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Reza Pahlavi Offers Senators Three-Pronged Approach on Iran (Speaks in Front of Senate)
USNewswire ^ | Sept. 14, 2006

Posted on 09/15/2006 5:21:32 AM PDT by nuconvert

Reza Pahlavi Offers Senators Three-Pronged Approach on Iran; Confront and Pressure the Regime, Support the People

9/14/2006

WASHINGTON, Sept. 14 /U.S. Newswire/ -- Hosted by US Senators Rick Santorum (R-PA) and Mel Martinez (R-FL) Reza Pahlavi of Iran affirmed the world needed to focus on the big picture regarding the crisis facing his homeland, proposing an integrated three- pronged policy approach to the clerical regime of Iran. Offering his views to US law makers, he said "the best way to deal with the Iranian regime is by confronting it, pressuring it, at the same time supporting the Iranian people."

Elaborating on his three point policy recommendation, the Iranian opposition leader said "Where ever the regime is up to mischief, it needs to be confronted." Prefacing his second point by emphasizing that meaningful pressure needed to be applied on the regime in such a way as to avoid hurting the Iranian people, he prescribed "a progressive set of smart and vigorous sanctions targeted at the economic, political and personal interests of the regime's inner circle and power base." The third and what he referred to as the most critical point of his policy recommendation was the need for the "free world to provide unapologetic and robust support for the democratic aspirations of the Iranian people."

Rejecting war as a policy option, the former jet fighter pilot said, "the option of war must be taken off the table." Pronouncing "endless diplomacy" as equally ineffective, he said "it has been fruitlessly pursued, with the full weight, backing and prestige of the European Union, Russia, the UN and the United States for several years now, only resulting in the clerical regime's inching closer to its objectives of acquiring WMDs." Pahlavi reminded his audience that the Iranian regime had been dangerously emboldened by "the lack of resolve it has seen amongst practitioners of international diplomacy on Iran."

Agreeing that war was not an option, Senator Santorum said, of Reza Pahlavi: "He is a leading and enthusiastic advocate of the principals of freedom, democracy and human rights for his countrymen;" adding that "Reza Pahlavi has upheld the honor of his country in a time of upheaval and darkness."

Marking the second of such appearances, in recent days, Reza Pahlavi was joined, last week, by Senator Brownback (R-KS) and Congressman Sherman, (D-CA) at a press event, at which the forty six year old Iranian leader introduced torture victims and former political prisoners of the Iranian regime converged in Washington to protest the U.S. tour of former Islamist President Khatami. At that event, Senator Brownback introduced the "Iran Human Rights Act," while Congressman Brad Sherman criticized the Bush administration's approval of Khatami's visit, calling it an appeasing concession to the clerical regime of Iran.

Earlier this summer, as part of his continuous campaign against the clerical regime, Reza Pahlavi was received at the French National Assembly where he addressed over 40 French lawmakers, pressing them and other senior policy makers on issues relating to the democratic movement in his homeland.

Asked what role he envisioned for himself, Reza Pahlavi said "my function is that of a catalyst -- raising global attention to our national plight, and helping bring the Iranian opposition together." He added "my goal is to enable my compatriots to participate in an all inclusive, transparent national election, beyond this regime, whereby they can choose their form of government; beyond that, should the Iranian people embrace my vision of a secular, modern and democratic system of constitutional government, I will be honored to serve."

Leading a campaign of political defiance against the militant Islamist regime of Iran, Reza Pahlavi is the former Crown Prince of Iran. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force training program, has a political science degree from the University of Southern California and has authored Winds of Change, The Future of Democracy in Iran. He is married and is father to three daughters.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bombirannow; bombiransoilwells; democracy; freedom; iran; liberty; martinez; pahlavi; regime; rezapahlavi; santorum; senate; windsofchange
The following is a statement by Reza Pahlavi at the U.S. Senate :

Senator Santorum, Senator Martinez thank you for inviting me here, thank you especially for holding this meeting in this great house.

My respect for this institution is enormous as it embodies the best of America's promise to the world -- in terms of what liberty and representative democracy means. You see it, and you practice it here everyday; a dream my compatriots -- I am hopeful -- will see in reality someday very, very, soon.

