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Cool Capitalist: The 100th Anniversary of the Air Conditioner
The Washington Times ^ | July 21, 2006 | Edward Hudgins

Posted on 07/21/2006 7:15:05 AM PDT by Ed Hudgins

Ehudgins@atlassociety.org

It's a typical 3-H Washington, D.C. summer: hazy, hot and humid. And with small variations, the rest of the country sweats through this same season.

But I sit typing in cool comfort, looking out a window into the park at the statue of an admiral who might want to yield his pedestal for a likeness of Willis Haviland Carrier. Who was Carrier and why does he deserve our esteem? He's the American who invented and commercialized the modern air conditioner.

Carrier was born in 1876 and grew on the cold shores of Lake Erie in Upstate New York. He earned a masters in electrical engineering from Cornell University in 1901 and went to work for the Buffalo Forge Co., where he worked on heating systems for companies to dry lumber and coffee.

One of his firm's customers, Sackett-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Co. in Brooklyn, faced a problem. Climate variations in their facility meant the printing equipment would expand or contract subtly, making it difficult to keep the machines properly aligned for the multistage printing process. Carrier solved the company's problem by producing the first system to control temperature, humidity and ventilation; U.S. Patent No. 8008897 for the "Apparatus for Treating Air" was granted in 1906.

Carrier started his own company in 1915. Entrepreneurs soon understood cool could attract customers. By 1924, he was producing air conditioning systems not only for industrial concerns but for department stores and theaters. Carrier's creations meant that in the hard times and long, hot summers of the Depression and World War II Americans could chill out watching a Clark Gable movie.

In 1928, Carrier produced the first AC unit for private residences ...

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtontimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Philosophy; US: New York
KEYWORDS: airconditioner; capitalism; capitalist; consumerism; energy; williscarrier

1 posted on 07/21/2006 7:15:07 AM PDT by Ed Hudgins
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To: Ed Hudgins

Cool.


2 posted on 07/21/2006 7:18:55 AM PDT by Lil'freeper (You do not have the plug-in required to view this tagline.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

That's a cool story!


3 posted on 07/21/2006 7:19:45 AM PDT by coloradan (Failing to protect the liberties of your enemies establishes precedents that will reach to yourself.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

See also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gorrie


4 posted on 07/21/2006 7:20:02 AM PDT by Crawdad (So the guy says to the doctor, "It hurts when I do this.")
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To: Ed Hudgins

...kewl...


5 posted on 07/21/2006 7:21:08 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (dust off the big guns.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

I suspected someone by the name of Carrier started air conditioning but didn't know the story. Thanks for posting it. I'll show this to my daughter.


6 posted on 07/21/2006 7:21:34 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) !)
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To: Ed Hudgins

Greatest Invention ever.


7 posted on 07/21/2006 7:22:43 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Ed Hudgins

Weren't the first AC units ammonia based?.......


8 posted on 07/21/2006 7:22:59 AM PDT by Red Badger (Is Castro dead yet?........)
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To: Ed Hudgins
when we actually run out of oil

I reject the premise as mere speculation.

9 posted on 07/21/2006 7:23:33 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (dust off the big guns.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

Oh yeah!


10 posted on 07/21/2006 7:23:38 AM PDT by Graymatter ("Put only Americans on guard tonight." -- George Washington)
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To: Ed Hudgins
Excellent post, thanks. He is my new hero in this 105 degree weather we are having.

However, we went with a Trane.......

11 posted on 07/21/2006 7:24:14 AM PDT by yellowdoghunter (Vote out the RINO's; volunteer to help get Conservative Republicans elected!)
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To: Ed Hudgins

Thank God for Mr. Carrier! Where would we be without him?


12 posted on 07/21/2006 7:24:28 AM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3rd Bn. 5th Marines, RVN 1969. - St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle!)
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To: the invisib1e hand
when we actually run out of oil
I reject the premise as mere speculation.

That's just silly. The fact that the amount of oil in existence is finite is a fact, not a speculation.

13 posted on 07/21/2006 7:25:59 AM PDT by steve-b ("Creation Science" is to the religous right what "Global Warming" is to the socialist left.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

If Willis Haviland Carrier is not a candidate for sainthood, he ought to be. Thanks to him, I can inhabit my beloved home state. As a child we had no AC, and I can tell your from that experience that without his invention to filter, cool and dehumidify the air in our homes, life Texas for asthmatics and allergy sufferers is extremely difficult during the summer months.


