical position of the five archaeological sites investigated. Green dots indicate the sites. Also indicated are two likely independent infection routes (black and red dotted arrows) for the spread of the Black Death (1347-1353) after Benedictow. ©: PLoS Pathogens The 'Black Death' was caused by at least two previously unknown types of Yersinia pestis bacteria. The latest tests conducted by anthropologists at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have proven that the bacteria Yersinia pestis was indeed the causative agent behind the "Black Death" that raged across Europe in the Middle Ages. The cause of the epidemic has always remained...
  • Plague Victims Discovered After 1500 Years (Justinian)

    04/10/2008 3:16:15 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 266+ views
    Adnkronos ^ | 4-10-2008
    Italy: Plague victims discovered after 1500 years Rome, 10 April (AKI) - The remains of hundreds of victims, believed to have been killed in a plague that swept Italy 1500 years ago, have been found south of Rome. The bodies of men, women and children were found in Castro dei Volsci, in the region of Lazio, during excavations carried out by Lazio archaeological office. News of the extraordinary discovery was reported in the magazine, "Archeologia Viva". The victims are believed to have been victims of the Justinian Plague, a pandemic that killed as many as 100 million people around the...
  • Bubonic Plague Traced To Ancient Egypt (Black Death)

    03/11/2004 3:40:50 PM PST · by blam · 96 replies · 5,507+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 3-10-2004 | Cameron Walker
    Bubonic Plague Traced to Ancient Egypt Cameron Walker for National Geographic News March 10, 2004 The bubonic plague, or Black Death, may have originated in ancient Egypt, according to a new study. "This is the first time the plague's origins in Egypt have been backed up by archaeological evidence," said Eva Panagiotakopulu, who made the discovery. Panagiotakopulu is an archaeologist and fossil-insect expert at the University of Sheffield, England. King Tutankhamun lies in his burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt. Some researchers now believe that the bubonic plague, or Black Death, originated in the village where builders...
  • Ancient Greece's 'global warming'

    05/08/2009 6:39:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 25 replies · 1,347+ views
    American Thinker ^ | May 08, 2009 | Ben-Peter Terpstra
    In Heaven + Earth (Global Warming: The Missing Science), Ian Plimer, Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide, Australia, asks us to embrace big-picture science views; for to recognize our limits is a sign of maturity. "Climate science lacks scientific discipline," says the pro-amalgamation Professor, and in order to see more clearly we need to adopt an interdisciplinary approach. This requires humbleness. In Chapter 2: History, Plimer travels back in time, thousands of years, in fact, to debunk Gore's catastrophic global warming myths. I particularly like his research on the ancient Greeks. For Plato (427-347 BC) advanced the...
  • Computer Program Learning to Read Paleo-Hebrew Letters

    05/23/2015 11:40:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 4/30/2015 | Robin Ngo
    Tel Aviv University researchers are writing a computer program that can read Paleo-Hebrew letters inscribed on First Temple period ostraca. Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) are developing a computer program that can read a script used by the Israelites over 2,600 years ago... The project was begun by TAU Professor of Archaeology Israel Finkelstein and Professor of Physics Eliezer Piasetsky six years ago. Since then, the researchers have enlisted the help of epigraphy, archaeology and math experts along with TAU Ph.D. math students Arie Shaus, Shira Faigenbaum-Golovin and Barak Sober. At the center of this ambitious project are First...
  • Former UN Lead Author: Global Warming Caused By ‘Natural Variations’ In Climate

    05/22/2015 4:53:40 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 24 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | May 22, 2015 | by Michael Bastasch
    Global temperature change observed over the last hundred years or so is well within the natural variability of the last 8,000 years, according to a new paper by a former Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change (IPCC) lead author. Dr. Philip Lloyd, a South Africa-based physicist and climate researcher, examined ice core-based temperature data going back 8,000 years to gain perspective on the magnitude of global temperature changes over the 20th Century. What Lloyd found was that the standard deviation of the temperature over the last 8,000 years was about 0.98 degrees Celsius– higher than the 0.85 degrees climate scientists say...
  • Space Station Could Get Laser Cannon to Destroy Orbital Debris