Senator Santorum, over the years your leadership has stood apart when it comes to the issue dearest to 70 million Iranians. You have been among the first and strongest proponents of democracy in Iran and have stood up for freedom wherever it has been suppressed, in Iran or elsewhere around the world.

Senator Martinez, I thank you also for your leadership and am heartened that liberty and freedom are two words particularly close to your heart in view of your heritage, sir, and that of the constituency you so ably represent.

As you have both so well articulated, the dangers and issues confronting us today are very, very real; the biggest question however is how to best deal with the increasingly militant and adventurous regime in Tehran.

Clearly, war is an option rejected and which, as far as I am concerned, must be taken off the table; equally ineffective, is the process of endless diplomacy which has been fruitlessly pursued, now for several years -- with the full prestige, backing and weight of the European Union, Russia, the UN and the United States. The net result of this process has been that the militant clerical regime of Iran is today not only closer to reaching its enrichment objectives, but also recklessly emboldened by the lack of resolve it has seen amongst the practitioners of international diplomacy.

I believe and would like to present for your serious consideration, and sharing with your colleagues, my view on how to best deal with the clerical regime of Iran: It is an integrated three-pronged policy of "Confrontation, Pressure and Support." I believe the regime needs to be confronted where ever it is up to mischief (i.e. Lebanon, Iraq, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia or even right here in the western hemisphere); simultaneously the regime needs to be pressured by way of a progressive set of smart, vigorous and targeted sanctions aimed at the economic, political and personal interests of the regime, not the people; all while, the world will need to provide unapologetic and robust support for the democratic aspirations of the Iranian people.

This is a policy that will without a doubt require international support, but one which need not necessarily be kept hostage to the commercial interests of certain nation-states that have proven less than reliable in terms of standing up to the bullying of the clerical regime.

In closing, I wish to leave you with this thought: Throughout our long and proud history, the Iranian nation has had to, time and again, stand up to, and overcome much adversity. This too, is a passing storm in our long history. We are determined and have no doubt that we will ride this storm to victory -- achieving our goal of liberty, modernity and democracy. Our struggle, however, will become much easier knowing that we will have the unwavering support of nations that choose -- today -- to side with us, in our national quest for democracy.

The time to make that choice is now.

1 posted on 09/15/2006 5:21:34 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: freedom44; sionnsar; LibreOuMort; odds; Valin; AdmSmith

P O N G


2 posted on 09/15/2006 5:25:46 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: DoctorZIn

PONG


3 posted on 09/15/2006 5:39:27 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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Perhaps he should have introduced some torture victims of his father's regime.

I hope and pray for a free Iran. However, this guys will never, ever, be the Shah.


4 posted on 09/15/2006 5:47:29 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (I am not from Vermont. I lived there for four years and that was enough.)
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To: Vermont Lt
I hope and pray for a free Iran. However, this guy will never, ever, be the Shah.

Two questions:

  1. do you hold him responsible for his father’s acts?
  2. is he not a legitimate candidate for president as any other Iranian exile?

5 posted on 09/15/2006 6:21:36 AM PDT by humint (...err the least and endure! --- VDH)
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To: Vermont Lt

You prefer Khomeini and his heirs over the Shah?


6 posted on 09/15/2006 6:28:29 AM PDT by Salvey (ancest)
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To: Salvey

hmm can you point out where that has been said... I couldn't find it .


7 posted on 09/15/2006 6:53:52 AM PDT by Rummenigge (there's people willing to blow out the light because it casts a shadow)
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To: Vermont Lt

The one thing the regime fears most is it's own people.

I think Reza Pahlavi is the scariest thing to the mullahs; Scarier than anything we or the EU might be willing to do at the moment. Pahlavi represents true hope for ending the regime. He's a bona fide contender for their replacement.

We should be backing his efforts and supporting the Iranian peoples' desire for freedom and true democracy.
Whether Pahlavi becomes head of state, is up to the Iranian people to decide. They may choose a form of gov't similar to that of England, with a king as more of a figurehead. He wants a democracy.

I would like to see the formation of a temporary, interim gov't in exile to be ready to take over and see the people thru their referendum vote on the type of new gov't they would like. That would have the regime soiling their robes big time, and I think it would be a catalyst for the Iranian people to unite against the regime.


