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Down Home Cooking

Posted on 04/05/2006 10:43:24 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy

Today is Wednesday. In my house that means American History is our History/Geography topic. We are also learning about the individual states. The best way to learn is always through hands-on experience. Since we can't travel to each state at this time, I hoped all the good Freepers could bring their states to us. What recipes do you have that are specific to your area and can rarely be found anywhere else?


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: cooking; food; freeperkitchen; recipes; regional; yummy
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Have fun. Look forward to the responses on this thread.
1 posted on 04/05/2006 10:43:27 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: Andy'smom; bradactor; politicalwit; Spunky; mplsconservative; don-o; boadecelia; freeangel; ...
**Food Ping**
2 posted on 04/05/2006 10:44:39 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy (I'm writing a post to a message board. I don't care if it's not grammatically perfect.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Let's see...There's Reindeer Sausage, Pickled Moose Nose, Muktuk (Whale Blubber), and Herring Roe On Kelp... Hope this helps.


3 posted on 04/05/2006 10:47:15 AM PDT by redhead (www.opinions3.com and http://halfbakedsourdough.blogspot.com, if you would like to read more...)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Maryland - A mess of steamed Blue Crabs with Old Bay Seasoning...can't get any more Maryland/Chesapeake Bay than that!


4 posted on 04/05/2006 10:48:03 AM PDT by Woodstock
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To: HungarianGypsy
Poor Dad casserole.
It's specific to my family though, not the state.
5 posted on 04/05/2006 10:48:47 AM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: Woodstock

Yep. Soft shells. I lived in Maryland for a while, worked as a cook. Used to make soft shell crab sandwiches for people. Breaded, fried in a pan, served on a bun. Of course Maryland crab cakes are very popular, even if the actual crab meat comes from Mexico or Venezuela.


6 posted on 04/05/2006 10:51:22 AM PDT by Huck
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To: HungarianGypsy

Classic OLD BAY Crab Cakes
This is the original recipe that was on the back of the Old Bay can. This version contains baking powder which helps make the crab cakes light and fluffy. Try refrigerating the shaped patties 30 minutes to help keep them together when cooking,

Ingredients:
2 slices dried bread, crusts removed
small amount of milk
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon McCormick® Parsley Flakes
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon OLD BAY® Seasoning
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg, beaten
1 pound fresh lump crabmeat*


Directions:
1. Break bread into small pieces and moisten with milk. Add remaining ingredients. Shape into patties.

2. Broil or fry until golden-brown on both sides.

* Dungeness Crab, Stone Crab and Alaska King Crab will work if you can not get Blue Crab meat.

Makes 4 servings

Nutritional Info
Calories: 174, Fat: 6 g, Cholesterol: 142 mg, Sodium: 1047 mg, Carbohydrates: 7 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 23


7 posted on 04/05/2006 10:52:57 AM PDT by RebelBanker (If you can't do something smart, do something right.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Let's see, there's the Sonker, which is somewhat like a cobbler, deep dish, made with fresh fruit with a crusty top. There's the Turkey Bog or Chicken Bog, which is stewed turkey or chicken with rice, peppers (both hot and sweet) and onions, a very thick stew. Persimmon Pudding, made with wild persimmons, cinnamon, brown sugar, etcetera. Wild greens that we call Creasie (sp?) Greens.

I'd have to ask my older relatives for more.


8 posted on 04/05/2006 10:54:28 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RebelBanker

Pasties from Michigan. I don't have a recipe on hand though.


9 posted on 04/05/2006 10:54:47 AM PDT by ChiefChris
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To: HungarianGypsy
Bagna Calda (hot gravy) or Bunyacauda (americanized). From the large group of northern Italian immigrants to Colorado in the 1890's and 90's to work in the silver mines.

2 Quarts half-and-half
2 cubes butter
A lot of garlic
3 tins of anchovies in oil
A bunch of chopped celery and optional, other veggies
Homemade style bread sliced

Add the anchovies to the butter in a fry pan over a low heat. Break them up with a wooden spoon until they are pulverized.

Start adding the cream slowly over low heat. Stir. Add more cream. Stir.

At a certain point, the butter and cream will blend together. Stop adding half-and-half at that point. Cook it down 'til it is thick over low heat.

