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China Building Military at Pace Last Seen in 1930s Germany
HUMAN EVENTS ^ | May 24, 2006 | Jed Babbin

Posted on 05/24/2006 12:01:02 AM PDT by neverdem

From ancient Rome's destruction of Carthage to the Soviet Union of the late 1940s, nations' rise to great power status has almost always been on a tide of war. China -- both economically and militarily -- is on the verge of regional superpower status and aiming at the global equivalent.

Despite President Hu Jintao's "peaceful rise" sloganeering, China is building its military at a pace last seen in 1930s Germany, arming itself with things such as anti-satellite weapons that have no defensive purpose. America faces two great challenges in this decade: to defeat the terrorists and to help shape China's rise. No nation has managed the great power emergence of another. But we must. If we fail, we will be at war with China within the next decade.

America expects more of its military than does any other nation. We expect it to be able to fight and win. That it does, with incredible skill and courage. But we call on our troops to build schools in Iraq, to drill oil wells in Djibouti and do hundreds of other jobs that they don't learn in basic training or in college. Whether or not they think it's their job or smart for them to be doing it, they always answer, "can do."

But just as the military isn't comfortable in some civilian roles -- nation-building is one -- civilians often don’t trust the military to do some of the things it does best. One issue in the fight over Gen. Michael Hayden's nomination to head the CIA is whether the Pentagon should dominate the intelligence arena. (That issue is important only to those who are more concerned with bureaucratic turf wars than whether the best result obtains). That discomfort with the military has concealed, for hundreds of years, one of the military’s most important and least-used talents: diplomacy.

Military diplomacy is not an oxymoron. NATO didn't become the most effective peacetime alliance in American history because the Foggy Bottom striped-pants crowd made it so. It was the result of decades of shared training and teamwork among the militaries that grew to know each other personally. Military diplomacy works just as well among adversaries as among friends. One reason the Cold War stayed cold is that the Soviets saw, first-hand, who comprised our military and much of what they were capable of. If we are diligent about employing this military talent, the emergence of China as a superpower can be a peaceful one.

We have to employ our military diplomats to accomplish gains with China's neighbors as well as with China itself. With China, we already have two good examples to follow.

First was last year's trip to China by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. There is a message we send when we announce that the Secretary of State is going to a nation, and an entirely different one when the Secretary of Defense is the chosen emissary. In an interview last November, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Affairs Peter Rodman said that Rumsfeld spoke quite openly with the Chinese on a host of issues. Rodman said the lesson is that you can be firm with the Chinese and frank with the Chinese and yet have a very constructive relation with them. Adm. William Fallon's visit to Beijing this week -- his second since taking command of U.S. forces in the Pacific -- is the other example.

According to a Washington Post report of the trip, Fallon said his goal was to push China for more contacts, "…to see more things and different things, and to be more open and transparent in military matters." Because China's military buildup is being carried out in such secrecy that even its military budget is hidden whatever threat China may or may not pose is also hidden. This secrecy increases tensions enormously, especially among American allies and within the White House. Fallon, by pushing the Chinese for openness, is helping reduce that tension.

What Fallon is doing is paralleled by military diplomacy with China’s neighbors. These nations -- Malaysia, Vietnam, Japan and South Korea to name only a few -- are justly frightened by China’s growing strength and ambitions. The last time China built a "blue-water" navy was about the same time Christopher Columbus was sailing to the Americas. And when that Chinese fleet sailed, it was to demand tribute from nations as far away as Africa. Today's China will demand the modern equivalent, the oil and gas its neighbors possess.

To China, we can show that openness pays and secrecy has a price. Among China's neighbors, our military can gain trust at a personal level civilian diplomats can't. We should send our defense officials, admirals and generals to visit them often to tell these nations that we will help them defend themselves while working with them to remain on peaceful -- if often adversarial -- terms with China.

The White House is overly anxious to avoid calling our policy toward China "containment." The administration fears being accused of reviving Cold War images and rhetoric. We will not be able to contain China as we did with the Soviet Union. But with effective deployment of our military diplomats, we may be able to make Hu Jintao's "peaceful rise" less a slogan and more a fact.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Germany; Government; Japan; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; Russia; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: armsbuildup; babbin; china; chinathreat; chinesemilitry; redchina

1 posted on 05/24/2006 12:01:05 AM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

At the rate China is arming our biggest problems may not be either Muslims or Mexicans.


