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FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Exploiters and the Exploited
A Publius Essay | 28 February 2009 | Publius

Posted on 02/28/2009 7:49:58 AM PST by Publius

Part I: Non-Contradiction

Chapter VII: The Exploiters and the Exploited

Synopsis

We meet Mr. Mowen of Amalgamated Switch and Signal of Connecticut, who needs training from Rearden’s men before he can handle Rearden Metal, all the while bleating about whether the metal is real or a fraud.

In Colorado, Dagny is having problems with the Rio Norte Line. Ben Nealy isn’t up to the job, and she and Hank have had to buy up bankrupt companies and shuttered plants to make the necessary equipment. Her chief engineer balks at reinforcing an ancient bridge with Rearden Metal.

Ellis Wyatt shows up and gives Dagny some good advice on upgrading the facilities for Nealy’s crew. Dagny takes Nealy into his work car and tells him what is to be done and how.

Hank Rearden arrives in his new car, a Hammond of Colorado, and his attitude toward Dagny is back to where it was when they were working together at his steel mill. They spar verbally, and Dagny is pleased at her emotions. Hank designs a new bridge of Rearden Metal on the spot with an estimated cost of less than half what her chief engineer has projected. He intends to confront the doubts about the safety of Rearden Metal by building an entire bridge out of it.

Hank is in Colorado looking for a copper mine because he doesn’t want to deal with Francisco. Hank and Dagny have a sense of accomplishment, but when Dagny asks Hank for a lift in his plane to New York, Hank tells her he is flying to Minnesota. When she shows up at the local airport and finds there are no flights out that day, she discovers that Rearden has taken off for New York after all.

Back in New York, Dagny and Jim go to a dinner and conference at the New York Business Council where Dagny is scheduled to speak about Rearden Metal. Jim is in a tizzy. The National Council of Metal Industries, headed by Orren Boyle, has condemned it as a threat to public safety. The union is not sure it wants its members to work with it. A convention of grade school teachers in New Mexico has passed a resolution that children should not be permitted to ride the Rio Norte Line because of it. As Jim complains, Dagny notices that every good, reliable piece of equipment on the streets of New York has originated in Colorado.

Dagny is furious to discover that Jim has tried to get Dan Conway to sell his railroad to Taggart Transcontinental; Jim’s rationale was to use Phoenix-Durango’s steel on the Rio Norte Line to avoid using Rearden Metal altogether. Jim wants to bid for Conway’s rail, but his looter friends at the National Alliance of Railroads are all attempting to get their own hands on it.

But it gets worse when Dagny discovers that she is there tonight to debate Bertram Scudder on nationwide radio on the topic, “Is Rearden Metal a lethal product of greed?” Dagny says the question is not debatable, and she jumps out of the car. She takes refuge in a diner in the shadow of a deserted ruin of an office building and orders coffee. An old bum gives Dagny a sermon on nihilism; in the middle of it the counter boy comments, “Who is John Galt?” Another bum tells Dagny yet another legend of Galt, this one about finding a fountain of youth and being unable to bring it back.

Dr. Potter of the State Science Institute sits in Hank Rearden’s office and asks him not to upset the economy by introducing Rearden Metal. Hank is not bothered by the disapproval of his metal by the Institute. Potter believes that if the metal is not a physical danger, it’s a social danger to the country. He offers to buy the rights to the metal from Rearden for a lot of government money to keep it off the market. Rearden refuses, and Potter issues a veiled threat about Rearden needing friends in politics and government.

Mr. Mowen bails from the project and refuses to make any more switches of Rearden Metal because too many people don’t like it.

Dagny discovers from Eddie Willlers that the State Science Institute has warned people against using Rearden Metal but has not really said why. Taggart stock has crashed, Nealy has quit and the union won’t let its members work with the metal.

