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ALERT: The Nearly Diversionary Presidential Elections
February 6, 2008 | Chuck Plante - aka backtothestreets

Posted on 02/06/2008 3:57:35 PM PST by backtothestreets

Listen Up!

Senator John McCain may be the Republican nominee for President, and will most likely face either Clinton or Obama in the General Election. One of the great concerns Republicans voice with McCain is his pro-amnesty stance, which coincidently is shared by the presumed Democratic rivals. They believe McCain as President, or either of the Democrats, would grant amnesty to illegal aliens. Well, our current President wasn't able to accomplish that, and this fact had better make conservatives pay closer attention to all the elections taking place this year.

Class II of the Senate has 33 seats up for election, plus an additional seat from another Class that was vacated. Class II is the most Republican populated Class. Of the present 49 Republicans in the US Senate, twenty-one are members of Class II, with the remaining 28 Republicans seats being members of Class I (9 Republican seats) and III (19 Republican seats).

As many as 13 of the Class II Senate seats are expected to face strong challenges, 11 of which are now held by Republicans (two in favor of amnesty - 9 opposed), and two by a Democrats (one in favor, one opposed).

Once again, very recent history tells us a pro-amnesty president is of no consequence in signing an amnesty bill if such a bill cannot be passed in the Senate.  That said, the presidential race will result in a new President of the Senate (Vice-President of the United States) to cast the deciding vote in case of a tied Senate vote when such a bill resurfaces.

The race for the White House is an extremely crucial race, but the greater battle will be for the overall composition of the US Senate, including who will serve as President of the Senate.

Here's a table of how the Class II Senators voted on the two amnesty bills before the Senate last Summer.

 

34 Senate Seats Up For Election In 2008 (22 Republican - 12 Democrat)

State

 

Incumbent

Outlook

Amnesty Bill Votes

       

S.1348
Vote 204
06/07/2007

S.1639
Vote 235
06/28/2007

Alabama

R

Jeff Sessions
(1997 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Alaska R Ted Stevens
(1968 - )
He will be 85 in 2008; under corruption investigation. Nay Nay
Arizona D Mark Pryor
(2003 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Colorado R Wayne Allard
(1997 - 2008)
Open seat; retiring. Received 51% of votes in 2002.  Candidates: former US Rep. Bob Schaffer (R) and current US Rep. Mark Udall (D) Nay Nay
Delaware D Joseph Biden
(1973 - )
Considered safe seat Yea Yea
Georgia R Saxby Chambliss
(2003 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Idaho R Larry E. Craig
(1991 - 2007)
Was to resign amid scandal. Nay Yea
Iowa D Tom Harkin
(1985 - )
Considered safe seat Yea Nay
Illinois D Richard Durbin
(1997 - )
Considered safe seat Yea Yea
Kansas R Pat Roberts
(1997 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Kentucky R Mitch McConnell
(1985 - )
Considered safe seat; senior senator and Senate Minority Leader. Seat targeted by DNC. Nay Nay
Louisiana D Mary Landrieu
(1997 - )
Possible Katrina voter backlash.  Received 52% of votes in 2002. Nay Nay
Maine R Susan Collins
(1997 - )
State leans Republican; Will be strongly contested.   Nay Nay
Massachusetts D John Kerry
(1985 - )
Considered safe seat Not Voting Yea
Michigan D Carl Levin
(1979 - )
Considered safe seat Not Voting Yea
Minnesota R Norm Coleman
(2003 - )
State leans Republican. Received 50% of votes in 2002.  Candidates: author and former radio talk show host Al Franken (D) DNC Targeted Nay Nay
Mississippi R Thad Cochran
(1979 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Montana D Max Baucus
(1978 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
New Jersey D Frank R. Lautenberg
(1982-2001, 2003-)
Considered safe Democratic seat; will be 84 in 2008 Yea Yea
North Carolina R Elizabeth Dole
(2003 - )
State leans Republican; Received 54% of votes in 2002.  Could be targeted by DNC Nay Nay
Nebraska R Chuck Hagel
(1997 - )
Retiring. Nay Yea
New Hampshire R John E. Sununu
(2003 - )
State leans Republican Nay Nay
New Mexico R Pete Domenici
(1973 - )
Will not run; implicated in US Attorneys firings. Nay Nay
Oklahoma R James M. Inhofe
(1994 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Oregon R Gordon H. Smith
(1997 - )
Received 56% of votes in 2002.  May be targeted by DNC Nay Nay
Rhode Island D Jack Reed
(1997 - )
Considered safe seat Yea Yea
South Carolina R Lindsey Graham
(2003 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Yea
South Dakota D Tim Johnson
(1997 - )
Considered safe Democratic seat; Health issues Not Voting - but supported the bill Not Voting - but supported the bill
Tennessee R Lamar Alexander
(2003 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Texas R John Cornyn
(2002 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Virginia R John W. Warner
(1979 - 2008)
Will not run Nay Nay
West Virginia D Jay Rockefeller IV
(1985 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Wyoming R Michael B. Enzi
(1997 - )
Considered safe seat Nay Nay
Wyoming R John Barrasso
(2007)
State leans strongly Republican; Special election to fill seat vacated by death of Craig Thomas Vacant Seat Nay
Vote Results of Class II Senators on S.1348 & S.1639 N = 25

