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Why Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican
National Black Republican Association ^ | Frances Rice

Posted on 10/23/2008 12:30:59 PM PDT by uncommonsense

It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans. Why? From its founding in 1854 as the anti-slavery party until today, the Republican Party has championed freedom and civil rights for blacks. And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: Slavery, Secession, Segregation and now Socialism.

It was the Democrats who fought to keep blacks in slavery and passed the discriminatory Black Codes and Jim Crow laws. The Democrats started the Ku Klux Klan to lynch and terrorize blacks. The Democrats fought to prevent the passage of every civil rights law beginning with the civil rights laws of the 1860's, and continuing with the civil rights laws of the 1950's and 1960's.

During the civil rights era of the 1960's, Dr. King was fighting the Democrats who stood in the school house doors, turned skin-burning fire hoses on blacks and let loose vicious dogs. It was Republican President Eisenhower who pushed to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and sent troops to Arkansas to desegregate schools. President Eisenhower also appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren to the U.S. Supreme Court which resulted in the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision ending school segregation. ...it was President Eisenhower who actually took action to effectively end segregation in the military.

Democrat President John F. Kennedy is lauded as a proponent of civil rights. However, Kennedy voted against the 1957 Civil rights Act while he was a senator, as did Democrat Senator Al Gore, Sr. And after he became president, John F. Kennedy was opposed to the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. King that was organized by A. Phillip Randolph who was a black Republican.

(Excerpt) Read more at nationalblackrepublicans.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: 2008; alvedaking; black; blackrepublicans; equity; freedom; mlk; republican
I found many interesting facts - especially the quote

"And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: Slavery, Secession, Segregation and now Socialism."

And "Few black Americans know that it was Republicans who founded the Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Unknown also is the fact that Republican Senator Everett Dirksen from Illinois was key to the passage of civil rights legislation in 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965. Not mentioned in recent media stories about extension of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is the fact that Dirksen wrote the language for the bill. Dirksen also crafted the language for the Civil Rights Act of 1968 which prohibited discrimination in housing. President Lyndon Johnson could not have achieved passage of civil rights legislation without the support of Republicans."

My question is, what the heck happened over the last 30 years? Why don't more black people understand what's written here?

1 posted on 10/23/2008 12:30:59 PM PDT by uncommonsense
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To: uncommonsense

I’m a minority — of Indian descent. When compared to the Democratic Party, the Republican one stands for individual freedom, liberty and a chance to make something of yourself.

To me the Democratic Party stands for misery, handouts, entitlements, and the failed communal mentality of so many societies that immigrants have fled from.

Yes, the Republicans have lost their way in recent years. But the party still (ostensibly) stands for FREEDOM and PROSPERITY.

Too bad so many of us with darker colored skin have bought the line that “Republicans hate minorities”.


2 posted on 10/23/2008 12:34:33 PM PDT by rom (Keep Senator Government from Spreading YOUR Wealth! McCain/Palin '08!)
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To: uncommonsense
Why don't more black people understand what's written here?
Even though the Republicans wrote the bill, the Democrats wrote the text books.

Have you ever seen Dirksen's name in a text book?

3 posted on 10/23/2008 12:35:17 PM PDT by 5thGenTexan
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To: uncommonsense

Thanks for posting, great information.


4 posted on 10/23/2008 12:41:15 PM PDT by Sergio (If a tree fell on a mime in the forest, would he make a sound?)
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To: uncommonsense

Did I hear correctly that the MLK III and MLK Jr’s niece both have come out in support of McCain?


5 posted on 10/23/2008 12:43:55 PM PDT by CatOwner
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To: uncommonsense

The History of “Republican Evil”

The Republican Party was formed in 1854 specifically to oppose the Democrats, and for more than 150 years, they have done everything they could to block the Democrat agenda. In their abuses of power, they have even used threats and military violence to thwart the Democrat Party’s attempts to make this a progressive country. As you read the following Republican atrocities that span three centuries, imagine if you will, what a far different nation the United States would be had not the Republicans been around to block the Democrats’ efforts.