Serve in an electric skillet keeping the gravy just barely bubbling occasionally. Everyone stands around the table and scoops the gravy and veggies up onto the bread.

Delicious beyond description and a great holiday dish.

Some replace the butter with olive oil. I don't think it's nearly as good.

10 posted on 04/05/2006 10:54:52 AM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: HungarianGypsy

Pleased put me on this ping list. Thank you.


11 posted on 04/05/2006 10:55:19 AM PDT by TXBSAFH (Proud Dad of Twins, What Does Not Kill You Makes You Stronger!!!!!!)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Shrimp & Cheese Grits


12 posted on 04/05/2006 10:55:23 AM PDT by najida (He who cannot dance puts the blame on the floor. *Hindu proverb*)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Also, the garlic goes in with the anchovies. Don't burn the garlic.


13 posted on 04/05/2006 10:55:57 AM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: HungarianGypsy
From San Diego... (20 miles from the border... I think... watching the news lately, I may be in mexico way! LOL)

Killer Chile Rellenos:

Ingredients:

6 Ancho, Pasilla or Anaheim Chiles - or - 27 oz. can Mild Whole Green Chiles
1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese, thinly sliced
1/4 cup Flour
6 Raw eggs (separated)
1/2 cup Flour
2 cups salsa verde
2 cups Homestyle Mexican Salsa
1 cup Corn oil

Recipe Instructions:

1. Rinse the chiles.
2. Preheat your oven to broil.
3. Place the chiles in a 9 x 14 baking dish and place on the top shelf of your oven.
4. Watch and listen closely. When the skins start to make popping sounds and to char and turn black in places, take the chiles out and flip them over. Be sure and use a potholder so you don't burn your hands!
5. When both sides are fairly evenly charred, remove them from the oven.
6. Wrap each chile in a moist paper towel or place in a sealed plastic bag to steam.
7. After a few minutes, check them. Once the skin comes off easily, peel each chile.
8. Cut a slit almost the full length of each chile. Make a small "t" across the top, by the stem. Pull out fibers and seeds (this is where the heat is) and replace with a slice of cheese. You can set these aside, for a few minutes or a few hours if you put them in the refrigerator.
9. Whip the egg whites at high speed with an electric mixer, until stiff peaks have formed.
10. Heat the oil in a skillet until a drop of water sizzles when dropped into the pan.
11. Beat the egg yolks with one tablespoon flour and salt. Mix the yolks into egg whites and stir until you have a thick paste.
12. Roll the chiles in 1/4 cup flour and dip each one in the egg batter. Coat evenly. Fry, seam side down on both sides until golden brown. Place on paper towels to drain.
13. Meanwhile, heat the salsa in a medium saucepan (either one or some of each). Place one or two Rellenos on each plate and pour salsa over them. Serve them immediately and brace yourself for major compliments!

14 posted on 04/05/2006 10:56:40 AM PDT by cgk (I don't see myself as a conservative. I see myself as a religious, right-wing, wacko extremist.)
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To: HungarianGypsy
Rocky Mountain Oysters

2 pounds calf testicles*

2 cups beer

2 eggs, beaten

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

¼ cup yellow cornmeal

Salt and ground black pepper to taste

Vegetable oil**

1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

* Be sure to ask your butcher for calf testicles, not bull testicles. Calf testicles are the size of a walnut and are much more tender than the larger bull testicles.

** Use enough vegetable oil to fill your frying container halfway to the top (to allow for bubbling up and splattering) and to completely cover calf testicles while frying.

With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each testicle. Remove the skin (you can remove the skin easily if the testicles are frozen, then peel while thawing). Slice each testicle into approximately ¼- to ½- inch-thick ovals. Place slices in a large pan or blow with enough beer to cover them; cover and let sit 2 hours.

In a shallow bowl, combine eggs, flour, cornmeal, salt, and pepper. Remove testicles from beer; drain and dredge thoroughly in the flour mixture. In a large, deep pot, heat oil to 375 degrees F. Deep fry 3 minutes or until golden brown (will rise to the surface when done). Drain on paper towels. Serve warm with your favorite hot pepper sauce.

15 posted on 04/05/2006 10:57:17 AM PDT by Bluegrass Conservative
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To: HungarianGypsy

In WV, there are ramps. Kinda like wild onions. I think you boil them. Almost like garlic and vampires...the stink oozes from you for a couple of days, but they sure keep you regular!