Dagny visits the Institute in New Hampshire to meet with Dr. Robert Stadler, once the head of the Physics Department at Patrick Henry University and one of the nation’s leading scientists. Stadler has not even read the Institute’s report on Rearden Metal. He knows that there is nothing wrong with it but says that there are other “non scientific” factors. He is concerned that the Institute, with all its government funding, has not been able to come up with anything useful. But Rearden did, and that makes the Institute look bad. The survival of the Institute is more important than the survival of Hank Rearden.

Stadler tells Dagny of the three star students he and Hugh Akston shared at Patrick Henry University. One star was Francisco, the other was Ragnar Danneskjøld – and the third was a man who is probably a second assistant bookkeeper somewhere. (No spoilers please!)

Dagny finds a boozed-up Jim hiding at the old Taggart estate on the Hudson. Jim has been using his pull in DC, first to get the government to seize Dan Conway’s railroad, and then to convince the Alliance to let Conway run his line for another year. But Conway has refused. Dagny tells him she is going to start her own company and build the Rio Norte Line for Taggart Transcontinental on a turnkey basis. Eddie Willers will take over Operations. Dagny will call her company the John Galt Line.

But Francisco will not help fund the line, nor will he tell Dagny why. But he hints that her premises are wrong and that she must reach the correct conclusion herself. When Dagny suggests that she crawl, Francisco comes over to her and tenderly kisses her hand. Realizing he has given away too much, he puts on the act of a cad. He is horrified to discover that Dagny is going to name the line after John Galt, and he tells her that Galt will come to claim it.

Dagny meets with Hank to confirm the orders for the John Galt Line. The financiers are the Colorado industrialists whom the line will serve. Even Ken Danagger of the Pennsylvania coal company is in, and Hank signs on. Wyatt and Danagger have already agreed to purchase Rearden Metal simply because of the State Science Institute’s partial condemnation of it. Stockton Foundry of Colorado is going to finish the switches that Mowen wouldn’t make. The union won’t try to stop the line because there are so few union jobs available.

While Dagny reads the structural specifications for the bridge, Hank indulges in a violent sexual fantasy about her.

An Atlantic Southern freight train carrying copper for the Rearden mills slams into a passenger train in New Mexico, and the railroad can’t do anything but make excuses. Hank puts together a rescue effort that gets the copper moving again, although Hank decides to move his ore in the future via Taggart Transcontinental.

In the middle of all this, Hank’s mother shows up at the mill and asks him to give his brother Philip a job that he doesn’t deserve. Hank effectively throws her out.

Hank now tries to find some steel for the Ward Harvester Company of Minnesota, but he is interrupted by the news that the National Legislature had enacted the Equalization of Opportunity Bill. Wesley Mouch is nowhere to be found.

Hank suddenly comes up with a new design for the rail bridge. He calls Dagny in Colorado and tells her about his new design, which will outperform any bridge ever built and cost no more than a culvert. There is a hint that Dagny has broken into tears.

The State Science Institute

Rand knew about the National Science Foundation, headquartered in Arlington, VA, because it had been founded by an act of Congress in 1950. Every year it funds about ten thousand grants for research and development. It performs no actual research but acts as a clearinghouse for grants.

Rand’s State Science Institute, headquartered in New Hampshire, is a research and development facility; her model is the Department of Agriculture’s laboratory system. These facilities engage in pure research and occasionally come up with something useful. (I worked at one such lab over 40 years ago.) But the State Science Institute has not been able to come up with anything useful, and it views Rearden Metal – or anything created by the private sector – as a threat to its existence. Bureaucracies are terribly protective of their turf.