Y = 5

N =  24

Y = 9

     May have heavily contested races  11 Republican - 2 Democrat
 

A total of thirteen Class II Senate seats, currently held by Senators that took stances on Immigration Reform Legislation in 2007, are expected to have strong competition in the November General Elections.  Ten opposed the amnesty bill, while three favored the bill.

Of the Class II Republican Senators voting Nay on Immigration Reform Legislation, 9 seats will face strong competition.  The two Republicans that supported the amnesty packages are due to leave office.

Of the Class II Democratic Senators voting Nay on Immigration Reform Legislation, 1 will face strong competition.  Additionally, 1 additional Senator absent due to health problems at the time votes were cast is a supporter of those measures, and may face stiff competition due to those health concerns.

Collectively, the net outcome of these races will determine the future fate of any amnesty bills taken up in the Senate in 2009 and 2010.

Also, do not assume a Democratic candidate for Senate would favor amnesty, nor that a Republican would oppose amnesty.  The 2006 Senate elections brought two of the staunches Democratic opponents of amnesty and illegal immigration to the Senate.  This is not about party affiliation.  This is about the future of the USA.  Look into the specific positions of all candidates.  Assume nothing.

If you are a conservative, and you are considering not voting in the November elections with hopes that by not voting it will somehow fix America or your political party, you may just put America in a real fix.  WAKE UP!


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: aliens; amnesty; congress; conservative; downballot; elections; gop; government; senateraces; thirdparty

1 posted on 02/06/2008 3:57:41 PM PST by backtothestreets
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To: backtothestreets

I vote downticket even if McStain is a no go.

(Presidentail Elections?)

Speelchek is for wimps!


2 posted on 02/06/2008 4:00:25 PM PST by dynachrome (Immigration without assimilation means the death of this nation~Captainpaintball)
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To: backtothestreets

Alaska picked Obama and Romney, which seems like a fine thing to do. The whole Party thing is entirely extra-Constitutional of course, which means that something is seriously amiss. However, Alaska had traditionally been Conservative and that may be coming to an end. Don’t expect to win Alaska for the Senate or the House. Could happen, but don’t count on it.


3 posted on 02/06/2008 4:02:49 PM PST by RightWhale (oil--the world currency)
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To: backtothestreets

There is a difference between not voting for McCain and not voting at all.

I won’t vote for McCain, but I will still vote.


4 posted on 02/06/2008 4:02:52 PM PST by luckystarmom
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To: dynachrome
"Speelchek is for wimps!"