2 posted on 05/24/2006 12:10:01 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Proud soldier in the American Army of Occupation..)
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To: neverdem

Do any of the so-called conservapoots, um, er, socialatives,...... Soldouticans..... Republicayellowdefecators....

I give up on what passes for having an "R" after their names means, but the real fact of the matter is NOT ONE SOUL IN THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA HAS THE TESTOSTERONE PRODUCING GLANDS TO SIMULTANEOUSLY STAND UP FOR THE SECOND AND TENTH AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION WHILE RESISTING THE ADVANCES OF CHINA INC.

Sorry about all the yelling. I shall endeavor to persevere to maintain low tones, for the rest of the day anyway.


3 posted on 05/24/2006 12:11:34 AM PDT by 308MBR ( Somebody sold the GOP to the socialists, and the GOP wasn't theirs to sell.)
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To: neverdem
I think China is certainly the real threat to the West, in the long run. What the President is doing with India is helpful, but is no substitute for aggressive American deterrence.

I think the honeymoon with China (especially wrt trade) is nearly over.

4 posted on 05/24/2006 12:46:42 AM PDT by TheWasteLand
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To: TheWasteLand

I have always believed that while the muslims are a threat, the greatest threat we face is China. They are forming a worldwide proxy front against us, using the muslims, South Americans, NK and even Africa. They hope to avoid the mistakes of Japan/Germany.


5 posted on 05/24/2006 1:10:14 AM PDT by catbertz
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To: neverdem

China is building up. But many analysts are jumping the gun. Pre-war Germany had some of the best weaponry in the world. It was also one of the world's top industrial powers, having just revolutionized the chemical industry by inventing the Bosch and the Haber processes.

China's weaponry is crap - a small amount of it is overrated garbage imported from Russia, but most of it is Chinese-made junk - modified 50-year old Soviet designs. China is also one of the more backward countries in the world. Don't just take my word for it - go there sometime and experience it for yourself.

Go to any internet military forum with US veterans on it, and they'll tell you that the Chinese military would be flattened by the Korean military, let alone the American one. At this stage, China isn't pre-WWII Germany. It isn't even pre-WWII Japan - a much weaker power than the Germany of that era.*

China is a paper tiger at the moment. And the capabilities gap between the US and China is widening. And will continue to widen, assuming the US military budget remains at around 4% of American industrial output.

* Germany fought all the allies pretty much alone for six years. Uncle Sam devoted 80% of the war effort to fight Germany. It took 4 years to get to Berlin. Three months after 100% of the US war effort was devoted to fighting Japan, the Japanese had surrendered.


6 posted on 05/24/2006 1:19:17 AM PDT by Zhang Fei
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To: catbertz

"I think China is certainly the real threat to the West, in the long run."

I agree.


7 posted on 05/24/2006 1:43:48 AM PDT by Cindy
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To: catbertz
From what I've read, the Chinese have had their own problems with Muslims, but certainly you're right that they've been casting around for allies, if that's the right word.

It's important that America start moving strategically to counter China. That's why the President went to India a short while ago, in order to begin the process of aligning India with the West, as a buffer against China. But it is no replacement for purely American deterrence (ie. missiles, navy, air force, anti-ballistic shields, etc.), which has to be the foundation.
8 posted on 05/24/2006 1:45:16 AM PDT by TheWasteLand
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To: Zhang Fei
China is building up.

And there's the rub. The more people get, the more people want,i.e. they get electricity, next thing you know they want a steady supply of electricity, then a steady supply 24/7.

At some point, in order to retain control, the State will have announce, "The 'build up' stops here." For you can't give people a little bit of choice, wee bit of build up, or a smiggen of freedom - of any kind - and than expect them to say "That's all? Oh, okay."

You can stop them from outwardly expressing the desire but only by beating them into the dust a la Mao or Stalin via a 'built up' military ordered to fire on its own neighbors.

9 posted on 05/24/2006 2:30:15 AM PDT by yankeedame ("Oh, I can take it but I'd much rather dish it out.")
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To: Zhang Fei
China is a paper tiger at the moment.

Yeah, and all the Japanese manufacture is cheap toys! </sarcasm>

10 posted on 05/24/2006 2:43:53 AM PDT by The Duke
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To: yankeedame
The situation isn't so simple. China is comprised of hundreds of ethnic groups most of whom speak different languages.

During the Tianeman Square incident, troops were brought in from regions far away from Beijing precisely so they would have very little problem with shooting 'chinese'.