8 posted on 09/15/2006 6:59:42 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: nuconvert

Don't forget, the reason Pahlavi's dad got tossed out in the first place was because he was trying to modernize (i.e. westernize)Iran; the atavistic, backwards-looking Iranian masses rebelled against this, and that's why they're stuck with the mullahs (parenthetically this is also why their nuke program has stalled; it's a wonder that folks with a 7th century mindset have gotten this far with it). Pahlavi Jr., with his preppie, Williams College education, is going to have a tough time squaring this circle.


9 posted on 09/15/2006 7:14:38 AM PDT by katyusha (Those who fail history are doomed to go to summer school)
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To: nuconvert
I think Reza Pahlavi is the scariest thing to the mullahs; Scarier than anything we or the EU might be willing to do at the moment.

When it comes to opposition, there is real evidence the [PMOI, MEK, NCRI] are the scariest thing to the mullahs. To be sure, the mullahs will do anything to stay in power, no matter who suggests an ambition to depose them. When it comes to RP, LA based TV broadcasts have yet to depose the mullahs or reveal details of Iran’s nuclear ambitions. Do you think he’s softening the ground for democracy’s arrival in Iran or a return to pre79 dictatorship?

10 posted on 09/15/2006 7:25:02 AM PDT by humint (...err the least and endure! --- VDH)
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To: Vermont Lt

Perhaps introducing torture victims of his father's regime would tend to obsure the fact that his father was fighting a battle with forces that wanted to align Iran with the Soviet Union, and were equally guilty of heinous crimes.

Of course, apologists for the Ayatollah's actions, which were hundreds of times more offensive (and more random, rather than focusing on those who sought to establish a more tyrannical regime) will continue to point to the Shah's flaws, while ignoring the far worse offenses that took place once the Shah was deposed.

Reza Pahlavi is already on record as not seeking the Peacock Throne - but to try to establish freedome for the people of Iran, and a more democratic country.

Mike


11 posted on 09/15/2006 7:40:48 AM PDT by Vineyard
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To: katyusha

"Don't forget, the reason Pahlavi's dad got tossed out in the first place was because he was trying to modernize (i.e. westernize)Iran;"

That was a small part in a much more complicated scenario. and that part was organized by the mullahs, whom the Shah had unempowered. They were teaching the evils of modernization to their loyal followers in order to gain back what the Shah had stripped them of, but the general population was enjoying the freedoms of modern life.

The Iranian people and the cities have modernized and moved on from that time. The regime is trying to hold things back, but it's a futile battle for the most part.
Satellite dishes and computers and cell phones have taken over. The people want what the rest of the free world has.
Reza Pahlavi is very in touch with Iran and on all societal levels.


12 posted on 09/15/2006 8:35:30 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: nuconvert

Reza Pahlavi is a walking zero--read Kenneth Timmerman's book about the coming crisis with Iran for details. Basically, he's a playboy, not a crown prince.


13 posted on 09/15/2006 8:37:14 AM PDT by BeHoldAPaleHorse ( ~()):~)>)
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To: Vineyard; Vermont Lt
You wrote: "Of course, apologists for the Ayatollah's actions, which were hundreds of times more offensive (and more random, rather than focusing on those who sought to establish a more tyrannical regime) will continue to point to the Shah's flaws, while ignoring the far worse offenses that took place once the Shah was deposed."

===============================================

nice Stalinist trick to state that any sober and accurate look at the offenses of the shah must come from apologists for the ayatollahs. Like all stalinist tactics it is cute but dishonest. The shah (who was described by our own CIA as being 'pathologically afrtaid') was a corrupt dictator who was put on the make-believe throne by a foreign power and kept there through the gestapo-like tactics of his secret police. His own people died to throw him out.

Junior shah lives in safety and luxury that is paid for by the billions that his father and his cronies stole from their own people. He will likely die in wealthy exile without ever having accomplished a thing.