Yeah, I saw that about a moment too late. LOL Have sent an FReepmail asking for an assist on my spelling of Presidential.
5 posted on 02/06/2008 4:07:13 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: backtothestreets; La Enchiladita; vince2285
Hey there backtothestreets! Thanks for posting this. It is very important that we keep the conservative critters in!

So, if McCain gets the nomination, do you have any suggestions for a third party candidate?

6 posted on 02/06/2008 4:14:51 PM PST by jan in Colorado ("It's easier to believe a lie one hears 1,000 times than to believe a fact that one has never heard)
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To: backtothestreets

The last I read, John Sununnu is in trouble in NH, and Allard in CO is going to be tough to replace as CO is trending Dhimmi, and they will be holding their Convention there.

Libby Dole should do well though.


7 posted on 02/06/2008 4:20:53 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3/Cry havoc and let slip the RINOS)
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In the Alaska R caucus, Paul beat out McCain for third place. Perhaps amusing but not surprising.


8 posted on 02/06/2008 4:32:34 PM PST by RightWhale (oil--the world currency)
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To: luckystarmom

Same here.


9 posted on 02/06/2008 4:54:28 PM PST by mtnwmn (mtnwmn)
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To: jan in Colorado

“So, if McCain gets the nomination, do you have any suggestions for a third party candidate?”

Hi Jan! I have made a decision for my vote, but before making that known, I have to preface my reasoning. As you are likely aware, my responses to issues important to me get some rather long explanations. My response to your question is no exception.

Top of my considerations for choices, a strict adherence to the Constitution of the United States. This position shouldn’t require a detailed reasoning, so moving along...

As President, Ronald Reagan had a couple of experiences as Commander-in-Chief that offered extremely different results for the nation. The first involved the terrorist attack on a US Marine barracks in Lebanon that killed 241 American servicemen. Soon thereafter, the Marines were moved offshore where they could not be targeted.

The second best exemplifies my own position on protecting our nation. It was a retaliatory strike on Libya for their role in sponsored terrorism. The strike was a complete success, accomplished by aircraft stationed well beyond the reprisal capabilities of Libya.

I learned, as I believe President Reagan learned from these two experiences, the absolute best way to protect our nation is by striking hard, and distancing our military forces as best as possible from areas where they could be easily targeted. Also, having our military stationed in potential hot spots offers our adversaries a degree of insurance as it prevents our military from using our most terrible weapons if the circumstances required them. I have deep respect and admiration for all our heroes serving in our military, and want steps taken to assure as many as possible remain living heroes.

Two added notes on the subject of national defense. There is no place on Earth our military cannot respond to militarily, from domestic bases, if the need arose. Although none of the candidates has suggested it, we would be well served by a President that would author a Doctrine for all nations of the world to see that spelled out exactly what we constitute an attack on our nation, along with a dire warning of consequences if that doctrine is violated.

Another major reason for my third party choice if on the ballot is the current condition of our economy and the fiscal state of the nation.

The economic stimulus proposals in Congress are dangerously flawed. They require the USA to take on further debt which in turn will weaken the dollar and continue our economic misfortunes. The best proposal I have heard thus far would completely end federal income taxes and reduce the federal government to 2000 levels to pay for the lost revenues. For most American households, this proposal would amount to having thousands of dollars every year, not merely a one time $500 to $800 rebate. We cannot continue to add to the heavy financial burdens already placed on future generation of Americans. It is madness, and from my perspective, abusive of the most defenseless among us, children.

As my initial post suggests, illegal immigration is also an issue of deep concern to me. I want our next President to have a very strong stance against illegal immigration, amnesty for illegal aliens, and a determination to secure our borders. On illegal immigration, the upcoming generations of Americans have more at stake than the current adult population. Right now, an estimated 200,000 youths, most of the children of American citizens, have been recruited, many through violence and coercion, to be in gangs affiliated to the foreign national paramilitary organization MS13 and the Zetas. As such, our own youths have been made surrogates of these two extremely violent organizations to carry out crime within our borders. We must rescue our youths from the peril that has infiltrated across our borders.