March 20, 1854 Opponents of Democrats’ pro-slavery policies meet in Ripon, Wisconsin to establish the Republican Party

May 30, 1854 Democrat President Franklin Pierce signs Democrats’ Kansas-Nebraska Act, expanding slavery into U.S. territories; opponents unite to form the Republican Party

June 16, 1854 Newspaper editor Horace Greeley calls on opponents of slavery to unite in the Republican Party

July 6, 1854 First state Republican Party officially organized in Jackson, Michigan, to oppose Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

February 11, 1856 Republican Montgomery Blair argues before U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of his client, the slave Dred Scott; later served in President Lincoln’s Cabinet

February 22, 1856 First national meeting of the Republican Party, in Pittsburgh, to coordinate opposition to Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

March 27, 1856 First meeting of Republican National Committee in Washington, DC to oppose Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

May 22, 1856 For denouncing Democrats’ pro-slavery policy, Republican U.S. Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA) is beaten nearly to death on floor of Senate by U.S. Rep. Preston Brooks (D-SC), takes three years to recover

March 6, 1857 Republican Supreme Court Justice John McLean issues strenuous dissent from decision by 7 Democrats in infamous Dred Scott case that African-Americans had no rights “which any white man was bound to respect”

June 26, 1857 Abraham Lincoln declares Republican position that slavery is “cruelly wrong,” while Democrats “cultivate and excite hatred” for blacks

October 13, 1858 During Lincoln-Douglas debates, U.S. Senator Stephen Douglas (D-IL) states: “I do not regard the Negro as my equal, and positively deny that he is my brother, or any kin to me whatever”; Douglas became Democratic Party’s 1860 presidential nominee

October 25, 1858 U.S. Senator William Seward (R-NY) describes Democratic Party as “inextricably committed to the designs of the slaveholders”; as President Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of State, helped draft Emancipation Proclamation

June 4, 1860 Republican U.S. Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA) delivers his classic address, The Barbarism of Slavery

April 7, 1862 President Lincoln concludes treaty with Britain for suppression of slave trade

April 16, 1862 President Lincoln signs bill abolishing slavery in District of Columbia; in Congress, 99% of Republicans vote yes, 83% of Democrats vote no

July 2, 1862 U.S. Rep. Justin Morrill (R-VT) wins passage of Land Grant Act, establishing colleges open to African-Americans, including such students as George Washington Carver

July 17, 1862 Over unanimous Democrat opposition, Republican Congress passes Confiscation Act stating that slaves of the Confederacy “shall be forever free”

August 19, 1862 Republican newspaper editor Horace Greeley writes Prayer of Twenty Millions, calling on President Lincoln to declare emancipation

August 25, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln authorizes enlistment of African-American soldiers in U.S. Army

September 22, 1862 Republican President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation

January 1, 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, implementing the Republicans’ Confiscation Act of 1862, takes effect

February 9, 1864 Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton deliver over 100,000 signatures to U.S. Senate supporting Republicans’ plans for constitutional amendment to ban slavery

June 15, 1864 Republican Congress votes equal pay for African-American troops serving in U.S. Army during Civil War

June 28, 1864 Republican majority in Congress repeals Fugitive Slave Acts

October 29, 1864 African-American abolitionist Sojourner Truth says of President Lincoln: “I never was treated by anyone with more kindness and cordiality than were shown to me by that great and good man”

January 31, 1865 13th Amendment banning slavery passed by U.S. House with unanimous Republican support, intense Democrat opposition

March 3, 1865 Republican Congress establishes Freedmen’s Bureau to provide health care, education, and technical assistance to emancipated slaves

April 8, 1865 13th Amendment banning slavery passed by U.S. Senate with 100% Republican support, 63% Democrat opposition

June 19, 1865 On “Juneteenth,” U.S. troops land in Galveston, TX to enforce ban on slavery that had been declared more than two years before by the Emancipation Proclamation

November 22, 1865 Republicans denounce Democrat legislature of Mississippi for enacting “black codes,” which institutionalized racial discrimination

December 6, 1865 Republican Party’s 13th Amendment, banning slavery, is ratified

February 5, 1866 U.S. Rep. Thaddeus Stevens (R-PA) introduces legislation, successfully opposed by Democrat President Andrew Johnson, to implement “40 acres and a mule” relief by distributing land to former slaves

April 9, 1866 Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Johnson’s veto; Civil Rights Act of 1866, conferring rights of citizenship on African-Americans, becomes law

April 19, 1866 Thousands assemble in Washington, DC to celebrate Republican Party’s abolition of slavery

May 10, 1866 U.S. House passes Republicans’ 14th Amendment guaranteeing due process and equal protection of the laws to all citizens; 100% of Democrats vote no

June 8, 1866 U.S. Senate passes Republicans’ 14th Amendment guaranteeing due process and equal protection of the law to all citizens; 94% of Republicans vote yes and 100% of Democrats vote no

July 16, 1866 Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of Freedman’s Bureau Act, which protected former slaves from “black codes” denying their rights

July 28, 1866 Republican Congress authorizes formation of the Buffalo Soldiers, two regiments of African-American cavalrymen

July 30, 1866 Democrat-controlled City of New Orleans orders police to storm racially-integrated Republican meeting; raid kills 40 and wounds more than 150

January 8, 1867 Republicans override Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of law granting voting rights to African-Americans in D.C.

