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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

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Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Blam. Crummy? Pitts? Great names to not be taken seriously. Of course, it's not as bad as their postgrad archaeology professor, Dr. Feeces-Cranium.
Within the wooden, chambered burial site, researchers have excavated a wine warmer, cremated human remains, a cloak pinned with brooches, a jet bead, divining rods (for fortune-telling), a series of surgical instruments, a strainer bowl last used to brew Artemisia-containing tea, a board game carefully laid out with pieces in play, as well as other objects... The surgical kit found in the grave includes iron and copper alloy scalpels, a surgical saw, hooks, needles, forceps and probes. Pitts said the collection mirrors basic medical tools from other parts of the Roman world... The board game and its arranged pieces, however, are anything but common. None other like it has ever been found at Roman-era sites in Great Britain. Surviving metal corners and hinges from the board allowed Pitts to reconstruct it as an 8-inch by 12-inch rectangle. Raised sides suggest dice might have been used. The white and blue glass counters were positioned with care. Some were straight across the sides, another in a diagonal line and one white marker close to the board's center.
Of course, the game wasn't just a game, but attributed to "divination". We don't know how it was used, so it must have been a ceremonial and/or cultic object. Or maybe this roll of parchment we found was just buried to serve as toilet paper in the afterlife. ;')

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GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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20 posted on 02/11/2008 11:42:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, February 10, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv

Crummy? Pitts?

Let me share with you some names of English towns and their meanings...

AFFPUDDLE.

A puddle which is hidden under a pivoted paving stone. You only know it’s there when you step on the paving stone and the puddle shoots up your leg.

AITH.

The single bristle that sticks out sideways on a cheap toothbrush.

AMLWYCH.

A British Rail sandwich which has been kept soft by being regularly washed and resealed in clingfilm.

BECCLES.

The small bone buttons placed in bacon sandwiches by unemployed guerilla dentists...

I guess you have to be a Brit (or an aussie) to be amused.


23 posted on 02/12/2008 2:57:45 AM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: SunkenCiv
The board game and its arranged pieces, however, are anything but common. None other like it has ever been found at Roman-era sites in Great Britain. Surviving metal corners and hinges from the board allowed Pitts to reconstruct it as an 8-inch by 12-inch rectangle. Raised sides suggest dice might have been used. The white and blue glass counters were positioned with care. Some were straight across the sides, another in a diagonal line and one white marker close to the board's center.

Very clearly a forerunner of Gobstones. /Harry Potter reference

25 posted on 02/12/2008 5:20:32 AM PST by CholeraJoe (Super What? How much longer until Nascar starts?)
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