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Beetle scourge goes from bad to worse
Denver Post ^ | 15 jan 08 | Howard Pankratz

Posted on 01/15/2008 6:39:21 AM PST by rellimpank

The beetle infestation that is expected to kill all of Colorado's mature lodgepole forest within five years is moving into Wyoming and the Front Range.

A pine beetle infestation is spreading from the mountains into southern Wyoming and the Front Range, and all of Colorado's mature lodgepole pine forests will be killed within three to five years, state and federal officials said Monday. The bark beetle infestation ravaged 500,000 new acres of forests in Colorado in 2007, bringing the total infestation to 1.5 million acres — almost all of state's lodgepole forests — according to the latest aerial survey. The infestation has now worked its way north and east, including an increase of more than 1,500 percent in the acreage affected in Boulder and Larimer counties.

"That's a pretty staggering thought," Susan Gray, group leader of Forest Health Management for the U.S. Forest

Service's Rocky Mountain Region, said of the statewide figures that the official news release called a "catastrophic event." "That is going to have an effect on wildlife habitat, watersheds and everything that is dependent on lodgepole pine forests."

(Excerpt) Read more at denverpost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: Colorado
KEYWORDS: colorado; environment; forests
--followup from yesterday--
1 posted on 01/15/2008 6:39:23 AM PST by rellimpank
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To: rellimpank; george76

—from yesterday—

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1953523/posts


2 posted on 01/15/2008 6:40:46 AM PST by rellimpank (--don't believe anything the MSM tells you about firearms or explosives--NRA Benefactor)
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To: rellimpank

“The best thing about a tree is what you can do with it after you cut it down.” R.L.


3 posted on 01/15/2008 6:41:10 AM PST by Don Corleone (Leave the gun..take the cannoli)
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To: Don Corleone

Think of the dynamics of this. If in fact all the pines will be consumed by beetles(and I’ve seen how fast they destroy a tree), this should become self limiting within that geographical area. Kinda like ebola in a static population group/area.


4 posted on 01/15/2008 6:48:49 AM PST by blackdog
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To: rellimpank

Confidential to lodgepole pines: evolve, dammit. Get some natural defenses going. You’re supposed to be better than we carbon units running around spoiling the planet. Get on with it.


5 posted on 01/15/2008 6:50:02 AM PST by NonValueAdded (Fred Dalton Thompson for President)
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To: rellimpank; All
---"Those are the temperatures that used to shut these outbreaks down," he said. "We used to routinely get into the minus 40s in the mountains. And we just haven't been."--

--this is also so much hogwash--I lived in the Colorado mountains from 1960 to 1977 and can assure you that in most places temps of below zero were fairly rare---in fact, I'd challenge anybody to show me an honest -40F reading anywhere in Colorado-ever.

6 posted on 01/15/2008 6:55:34 AM PST by rellimpank (--don't believe anything the MSM tells you about firearms or explosives--NRA Benefactor)
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To: blackdog
It doesn't self-limit. The forests around Cedar Breaks National Monument Utah were infested in the late 1980's. The forest is completely dead now, and the infestation has spread from there.


7 posted on 01/15/2008 6:57:56 AM PST by colorcountry (To anger a conservative, lie to him. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: Beowulf; Defendingliberty; WL-law; Normandy
The reason for the infestation, according to Jeff Jahnke, Colorado state forester, is an "unprecedented combination of drought, warm winters . . . and poor conditions that have caused an extensive, unprecedented infestation of the beetle."

I expected as much.

"Hot Air Cult"

~~Anthropogenic Global Warming ™ ping~~

8 posted on 01/15/2008 7:03:28 AM PST by steelyourfaith
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To: colorcountry

Nature hates a void. It will correct the void if you let it.


9 posted on 01/15/2008 7:03:38 AM PST by blackdog
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To: colorcountry

Pine forests ain’t exacly salad bars for wildlife ya know. With the canopy down, all the oaks will take over. Low brush will get sunlight, causing it to grow fast. Elk, deer, and herbivours will populate the area in larger numbers and thrive. One species demise becomes another’s opportunity until it’s their turn to come up with the short straw.


10 posted on 01/15/2008 7:09:04 AM PST by blackdog
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To: blackdog

It sure will self correct, no doubt.