14 posted on 07/21/2006 7:26:46 AM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: dfwgator
The Einstein refrigerator is a type of refrigerator co-invented in 1926 by Albert Einstein and former student Leó Szilárd, who were awarded U.S. Patent 1,781,541 on November 11, 1930. The machine is a single-pressure absorption refrigerator, similar in design to the gas absorption refrigerator. The refrigeration cycle uses ammonia (pressure-equalizing fluid), butane (refrigerant), and water (absorbing fluid). The Einstein refrigerator is portable, made of inexpensive, nonmoving parts, operates silently, and is very reliable. However, leaks of the ammonia caused problems among the earlier models.

Einstein undertook this invention as a way of helping along his former student. He used the knowledge he had acquired during his years at the Swiss Patent Office to get solid patents for the invention in several countries. The refrigerator was not immediately put into commercial production, but rights to use the patents were sold to companies such as Electrolux of Sweden, and the funds obtained supported Szilárd for several years. Electrolux manufactures a similar design invented by Baltzar von Platen and Carl Munters in 1926 under the brand name Dometic.

15 posted on 07/21/2006 7:27:07 AM PDT by Red Badger (Is Castro dead yet?........)
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To: Ed Hudgins

What makes air conditioning so important is the fact that it made it possible to dramatically grow cities in the warmer climates of the southern half of the continental USA. Places like Las Vegas, NV, Phoenix, AZ and Orlando, FL could never have grown without widespread availability of air conditioning.


16 posted on 07/21/2006 7:27:50 AM PDT by RayChuang88
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To: Ed Hudgins

An air what?

17 posted on 07/21/2006 7:30:24 AM PDT by Andy from Beaverton (I only vote Republican to stop the Democrats)
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To: steve-b

The ^known^ amount of oil is finite (reservoirs deplete). Future stores and the Earth's rate of production of new oil is not known.


18 posted on 07/21/2006 7:32:14 AM PDT by Cletus.D.Yokel (Scatology is Serendipitous)
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To: Ed Hudgins

I drive by the Carrier facility outside of Syracuse regularly. Sad to see that much of that is now in Mexico and China.


19 posted on 07/21/2006 7:32:20 AM PDT by printhead
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To: Ed Hudgins
Very interesting article. As a person with a family history in the printing business of old, it holds special significance.

I too celebrate the wonders of human achievement!

PTL for air conditioning, the car and biologics research.
20 posted on 07/21/2006 7:33:41 AM PDT by HonestConservative ((It's SNOWING!))
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To: RayChuang88

I do strongly favor banning air conditioning in all government buildings here in heat-oppressed Washington, D.C. That would make this town a hardship post again, cut down on the number of people who would want to work for the oppressive federal bureacracy, and keep Congress out of session for the summer months so they would leave us the hell alone! -- Ed Hudgins


21 posted on 07/21/2006 7:34:01 AM PDT by Ed Hudgins (Rand fan)
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To: Ed Hudgins

There will be no "Sun Belt" without Carrier, period.


22 posted on 07/21/2006 7:39:01 AM PDT by MinorityRepublican (Everyone that doesn't like what America and President Bush has done for Iraq can all go to HELL)
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To: B-Chan

We didn't have AC when I was growing up either. With the exception of a few movie theaters and restaurants, I don't remember AC in widespread use until the late 1960s, early 70s. Most new automobiles didn't feature it until the 70s and even then it was an option.


23 posted on 07/21/2006 7:40:41 AM PDT by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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To: RayChuang88

Vegas would still be Vegas but the city would have been empty during the summer if there's no AC.


24 posted on 07/21/2006 7:41:27 AM PDT by MinorityRepublican (Everyone that doesn't like what America and President Bush has done for Iraq can all go to HELL)
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To: Ed Hudgins
Howard Baker recalled that it was his father who told him that all problems with government started in 1936 when they air-conditioned the Capitol. Prior to that Congress would flee Washington's beastly summers for months every year.

There is much wisdom to that observation.