July 19, 1867 Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of legislation protecting voting rights of African-Americans

March 30, 1868 Republicans begin impeachment trial of Democrat President Andrew Johnson, who declared: “This is a country for white men, and by God, as long as I am President, it shall be a government of white men”

May 20, 1868 Republican National Convention marks debut of African-American politicians on national stage; two – Pinckney Pinchback and James Harris – attend as delegates, and several serve as presidential electors

September 3, 1868 25 African-Americans in Georgia legislature, all Republicans, expelled by Democrat majority; later reinstated by Republican Congress

September 12, 1868 Civil rights activist Tunis Campbell and all other African-Americans in Georgia Senate, every one a Republican, expelled by Democrat majority; would later be reinstated by Republican Congress

September 28, 1868 Democrats in Opelousas, Louisiana murder nearly 300 African-Americans who tried to prevent an assault against a Republican newspaper editor

October 7, 1868 Republicans denounce Democratic Party’s national campaign theme: “This is a white man’s country: Let white men rule”

October 22, 1868 While campaigning for re-election, Republican U.S. Rep. James Hinds (R-AR) is assassinated by Democrat terrorists who organized as the Ku Klux Klan

November 3, 1868 Republican Ulysses Grant defeats Democrat Horatio Seymour in presidential election; Seymour had denounced Emancipation Proclamation

December 10, 1869 Republican Gov. John Campbell of Wyoming Territory signs FIRST-in-nation law granting women right to vote and to hold public office

February 3, 1870 After passing House with 98% Republican support and 97% Democrat opposition, Republicans’ 15th Amendment is ratified, granting vote to all Americans regardless of race

May 19, 1870 African-American John Langston, law professor and future Republican Congressman from Virginia, delivers influential speech supporting President Ulysses Grant’s civil rights policies

May 31, 1870 President U.S. Grant signs Republicans’ Enforcement Act, providing stiff penalties for depriving any American’s civil rights

June 22, 1870 Republican Congress creates U.S. Department of Justice, to safeguard the civil rights of African-Americans against Democrats in the South

September 6, 1870 Women vote in Wyoming, in FIRST election after women’s suffrage signed into law by Republican Gov. John Campbell

February 28, 1871 Republican Congress passes Enforcement Act providing federal protection for African-American voters

March 22, 1871 Spartansburg Republican newspaper denounces Ku Klux Klan campaign to eradicate the Republican Party in South Carolina

April 20, 1871 Republican Congress enacts the Ku Klux Klan Act, outlawing Democratic Party-affiliated terrorist groups which oppressed African-Americans

October 10, 1871 Following warnings by Philadelphia Democrats against black voting, African-American Republican civil rights activist Octavius Catto murdered by Democratic Party operative; his military funeral was attended by thousands

October 18, 1871 After violence against Republicans in South Carolina, President Ulysses Grant deploys U.S. troops to combat Democrat terrorists who formed the Ku Klux Klan

November 18, 1872 Susan B. Anthony arrested for voting, after boasting to Elizabeth Cady Stanton that she voted for “the Republican ticket, straight”

January 17, 1874 Armed Democrats seize Texas state government, ending Republican efforts to racially integrate government

September 14, 1874 Democrat white supremacists seize Louisiana statehouse in attempt to overthrow racially-integrated administration of Republican Governor William Kellogg; 27 killed

March 1, 1875 Civil Rights Act of 1875, guaranteeing access to public accommodations without regard to race, signed by Republican President U.S. Grant; passed with 92% Republican support over 100% Democrat opposition

September 20, 1876 Former state Attorney General Robert Ingersoll (R-IL) tells veterans: “Every man that loved slavery better than liberty was a Democrat… I am a Republican because it is the only free party that ever existed”

January 10, 1878 U.S. Senator Aaron Sargent (R-CA) introduces Susan B. Anthony amendment for women’s suffrage; Democrat-controlled Senate defeated it 4 times before election of Republican House and Senate guaranteed its approval in 1919