China likes to present to the world that it is one big happy family, but that really isn't true. The Hans don't much like the Manchurians who don't much like the Mandarins, etc etc. The CCP stays in power largely by playing one group off the other and trading in favors to the ruling classes.

Believe me the CCP would gladly starve 1/10th of their population to death in order to hold on to power. They've done it before and they won't hesitate to do it again if they must. All that matters to them is The Party.

The CCP has convinced itself that without the Party there is no China. That is a very dangerous mindset indeed.

L

11 posted on 05/24/2006 2:48:38 AM PDT by Lurker (Real conservatives oppose the Presidents amnesty proposal. Help make sure it dies in the House.)
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To: Mike Darancette
At the rate China is arming our biggest problems may not be either Muslims or Mexicans.

If China offered the Southwest to Mexico the latter might be part of the same problem. IMHO, they are.

12 posted on 05/24/2006 4:37:36 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (There are people in power who are REALLY stupid.)
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To: neverdem
"China Building Military at Pace Last Seen in 1930s Germany"

Somehow all those masses of Red Guards with their arms extended and screaming "SIEG HU!! SIEG HU!!" don't have the same impact.

(as some little Chinese peasant on the sidelines sez
"What Hu talkin bout Rillis?"

13 posted on 05/24/2006 4:45:55 AM PDT by mkjessup (The Shah doesn't look so bad now, eh? But nooo, Jimmah said the Ayatollah was a 'godly' man.)
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To: mkjessup

Thanks alot free traders. Keep shopping at wal-mart folks.


14 posted on 05/24/2006 5:20:28 AM PDT by jpsb
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To: A. Pole
"The White House is overly anxious to avoid calling our policy toward China "containment."

This is a joke right, this administration is giving China our factories, our jobs, are technology and are money. All in the name of Free trade. Containment, that was the old policy before NAFTA. GATT and the WTO.

15 posted on 05/24/2006 5:28:22 AM PDT by jpsb
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To: Carry_Okie
If China offered the Southwest to Mexico the latter might be part of the same problem. IMHO, they are.

Sure. That's the real impetus for letting so many illegals in: here, they are productive and under our influence - send them home poor and unemployable and they are likely before long to become revolutionary soldiers under the influence of Chavez, Castro, and, from afar, China.

Latin America is already in play, and our betters have apparently determined that an open border is the best way to spread the influence of American capitalism and blunt the advance of socialism there.

And they are quite annoyed at us for focusing so much attention on the attendant societal disruptions of illegal immigration, for they consider those things short-term and irrelevant. ;)

16 posted on 05/24/2006 5:37:17 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("When the government is invasive, the people are wanting." -- Tao Te Ching)
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To: Mike Darancette

"At the rate China is arming our biggest problems may not be either Muslims or Mexicans."

What are they going to do with a military that vast? Unless they plan on expansionism like the Soviets did(we saw how that went) there is nothing for them to do.

Of course it can be to move North which may be something that they are conspiring with the Russians on. Or they can attack Taiwan which would start a bigger war, unless they are betting the US will not intervene.

My bet is if Democrats win in 08, China is attacking Taiwan.


17 posted on 05/24/2006 5:49:08 AM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (Democrats = The Culture of Treason)
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To: Mr. Jeeves
Sure. That's the real impetus for letting so many illegals in: here, they are productive and under our influence - send them home poor and unemployable and they are likely before long to become revolutionary soldiers under the influence of Chavez, Castro, and, from afar, China.

Looks to me like their kids are more under the effluents of our publik skools and communist universitariat La Razoids than anybody. As such, they may be more of a threat. They could either be convulsing their own countries (where they threaten "investors") or ours.

And they are quite annoyed at us for focusing so much attention on the attendant societal disruptions of illegal immigration, for they consider those things short-term and irrelevant. ;)

So what "they" do is undermine our ability to sustain ourselves long-term, babbling meaningless pap like "peace and security through interdependence."

Yeah, okey dokey. BLOAT-WWSC.

18 posted on 05/24/2006 6:36:01 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (There are people in power who are REALLY stupid.)
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To: Mike Darancette
Unfortunately the Chinese have another strategy which involves rolling up huge dollar holdings and then leveraging them either openly or covertly to buy effective control of the US. They recognize that all they have to do is become the largest holder of equity in some interest not at all the majority holder to effectively control the entity. As they do this with businesses which can then be turned into reliable sounding boards for deliberately not doing anything to offend China and for legally funding foreign lobbying campaigns through their American surrogates they can also use the same strategy covertly on Congress and much of the US policy making elite.