However the circumstances that allowed for the expansion of the bark beetle, were weakened forests caused from overgrowth. The symptoms we are experiencing now are due to past policies of the Forest Service in controlling wild fires combined with Clinton politics of “do nothing” forest management (not controlling undergrowth - or thinning trees by logging). The ensuing years brought crowded, overgrown and weak trees that were susceptible to beetle.

The next step in the self-correction will be removal of the dead timber either by rational forest management or wildfire. Either way, It will correct, but there could be a huge loss of property or life in the process.


11 posted on 01/15/2008 7:11:12 AM PST by colorcountry (To anger a conservative, lie to him. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: colorcountry

Ever read Mel Ellis. I like his book “The Land, Alway’s The Land” He’s a true environmentalist, not some grant sponsored hack trying to insulate realestate values from nature.


12 posted on 01/15/2008 7:11:53 AM PST by blackdog
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To: rellimpank
Highest Temperature
The highest temperature recorded in Colorado is 118°, Fahrenheit.
This record high was recorded on July 11, 1888 at Bennett.

Lowest Temperature
The lowest temperature in Colorado, -61°, was recorded on February 1, 1985 at Maybell.

Average Temperature Monthly average temperatures range from a high of 98.8 degrees to a low of 36.2 degrees.

http://www.netstate.com/states/geography/co_geography.htm

13 posted on 01/15/2008 7:16:14 AM PST by rawhide
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To: rawhide

—thanks for the reference—


14 posted on 01/15/2008 7:19:50 AM PST by rellimpank (--don't believe anything the MSM tells you about firearms or explosives--NRA Benefactor)
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To: rellimpank

Professor Google told me.


15 posted on 01/15/2008 7:24:01 AM PST by rawhide
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To: blackdog

Haven’t read it. I’ll look it up.


16 posted on 01/15/2008 7:24:28 AM PST by colorcountry (To anger a conservative, lie to him. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: rellimpank

Alamosa, CO wasn’t nicknamed “The Nation’s Icebox” for no reason. While rare, -40 was not unheard of in the mountains around the San Luis Valley.


17 posted on 01/15/2008 7:27:36 AM PST by greyfoxx39 (Mitt willingly gives up his personal freedoms to his church..why would he protect YOURS!)
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To: rellimpank

Bark beetles went through our pinon trees like a storm here in Northern New Mexico. I know, because I have cords and cords of it, cut, split, and stacked in my yard.


18 posted on 01/15/2008 7:47:32 AM PST by pallis
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To: blackdog
Pine forests ain’t exacly salad bars for wildlife ya know.

Elk, deer, and herbivores will populate the area in larger numbers and thrive.

This is good news for hunters in the western states.

The bad news is the beetles won't attack pine trees in "Wilderness Areas" where roads have been closed to preserve the trees.

19 posted on 01/15/2008 7:48:54 AM PST by TYVets (God so loved the world he didn't send a committee)
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To: rellimpank

I wonder what would happen if they discovered that DDT would provide a good defense against the spread of this beetle plague? Would they start producing this chemical again?


20 posted on 01/15/2008 8:03:19 AM PST by 353FMG (Vote for the Person who will do the least damage to our country.)
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To: 353FMG
DDT doesn't work on the lifecycle of this critter. And DDT is still made in hugh quantities. It's banned as an active ingredient in pesticides. So in other countries they just lower the ratio percentage and it's now an inactive ingredient coupled with something else. Our mistake in this country was when they sprayed it all summer long at nights in neighborhoods all over the country for mosquito control in the 70's. They did it from trucks, helicopters, and aircraft.

Idiots!

21 posted on 01/15/2008 8:08:12 AM PST by blackdog
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To: rellimpank
On our Honeymoon 12 years ago we were staying at an expensive Mountain resort Lodge in the North Cascade. In the morning the floor seemed to be moving, we looked closer and found dozens of Pine beetle larva moving around. We at first thought they were maggots until the front desk explained what they were, and that sometimes they do come in to the building. Very gross. In the closet when we were packing up to leave we found hundreds more.
22 posted on 01/15/2008 8:19:28 AM PST by NavyCanDo
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To: NavyCanDo

Was that Sun Mountain?