July 14, 1884 Republicans criticize Democratic Party’s nomination of racist U.S. Senator Thomas Hendricks (D-IN) for vice president; he had voted against the 13th Amendment banning slavery

August 30, 1890 Republican President Benjamin Harrison signs legislation by U.S. Senator Justin Morrill (R-VT) making African-Americans eligible for land-grant colleges in the South

June 7, 1892 In a FIRST for a major U.S. political party, two women – Theresa Jenkins and Cora Carleton – attend Republican National Convention in an official capacity, as alternate delegates

February 8, 1894 Democrat Congress and Democrat President Grover Cleveland join to repeal Republicans’ Enforcement Act, which had enabled African-Americans to vote

December 11, 1895 African-American Republican and former U.S. Rep. Thomas Miller (R-SC) denounces new state constitution written to disenfranchise African-Americans

May 18, 1896 Republican Justice John Marshall Harlan, dissenting from Supreme Court’s notorious Plessy v. Ferguson “separate but equal” decision, declares: “Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens”

December 31, 1898 Republican Theodore Roosevelt becomes Governor of New York; in 1900, he outlawed racial segregation in New York public schools

May 24, 1900 Republicans vote no in referendum for constitutional convention in Virginia, designed to create a new state constitution disenfranchising African-Americans

January 15, 1901 Republican Booker T. Washington protests Alabama Democratic Party’s refusal to permit voting by African-Americans

October 16, 1901 President Theodore Roosevelt invites Booker T. Washington to dine at White House, sparking protests by Democrats across the country

May 29, 1902 Virginia Democrats implement new state constitution, condemned by Republicans as illegal, reducing African-American voter registration by 86%

February 12, 1909 On 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth, African-American Republicans and women’s suffragists Ida Wells and Mary Terrell co-found the NAACP

June 18, 1912 African-American Robert Church, founder of Lincoln Leagues to register black voters in Tennessee, attends 1912 Republican National Convention as delegate; eventually serves as delegate at 8 conventions

August 1, 1916 Republican presidential candidate Charles Evans Hughes, former New York Governor and U.S. Supreme Court Justice, endorses women’s suffrage constitutional amendment; he would become Secretary of State and Chief Justice

May 21, 1919 Republican House passes constitutional amendment granting women the vote with 85% of Republicans in favor, but only 54% of Democrats; in Senate, 80% of Republicans would vote yes, but almost half of Democrats no

April 18, 1920 Minnesota’s FIRST-in-the-nation anti-lynching law, promoted by African-American Republican Nellie Francis, signed by Republican Gov. Jacob Preus

August 18, 1920 Republican-authored 19th Amendment, giving women the vote, becomes part of Constitution; 26 of the 36 states to ratify had Republican-controlled legislatures

January 26, 1922 House passes bill authored by U.S. Rep. Leonidas Dyer (R-MO) making lynching a federal crime; Senate Democrats block it with filibuster

June 2, 1924 Republican President Calvin Coolidge signs bill passed by Republican Congress granting U.S. citizenship to all Native Americans

October 3, 1924 Republicans denounce three-time Democrat presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan for defending the Ku Klux Klan at 1924 Democratic National Convention

December 8, 1924 Democratic presidential candidate John W. Davis argues in favor of “separate but equal”

June 12, 1929 First Lady Lou Hoover invites wife of U.S. Rep. Oscar De Priest (R-IL), an African-American, to tea at the White House, sparking protests by Democrats across the country

August 17, 1937 Republicans organize opposition to former Ku Klux Klansman and Democrat U.S. Senator Hugo Black, appointed to U.S. Supreme Court by FDR; his Klan background was hidden until after confirmation

June 24, 1940 Republican Party platform calls for integration of the armed forces; for the balance of his terms in office, FDR refuses to order it

October 20, 1942 60 prominent African-Americans issue Durham Manifesto, calling on southern Democrats to abolish their all-white primaries

April 3, 1944 U.S. Supreme Court strikes down Texas Democratic Party’s “whites only” primary election system

August 8, 1945 Republicans condemn Harry Truman’s surprise use of the atomic bomb in Japan. The whining and criticism goes on for years. It begins two days after the Hiroshima bombing, when former Republican President Herbert Hoover writes to a friend that “[t]he use of the atomic bomb, with its indiscriminate killing of women and children, revolts my soul.”