For Congress the mechanism will be semi-open 'soft money' contributions from their various controlled organizations here in CONUS combined with sophisticated illegal contributions and expensive gifts and funding whatever perversion it is the Congresscritter prefers. Thus they will come to own enough Congresspersons to effectively control both chambers.

For the so-called policy making and foreign policy-defense policy elites the same mechanism of funding their efforts through lots of soft money fronts and lots of remuneration for participating in a host of 'conferences and policy workshops' at the priciest resorts in the Pacific Basin.
Flat out bribery and 'gifting' these people will also work to make a large part of the blabbocracy reliably sinophil stooges.

It is going to be very hard if at all possible to resist this wave of subversion by people who already have many agents in place and who know how to exploit every loophole in laws and regulations.
19 posted on 05/24/2006 8:36:27 AM PDT by robowombat
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To: robowombat
Unfortunately the Chinese have another strategy which involves rolling up huge dollar holdings and then leveraging them either openly or covertly to buy effective control of the US.

Like the Japanese in the 80's?

20 posted on 05/24/2006 8:44:06 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Proud soldier in the American Army of Occupation..)
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To: Mike Darancette
Chinese dollar holdings make what Japanese banks accumulated look anemic. Moreover, the most the Japanese hankered after was to manipulate the two economies for the long term benefit of some large corporations, banks and insurance companies. The Chinese have their eye on first becoming the hegemon of East Asia and in due course being able to end the politeness regime with the US and become the global hegemon. This will feature so unmistakable actions to degrade the US.
21 posted on 05/24/2006 8:50:51 AM PDT by robowombat
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To: jpsb

Take your Wal-Mart bashing elsewhere.


22 posted on 05/24/2006 8:52:03 AM PDT by Extremely Extreme Extremist (Conservatism is moderate, it is the center, it is the middle of the road)
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To: neverdem

We are going to have a big problem soon.

I expect after the 2008 Olympics, things will get interesting.


23 posted on 05/24/2006 8:54:48 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: robowombat

Heck, they bought Bill Clinton. Buying a few Congresscritters is probably peanuts.


24 posted on 05/24/2006 9:07:29 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Guns themselves are fairly robust; their chief enemies are rust and politicians) (NRA)
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To: Lurker
"The CCP has convinced itself that without the Party there is no China. That is a very dangerous mindset indeed."

I am reading this, fighting the temptation to note any parallels that could be made wrt to some quarters on FR.

25 posted on 05/24/2006 9:22:23 AM PDT by Tench_Coxe
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To: Extremely Extreme Extremist; A. Pole; Jeff Head

LOL, embrassed to be exposed as a Chicom abologist? Helping support the country that is building up it's military machine for the comming war with the USA? Good I am happy I can shame you, you deserve shame.


26 posted on 05/24/2006 10:00:23 AM PDT by jpsb
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To: jpsb; Extremely Extreme Extremist

Didn't we already grant PMFN status to China?     

27 posted on 05/24/2006 10:35:11 AM PDT by melancton
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To: melancton

China was granted Permanent MFN status in 2000. Prior to that a yearly renewal was required.


28 posted on 05/24/2006 10:45:56 AM PDT by jpsb
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To: EQAndyBuzz
What are they going to do with a military that vast? Unless they plan on expansionism like the Soviets did(we saw how that went) there is nothing for them to do.

First they go west into all the little stans to secure a domestic oil supply... then they go North to Siberia.

29 posted on 05/24/2006 10:59:04 AM PDT by Centurion2000 (The social contract is breaking down.)
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To: robowombat
being able to end the politeness regime with the US and become the global hegemon.

Where then will we buy junky stuff? China is a long way from being able to project power globally.

Where would China be without it's trade surplus with the USA? China IMHO walks a fine line and will have to make a decision as to whether they want to foster world wide Socialism or they want to be a modern nation.

30 posted on 05/24/2006 11:16:27 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Proud soldier in the American Army of Occupation..)
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To: Mike Darancette
You are right that the Chinese walk a fine line. They want all the Outer barbarians to properly respect the innate superiority of the Middle Kingdom and continue to buy Chinese products. At the same time they want to replace the US as the greatest military power on the planet. They are as you say a long way from trying to do that but I suspect they think in decades or longer not today's lamestream evening news or the next poll.