    05/18/2015 4:45:50 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | May 18, 2015 08:31 AM ET // | by Charles Q. Choi,
    Now researchers suggest the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO), scheduled to be installed on Japan’s module on the space station in 2017, could help the orbiting complex detect dangerous debris. They add that a powerful laser under development could then help shoot down this space garbage. “The EUSO telescope, which was originally designed to detect cosmic rays, could also be put to use for this useful project,” study lead author Toshikazu Ebisuzaki, an astrophysicist and chief scientist at the RIKEN (Rikagaku Kenky?sho) Computational Astrophysics Laboratory in Wako, Japan, told Space.com.
  • Asteroid a MILE wide to hurtle past Earth in 48 HOURS - as experts warn of MASS EXTINCTION

    05/12/2015 7:08:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 204 replies
    www.express.co.uk ^ | UPDATED: 14:28, Tue, May 12, 2015 | By Nathan Rao
    A COLOSSAL asteroid hurtling through space is feared to be one of the biggest EVER to threaten a collision with Earth. The gigantic missile thought to measure almost a mile across will brush closer than previous monsters which have sparked a global panic. Worried astronomers warned 1999 FN53, which is an eighth of the size of Mount Everest, will skim the Earth in TWO DAYS. A collision would be nothing short of catastrophic triggering mass destruction, earthquakes and global extinction. The monster is more than TEN TIMES bigger than other meteorites currently visible on NASA’s Near Earth Object radar. It...
  • Did Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Trigger Largest Lava Flows on Earth?

    05/11/2015 1:22:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Astrobiology ^ | May 1, 2015 | University of California, Berkeley
    The asteroid that slammed into the ocean off Mexico 66 million years ago and killed off the dinosaurs probably rang the Earth like a bell, triggering volcanic eruptions around the globe that may have contributed to the devastation, according to a team of University of California, Berkeley, geophysicists. Specifically, the researchers argue that the impact likely triggered most of the immense eruptions of lava in India known as the Deccan Traps, explaining the "uncomfortably close" coincidence between the Deccan Traps eruptions and the impact, which has always cast doubt on the theory that the asteroid was the sole cause of...
  • New understanding of electromagnetism could enable 'antennas on a chip'

    04/11/2015 10:29:03 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/8/15
    New understanding of electromagnetism could enable 'antennas on a chip' Apr 08, 2015 Enlarge Anechoic chamber. Credit: University of Cambridge A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have unravelled one of the mysteries of electromagnetism, which could enable the design of antennas small enough to be integrated into an electronic chip. These ultra-small antennas - the so-called 'last frontier' of semiconductor design - would be a massive leap forward for wireless communications. In new results published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers have proposed that electromagnetic waves are generated not only from the acceleration of electrons,...
  • The Cult of Amun [ancient Egypt and Nubia]

    05/08/2015 3:25:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 17, 2015 | Daniel Weiss
    ...Through their shared history, Egyptians and Nubians also came to worship the same chief god, Amun, who was closely allied with kingship and played an important role as the two civilizations vied for supremacy. During its Middle and New Kingdoms, which spanned the second millennium B.C., Egypt pushed its way into Nubia, ultimately conquering and making it a colonial province. The Egyptians were drawn by the land's rich store of natural resources, including ebony, ivory, animal skins, and, most importantly, gold. As they expanded their control of Nubia, the Egyptians built a number of temples to Amun, the largest of...
  • Michigan earthquake not caused by fracking, scientists say

    05/04/2015 6:36:43 PM PDT · by cripplecreek · 27 replies
    Mlive.com ^ | May 04, 2015 | Julie Mack
    KALAMAZOO, MI -- The state official who oversees regulation of oil and gas wells says he is certain that Saturday's earthquake in Kalamazoo County is unrelated to fracking or other drilling in the area. "I am extremely confident there is no connection," said Hal Fitch, a geologist who is director of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality's Office of Oil, Gas, and Minerals. That opinion is echoed by David Barnes, professor of geosciences at Western Michigan University. "I'm as certain as a scientist can be" that there is no connection, Barnes said. Hydraulic fracturing -- also known as fracking --...
  • Last practitioner of Minoan rituals may have lived in Jerusalem's Old City till '48