If John McCain is the Republican candidate, and if Ron Paul is on the ballot as a choice, I will not hesitate to cast my vote for Ron Paul. I am expecting (and hoping), the very high regard Ron Paul has with both the Constitution Party and the Libertarian Party, brings these two together to have Ron Paul on the ballot. That choice will likely bring me scorn, but my love of country is so strong that I am more than willing to bear that scorn.

I have read many times that removing our troops from Iraq would signal a defeat by terrorist. I have looked long and hard, and cannot find where anyone held that position some years back, after the 9-11 attacks, when a USAF base located in Saudi Arabia was abandoned under order of President GW Bush, and the justification for the abandonment, the presence of our military within Saudi lands was used by Islamic terrorists to recruit new members and participate in acts of terrorism. That President GW Bush escaped the criticism laid upon Ron Paul for wanting to bring our troops home from another Islamic land has not escaped my scrutiny.

Whatever anyone does with their vote, I hope and pray they place their families and nation ahead of themselves or their political party.

Well Jan, I think I’m going to go have a glass of milk and prepare myself for what might be some disrespectful and insulting responses from some FReepers.

Wishing you all the best,

Chuck


10 posted on 02/06/2008 6:57:50 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: backtothestreets
Thanks, Chuck, for your very informative reply!

If John McCain is the Republican candidate, and if Ron Paul is on the ballot as a choice, I will not hesitate to cast my vote for Ron Paul.

No scorn from me. I was wondering if there was a chance Dr. Paul would go to the Constitution Party. I will not vote for McCain or Huckabee, and I know many other conservatives feel the same way. I don't want to just leave that vote blank, but I also know a write in doesn't count unless it is an official candidate, so I guess we shall see what happens in the next few weeks.

Thanks again.

Jan

11 posted on 02/06/2008 7:54:58 PM PST by jan in Colorado ("It's easier to believe a lie one hears 1,000 times than to believe a fact that one has never heard)
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To: backtothestreets; EternalVigilance; The Mayor; trooprally

BRAVO! This is what the grassroots must work on to reap a decent harvest later at the national level....


12 posted on 02/06/2008 9:55:10 PM PST by The Spirit Of Allegiance (Public Employees: Honor Your Oaths! Defend the Constitution from Enemies--Foreign and Domestic!)
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To: jan in Colorado
Thank you too Jan. I knew you would not scorn me for my opinions. We have always had very positive exchanges whenever we encountered one another on FR. You have always shown me, and everyone I recall you ever responding to civility and respect.

Whatever the future holds for us, this will be the most pivotal election year of our time. This one, more than any we have witnessed thus far is for America!

13 posted on 02/06/2008 10:11:05 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: The Spirit Of Allegiance
Thanks! I hope no one thinks I am writing off the presidential contests. I would not. I want so much to grab everyone that is disparaging over the Republican presidential candidates this year, shake them, and hope to grab their attention.

I know you are aware of the countless posts made on FR, and elsewhere, raising fear over how the next president may change immigration law, affect taxes, or make Supreme Court appointments. In every instance, the president, whoever that is to be, will have to go through the Congress. In the Senate, many of the staunchest conservative seats will be challenged this year. The race for the White House is a major political battle. The bigger battle will be for control of the Senate as the change in composition of the Senate could either support a liberal president, or win a veto-proof majority to force even a conservative president to abandon principles.

It would be good for everyone to begin working now on Congressional District races too. All are up for reelection.

14 posted on 02/06/2008 10:30:53 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: RightWhale
Alaska intrigues me. I began doing some research of a personal nature on two states a few weeks ago with the possibility of a move in mind. The other state that has my interest is Wyoming.

True enough, Alaska has been a bedrock conservative state, but it has been changing somewhat.