Some Discussion Topics

  1. I goofed. I forgot to increment last week’s body count by two instead of one: Hank Rearden’s foreman resigned and disappeared. In this chapter we discover that Taggart Transcontinental’s original chief engineer left five years ago.
  2. "I’ve hired you to do a job, not to do your best – whatever that is,“ says Dagny. Ben Nealy answers, “That’s an unpopular attitude, Miss Taggart...” What has happened to make quality unpopular?
  3. At the airport in Colorado, there are no flights out. What does this tell us about the state of American transportation?
  4. Rand unveils another one of her metaphorical images. This one is the ruin of the old office building with a good, clean diner in its shadow. Let’s take this one apart and see what makes it tick.
  5. The counter boy says, “Who is John Galt?” What is the meaning behind his words? How does it differ from others who have asked the magic question?
  6. Dr. Robert Stadler says a mouthful. “How can one deal in truth when one deals with the public? ... Men are not open to truth or reason ... Yet we have to deal with them. If we want to accomplish anything, we have to deceive them into letting us accomplish it. Or force them. They understand nothing else.” There’s a lot here to analyze, and its sources range from Marx to von Hayek to Alinsky.
  7. Dagny: ”The bedbugs will stop crawling from out of unlikely corners, because they won’t have the incentive of a big company to bite.” Did Ayn Rand predict the rise of a predatory legal system? Did she also see the rise of hedge funds?
  8. Hank: ”By means of getting from me a salary he can’t earn for work he can’t do?” His mother: “If you loved your brother, you’d give him a job he didn’t deserve, precisely because he didn’t deserve it ... If a man deserves a job, there’s no virtue in giving it to him. Virtue is the giving of the undeserved.” Holy ethics, Batman! Is this for real? Does the old biddy have a clue to the implications of what she is saying? Let’s analyze this, because not only is this “morality” totally upside down, we seem to be living in it today. (The government’s solution to the mortgage problem?)
  9. Hank’s violent sexual fantasy certainly explains a lot. What insights do we get into Hank and into Rand’s philosophy of sexuality?
  10. When the Union Pacific lost its route through the Oregon Cascades due to a mountain-slide during a blizzard, it had crews on the line as soon as weather permitted, stabilizing the mountain. Then it moved an army of workers and hopper cars into the area until the line was rebuilt, all the while rerouting traffic around the problem by sending freight as far away as Salt Lake City. Contrast this with the Atlantic Southern’s attitude when a mere 1200 feet of track is torn up in a collision.

Next Saturday: The John Galt Line


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Free Republic; News/Current Events; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: atlasshrugged; borg; brainscrub; freeperbookclub; indocterination; mindcontrol
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1 posted on 02/28/2009 7:49:59 AM PST by Publius
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To: Publius

bfltr


2 posted on 02/28/2009 7:50:51 AM PST by mnehring (!!!!!!!SHRUG!!!!!!!!!)
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To: ADemocratNoMore; Aggie Mama; alexander_busek; AlligatorEyes; AmericanGirlRising; Amityschild; ...
FReeper Book Club

Atlas Shrugged

Part I: Non-Contradiction

Chapter VII: The Exploiters and the Exploited

Ping! The thread has been posted.

Earlier threads:
Our First Freeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Theme
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Chain
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Top and the Bottom
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Immovable Movers
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Climax of the d’Anconias
FReeper Book Club: Atlas Shrugged, The Non-Commercial

3 posted on 02/28/2009 7:51:34 AM PST by Publius (The Quadri-Metallic Standard: Gold and silver for commerce; lead and brass for protection.)
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To: Publius

Please put me on the ping list.

Who is John Galt?


4 posted on 02/28/2009 8:02:19 AM PST by stockpirate (A people unwilling to use violent force to preserve liberty deserve the tyrants that rule them. SP-0)
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To: Publius
One “emotion” I couldn't control while reading is the hatred I had for Hanks mother. His wife I had contempt for and his brother was nothing but a wuss.

But that mother of his......I was hoping he would just slap that putrid face of hers.

5 posted on 02/28/2009 8:06:04 AM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Publius

Thanks much. That’s the chapter I’m on right now. You’ve given me thinking points for when I get done in a few hours, sittin’ at the Juice & Java in Orem, Utah, sipping my morning cup, looking at Snowy Mt. Timpanogos rising to 12,000 Ft just six miles away, and reading.


6 posted on 02/28/2009 8:07:34 AM PST by Sundog (Atlas Shrugged needs to be required reading . . . Which character are you?)
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To: Publius

Junk science and opinion leading to public policy with regard to Rearden Metal reminds me of all that has been done in the name of “saving the planet.”