14 posted on 09/15/2006 8:37:17 AM PDT by wtc911 (You can't get there from here)
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To: humint

MEK is scary to the regime because of their forceful ability as an armed resistance. However, the regime is well aware that very few Iranian people would back MEK. So again, it is the power of the people that is the decideing force.
The population themselves are the true power and the real fear of the regime. Anyone with real knowledge of Iran agrees.

Do I think that Reza Pahalvi is even capable of being a dictator? Absolutely not.
He wants a democracy.
IMO - The Iranian people couldn't ask for a more dedicated, honest, loyal, nationalist, democratically-minded, respected leader.
I truly think he's the hope for Iran's future.
I just hope he's strong enough for the job. The first gov't after the current regime will be under attack from the mullahs and whomwever remains of their followers - and the MEK.<They will be a source of trouble until the Rajavi's are dead.

It's going to be a very dangerous job.


15 posted on 09/15/2006 8:52:25 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: BeHoldAPaleHorse

You seem to think that Timmerman is against Pahlavi. They've known each other for years and shows up at rallies in favor of Pahlavi quite often.

Which book are you referring to?


16 posted on 09/15/2006 8:55:53 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: Vineyard

You're absolutely correct.


17 posted on 09/15/2006 8:57:28 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: nuconvert
You seem to think that Timmerman is against Pahlavi.

He certainly painted a very negative picture of him in his book.

They've known each other for years and shows up at rallies in favor of Pahlavi quite often.

Well, if that was the case, after his description of Pahlavi's spending habits, their next get-together must've been quite strained.

Which book are you referring to?

I believe the title is The Coming Confrontation with Iran.

18 posted on 09/15/2006 8:58:25 AM PDT by BeHoldAPaleHorse ( ~()):~)>)
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To: katyusha

I think Jimmah Carter had something to do with it also.

And don't forget the feckless French for warehousing that lunatic Khomeni.


19 posted on 09/15/2006 9:03:39 AM PDT by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis, Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts, and guns made America great.)
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To: ZULU

--I think Jimmah Carter had something to do with it also.

And don't forget the feckless French for warehousing that lunatic Khomeni--


Sure, but in any civilized nation, Khomeni's rantings would have fallen on deaf ears. The Iranian masses liked his "lets go back to the 7th century" line and Khomeini thus became the focal point of an ultra-reactionary movement favored by the vast majority of Iranians AT THAT TIME anyway.


20 posted on 09/15/2006 9:15:57 AM PDT by katyusha (Those who fail history are doomed to go to summer school)
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To: nuconvert

--The Iranian people and the cities have modernized and moved on from that time. The regime is trying to hold things back, but it's a futile battle for the most part.
Satellite dishes and computers and cell phones have taken over. The people want what the rest of the free world has.--

It may be that YOUNG (i.e too young to remember 1979) may want modern goodies, but their parents who took to the streets and risked their lives to oust the Shah do not. When the older generation (and the blackrobed fanatics they put into office) begins taking a dirt nap en masse, maybe that's when things will change. IIRC correctly things like sattelite dishes, cell phones, designer burkahs etc tend to show up in the big cities (Tehran, Isfahan etc.)but in the backcountry (Iran's version of our "red" heartland) fundamentalism (and the 7th century) still have strong appeal.


21 posted on 09/15/2006 9:21:51 AM PDT by katyusha (Those who fail history are doomed to go to summer school)
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To: katyusha

"It may be that YOUNG (i.e too young to remember 1979) may want modern goodies, but their parents who took to the streets and risked their lives to oust the Shah do not."

You're wrong. And the numbers are against those of the Parents, even if you were correct.
70% of the population is under the age of 30.
Many of the parents of those young people who did take part in protests back in the Shah's days (and the vast majority did not), regret what they did.

The majority of the population wants the regime out.


22 posted on 09/15/2006 9:43:38 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: katyusha

" The Iranian masses liked his "lets go back to the 7th century" line and Khomeini thus became the focal point of an ultra-reactionary movement favored by the vast majority of Iranians AT THAT TIME anyway."

Where do you get this crap? Ted Koppel?