Exporting socialism is not much on the PRC menu. They have basically become in action a true fascist dictatorship complete with hyper-nationalistic appeals to the masses, glorification of the armed forces,chauvinistic historical propaganda, and the myth of the heroic party. On top of which their attitude towards 'the broad masses' is that 'we still have far to many' so they are expendables and spending money on OSHA protections is not only damaging to export supremacy but counterproductive period. The PRC is a true thug state with desires to be super power. Imagine militarist Japan of the 1930's with a billion people.
31 posted on 05/24/2006 11:26:49 AM PDT by robowombat
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To: robowombat
At the same time they want to replace the US as the greatest military power on the planet.

Can't say that I agree with you on this. I believe that they are concerned with being the preeminent power in Asia (much like the pre-WWII Imperial Japanese military), but with the intent of securing their defense perimeter, on the one hand, and preventing the US military from interfering with their "projects" in Asia, such as invading Taiwan and securing as much of the offshore oil in South Asia as possible. To accomplish these objectives, the Chinese don't have to "match up" in every military category versus the US, they simply have to achieve conventional and asymmetrical military parity in Asia.

32 posted on 05/24/2006 12:49:13 PM PDT by pawdoggie
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To: Zhang Fei

china has the most advanced semiconductor manufacturing capabilities in the world - thanks to investment from the united states. they are also getting some of the most advanced telecommunications capabilities, and the most advanced auto manufacturing plants. these technoligies, along with whatever they can develop with aerospace - are the keys to a modern military.


33 posted on 05/24/2006 12:54:47 PM PDT by oceanview
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To: pawdoggie
Becoming the undisputed overlord of East Asia is certainly the most significant part of what the Chinese long term strategy. Beyond that I do believe they envision controlling the Central Pacific Ocean space and through presence in places such as Papua and New Caledonia in tandem with their economic clout effectively controlling Australia.

Replacing the United States as Number One is part and parcel of this scheme. Partly it is just the way fascists or Marxists think about power relationships. Someone always has to be dominant and domination is what statist power worshippers are most devoted to. It doesn't mean some notion of 'China conquerers the world' like the Martians in 'War of the Worlds' but it does mean the Chinese want a huge de facto empire in the Pacific just as the Japanese militarist dreamed of and want the arrogant long noses appropriately humbled and made receptive to direction from the Middle Kingdom.

They probably also want to be able to export enough of the Han people to Australia and North America to be able to have a large population that can be counted on to work in tandem with their native American or Australian Quislings to see to it that the appropriate rule of heavenly virtue is instituted.

There are several Freepers who display the affinity in debates about immigration for dollar based advantage outcomes typical of Hong Kong Chinese. I note these same individuals always are ready to slip in how mass immigration of Chinese 'who meet legal standards' would be a good thing. The softening up process for covert subversion by the Chinese is already well underway. It is still just well hidden.
34 posted on 05/24/2006 1:10:06 PM PDT by robowombat
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To: Mike Darancette
I find this line of reasoning funny, when it comes from us, America. A nation that has spent at least 10 trillion dollars on defense in the last quarter century. This isn't close to what china has spent in the entire period since the end of World War II.

China currently has a navy that is about 1/6 the size of the US Navy and at least fifty times less capable. They lack any real airlift capability, and their air force is at point we were in the early 80s. I could on, but what point is there, many believe that a war with China is inevitable, and in so thinking might make it happen. This is the question are we making to much of China's Military buildup or are we right to be concerned. This is the black space we find ourselves. In confronting China are we making self-fulling prophecy or are addressing a real possibility. Did the oil embargo against Japan create conditions that brought WWII to the pacific. I don't know, and we can't know.
35 posted on 05/24/2006 1:14:42 PM PDT by Kuehn12 (Kuehn12)
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To: robowombat

While it's possible that the Chinese might "go for the whole enchilada", if they perceived a power vacuum after they became the undisputed masters of Asia, I think your taking things a bit too far. I just don't see the ChiCom leadership worrying about whether to hold the victory ceremony in San Francisco or D.C. I do believe that they have a pathological desire to avenge themselves on the Japanese, and to force all the countries of Asia to acknowledge Chinese military, economic and cultural superiority.