    05/04/2015 7:48:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | April 20, 2015 | Roy (Chicky) Arad
    Midwife Mercada Dasa lived in the Old City of Jerusalem until 1948. In her attic she raised an unusual pet -- a white female snake about a meter and a half long -- and fed it sugar cubes. Just before the entry of the Jordanian Legion she left the besieged city with her family and her pet remained behind. That a midwife, whose family lived in Jerusalem since the time of the Second Temple, carried on a tradition of feeding white female snakes was part of the family's lore, but not something anyone considered significant. Now Mercada's grandson, Benny Avigdory,...
  • The Egyptian army headquarters in Sinai during the New Kingdom discovered

    05/04/2015 7:28:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Luxor Times Magazine 'blog ^ | May 3, 2015 | unattributed
    Dr. Mamdouh El Damaty announced the discovery of the remains of the eastern gate of Tharw fortres in Sinai which served as the Egyptian army headquarters in the New Kingdom. The discovery was made by the Egyptian team working at Tell Habwa in the east bank of the Suez Canal. The discovery also include mid brick royal warehouse belong to "Ramses II and Thotmoses III" and 26th Dynasty cemetery most of the graves are mud brick and group tombs of contains human remains showing battles injuries. The discovered part of the eastern gate of Tharw fortress are 3 fragments of...
  • Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank

    05/22/2011 6:31:53 AM PDT · by decimon · 16 replies
    BBC ^ | May 22, 2011 | Neil Bowdler
    Fractured human remains found on a German river bank could provide the first compelling evidence of a major Bronze Age battle.Archaeological excavations of the Tollense Valley in northern Germany unearthed fractured skulls, wooden clubs and horse remains dating from around 1200 BC. The injuries to the skulls suggest face-to-face combat in a battle perhaps fought between warring tribes, say the researchers. > The archaeologists also found remains of two wooden clubs, one the shape of a baseball bat and made of ash, the second the shape of a croquet mallet and made of sloe wood. Dr Harald Lubke of the...
  • "Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank"

    05/22/2011 6:37:56 AM PDT · by Covenantor · 38 replies
    BBC ^ | 22 May 11 02:38 ET | Neil Bowdler
    Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank 22 May 11 02:38 ET ? By Neil Bowdler Science reporter, BBC News Fractured human remains found on a German river bank could provide the first compelling evidence of a major Bronze Age battle. Archaeological excavations of the Tollense Valley in northern Germany unearthed fractured skulls, wooden clubs and horse remains dating from around 1200 BC. The injuries to the skulls suggest face-to-face combat in a battle perhaps fought between warring tribes, say the researchers. The paper, published in the journal Antiquity, is based primarily on an investigation begun in...
  • 1177 BCE, the year a perfect storm destroyed civilization

    05/03/2015 3:35:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 142 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 13, 2015 | Julia Fridman
    Sometime after 1200 BCE, civilization collapsed, and a dark age prevailed. The Late Bronze Age collapse of societies throughout the Levant, the Near East and the Mediterranean some 3,200 years ago has been a mystery. Powerful, advanced civilizations disappeared, seemingly overnight. Now an archaeologist believes he has figured out what lay behind the cataclysm. The trigger seems to have been the invasion of ancient Egypt in 1177 BCE by marauding peoples known simply as the “Sea Peoples,” as recorded in the Medinet Habu wall relief at Ramses III' tomb. The relief depicts a sea battle (and also carts full of...
  • Deconstructing the Walls of Jerico

    06/22/2002 5:13:53 AM PDT · by Seti 1 · 21 replies · 1,779+ views
    Following 70 years of intensive excavations in the Land of Israel, archaeologists have found out: The patriarchs' acts are legendary stories, we did not sojourn in Egypt or make an exodus, we did not conquer the land. Neither is there any mention of the empire of David and Solomon. Those who take an interest have known these facts for years, but Israel is a stubborn people and doesn't want to hear about it. This is what archaeologists have learned from their excavations in the Land of Israel: the Israelites were never in Egypt, did not wander in the desert, did...
  • A Biblical Interpretation of World History