25 posted on 07/21/2006 7:48:24 AM PDT by AustinBill (consequence is what makes our choices real)
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To: Ed Hudgins

Most interesting, like the story of the inventor of the first moldable plastic, Leo Baekland.


26 posted on 07/21/2006 7:55:41 AM PDT by RoadTest (Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, and this be our motto: in God is our trust.)
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To: AustinBill

About the only bit of wisdon that Howard ever imparted!!!!!


27 posted on 07/21/2006 8:00:34 AM PDT by Coldwater Creek ("Over there, over there, We won't be back 'til it's over Over there.")
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To: Ed Hudgins
A lot less time to contemplate and pass more B.S. type of laws. Look at the states, those who have part time legislatures have more freedom than states with full-time, professional legislatures such as California.

I agree with Mr. Hudgins.

I do strongly favor banning air conditioning in all government buildings here in heat-oppressed Washington, D.C. That would make this town a hardship post again, cut down on the number of people who would want to work for the oppressive federal bureacracy, and keep Congress out of session for the summer months so they would leave us the hell alone! -- Ed Hudgins
28 posted on 07/21/2006 8:04:49 AM PDT by CORedneck
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To: AustinBill

We held the March for Truth in Lafayette Park when it was 100 degrees. I can understand why people would flee Washington.


29 posted on 07/21/2006 8:20:42 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: Inyo-Mono

(((We didn't have AC when I was growing up either. With the exception of a few movie theaters and restaurants, I don't remember AC in widespread use until the late 1960s, early 70s. Most new automobiles didn't feature it until the 70s and even then it was an option.)))

I'm only fifty (gee, it sounds good to say ONLY), but we didn't have air conditioning until the mid-70s, and then it was considered a neat luxury.


30 posted on 07/21/2006 8:32:49 AM PDT by freepertoo
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To: dfwgator
Greatest Invention ever.

Where we live (low desert) it's gaining population by leaps and bounds. I often muse that if reliable A/C hadn't come about this area would have the same population ratio as the Sahara Desert.

(Check my page - it's 8:30 am, and already 102 on my three thermos - expected to hit 116 today with a 'warmup' for the weekend...I'll likely FReep more than usual)

31 posted on 07/21/2006 8:35:54 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (Meep Meep)
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To: RoadTest
Most interesting, like the story of the inventor of the first moldable plastic, Leo Baekland.

Who, if I remembr my plastic history correctly, invented Bakelite as an entry for a contest. The Belgian companies who made billiard balls from ivory were concerned that the supply of ivory might be depleted.

They offered a cash prize to the person who could come up with the best substitute for ivory. Leo Baekland came up with a plastic named for him - Bakelite - and won the contest.

32 posted on 07/21/2006 8:38:35 AM PDT by Tokra (I think I'll retire to Bedlam.)
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To: Tokra

I didn't know about the Belgian prize.

He discovered the material while he (and other researchers) was looking for a substitute for varnish made from some bugs - but noticed big globs forming when he baked it, and went on to find he could mold the stuff.


33 posted on 07/21/2006 8:58:52 AM PDT by RoadTest (Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, and this be our motto: in God is our trust.)
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To: Ed Hudgins

I second that motion!


34 posted on 07/21/2006 8:59:39 AM PDT by TheDon (The Democratic Party is the party of TREASON!)
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To: AustinBill

Funny how that works, make them comfy and they want to lounge around and take forever to get things done, we should shut down the AC there and I bet the tempo would pickup quite a bit...


35 posted on 07/21/2006 9:04:22 AM PDT by MD_Willington_1976
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To: steve-b
when we actually run out of oil; I reject the premise as mere speculation.

That's just silly. The fact that the amount of oil in existence is finite is a fact, not a speculation

The rate of the earth's natural production of oil is unknown; therefore predicting an end to the supply is, in fact, mere speculation.