16 posted on 04/05/2006 10:58:06 AM PDT by samanella ((Proud member of the vast right wing conspiracy-all my bumper stickers say so))
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To: HungarianGypsy

Perhaps not totally unique to Missouri but delicious all the same.


Sour Cream Sugar Cookies
1 cup thick sour cream
1 cup shortening
2 cups sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp. soda
1 dessert spoon of salt
1 tsp. vanilla
5-6 cups flour

Cream together the sour cream, shortening and sugar. Add the vanilla and beat in the eggs. Combine the soda and salt with one cup of flour. Stir into the cream mixture, then add remaining flour until dough is stiff enough to roll. Chill, roll thin and cut into round cookies. Dust with sugar and bake on ungreased pan about ten minutes. 350°- 375°.


Green Tomato Pie
5 or 6 large green tomatoes
salt
1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar ground spice butter pie dough

Line the pie pan with dough, leaving a small amount of dough for the top crust. Chop the green tomatoes into fine pieces into a bowl, using all the juice from the tomatoes. Sprinkle the tomatoes with a bit of salt to take out the sweet taste, and mix slightly. Pour into uncooked pie crust. Sprinkle sugar and spice over the mixture and dot with butter. Roll out the remaining dough and cut into strips. Crisscross the pastry across the pie for top crust. Bake until-done in a hot oven.


17 posted on 04/05/2006 10:58:08 AM PDT by Leg Olam ("There is no Hell. There is only France." F. Zappa)
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To: ChiefChris
Pasties from Michigan. I don't have a recipe on hand though.

I didn't know that Michigan was requiring pasties now. Damn strip club rules!! :-)

18 posted on 04/05/2006 10:58:31 AM PDT by Bluegrass Conservative
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To: cgk

Haha! When I was thinking of food for Arizona, I really could only think of Mexican food, too. Have a friend who moved to Tennesee. He says he really misses having good Mexican food.


19 posted on 04/05/2006 10:58:58 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy (I'm writing a post to a message board. I don't care if it's not grammatically perfect.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

South Texas Frito Pie (to be eaten at high school football games) Take one small bag of Fritos and split up the side. Add one ladle of chili & a handful of shredded cheese and onions. Eat with flimsy white plastic spoon while jumping up and down on aluminum bleachers.


20 posted on 04/05/2006 10:59:43 AM PDT by OffMyMeds (Crede et manducasti)
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To: HungarianGypsy
Cube into small cubes, Ahi (yellow fin tuna raw) Add a little sesame oil and soy sauce. Add chopped green onion and sesame seeds. Then sprinkle a little cayenne pepper to give just a little hot, don't over due it. Let sit for awhile and then enjoy. It's called Poke (Poke- ee)

This is popular in Hawaii. Just about everyone makes theirs just a little different.

21 posted on 04/05/2006 10:59:56 AM PDT by fish hawk (TU)
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To: cgk

Dang, that sounds good!


22 posted on 04/05/2006 11:00:54 AM PDT by colorado tanker (We need more "chicken-bleep Democrats" in the Senate!)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Please add me to the Ping List. Thanks!


23 posted on 04/05/2006 11:01:02 AM PDT by Woodstock
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To: ChiefChris

I LOVE pasties, my whole extended family's from the UP, but I've been in FL since the late 70's when my immediate family moved down.

I actually do a lot of the cooking around the house, but as a gift to me, my wife learned how to make them from my mom and she does a really good job at it.


24 posted on 04/05/2006 11:01:07 AM PDT by Sax
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To: HungarianGypsy

Tex-Mex rules in Texas. Breakfast burritos with Chorizo and eggs are a personal favorite. Chicken fajitas for lunch.