    04/13/2003 10:04:27 AM PDT · by restornu · 11 replies · 369+ views
    Chapter 3: EARLY CIVILIZATION, A SHORT HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST FROM 3000 TO 1000 B.C. PART I The first civilizations after Babel were founded in the Tigris, Euphrates and Nile River valleys. Civilization also occurred at a very early date in the Indus and Yellow River valleys, but they are beyond the scope of this work. In this chapter we will concentrate on the two main civilizations of the "Fertile Crescent," Egypt and Mesopotamia, and conclude with a look at the smaller nations nearby, like the Phoenicians and Minoans. Map 4: The Middle East, about 2300 B.C. Shown here...
  • Ancient megadrought entombed dodos in poisonous fecal cocktail

    04/30/2015 7:13:19 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 55 replies
    AAAS ^ | 28 April 2015 5:15 pm | David Shultz
    Nine hundred kilometers off the east coast of Madagascar lies the tiny island paradise of Mauritius. The waters are pristine, the beaches bright white, and the average temperature hovers between 22°C and 28°C (72°F to 82°F) year-round. But conditions there may not have always been so idyllic. A new study suggests that about 4000 years ago, a prolonged drought on the island left many of the native species, such as dodo birds and giant tortoises, dead in a soup of poisonous algae and their own feces. The die-off happened in an area known as Mare aux Songes, which once held...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet Churyumov Gerasimenko in Crescent

    04/29/2015 9:23:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | April 29, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko? As the 3-km wide comet moves closer to the Sun, heat causes the nucleus to expel gas and dust. The Rosetta spacecraft arrived at the comet's craggily double nucleus last July and now is co-orbiting the Sun with the giant dark iceberg. Recent analysis of data beamed back to Earth from the robotic Rosetta spacecraft has shown that water being expelled by 67P has a significant difference with water on Earth, indicating that Earth's water could not have originated from ancient collisions with comets like 67P. Additionally, neither Rosetta nor its Philae lander detected...
  • Newly Discovered Comet May Hit Mars: Watch for Two Others Near Earth

    03/04/2013 9:03:58 PM PST · by Jack Hydrazine · 30 replies
    Science World Report ^ | 4MAR2013 | Catherine Griffin
    This year seems to be one for comets. In addition to the two projectiles that will zoom near Earth, a third one has recently been discovered. The newest one, though, won't fly by our planet. Instead, it will pass uncomfortably close to Mars in 2014. Named C/2013 A1, the comet will fly near the Red Planet on Oct. 19, 2014 according to preliminary orbital prediction models. The icy missile is thought to have first originated from the Oort Cloud, which is a hypothetical region containing billions of cometary nuclei located around our solar system. Comets have struck planets in the...
  • Comet discovery closes door to theory of origin of Earth's oceans

    12/18/2014 3:24:20 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    newsworks.org ^ | December 18, 2014 |
    "We were looking to measure a certain particle called dueterium," said Alexander. It is this element that would confirm or scuttle the theory of comets hydrating Earth. And, as it turned out, Rosetta's data cast a strong doubt that comets were our aquatic benefactors.
  • Mars theory cites episodes of wet asteroids

    12/07/2002 9:19:26 PM PST · by farmfriend · 12 replies · 165+ views
    Seatle Times ^ | December 06, 2002 | Paul Recer
    Mars theory cites episodes of wet asteroids By Paul Recer The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Mars never had oceans as some researchers claim, but instead is a cold, dry planet that was pounded by water-bearing asteroids and showered with scalding rain that carved vast gullies and valleys, a new study claims. The study, reported this week in the journal Science, sheds new light on a continuing debate by Mars researchers about how much water was on Mars, where it went and how it formed the planet's intricate pattern of canyons, riverbeds and deltas. Using Mars photos and computer simulations, researchers...
  • Did Halley's Comet Convert the Irish to Christianity?