23 posted on 09/15/2006 9:46:56 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: humint

MEK/NCRI are bunch of terrorists according to State Dept


24 posted on 09/15/2006 1:14:59 PM PDT by Biscuit85 (I hate CNN!)
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To: katyusha
Right that's why there are protests and demonstrations against the Mullahs all the time.
25 posted on 09/15/2006 2:03:01 PM PDT by Valin (http://www.irey.com/)
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To: Salvey

Where would you get that idea? Quite frankly, I couldnt care less who runs Iran, as long as they stop giving us a hard time.

I just think that its revisionist history to look back at the Shah with rose colored glasses. His was a repressive regime. He was a bad guy who stole from his people. He tortured his people. He put his people in jail. He got what he deserved.

Would a democratic Iran be great? Absolutely.

Just don't assume that because I am anti-Shah, that I am pro Khomeini.


26 posted on 09/15/2006 6:00:38 PM PDT by Vermont Lt (I am not from Vermont. I lived there for four years and that was enough.)
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To: nuconvert; Vermont Lt; humint; Valin

“with the full prestige, backing and weight of the European Union, Russia, the UN and the United States. The net result of this process has been that the militant clerical regime of Iran is today not only closer to reaching its enrichment objectives, but also recklessly emboldened by the lack of resolve it has seen amongst the practitioners of international diplomacy.”

Interestingly, there isn’t a reference to China. I believe there should be (not enough to include it, for example, as part of the UN). China is very dangerous with incredible political and economic ambitions, not only in the Middle East but also in S.America and Africa.

The bottom line is that sooner or later the EU will have to make a 'final choice' between their economic interests based on relations with Iran and their own security (never mind global security). Hopefully, sooner than later. People like Sarkozy, if elected to be the next President of France, can play a positive role in putting more meaningful pressure on Iran.

About the comment that “he will never be the Shah..”

People are entitled to their opinions. But for one thing and as ‘humint’ put it, RP, as an Iranian, has every right to be considered as a legitimate candidate in whatever form of government (especially in a Democracy). Besides, it is and will be up to the Iranian people to choose not others.


27 posted on 09/16/2006 1:05:20 AM PDT by odds
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To: odds


The bottom line is that sooner or later the EU will have to make a 'final choice' between their economic interests based on relations with Iran and their own security (never mind global security).

I believe they will choose correctly...eventually. (Well maybe not the French) But only when it is almost too late, in the mean time it will be...interesting.


28 posted on 09/16/2006 3:20:07 AM PDT by Valin (http://www.irey.com/)
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To: Valin

"I believe they will choose correctly...eventually.(Well maybe not the French)"


My hope is that Sarkozy gets elected and the French come to the party. From what I've read and heard thru the French media lately, the French are looking for a change too, given last year riots in France and more recent situation in Lebanon and also this piece of news:

"Al-Qaida joins Algerians against France"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060914/ap_on_re_eu/france_al_qaida_video

With Blair gone in the near future (Gordon Brown as a potential replacement), there will be no telling which way the political scene might shift.

Also, I think the outcome of the mid-term elections in November in the U.S. will have implications and an impact across the Atlantic.


29 posted on 09/16/2006 4:14:38 AM PDT by odds
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To: odds

"Al-Qaida joins Algerians against France"

I saw that. Birds of a feather.....

The thing about the French is they can always be counted on to do what they think is in their best interest and the rest of the world can go suck an egg.


30 posted on 09/16/2006 4:32:48 AM PDT by Valin (http://www.irey.com/)
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To: Valin

"world can go suck an egg"

lol... I know what you mean.

Can their cheese come back and bite them in Le Derrière? ;-) hehe


31 posted on 09/16/2006 5:31:23 AM PDT by odds
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To: Vermont Lt

<< I hope and pray for a free Iran. However, this guy will never, ever, be the shah. >>

Please God!

His father's SAVAK savages set the standard for all of the mid-east's similarly seriously murderous 'security' savages.


32 posted on 09/16/2006 7:22:54 PM PDT by Brian Allen ("Moral issues are always terribly complex, for someone without principles." - G K Chesterton)
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To: nuconvert

"Where do you get this crap? Ted Koppel?"

WTF does Ted Koppel have to do with anything? Trying to democratize an Arab or Persian society is like trying to get a cat to bark!


33 posted on 09/18/2006 6:54:02 AM PDT by katyusha (Those who fail history are doomed to go to summer school)
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