25 posted on 04/05/2006 11:02:00 AM PDT by FreedomCalls (It's the "Statue of Liberty," not the "Statue of Security.")
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To: HungarianGypsy
Pleasant Hill, KY

Shakertown Village Restaurant

Corn Sticks

1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. soda
3 tsp. sugar 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1 T. Oil 1 egg
1/2 flour 1 cup buttermilk
1 cup + 2 T. Cornmeal

Beat all ingredients together, beating well. Heat greased irons until hot enough to sizzle. Fill irons half full. Bake at 450 degrees about 10 minutes or until golden brown.
26 posted on 04/05/2006 11:03:30 AM PDT by Thumbellina (As I recall, Kerry referred to terrorism as "overrated".)
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To: HungarianGypsy
Chicken fried steak and gravy, with a side of rice w/gravy of course, and string beans or maybe black-eyed peas. Some good, sweet, cornbread. And maybe a bit a peach cobbler and ice cream fer dessert.

South Carolina

27 posted on 04/05/2006 11:03:57 AM PDT by lovecraft (Specialization is for insects.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

I've been making my gumbo since I was in college. Finally wrote it down for some friends. Sorry, but I'm not much for exact measurements (in any kind of cooking.):

NO NAME GUMBO

1 to 1.5 lbs shrimp unshelled, heads on preferred.
1 lb catfish
1 can lump crab meat, 1 can shredded crab meat.
Fresh garlic
Pack of complete celery (stalks with leaves are important)
2 bay leaves
Bacon
Onion
Green Pepper
Tomato sauce
Thyme (powder is ok, or extra finely chopped fresh)
Lemon juice (from about a ½ lemon, or just a little more)
Worscheshire sauce (1/4 c.)
Clam juice, 2 bottles
Cayenne pepper powder
Cajun/Creole seasoning (Tony Chachere’s, Konrico, or equiv.)


1. STOCK
• A good amount (not excessive) of water in a stock pot.
• The ends w/ leaves and butt end of the celery stalks
• Shrimp shells and heads
• Garlic (freshly minced)
• 1 bay leaf
• Cajun/Creole seasoning estimate, to taste
• 1 bottle clam juice
Boil this down to ½ volume or a little less (Then strain & save just the liquid)

2. ROUX (in a separate deep dish fry pan)
• Fry 6-8 pieces of bacon for the fat, remove the bacon strips, dry & finely chop then set aside Leave the grease in the pan.
• Add shortening to make about a cup to 1.5 cups of total hot fat.
• Gradually add an equal amount of flour to fat on med/low heat. One table spoon at at time, sprinkle and mix thoroughly before adding the next tablespoon. It’s done when it’s approaching the color of hot cocoa.

3. ROUX Y VEGGIES
• Add sliced okra, stir and cook over med/low
• Add green pepper finely chopped
• Add thinly sliced celery
• Add thin or tiny onion pieces
• Cook until the veggies are approaching soft
(Add small amounts of water as needed to keep it stirrable)


4. MIX
• Mix the stock and the Roux with veggies
• Add an 8oz can, and maybe another 4-5 oz of tomato sauce
• Add thyme
• Add lemon juice
• Add Worscheshire sauce
• Add finely chopped bacon
• Add 1 bottle of clam juice
• Add bay leaf (remove later, before serving)
• Add cayenne (don’t go crazy)
• Add extra Creole or Cajun seasoning to taste.
Let this simmer for 30-45 minutes, tasting and checking to see if you like the consistency. You can always add a little water, or cook a little longer to get rid of extra liquid.


5. Seafood
• Add catfish first (then wait a few minutes, but not long)
• Add crabmeat
• Add shrimp
Only cook and additional 3 minutes or so, test a shrimp for doneness.

Serve in a bowl that has a little mound of rice in the center of it.

Sprinkle on a little gumbo file (pure ground sassafras) to the gumbo in each bowl just before serving (I left mine at home for the potluck)

Hot sauce on the side as a condiment.

Corn bread’s a great side dish.


28 posted on 04/05/2006 11:05:31 AM PDT by Sax
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To: HungarianGypsy
I grew up in Lancaster County, Pa. My family was part of the Mennonite community. We ate a diet dominated by what is known as meat and potatoes.
The following recipe which may turn you off, is better than it sounds. Sometimes it was known as pig stomach or fake goose.
Stuffed Hog Maw [ Pa Dutch] #140591
recipe by philocrates

Hog Maw = Pig Stomach. You may want to stop reading here.
8 servings
3 hours
1 pig stomach (maw)
2 lbs sausage meat
4 quarts diced potatoes
1 small onion
1 teaspoon salt