    04/25/2015 3:57:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Smithsonian (video) ^ | circa 2014 | unattributed
  • A Volcano Just Erupted in Chile, Spewing Ash For Miles

    04/22/2015 7:38:25 PM PDT · by kingattax · 40 replies
    RYOT Blog ^ | 4-22-15
    A few hours ago Volcano Calbuco in southern Chile erupted for the first time in nearly 40 years. According to CNN Chile, a Red Alert was issued for the surrounding area. An estimated 1500 people are being asked to evacuate within a six mile radius. “The eruption happened about half an hour ago. There are a lot of people out in the streets, many heading to the gas stations to fill up on gas,” Derek Way, a resident of Puerto Varas, told Reuters.
  • Close Encounter of the Asteroid Kind – 2015 HD1 Skims By Earth Tonight

    04/20/2015 8:55:50 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Around 3 a.m. (CDT) tomorrow morning April 21, a 50-foot-wide asteroid will hurdle just 0.2 lunar distances or 45,600 miles over your bed. The Mt. Lemmon Survey, based in Tucson, Arizona, snagged the space rock Saturday. 2015 HD1 is about as big as a full grown T-rex through not nearly as scary, since it will safely miss Earth … but not by much.
  • Volcano responsible for one of the worst eruptions in last 2000 years set to explode again

    04/18/2015 10:12:44 PM PDT · by concernedcitizen76 · 40 replies
    The Weather Network ^ | April 15, 2015 | Rodrigo Cokting
    / Mount Baekdu is set to explode according to experts and if that isn't shocking enough, keep in mind that Baekdu is responsible for one of the worst eruptions in the last 2,000 years. Professor Yoon Seong-hyo from Pusan National University urged officials to keep a close eye on the highest peak of the Korean peninsula. Baekdu is an active volcano located on the border between North Korea and China. The caldera or cauldron of the Baekdu volcano, which is sometimes called Paektu or Changbai, has risen a centimetre since July, according to new research. "The mountains's height has risen...
  • Sixth extinction, rivaling that of the dinosaurs, should join the big five, scientists say

    04/16/2015 10:10:24 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 25 replies
    American Association for the Advancement of Science ^ | 16 April 2015 5:15 pm | Eric Hand
    Earth has seen its share of catastrophes, the worst being the “big five” mass extinctions scientists traditionally talk about. Now, paleontologists are arguing that a sixth extinction, 260 million years ago, at the end of a geological age called the Capitanian, deserves to be a member of the exclusive club. In a new study, they offer evidence for a massive die-off in shallow, cool waters in what is now Norway. That finding, combined with previous evidence of extinctions in tropical waters, means that the Capitanian was a global catastrophe. “It’s the first time we can say this is a true...
  • This Mountain on Mars Is Leaking

    04/11/2015 4:22:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Jason Major
    As the midsummer Sun beats down on the southern mountains of Mars, bringing daytime temperatures soaring up to a balmy 25ºC (77ºF), some of their slopes become darkened with long, rusty stains that may be the result of water seeping out from just below the surface. The image above, captured by the HiRISE camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Feb. 20, shows mountain peaks within the 150-km (93-mile) -wide Hale Crater. Made from data acquired in visible and near infrared wavelengths the long stains are very evident, running down steep slopes below the rocky cliffs. These dark lines, called...
  • The Black Pharaoh in Denmark

    04/10/2015 9:57:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 10, 2015 | editors
    It has been said that the period between 760 BCE to 656 BCE in Egypt was the 'age of the black pharaohs'. It was during this time that ancient Egypt was ruled by a dynasty or succession of kings from Nubia, the Kingdom of Kush, a rival African kingdom just to its south in what is today northern Sudan. Beginning with king Kashta's successful invasion of Upper Egypt, what became known as the 25th Dynasty achieved the reunification of Lower Egypt, Upper Egypt, and also Kush (Nubia), the largest Egyptian empire since the New Kingdom. They introduced new Kushite cultural...
  • Bigger than Apophis: Dangerous 300+ meter asteroid to cross Earth orbit every 3 years

    12/08/2014 10:42:03 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    Russia Today.com ^ | December 07, 2014 19:42 | Staff
    Scientists have calculated that 2014 UR116 asteroid will fly in dangerous proximity to Earth every three years. If it collides with the planet the energy of the explosion could be a thousand times greater than the impact of the Chelyabinsk meteorite. Vladimir Lipunov, a leading scientist on the team which discovered the asteroid this October, says the scientists now know its orbit and its period which is 3 years, but they cannot say precisely when the asteroid will approach the Earth. “We should track it constantly. Because if we have a single mistake, there will be a catastrophe. The consequences...
  • Origins of Russian fireball found: Scientists say... [similar orbit to asteroid 2014 UR116]