February 18, 1946 Appointed by Republican President Calvin Coolidge, federal judge Paul McCormick ends segregation of Mexican-American children in California public schools

July 11, 1952 Republican Party platform condemns “duplicity and insincerity” of Democrats in racial matters

September 30, 1953 Earl Warren, California’s three-term Republican Governor and 1948 Republican vice presidential nominee, nominated to be Chief Justice; wrote landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education

December 8, 1953 Eisenhower administration Asst. Attorney General Lee Rankin argues for plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education

May 17, 1954 Chief Justice Earl Warren, three-term Republican Governor (CA) and Republican vice presidential nominee in 1948, wins unanimous support of Supreme Court for school desegregation in Brown v. Board of Education

November 25, 1955 Eisenhower administration bans racial segregation of interstate bus travel

March 12, 1956 Ninety-seven Democrats in Congress condemn Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education, and pledge to continue segregation

June 5, 1956 Republican federal judge Frank Johnson rules in favor of Rosa Parks in decision striking down “blacks in the back of the bus” law

October 19, 1956 On campaign trail, Vice President Richard Nixon vows: “American boys and girls shall sit, side by side, at any school – public or private – with no regard paid to the color of their skin. Segregation, discrimination, and prejudice have no place in America”

November 6, 1956 African-American civil rights leaders Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy vote for Republican Dwight Eisenhower for President

September 9, 1957 President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republican Party’s 1957 Civil Rights Act

September 24, 1957 Sparking criticism from Democrats such as Senators John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, President Dwight Eisenhower deploys the 82nd Airborne Division to Little Rock, AR to force Democrat Governor Orval Faubus to integrate public schools

June 23, 1958 President Dwight Eisenhower meets with Martin Luther King and other African-American leaders to discuss plans to advance civil rights

February 4, 1959 President Eisenhower informs Republican leaders of his plan to introduce 1960 Civil Rights Act, despite staunch opposition from many Democrats

May 6, 1960 President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republicans’ Civil Rights Act of 1960, overcoming 125-hour, around-the-clock filibuster by 18 Senate Democrats

July 27, 1960 At Republican National Convention, Vice President and eventual presidential nominee Richard Nixon insists on strong civil rights plank in platform

May 2, 1963 Republicans condemn Democrat sheriff of Birmingham, AL for arresting over 2,000 African-American schoolchildren marching for their civil rights

June 1, 1963 Democrat Governor George Wallace announces defiance of court order issued by Republican federal judge Frank Johnson to integrate University of Alabama

September 29, 1963 Gov. George Wallace (D-AL) defies order by U.S. District Judge Frank Johnson, appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, to integrate Tuskegee High School

June 9, 1964 Republicans condemn 14-hour filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act by U.S. Senator and former Ku Klux Klansman Robert Byrd (D-WV), who still serves in the Senate

June 10, 1964 Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) criticizes Democrat filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act, calls on Democrats to stop opposing racial equality

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was introduced and approved by a staggering majority of Republicans in the Senate. The Act was opposed by most southern Democrat senators, several of whom were proud segregationists—one of them being Al Gore Sr. Democrat President Lyndon B. Johnson relied on Illinois Senator Everett Dirkson, the Republican leader from Illinois, to get the Act passed.

June 20, 1964 The Chicago Defender, renowned African-American newspaper, praises Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) for leading passage of 1964 Civil Rights Act

March 7, 1965 Police under the command of Democrat Governor George Wallace attack African-Americans demonstrating for voting rights in Selma, AL

March 21, 1965 Republican federal judge Frank Johnson authorizes Martin Luther King’s protest march from Selma to Montgomery, overruling Democrat Governor George Wallace

August 4, 1965 Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) overcomes Democrat attempts to block 1965 Voting Rights Act; 94% of Senate Republicans vote for landmark civil right legislation, while 27% of Democrats oppose

August 6, 1965 Voting Rights Act of 1965, abolishing literacy tests and other measures devised by Democrats to prevent African-Americans from voting, signed into law; higher percentage of Republicans than Democrats vote in favor

July 8, 1970 In special message to Congress, President Richard Nixon calls for reversal of policy of forced termination of Native American rights and benefits

September 17, 1971 Former Ku Klux Klan member and Democrat U.S. Senator Hugo Black (D-AL) retires from U.S. Supreme Court; appointed by FDR in 1937, he had defended Klansmen for racial murders

February 19, 1976 President Gerald Ford formally rescinds President Franklin Roosevelt’s notorious Executive Order authorizing internment of over 120,000 Japanese-Americans during WWII