Mix and put into a cleaned pig stomach. Close with needle and thread. Place in baking pan. Add 1 or 2 quarts of water. Bake at 350 for 3 hours. Less meat and potatoes could be use, and your favorite bread filling added to one end of maw

Recipe posted on Recipezaar
29 posted on 04/05/2006 11:06:40 AM PDT by oldtimer2 (Yes I am the center of the universe. (msm attitude))
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To: HungarianGypsy
It's almost time here to harvest the first fresh spring mess of wild poke salet. Parboiled three times to remove toxins, then slapped in an iron skillet and cooked with bacongrease, and topped with chopped boiled eggs. Makes ma' tongue almost slap ma' brain unconscious eating it!
30 posted on 04/05/2006 11:06:52 AM PDT by OB1kNOb (America is the land of the free BECAUSE of the BRAVE !!)
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To: HungarianGypsy
ORIGINAL FLORIDA KEY LIME PIE

(Must use fresh Key Limes or Key Lime Juice)

1 (14 oz) can sweetened condensed milk

4 egg yolks

4 ounces Florida Key West Key Lime Juice

9-inch graham cracker pie crust

Mix milk and egg yolks completely with electric mixer. Slowly add key lime juice and mix thoroughly.

Pour into 9-inch graham cracker pie shell. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes. Turn oven off and crack door.

If making meringue, place meringue on hot key lime pie, sealing edges to crust then brown to a golden brown. Turn oven off and cracked door after browning meringue. Let pie cool before placing in refrigerator. If using whipped topping, place on pie prior to serving and garnish as desired.

31 posted on 04/05/2006 11:07:39 AM PDT by varina davis
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To: Bluegrass Conservative

Do you know the difference between beer nuts and deer nuts?

Beer nuts cost around $2.99 and deer nuts can be found under a buck.


32 posted on 04/05/2006 11:09:45 AM PDT by toddlintown (Lennon takes six bullets to the chest, Yoko is standing right next to him and not one f'ing bullet?)
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To: varina davis

Beat me to the Key lime pie. The only thing I do differently is add lime zest to the pie mixture. Really helps to cut the sweetness of the condensed milk and it adds a little interest.

Florida FReeper ping!


33 posted on 04/05/2006 11:19:44 AM PDT by poobear (Islam - A Global Lynch Mob !)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Please add me to this Ping List! Thanks!
-redquill


34 posted on 04/05/2006 11:23:01 AM PDT by RedQuill
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To: HungarianGypsy
From Rochester,NY, it's gotta be Nick Tahoe's Garbage Plate:


35 posted on 04/05/2006 11:25:32 AM PDT by rochester_veteran (born and raised in rachacha!)
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To: HungarianGypsy
It will be state and local fair season in only a couple of months, here in Indiana. That means just about anything is fair game for deep-frying.

There are probably variations on the batter, but any pancake-like batter will work. Obtain skewers, dip the following items into the batter, and then deep-fry until golden brown.

- Oreo cookies
- Twinkies
- Snicker bars
- Milky Way bars

Sprinkle powdered sugar on the fried object when done.

36 posted on 04/05/2006 11:27:00 AM PDT by Lou L
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To: Woodstock

In Southern Maryland its Stuffed Ham.

Take a Corned Ham, cut slits in it and stuff those slits with greens., Cook for 7 hours and serve sliced, cold. The recipe for the greens is handed down from many years family to family, but basically its Cabbage and kale and spring onions perhaps some Collard.Pepper salt red pepper celery seed. You cook it down before stuffing and after stuffing you wrap the meat tight with cheesecloth to keep it from backing out.

When I go to Baltimore I always stop at the old market and get a stuffed hard crab. They take the top shell off clean out the devils fingers and eyes and mouth then they basically us a crabcake to fill the middle , batter it and deep fry the whole thing. You eat the crab cake and then pick the meat from the rest.


37 posted on 04/05/2006 11:29:24 AM PDT by sgtbono2002
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To: varina davis
Yummo! I love Key Lime Pie. I came across this same recipe a few years ago, with the sweetened condensed milk and egg yolks, and when I can find key limes up north here (PA), I make it. Thanks for posting, it's the best! I grate the zest of one or 2 of the limes into the mix, too. Because I can't get enough of the flavor.