    04/09/2015 10:36:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | April 8, 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    ...the Kola fireball had a 'disturbingly similar' path to asteroid 2014 UR116, which is due to pass by the moon in 2017. Spotted on April 19 last year, researchers used camera footage to help recreate its trajectory and hunt down any remaining fragments... This led researchers to the Annama meteorite, which is an ordinary H5 chondrite -- a group of space rocks with high strength that make up 31 per cent of meteorite falls. The computer model compared the orbit of Annama, a 1,100lb (500kg) rock, with the evolution of a dozen orbits of near-Earth asteroids... Vladimir Lipunov, a professor...
  • Buried Mars Glaciers are Brimming With Water

    04/08/2015 2:47:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Irene Klotz
    Radar images previously revealed thousands of buried glacier-like formations in the planet’s northern and southern hemispheres. That data has now been incorporated into computer models of ice flow to determine the glaciers’ size and hence how much water they contain. “We have looked at radar measurements spanning 10 years back in time to see how thick the ice is and how it behaves. A glacier is, after all, a big chunk of ice and it flows and gets a form that tells us something about how soft it is. We then compared this with how glaciers on Earth behave and...
  • Ice age polarity reversal was global event:

    04/06/2015 5:26:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 52 replies
    scienceheathen.com ^ | October 16, 2012 | Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
    Ice Age Magnetic Reversal Was Global Event And Linked With Super Volcano Eruption And Rapid Climate Variability, Says New Research October 17, 2012 in Geology & Climate During the last ice age, around 41,000 years ago, there was a very rapid and complete reversal of the Earth’s geomagnetic field, according to new research. There was already localized evidence of polarity reversals during this time, but with the new research, the theory that it was a global event is now strongly supported. And very interestingly, it is one that nearly coincided with the very fast, short-term climate variability of the last...
  • Strange 'Hollows' on Mercury Revealed by NASA Probe as Mission End Nears

    04/03/2015 7:41:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | Nola Taylor Redd
    When NASA's Mariner 10 flew by Mercury three times in the mid-1970s, it spotted what Blewett described as "certain odd, bright patches" within the impact craters. The patches showed up again during MESSENGER's flybys of the planet. It wasn't until 2011, when MESSENGER entered orbit and began to capture higher-resolution images, that the bright areas were revealed as shallow, irregularly shaped depressions on the surface. Hollows are relatively small landforms — shallow features on the surface that stretch at most 0.6 miles (1 kilometer). This small size implies a relatively young age, as cratering would have eroded them away over...
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • Mercury 'painted black' by passing comets

    03/30/2015 4:18:47 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Mercury reflects very little light but its surface is low in iron, which rules out the presence of iron nanoparticles, the most likely "darkening agent". First, researchers modelled how much carbon-rich material could have been dropped on Mercury by passing comets. Then they fired projectiles at a sugar-coated basalt rock to confirm the darkening effect of carbon. Their results, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, support the idea that Mercury was "painted black" by cometary dust over billions of years. The effect of being intermittently blasted with tiny, carbon-rich "micrometeorites", the team says, is more than enough to account for...
  • NASA selects ‘Option B’ for Asteroid Redirect Mission

    03/28/2015 12:32:23 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    spaceflightinsider.com ^ | Collin Skocik
    NASA has announced that it has selected “Option B” for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (more commonly referred to as ARM), meaning that rather than towing an entire asteroid into lunar orbit, it will instead retrieve a boulder from an asteroid and bring it into a distant retrograde lunar orbit. Using Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP), an uncrewed spacecraft will retrieve a boulder from a yet-to-be-determined asteroid and tow it into lunar orbit, where it will be visited by astronauts on a future Orion / SLS mission. NASA Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot said that Option B offers more choices for what object...
  • Did a volcanic cataclysm 40,000 years ago trigger the final demise of the Neanderthals?