36 posted on 05/24/2006 1:59:02 PM PDT by pawdoggie
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To: neverdem

bttt


37 posted on 05/24/2006 4:08:35 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
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To: pawdoggie
>>> I do believe that they have a pathological desire to avenge themselves on the Japanese, and to force all the countries of Asia to acknowledge Chinese military, economic and cultural superiority.<<<
Having spent time with PRC 'middle management' types, I agree. The Japs were rather nasty during their last visit.
38 posted on 05/24/2006 4:24:46 PM PDT by investigateworld (Abortion stops a beating heart)
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To: Mike Darancette; neverdem

<< At the rate China is arming our biggest problems may be neither Muslims nor [Central and South American Indians]. >>

Close but no Christmas Box.

At the rate China is arming AND is increasing the numbers of its already many scores of thousands of agents in our every at home and abroard industry, production process, school, college, university, computer developer and manufactory, aircraft manufacturer, nuclear and every other kind of laboratory and government agency and is at the same time inciting, aiding, abetting and facilitating our every domestic and international "problem," including those comprising both Muslims and the criminal alien invasion.


39 posted on 05/24/2006 11:04:54 PM PDT by Brian Allen (All that is required to ensure the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing. -- Edmund Burke)
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To: neverdem; Mia T

<< China Building Military at Pace Last Seen in 1930s Germany
>>

For which we may all thank eight years of the traitors, Cli'ton.

BUMPping


40 posted on 05/24/2006 11:06:28 PM PDT by Brian Allen (All that is required to ensure the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing. -- Edmund Burke)
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To: Brian Allen
bump!

WHY HILLARY IN THE OVAL OFFICE IS A NATIONAL-SECURITY NO-NOPART ONE
EXPENSIVE CHINA: the clinton legacy

by Mia T et al, 10.17.03, 03.01.06

It is no secret that Hillary's past takes us through a pile of hard, cold cash from the Chinese army, Chinese army agents roaming the White House and photos with a wide variety of scoundrels.

For example, the one prominent name missing from Hillary's recent "tell-all" book is Riady. Mrs. Clinton failed to mention the Riady family at all. One would get the impression that the Riadys were not present in the Clinton White House. Hillary Clinton certainly overlooked listing the table settings and menus for White House dinners with the Riadys.

The Riadys knew the Clintons from their Arkansas years, when Moctar bought out a local bank. Moctar and his son James were close to Bill and Hillary through 1992 and into the White House. Moctar even owned the firm selected by Hillary Clinton to replace the White House travel office.

Riady and Hillary

Moctar and James Riady played a key role in bringing the Clintons to power in Washington. The Indonesian billionaire and his Lippo banking company managed to contribute large sums of money to the Clintons' campaigns even though it was against the law. Moctar's gardener contributed $450,000 directly to Bill Clinton in a single check. James Riady, Moctar's son, eventually pleaded guilty to campaign violations.

The connections between the Riadys and the Clintons have a much more sinister theme than simple foreign money inside U.S. elections. Testimony before the U.S. Senate revealed Moctar Riady's involvement in Chinese espionage. The Lippo Group is in fact a joint venture of China Resources, a trading and holding company "wholly owned" by the Chinese communist government and used as a front for Chinese espionage operations.

Mrs. Clinton not only knew the Riadys but took their money as well. To prove my point I need only to cite photographic evidence. Her picture with Moctar Riady is certainly damning evidence of a relationship that spanned several bank accounts and two decades. It is often said that a picture tells a thousand words. However, Hillary's pictures not only tell stories left out of her book but they also netted $10,000 each for the DNC in illegal donations.

Hillary's Most-Wanted

Mrs. Clinton has left us with a wide selection of photo evidence. Mrs. Clinton has had her photo taken with drug dealer Jorge Cabrera. Jorge donated a load of drug money to the DNC in order to get close to the first lady. Jorge is currently serving federal time for smuggling 3,000 pounds of cocaine into the United States.

READ MORE

41 posted on 05/25/2006 5:06:56 AM PDT by Mia T (Stop Clintons' Undermining Machinations (The acronym is the message.))
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To: neverdem
Despite all the negative postings, the reality is, the official US government stance is that the US welcomes the rise of China. There are efforts underway, not to contain China, but ensure that China participates in helping maintain the stability in the global trading system in which she is benefiting from.

Hence, the military exchanges that are going on now.

I personally believe there will come a day when the US will insist China help out in maintaining global security.

42 posted on 05/25/2006 11:25:04 AM PDT by ponder life
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To: AdmSmith; Arthur Wildfire! March; Berosus; bigheadfred; blueyon; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; ...

Note: this topic is from May 24, 2006. Thanks neverdem.
43 posted on 09/11/2010 6:57:20 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Democratic Underground... matters are worse, as their latest fund drive has come up short...)
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