September 15, 1981 President Ronald Reagan establishes the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, to increase African-American participation in federal education programs

June 29, 1982 President Ronald Reagan signs 25-year extension of 1965 Voting Rights Act

August 10, 1988 President Ronald Reagan signs Civil Liberties Act of 1988, compensating Japanese-Americans for deprivation of civil rights and property during World War II internment ordered by FDR

November 21, 1991 President George H. W. Bush signs Civil Rights Act of 1991 to strengthen federal civil rights legislation

August 20, 1996 Bill authored by U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari (R-NY) to prohibit racial discrimination in adoptions, part of Republicans’ Contract With America, becomes law

April 26, 1999 Legislation authored by U.S. Senator Spencer Abraham (R-MI) awarding Congressional Gold Medal to civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks is transmitted to President

January 25, 2001 U.S. Senate Republican Policy Committee declares school choice to be “Educational Emancipation”

March 19, 2003 Republican U.S. Representatives of Hispanic and Portuguese descent form Congressional Hispanic Conference

May 23, 2003 U.S. Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) introduces bill to establish National Museum of African American History and Culture

February 26, 2004 Hispanic Republican U.S. Rep. Henry Bonilla (R-TX) condemns racist comments by U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown (D-FL); she had called Asst. Secretary of State Roger Noriega and several Hispanic Congressmen “a bunch of white men...you all look alike to me”

* * *

There you have it. What a different country this would be, had not Republicans blocked the agenda of Democrats every step of the way. But this evil organization is far from through. Now, they want to give education vouchers to public school children, so kids of every race and class can attend private schools of their CHOICE. Where will we get our garbage collectors, dishwashers and ditch diggers if blacks, hispanics and white trash have access to a good education? They are trying to stop undocumented immigration, meaning the cheapest labor Democrats have had since the days of slavery will be taken away. They are trying to end segregation and slavery all over again!

And in true Republican tradition, they just can’t stop poking their nose into other people’s business, trying to destroy a woman’s right to choose. They are trying to crush the secret vision of Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, who once said, “”We should hire three or four colored ministers, preferably with social-service backgrounds, and with engaging personalities. The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal. We don’t want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population…”

Is there NO end to the freedoms these fascists will try to destroy?! No matter how many lies must be told, no matter how many schoolchildren must be mis-educated, no matter how many elections must be rigged, THE REPUBLICANS MUST BE STOPPED!

posted by Lone Ranger


6 posted on 10/23/2008 12:43:57 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: uncommonsense

At the time of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, almost all the Senators and Congressmen from the South were Democrats. However, when it came to vote for the Civil Rights Act of 1965 almost all of the Southern Democrats voted Against the Bill and all the Southern Republicans Voted Against the Civil Rights Act of 1965.

Therefore, the opposition to Civil Rights was not a Democrat vs. Republican issue but rather a regional matter and the few in the South the did support Civil Rights were Democrats.


7 posted on 10/23/2008 12:45:07 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: uncommonsense
My question is, what the heck happened over the last 30 years? Why don't more black people understand what's written here?

Money, power, control, and anti-intellectual indoctrination.


8 posted on 10/23/2008 12:47:14 PM PDT by rdb3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2S3WtJYgy1Q << Hear this. Feel this.)
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To: RasterMaster

For some reason your list of Republican Civil Rights accomplishments does not include the names of Southern Republicans who voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1965.
Could you please add those names?


9 posted on 10/23/2008 12:48:56 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: RasterMaster

You’ve got to admit that the goal of of historical revisionism has been achieved. The murder of Dr King and the media assassination of Wubya has achieved their ends.


10 posted on 10/23/2008 12:49:27 PM PDT by Young Werther (Julius Caesar (Quae Cum Ita Sunt. Since these things are so.))
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To: trumandogz

See the post above by Lone Ranger. That’s a long list of promoting equality and fairness.


11 posted on 10/23/2008 12:51:54 PM PDT by uncommonsense
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To: Young Werther
You’ve got to admit that the goal of of historical revisionism has been achieved. The murder of Dr King and the media assassination of Wubya has achieved their ends.

Indeed. They have acheived their goals.


12 posted on 10/23/2008 12:53:13 PM PDT by rdb3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2S3WtJYgy1Q << Hear this. Feel this.)
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To: uncommonsense

Then why is it the none of the Southern Republicans supported the Civil Rights Act of 1964?