Ted Stevens, the senior US Senator from Alaska, he has made of himself an embarrassment for all that are truly conservative Americans. His budgetary earmark antics are going to weigh heavy in senate races beyond Alaska. For the sake of the nation, I would hope he would step aside and allow a more principled conservative take his place.

15 posted on 02/06/2008 10:55:44 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: luckystarmom

Ditto!


16 posted on 02/06/2008 10:58:07 PM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: backtothestreets
"The race for the White House is an extremely crucial race, but the greater battle will be for the overall composition of the US Senate, including who will serve as President of the Senate."

That is worth repeating.

I hope all those who say they won't vote for " .... " at least go to the polls and vote for their local representative.

[Mr] T

17 posted on 02/07/2008 2:57:54 AM PST by trooprally (Never Give Up - Never Give In - Remember Our Troops)
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To: backtothestreets

I will definitely cast a vote for president. It won’t, however, be for McCain, Hillary, or Oh Black Obama. Down ticket, I will vote Republican.


18 posted on 02/07/2008 3:03:00 AM PST by Fresh Wind (Scrape the bottom, vote for Rodham!)
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To: backtothestreets

or win a veto-proof majority

If the Democrats seriously get a veto-proof majority, does that mean that they can pass anything they want. For example, if they want to vote on a pro gay marriage and they get veto proof majority does that automatically go through or is there something that the Republicans that are left can do?


19 posted on 02/07/2008 3:35:15 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator
A veto-proof majority negates the veto power of the president. It is difficult for one political party to have such a position in one house of Congress, let alone both, but has occurred many times in our history.

It is much more common for coalitions comprised of members from both parties to work together on passing legislation which if vetoed by a president would, when reintroduced in Congress, have the two-thirds required votes necessary to override the veto.

Since the latter political coalition formation of veto-proof congressional majorities is the more common, it makes it more important that voters look beyond party affiliation of the candidates, and investigate the issue positions of each candidate.

As for specifics on the Democrats and gay marriage, I think you are wondering if they could amend the Constitution to allow for such marriages. Congressional Democrats would not be able to do this even if they held a veto-proof majority as the amendment process requires ratification of proposed amendments by two-thirds of the states. What they could do with a veto-proof majority in Congress is pass legislation that recognizes same-sex marriages. This would have the effect of legitimizing such unions, and not require an amendment to the Constitution.

20 posted on 02/07/2008 8:07:26 AM PST by backtothestreets (My bologna has a first name, it's J-O-R-G-E)
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To: backtothestreets

I know Ted Stevens. He has done a fine job, but he ought to retire. The time comes.


21 posted on 02/07/2008 10:13:20 AM PST by RightWhale (oil--the world currency)
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To: backtothestreets
Big time bump!

Even if we're screwed on the Presidency, it is all the more reason to turn out and secure conservatives in congressional posts!

22 posted on 02/07/2008 3:50:13 PM PST by batter ("Always take the offensive...Never Dig in." - Gen Patton)
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To: backtothestreets

Chuck—I missed this yesterday. I am so glad that you posted this thread. This is very helpful information.


23 posted on 02/07/2008 6:55:44 PM PST by exit82 (People get the government they deserve. And they are about to get it--in spades.)
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To: backtothestreets
The only way I can see to avoid a bloodbath in Congress is for a strong conservative third-party candidate to emerge (well, the departure of John McCain would be another, but that doesn't seem likely...)

Even if such a candidate had little chance of winning, he could help the Republicans by drawing conservative voters who would otherwise stay home. And if the ticket won at least some Electoral Votes (a possibility I would think, with the right candidates) that could send a pretty strong message. What I'd most like would be for McCain to come in third, though that doesn't seem terribly likely. But if he gets sufficiently stomped, it could happen in the EC.

24 posted on 02/07/2008 7:13:18 PM PST by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: backtothestreets

BTTT


25 posted on 02/08/2008 6:28:39 AM PST by jokar (The Church age is the only time we will be able to Glorify God, http://www.gbible.org)
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