I fell in love with Key Lime Meltaways on a trip to Florida several years ago and found this recipe - from Martha Stewart, I believe - that tastes remarkably like the cookies I had on that trip. Easy to make and great served with fresh fruit:

LIME MELTAWAYS

Makes about 10 dozen The dough for these icebox cookies can be frozen in logs for up to two months.

12 tbs (1 ½ sticks) unsalted butter, room temp

1 cup confectioners’ sugar

Grated zest of 2 limes (or 3!)

2 tbs of freshly squeezed lime juice

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 3//4 cup a.p. flour plus 2 tbs

2 tbs cornstarch

¼ tsp salt

1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, cream butter and 1/3 cup sugar until fluffy. Add lime zest, juice, and vanilla; beat until fluffy.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornstarch, and salt. Add to butter mixture, and beat on low speed until combined.

3. Between two 8-by-12-inch pieces of parchment paper, roll dough into two 1 1/4-inch-diameter logs. Chill at least 1 hour.

4. Heat oven to 350°. Line two baking sheets with parchment. Place remaining 2/3 cup sugar in a resealable plastic bag. Remove parchment from logs; slice dough into 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Place rounds on baking sheets, spaced 1 inch apart. 5. Bake cookies until barely golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool slightly, 8 to 10 minutes. While still warm, place cookies in the sugar-filled bag; toss to coat. Bake or freeze remaining dough. Store baked cookies in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Enjoy! BTW, perhaps my 'logs' were larger in diameter or my cookies cut thicker, but I've never gotten more than 6 dozen and I've never had to freeze 'leftover' dough! ;-)

38 posted on 04/05/2006 11:29:38 AM PDT by fortunecookie
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To: HungarianGypsy

Add me to the ping list, also, please.

Thanks!


39 posted on 04/05/2006 11:31:36 AM PDT by beaureguard
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To: varina davis

In my area of Florida they eat Cuban sandwiches and lots of Cuban food. Also, because of Tarpon Springs we have a lot of greek - gyros and the like.

I come from NY, and grew up in an Italian household. That's what I like.

I am going to tell everyone one of the secrets to really great pasta sauce, so those interested should remember it.

Put it through a foley food mill to remove the seeds. The seeds are what add the bitterness. Then you don't have to add sugar, as many do.


40 posted on 04/05/2006 11:31:53 AM PDT by I still care ("For it is the doom of men that they forget" - Merlin, from Excalibur)
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To: HungarianGypsy
Kansas (KC) - the best steak in the world, baked potato, veggies and apple pie - or - barbecue.
41 posted on 04/05/2006 11:33:54 AM PDT by peggybac (Tolerance is the virtue of believing in nothing)
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To: mylife

Seems like your kind of thread!


42 posted on 04/05/2006 11:33:58 AM PDT by ozaukeemom (Nuke the ACLU and their snivel rights!)
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To: rochester_veteran

That Garbage plate scares me. It looks disgusting and appealing all at once.


43 posted on 04/05/2006 11:34:01 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy (I'm writing a post to a message board. I don't care if it's not grammatically perfect.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

Here's a write-up about Nick Tahou's famous garbage plate:

Founder Nick Tahou died in 1997 after more than fifty years running Rochester’s premier hot dog joint (actually two joints – on West Main and at 2260 Lyell). His culinary legacy remains the amazing dish known as a garbage plate. It is up to each customer to choose the foundation of his or her garbage plate. It can be based on Texas hot wieners, hamburgers (with or without cheese), Italian sausage, or steak. The meatstuff of your choice is plated with piles of baked beans and home-fried potatoes, a scoop of cool macaroni salad, a dollop of spicy chili sauce, a squirt of two of mustard, and a sprinkle of chopped raw onions. It comes with plastic fork and knife, a bottle of Ketchup, some hot sauce, and white bread with butter.

It is a wild, ridiculous, and delicious mess! Especially noteworthy is the sauce, a fine-grained, Greek-accented brew that is also available on such lesser variants of frankfurter cookery as Nick Tahou's peppery pork hots and the basic garlic-packed Texas hots, as well as on grilled hamburgers.

Burgers are OK, but upper New York State is hot dog country. Nick Tahou’s are exemplary, if not epicurean. They are called Texas hots, and they are split and fried, which gives them a nice, chewy exterior and hash house raunch that boiled or even charcoal-grilled weenies do not offer.

