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Vail: Beetle battle begins again this summer
Vail Daily ^ | May 14, 2008 | Edward Stoner

Posted on 05/15/2008 8:32:54 AM PDT by george76

Crews will cut trees on more than 200 acres around Vail this summer in their continuing efforts to battle the pine beetle epidemic.

This summer’s work will continue to create a ribbon of “defensible space” around the town that seeks to prevent the spread of fire...

“It’s to protect lives, homes and property from the effects of catastrophic wildfire,” ...

The work is part of the Vail Valley Forest Health Project, a multi-year effort coordinated by the Forest Service that seeks to combat the pine beetle infestation from East Vail to Edwards.

The mountain pine beetle epidemic has killed up to 90 percent of mature lodgepole pine in some areas near Vail.

“It’s just a cleanup of the fuel for fire,” ... “It’s very good to do it.”

(Excerpt) Read more at vaildaily.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; US: Colorado
KEYWORDS: beetle; defensiblespace; ecoping; environment; epidemic; forestservice; pinebeetle; pinebeetleepidemic; pinebeetles; usfs; vail; wildfires
Better late than never.

.

1 posted on 05/15/2008 8:32:55 AM PDT by george76
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To: george76

But, they are attempting to stop a special beetle from its natural habit, eating pine trees. These Vail liberals need to let the pine beetle live, as insects have rights, too.


2 posted on 05/15/2008 8:37:03 AM PDT by ConservativeMind
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To: ConservativeMind

“These Vail liberals need to let the pine beetle live, as insects have rights, too.”
These Vail liberals ARE insects!


3 posted on 05/15/2008 8:39:39 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ("Don't touch that thing")
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To: george76
Aren’t the beetles supposed to eat dead trees returning them to dust to feed the soil? Isn't it just nature at work?
4 posted on 05/15/2008 8:43:07 AM PDT by svcw (There is no plan B.)
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To: ConservativeMind
No, see, the only reason that the pine beetles are living is because of climate change. The temperature has been warmer in the winter, therefore the pine beetles are not dying out as they should. They make it through the winter and continue on. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/mar/19/usnews.conservationandendangeredspecies So, this beetle plague is all OUR and Bush's fault, not theirs.
5 posted on 05/15/2008 8:45:44 AM PDT by RepublitarianRoger2
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To: RepublitarianRoger2
Oops, that link didn't format properly. Here it is.
6 posted on 05/15/2008 8:46:51 AM PDT by RepublitarianRoger2
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To: svcw; forester; rellimpank; MtnClimber

These beetles only eat live trees, then move on after the kill.

It would be nice if they would eat dead trees.


7 posted on 05/15/2008 8:56:05 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Tweetle Beetles, excerpted from “The Fox in Socks”, by Dr Seuss

Very well, then
Mr. Knox, sir.
Let’s have a little talk
about tweetle beetles....

What do you know
about tweetle beetles?
well...

When tweetle beetles fight,
it’s called
a tweetle beetle battle.

And when they
battle in a puddle,
it’s a tweetle
beetle puddle battle.

AND when tweetle beetles
battle with paddles in a puddle,
they call it a tweetle
beetle puddle paddle battle.
AND...

When beetles battle beetles
in a puddle paddle battle
and the beetle battle puddle
is a puddle in a bottle...

...they call this
a tweetle beetle
bottle puddle
paddle battle muddle.
AND...
When beetles
fight these battles
in a bottle
with their paddles
and the bottle’s
on a poodle
and the poodle’s
eating noodles...

...they call this
a muddle puddle
tweetle poodle
beetle noodle
bottle paddle battle.
AND...

Now wait
a minute
Mr. Socks Fox!

When a fox is
in the bottle where
the tweetle beetls battle
with their paddles
in a puddle on a
noodle-eating poodle.
THIS is what they call...

...a tweetle beetle
noodle poodle bottles
paddled muddled duddled
fuddled wuddled
fox in socks, sir!

Fox in socks,
our game us done, sir.
Thank you for
a lot of fun, sir.


8 posted on 05/15/2008 9:00:14 AM PDT by Red Badger ( We don't have science, but we do have consensus.......)
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To: george76

When I lived in the mountains I was told by the tree cutter that the beetles only attack unhealthy trees.
I would think it is all part of natural selection in the forest.
But hey I could be wrong.


9 posted on 05/15/2008 9:06:07 AM PDT by svcw (There is no plan B.)
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To: svcw
I would think it is all part of natural selection in the forest.

No. They all get hit. The 90% tree mortality rate in infested areas is not a misprint. We have literally entire mountainsides full of dead trees in Colorado right now. One good hard winter would clear it up, but we haven't had one in a good decade.
10 posted on 05/15/2008 9:10:35 AM PDT by CowboyJay (There's always 2012...)
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To: svcw; colorcountry; marsh2; EggsAckley; Concho; editor-surveyor

They may be faster on unhealthy trees, but kill healthy ones too.