13 posted on 10/23/2008 12:54:45 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: uncommonsense

Then why is it the none of the Southern Republicans supported the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

Civil Rights was a regional issue, not a party issue.


14 posted on 10/23/2008 12:55:29 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: Gooch

Sad to say but the republican party are infested with RINO’s, democrats and pussies.


16 posted on 10/23/2008 1:00:47 PM PDT by jrolfedrev
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To: CatOwner

His niece is Alveda King

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3PWiOSMUFI

I would put MLK III as a NO. He’s supporting Obama.


17 posted on 10/23/2008 1:06:50 PM PDT by GoLightly
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To: CatOwner
"MLK Jr’s niece "

Dr. Alveda King. She said she cannot vote for Obama. Alveda King is very strongly pro-life.

18 posted on 10/23/2008 1:13:29 PM PDT by cookcounty (Sarah and Todd Palin : They're more like us than we are.)
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To: Gooch

MLK was actually a Registered Republican, this article is not conjecture, it is a statment of fact and history explaining possible reasons why.

The Black vote turned democrap under Lyndon Johnson who signed the ‘great society’ legislation remarking (actual quote- don’t flame me) “I’ll have them niggers voting democrat for years”


19 posted on 10/23/2008 1:15:06 PM PDT by Mr. K (Some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help)
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To: Gooch
Okay, but what was the question?


20 posted on 10/23/2008 1:15:19 PM PDT by rdb3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2S3WtJYgy1Q << Hear this. Feel this.)
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To: RasterMaster

Excellent list! It needs to be broadcast far and wide.


21 posted on 10/23/2008 1:37:59 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Are there any men left in Washington? Or, are there only cowards? Ahmad Shah Massoud)
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To: uncommonsense

I learned these things about the Democrat Party when I was eight years old. (I was homeschooled...If wasn’t homeschooled, I probably wouldn’t have found out). Ever since, I have been a Republican. Neither party sticks to its platform the way that they should, but at least the Republican platform is to stand up for what is right. So many black people I know identify with the Democrats, and I think it because the media paints conservatives as intolerant bigots, standing in the way of progress and civil rights.


22 posted on 10/23/2008 1:38:50 PM PDT by AmericanDude (Hmm.)
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To: All

Another great Republican, U.S. Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, authored and introduced the 1960 Civil Rights Act. It was also he who was most responsible — more than any other individual — for the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. As Republican Leader in the Senate, even though his party was in the minority, Dirksen crafted the strategy that overcame long odds and tenacious Democratic opposition.

The Democrats weren’t just internally conflicted about the 1964 Civil Rights Act; a significant number of them actually filibustered it — preventing an up or down vote on the bill. Eventually, however — thanks to Dirksen’s leadership — this landmark legislation did get the vote it deserved. As with all of the previous civil rights legislation in our nation’s history, it passed with significantly more support from Republicans than from Democrats. The same was true for the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which became law the following year.

http://www.ccrgop.org/CivilRights.htm

http://forums.hannity.com/showthread.php?t=973891

http://archive.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2002/12/13/194350.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voting_Rights_Act


23 posted on 10/23/2008 1:45:33 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: uncommonsense

Is there any actual PROOF that he was a Republican? It is my understanding that he voted for Kennedy in 1960 and LBJ in 1964.


24 posted on 10/23/2008 1:48:02 PM PDT by MBB1984
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To: uncommonsense

bttt


25 posted on 10/23/2008 1:49:34 PM PDT by petercooper (I am a bitter clinger!)
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To: trumandogz

Southern Republicans were about as scarce as hen’s teeth in 1964.


26 posted on 10/23/2008 1:50:58 PM PDT by MBB1984
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To: trumandogz

“If you look at the make up of the Senate for the 88th Congress, you can see that each and every one of the Senate seats for these states was 100%, tried and true Democrat.”

http://charliefoxtrotblog.blogspot.com/2008/02/mason-confusion-line.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/88th_United_States_Congress


27 posted on 10/23/2008 2:11:02 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: All

The bill came before the full Senate for debate on March 30, 1964 and the “Southern Bloc” of southern Senators led by Richard Russell (D-GA) launched a filibuster to prevent its passage. Said Russell “We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1964


28 posted on 10/23/2008 2:13:11 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: All

The original House version:

Southern Republicans: 0-10 (0%-100%)


The Senate version:

Southern Republicans: 0-1 (0%-100%)
(this was Senator John Tower of Texas)


29 posted on 10/23/2008 2:14:52 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: All

Civil Rights Act of 1964

An early version, H.R. 3994, was first introduced by Representative Vito Marcantonio from New York on March 13, 1941, but it died in committee. A second version, H.R. 7142, was introduced by Representative Vito Marcantonio from New York on July 20, 1942, and it also died in committee.