23 posted on 01/15/2008 8:24:17 AM PST by goodnesswins (Being Challenged Builds Character! Being Coddled Destroys Character!)
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To: rellimpank
I think I saw that same headline back in 1962.


24 posted on 01/15/2008 8:28:06 AM PST by Larry Lucido (Hunter 2008)
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To: blackdog

The “static area” is North America. These beetles have destroyed a ton of trees in British Columbia. The only hope is a uper-killing frost. I forget the termperature but the larve die somewhere around 20 or 30 below. If it gets that cold and stays there they can be stopped.


25 posted on 01/15/2008 8:31:04 AM PST by Jack Black
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To: NonValueAdded
Confidential to lodgepole pines: evolve, dammit. Get some natural defenses going.

They've got a great natural defense for this. Mature trees die, they burn down killing the beetle infestation, the heat reaches the needed temperature to open the resin sealed cones, the seeds drop, and new lodgepoles grow in the newly opened meadows.

The problem is that burns were stopped for decades, and so were the clear-cutting that replaced them. Now, the forests are continuous, with no natural or artificial fire breaks. Therefore, the trees are ALL mature and subject to the beetles.

This was the same cause of the fires that devastated Yellowstone in the 80's.

26 posted on 01/15/2008 8:34:06 AM PST by LexBaird (Behold, thou hast drinken of the Aide of Kool, and are lost unto Men.)
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To: goodnesswins

Was that Sun Mountain?

Yep. Great place, but hit it at the wrong time of year.


27 posted on 01/15/2008 8:34:09 AM PST by NavyCanDo
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To: 353FMG
I wonder what would happen if they discovered that DDT would provide a good defense against the spread of this beetle plague? Would they start producing this chemical again?

Not effective on a forest wide basis, but if you just want to save the trees on your lot, I understand diesel oil kills them by suffocation.

28 posted on 01/15/2008 8:38:07 AM PST by LexBaird (Behold, thou hast drinken of the Aide of Kool, and are lost unto Men.)
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To: rellimpank; marsh2; forester; SierraWasp; Grampa Dave

Thanks for the ping.

The DUmmie media is just now discovering this fact.

At least their hair is perfect.

/s


29 posted on 01/15/2008 8:48:23 AM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: TYVets
"The bad news is the beetles won't attack pine trees in "Wilderness Areas" where roads have been closed to preserve the trees. "

I think you've got it wrong:
The beetles spread faster in dense Forest, lots of reasons but the article cites density as a big factor. Traditional 'wilderness areas' implies no effort to thin out or to remove damaged trees - which is also a factor in fires.

Human access is not a factor in this.
Human policies that kept land 'unspoiled' are a factor.

Two other points:
I remember watching the spread in the Boulder area back in the eighties. You could see it literally from month to month way back then. It's amazing to me that over 20 years were insufficient to develop any countermeasures. And,
I wonder if, after clearing large chunks of wasted Forest, resistant trees (not different pines) could be imported?

30 posted on 01/15/2008 9:11:57 AM PST by norton (deep down inside you know that Fred is your second choice - and there isn't a third choice)
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To: greyfoxx39
Alamosa, CO wasn’t nicknamed “The Nation’s Icebox” for no reason. While rare, -40 was not unheard of in the mountains around the San Luis Valley.

I thought Fraser, CO was the Icebox. I was there for a -34 degree night in the late 1980s

31 posted on 01/15/2008 1:59:52 PM PST by Dumb_Ox (http://kevinjjones.blogspot.com)
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To: Dumb_Ox

I see Fraser is contending for the title now...I left CO many years ago, but in the 60s Alamosa was called the ice box of the nation.


32 posted on 01/15/2008 2:24:03 PM PST by greyfoxx39 (Mitt willingly gives up his personal freedoms to his church..why would he protect YOURS!)
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To: rellimpank

Colorado needs to hire this lady, PhD in studying Beetles:

http://janalee.net/z_pdf/CV-JanaLee-2pg.pdf


33 posted on 01/15/2008 7:44:08 PM PST by Kevmo (Duncan Hunter won't "let some arrogant corporate media executive decide whether this campaign's over)
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