36 posted on 07/21/2006 9:09:10 AM PDT by xjcsa (The internet is not a truck. It's a series of tubes.)
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To: Crawdad
John Gorrie, (October 3, 1802 – June 29, 1855) physician, scientist, inventor, and humanitarian, is considered the father of refrigeration and air conditioning.
He was born on the Island of Nevis on October 3, 1802, and spent his childhood in South Carolina. He received his medical education at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of the Western District of New York in Fairfield, New York.
In 1833, he moved to Apalachicola, Florida, a port city on the Gulf coast. As well as being resident physician at two hospitals, Gorrie was active in the community.
At various times he served as Postmaster, President of the Bank of Pensacola's Apalachicola Branch, Secretary of the Masonic Lodge, and was one of the founding vestrymen of Trinity Episcopal Church.
37 posted on 07/21/2006 9:12:35 AM PDT by blam
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To: steve-b
That's just silly. The fact that the amount of oil in existence is finite is a fact, not a speculation.

what's sillier is that your statement suggests that you know categorically that oil, which is formed by natural processes, has for some reason ceased to be formed by natural process.

38 posted on 07/21/2006 9:22:20 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (dust off the big guns.)
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To: Ed Hudgins
The portable, in-window air conditioner was invented in 1945 by Robert Sherman. His patent was stolen and Sherman never received a dime or any official recognition.
39 posted on 07/21/2006 10:24:38 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: HonestConservative
As a person with a family history in the printing business of old, it holds special significance.

Sackett-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Co. in Brooklyn, faced a problem. Climate variations in their facility meant the printing equipment would expand or contract subtly...

It was the paper that would expand and contract with temperature and moisture changes, not the machinery.

40 posted on 07/21/2006 10:37:52 AM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done, needs to be done by the government.)
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To: Ed Hudgins; All
In the "sorta for what it's worth" department, there is a new, drop-in replacement for automotive air conditioner refrigerants, called hc-12a. It's hydrocarbon-based, so it doesn't fall afoul of the draconian regulations for CFC ( freon ), and they make claims ( backed, of course, by their own charts ) of lower temperatures, lower head pressure ( less horsepower & wear ), self-lubricating, etc.

Well, long story short, I tried it in the Zook, and it reads about 5 degrees colder versus the R-134a it replaced.

Here's one ( there are several, search ) supplier:
http://www.foxtoolsupply.com/HC-12a.htm

For your consideration.
41 posted on 07/21/2006 11:54:09 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: the invisib1e hand
Oil is indeed formed by natural processes but over very long periods of time, millions of years. That's why I think in centuries to come will drain most of it or it will simply become too costly to extract. But not to worry! It was the human mind, which figured out how to make use of oil and to extract and refine it. And if we can avoid a complete anti-reason culture and avoid harsh government regulations, individual minds will figure out how to make the matter and energy in the world around us serve our purposes!
42 posted on 07/21/2006 11:59:01 AM PDT by Ed Hudgins (Rand fan)
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To: Inyo-Mono
We didn't have AC when I was growing up either. With the exception of a few movie theaters and restaurants, I don't remember AC in widespread use until the late 1960s, early 70s. Most new automobiles didn't feature it until the 70s and even then it was an option.

Yep- we had a house on the Atlantic ocean when I grew up-- attic fans, pedestal fans, oscillating fans, hassock fans-- and for the last weeks of August and the first of September, you slept about an hour before awaking, soaked. Despite all those fans drawing hot air over you.

The stores had AC, and advertised "Come on IN! It's 20 degrees COOLER inside!"

43 posted on 07/21/2006 1:15:51 PM PDT by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: backhoe

Capitalism at its best!


44 posted on 07/21/2006 2:46:07 PM PDT by Ed Hudgins (Rand fan)
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To: backhoe
The stores had AC, and advertised "Come on IN! It's 20 degrees COOLER inside!"

Boy, do I remember that! Those places were havens for the hot traveler. Do you remember after market swamp coolers for your car? My Dad had one that looked like a jet engine mounted on the passenger window of our 1960 Volkswagon and another in our '56 Olds that mounted on the floorboard under the dash that you had to add ice to.

45 posted on 07/21/2006 6:28:25 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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To: Inyo-Mono
Do you remember after market swamp coolers for your car? My Dad had one that looked like a jet engine mounted on the passenger window of our 1960 Volkswagon and another in our '56 Olds that mounted on the floorboard under the dash that you had to add ice to.

I saw stuff like that, but we never had them- Dad didn't like air conditioning... ironic, since his business had an HVAC division!

46 posted on 07/22/2006 4:14:51 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: Andy from Beaverton

Very good!


47 posted on 07/25/2006 9:21:40 AM PDT by Ed Hudgins (Rand fan)
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