    03/24/2015 7:28:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Geological Society of America
    In their climate simulations, Black and colleagues found that the largest temperature decreases after the eruption occurred in Eastern Europe and Asia and sidestepped the areas where the final Neanderthal populations were living (Western Europe). Therefore, the authors conclude that the eruption was probably insufficient to trigger Neanderthal extinction. However, the abrupt cold spell that followed the eruption would still have significantly impacted day-to-day life for Neanderthals and early humans in Europe. Black and colleagues point out that temperatures in Western Europe would have decreased by an average of 2 to 4 degrees Celsius during the year following the eruption....
  • World's largest asteroid impacts found in central Australia

    03/23/2015 5:53:18 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    Australian National University News Online ^ | 23 March 2015 | Australian National University
    A 400 kilometre-wide impact zone from a huge meteorite that broke in two moments before it slammed into the Earth has been found in Central Australia. The crater from the impact millions of years ago has long disappeared. But a team of geophysicists has found the twin scars of the impacts – the largest impact zone ever found on Earth – hidden deep in the earth’s crust. Lead researcher Dr Andrew Glikson from the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology said the impact zone was discovered during drilling as part of geothermal research, in an area near the borders of...
  • Young Jupiter wiped out solar system's early inner planets, study says

    03/23/2015 5:01:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    The more planetary systems astronomers discovered, the more our own solar system looked like an oddball. Exoplanets – at least the ones big enough for us to see – tended to be bigger than Earth, with tight orbits that took them much closer to their host stars. In multi-planet systems, these orbits tended to be much closer together than they are in our solar system. For instance, the star known as Kepler-11 has six planets closer to it than Venus is to the sun. Why does our solar system look so different? Astrophysicists Konstantin Batygin of Caltech and Greg Laughlin...
  • Why ancient myths about volcanoes are often true

    03/22/2015 6:17:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | March 18, 2015 | Jane Palmer
    Story has it that many hundreds of years ago, Tanovo, chief of the Fijian island Ono, was very partial to a late afternoon stroll. Each day he would walk along the beach, watch the sun go down and undoubtedly contemplate this paradise on Earth. But one day Tanovo's rival, chief of the volcano Nabukelevu, pushed his mountain up and blocked Tanovo's view of the sunset. Enraged at this, and robbed of the pacifying effects of his daily meditation, Tanovo wove giant coconut-fibre baskets and began to remove earth from the mountain. His rival, however, caught Tanovo and chased him away....
  • 'Orbis Spike' in 1610 marks humanity's first major impact on planet Earth

    03/13/2015 9:58:50 AM PDT · by posterchild · 22 replies
    cnet.com ^ | Mar 12, 2015 | Michael Franco
    While 1492 may have been the year Columbus sailed the ocean blue, it also marks the start of a mass swapping of species between the Old World and the New World as Europe began colonizing the Americas. Research published Wednesday from University College of London (UCL) and Leeds University Professor Simon Lewis and UCL Professor Mark Maslin argues that just over 100 years later -- 1610 -- is when those actions dramatically changed the planet Earth. As a result, they say, 1610 deserves to be designated as the start of the Anthropocene Epoch.
  • Carl Sagan's Son Is a 9/11 Truther

    03/12/2015 4:27:21 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 107 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 03/12/2015 | Ashley Feinberg ProfileFollow Ashley Feinberg
    Carl Sagan is arguably science's biggest rockstar—the ultimate champion for logic and reason. Which makes it all the more painful to find out that his son is a vehement 9/11 truther. In a recent interview for a radio show called 9/11 Free Fall (already off to a great start), Jeremy Sagan—the younger son of Sagan senior and his first wife, fellow scientist Lynn Margulis—went off on all us closed-minded sheeple. In response to a prompt asking when he first "woke up," Sagan remarks:
  • This Is The Asteroid That Didn’t Hit Us

    03/13/2015 12:51:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Jason Major
    The video above shows the passage of 2015 ET across the sky on the night of March 11–12, tracked on camera from the Crni Vrh Observatory in Slovenia. It’s a time-lapse video (the time is noted along the bottom) so the effect is really neat to watch the asteroid “racing along” in front of the stars… but then, it was traveling a relative 12.4 km/second! The description on the video reads: The asteroid starts as tiny dot just below the centre of the right image and drifts gradually downwards. Due to a software glitch a correction which was meant to...