Never seen that they eat on dead wood.

picture from colorcountry


11 posted on 05/15/2008 9:15:34 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: CowboyJay

Last year when we visited family in Highlands Ranch we experienced two blizzards. We were snowed in twice.
You didn’t have a good snow fall in the mountains, thats something I did not know.


12 posted on 05/15/2008 9:19:06 AM PDT by svcw (There is no plan B.)
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To: george76
Better late than never.

Isn't that Mark Udall's campaign slogan?

13 posted on 05/15/2008 9:23:59 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: svcw

It takes some serious cold to kill the larvae. I can’t recall the specific numbers but IIRC -10F for 1-2 weeks solid to chill the trunks enough to freeze the little rascals dead. Snowfall doesn’t help a bit. In fact, high snowpack acts as an insulating blanket.


14 posted on 05/15/2008 9:58:35 AM PDT by CowboyJay (There's always 2012...)
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To: svcw
When I lived in the mountains I was told by the tree cutter that the beetles only attack unhealthy trees.

That "used" to be true before Colorado underwent a 10-year drought when all the trees got stressed from lack of water making all of them ripe for the pickings.

15 posted on 05/15/2008 10:22:36 AM PDT by moondoggie
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To: All

You can see in infected wood a purple stain. Every pine tree I cut down in Roosevelt National Forest in the late 70s (firewood) was stained purple. The need to develop GM pine trees.


16 posted on 05/15/2008 10:27:05 AM PDT by paristwelve (.......the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them)
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To: CowboyJay
We have literally entire mountainsides full of dead trees in Colorado right now.

Makes me sad since I'm moving to Colorado by the end of this year. I'm wondering if all of the main natural attractions in the state are going to be gone in a couple years, and we'll just have a sea of brown.

17 posted on 05/15/2008 10:44:32 AM PDT by RepublitarianRoger2
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To: george76

Beetles don’t eat the wood. They burrow into the cambium to lay eggs. The hatched larvae destroy considerable swaths of cambium, and if the tree is thereby girdled, it dies.

We’ve lost several pines over the last two years.


18 posted on 05/15/2008 2:13:00 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Jimmy Carter is the skidmark in the panties of American History)
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To: svcw; george76
"Aren’t the beetles supposed to eat dead trees returning them to dust to feed the soil?"

You're thinking of the Powder Post Beetle (AKA Stink Bug). Different animal. The Mountain Pine Beetle is the culpret.

19 posted on 05/15/2008 2:15:51 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Jimmy Carter is the skidmark in the panties of American History)
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To: svcw
"I was told by the tree cutter that the beetles only attack unhealthy trees."

Not so. Their attack is certainly more devastating on a tree that has a poor water supply, but without the beetle, the tree would live on for decades.

20 posted on 05/15/2008 2:17:59 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Jimmy Carter is the skidmark in the panties of American History)
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To: editor-surveyor

Thanks


21 posted on 05/15/2008 3:49:49 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: paristwelve

I logged for a lot of years in the Sangre de Cristos. I never did see purple stain, but I saw a lot of blue stain which was caused by improper handling of the logs after cutting. IIRC, it is a fungus which grows in the wet wood because of heat and high moisture content when the logs are not debarked soon after cutting. The bark holds in the moisture and contributes to heat rise in the log promoting the blue-stain. That will also happen to trees on a south slope which are beetle killed and become standing dead with the bark on and exposed to the sunlight. The log temperature raises and the hot wet interior develops blue-stain.

The forests of the greater West/Southwest have had less than adequate rainfall for several years. This has weakened the trees and made them attractive to the insects. When a plant is weakened because of drought or other environmental factors, the plant attempts to heal itself by manufacturing higher levels of sugars in the sap which attracts insects. When the cycle runs its course and the rainfalls come up and the winter temps go down, then the insects will go away. Fire could play a good part in correcting that, as it will do in many area. However, the fire attracts other insects, so it is a never ceasing circle.


22 posted on 05/16/2008 10:10:32 AM PDT by Concho (IRS--Americas real terrorist organization.)
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To: george76

Wouldn’t DDT dusted from airplanes put a dent in it?


23 posted on 05/18/2008 10:47:00 AM PDT by dsc
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To: dsc

DDT is illegal plus the bugs have moved on to live trees elsewhere.

These trees are already dead and a spark away from a fire storm that could kill people, wipe out lots of homes and businesses.

Prevention could have been effective ten years ago but the Sierra Club lawyers prevented that.


24 posted on 05/18/2008 10:54:16 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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