As befits its menu, Nick Tahou is an unruly dog house, with chairs and tables scattered around and plenty of noise as customers call out for red hots and white hots with the works. Of course Nick Tahou is open all night. You never know when the craving for a garbage plate will strike.

- Michael Stern, 10/3/2000

44 posted on 04/05/2006 11:34:01 AM PDT by rochester_veteran (born and raised in rachacha!)
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To: HungarianGypsy
From my home state, Wisconsin, my parents make this fantastic dish called "Bratwurst Casserole." It's so easy...

1 package of Johnsonville Brats (LOL)
1 package of 'crispy crown' tater tots
1 can of cream of mushroom soup
1 container of sour cream
1 8oz package of shredded cheddar cheese

Directions:
heat oven to 350.
In a pan on the stove, cook brats until no longer pink. (Squeeze them out of the casing) Drain off grease. Add cream of mushroom soup, mix. Spread brat/soup mix in bottom of a 9x13 dish. Cover with crispy crowns. Cover with sour cream. Cover with cheese. Bake 20 minutes(?) or until everything is heated!

Enjoy your heart stopping casserole with a Miller! LOL. I swear this stuff has so much fat and calories I heard my arteries clogging the first time I ate it!
45 posted on 04/05/2006 11:34:15 AM PDT by arizonarachel (Praying for a January miracle!)
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To: Just another Joe

Really want to hear more about this Poor Dad Casserole. We all have those weeks when we need a recipe like that.


46 posted on 04/05/2006 11:34:43 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy (I'm writing a post to a message board. I don't care if it's not grammatically perfect.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

St. Louis, Missouri has a large Italian community. Originally, they settled largely in an area known as The Hill. There are still many great Italian restaurants there. This is easy and tasty:

ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND ARTICHOKE SOUP

1 pound Italian pork sausage links
1 large red onion, chopped
1 14 oz. can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped, or 1 9 oz. package frozen art hearts, thawed and chopped
1 28 oz can plum tomatoes
3 cups chicken stock
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried basil
1 tsp fennel seeds
¼ pound penne pasta
Salt and pepper to taste

Remove sausage from casings and crumble. Brown the sausage, stirring often, with the chopped onions in a stockpot over medium heat for 6 to 8 minutes until the sausage is cooked through and the onions are translucent. Add the hearts and tomatoes with their juice and pour the stock over the sausage and vegetables. Stir in the herbs. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes. Add the pasta and simmer for 15 minutes until the pasta is done. Add salt and pepper.


47 posted on 04/05/2006 11:40:20 AM PDT by Bahbah (Harry Reid is a Liar)
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To: arizonarachel

Yay! A Wisconsin recipe. My dad was from Wisconsin and said he thought the Arizona sun made people from back east forget how to cook. Last time he was back in '83 he brought back so many cheeses, sausage, and white soda. I always bypass a lot of summer sausage when it isn't garlic summer sausage. His favorite. Of course, this was a guy who also liked to try unusual foods. His New Year's tradition was limburger cheese and herring on Rtiz crackers.


48 posted on 04/05/2006 11:40:47 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy (I'm writing a post to a message board. I don't care if it's not grammatically perfect.)
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To: HungarianGypsy
What recipes do you have that are specific to your area and can rarely be found anywhere else?

That's an easy one. The Philly Cheesesteak. The reason it never tastes the same outside of Philly is that other regions attempt to make it using real food.

49 posted on 04/05/2006 11:43:22 AM PDT by dirtboy (Tagline under contruction. Fines doubled.)
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To: HungarianGypsy
OK,
You take 1 package of little smokie sausages, 2 cans of green beans, two cans of cream of mushroom soup.

in a baking dish of 9"X13" put a layer of sausages, a layer of green beans and a layer of soup (with no water added), pepper to taste (no salt is needed), repeat layering, cover with aluminum foil, cook in a 325 degree oven for 20-25 minutes.
Serve hot.

The name came from my wife. She was working evenings so I was always cooking dinner for myself and the two daughters.
One night we had those ingredients left in the house and I was too tired to go shopping.
When she came home she said, "Poor Dad". And there it was, Poor Dad casserole.
LOL

50 posted on 04/05/2006 11:43:22 AM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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