The final House version was H.R. 7152. It was drafted by President John F. Kennedy and introduced in the House by Representative Emanuel “Manny” Celler (D) of New York on June 20, 1963. Co-sponsors included Mr. James Roosevelt of California, and William M. McCulloch (R) .

Senator Everitt Dirksen, Senator Hubert Humphrey, Senator Mike Mansfield, Thomas Kuchel (R-CA), and 38 other senators joined in co-sponsorship of the bill for the omnibus Civil Rights Act of 1964 in the Senate.

Voting Rights Act of 1965 S 1564,

President Lyndon Baines Johnson presented S 1564 to a joint session of Congress on March 15, 1964.

The original sponsors and presenters to Congress (March 18, 1964) were Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (Illinois) and Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield, who worked to design it with Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach at the request of President Lyndon Baines Johnson.
Sources: http://www.congresslink.org/print_basics_histmats_votingrights_contents.htm AND http://www.congresslink.org/print_basics_histmats_civilrights64text.htm


30 posted on 10/23/2008 2:18:03 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: MBB1984

“As I point out in my book, Back to Basics for the Republican Party, MLK told Vice President Nixon publicly that he had voted Republican in 1956, but after not voting in 1960 he actually campaigned for Lyndon Johnson in 1964. So, calling MLK a Republican is misleading. See http://www.republicanbasics.com for more information.”

8 posted on Thursday, August 31, 2006 11:06:51 AM by since 1854

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1693196/posts


31 posted on 10/23/2008 2:24:53 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: trumandogz
Then why is it the none of the Southern Republicans supported the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

I suspect most of the region's Republicans supported Civil Rights in 1964. There just wasn't many of them in office in 1964. The career of Frank Johnson of Alabama is good place to start if one is interested in learning of pro-civil rights southern Republicans.

32 posted on 10/23/2008 2:49:48 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

My mistake the Civil Rights Act was in 1964.

However, no Republicans from the South voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


33 posted on 10/23/2008 3:05:41 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: RasterMaster

Try again.

Sen. John Tower of Texas (R) Voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1965 as did the ten GOP Congressman from the South.

Therefore, Civil Rights was a regional issue not a party issue.


34 posted on 10/23/2008 3:17:12 PM PDT by trumandogz (The Democrats are driving us to Socialism at 100 MPH -The GOP is driving us to Socialism at 97.5 MPH)
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To: uncommonsense

btt


35 posted on 10/23/2008 3:33:59 PM PDT by Cacique (quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat ( Islamia Delenda Est ))
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To: MBB1984

I got that form the National Black Republicain Association.


36 posted on 10/23/2008 7:02:41 PM PDT by uncommonsense
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To: trumandogz

Yes, it was those mean-spirited YANKEE REPUBLICANS who pushed for Civil rights in the south since the JACKASS party had locked up most states at that time.


37 posted on 10/23/2008 7:51:26 PM PDT by RasterMaster (DUmocrats - the party of slavery, sedition, subversion, socialism & surrender)
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To: rdb3
You're right, but how sad! They’ve now been trained to see freedom as oppression and inaction as discrimination and helplessness. The only solution is to wait for someone else to provide for them.

The Rats need a subservient, reliable underclass to keep them in power to “fix” the problems they create, and “fight” for them.

Conditioned behavior has been ingrained - job well done. This video explains it very well: Yuri Bezmenov, a video on propaganda techniques used by the KGB (“useful idiots”):

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/k6KUDv1wzraWhwlBt1

38 posted on 10/24/2008 10:04:51 AM PDT by uncommonsense
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To: rdb3

“My question is, what the heck happened over the last 30 years? Why don’t more black people understand what’s written here?”

Public School education became a tool to spread liberal propaganda. Too many people’s minds are mush.


39 posted on 10/31/2008 1:14:58 PM PDT by keats5 ("I hope for his sake, Joe Biden got that VP thing in writing."- Rudy)
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To: uncommonsense

I sent this to Drudge.


40 posted on 10/31/2008 1:16:45 PM PDT by keats5 ("I hope for his sake, Joe Biden got that VP thing in writing."- Rudy)
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