7 posted on 02/28/2009 8:35:54 AM PST by Savagemom (Educational Maverick (at least while homeschooling is still legal))
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To: Publius

#2 “I’ve hired you to do a job, not to do your best – whatever that is,“ says Dagny. Ben Nealy answers, “That’s an unpopular attitude, Miss Taggart...” What has happened to make quality unpopular?

I think this goes again to how we raise our children. “All you can do is your best.” “As long as you tried, that’s good enough.” To suggest to a child that his best isn’t good enough - it just isn’t done. We want to encourage them, but we don’t want them to feel bad if their effort falls short.

Maybe some children need this approach, and would give up too easily without it. But it’s the ones who do beat themselves up after a failure who are relentless in trying again and again until they get it right - and I would guess that these are the Dagnys and Hanks of the world.

We frown on perfectionism because of its negative side-effects, but without these driven individuals, where would our world be?


8 posted on 02/28/2009 8:47:59 AM PST by Savagemom (Educational Maverick (at least while homeschooling is still legal))
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To: GeorgiaDawg32

Ping to the book club!

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

CB


9 posted on 02/28/2009 9:33:10 AM PST by CottonBall
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To: Sundog

How high up the mountain is the cave?


10 posted on 02/28/2009 9:34:14 AM PST by ExGeeEye (COTUS 2A should be the USA's ONLY gun law.)
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To: NoGrayZone

Hanks mother has always infuriated me. Hank’s mother may only be a character in a novel, but, unfortunately, she has too many counterparts in real life.


11 posted on 02/28/2009 9:37:57 AM PST by stylin_geek (Liberalism: comparable to a chicken with its head cut off, but with more spastic motions)
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To: Savagemom
Junk science and opinion leading to public policy with regard to Rearden Metal reminds me of all that has been done in the name of “saving the planet.”

You hit it out of the park! Now you can strut around the bases with pride.

12 posted on 02/28/2009 9:47:36 AM PST by Publius (The Quadri-Metallic Standard: Gold and silver for commerce; lead and brass for protection.)
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To: NoGrayZone
But that mother of his...

She and that whole nest of vipers will get theirs in a later chapter. Pour yourself a tall one when that happens.

13 posted on 02/28/2009 9:49:40 AM PST by Publius (The Quadri-Metallic Standard: Gold and silver for commerce; lead and brass for protection.)
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To: Savagemom
We frown on perfectionism because of its negative side-effects, but without these driven individuals, where would our world be?

This is good, but we need to go deeper.

Have you ever held a job, usually in a union shop, where quality was discouraged because it showed everyone else up? How about a school where the students got that attitude from their fellows about not making everybody else look bad, and the principal and the teachers could not break through?

14 posted on 02/28/2009 9:53:58 AM PST by Publius (The Quadri-Metallic Standard: Gold and silver for commerce; lead and brass for protection.)
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To: Publius
Dagny asks Hank for a lift in his plane [from Colorado] to New York

General Aviation is one of those things that Rand obviously never understood. She has her people flying hither and yond as if these plane were time machines. Back when she wrote the book Commercial Aviation was still largely driven by piston engines; and the sort of planes that folks like Reardon and Dagny might have been able to fly might fly 140 mph tops. I once flew in one of these from NJ to South Florida (and back). You have to make one or two fuel stops along the way and it takes a full day to make the one-way trip. It's a kicky thing to do, but it's not for people who are in a hurry. No one could make it from Colorado to NY without an overnight stop someplace. And I haven't even talked about weather yet!

ML/NJ

15 posted on 02/28/2009 10:26:28 AM PST by ml/nj
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To: stylin_geek

Unfortunately, you are too correct.


16 posted on 02/28/2009 10:29:15 AM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Publius

I finished the book yesterday! I can’t say anymore without giving anything away!!


17 posted on 02/28/2009 10:30:11 AM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: ml/nj
General Aviation is one of those things that Rand obviously never understood.

The implication being that there were other things she didn't understand as well. She did know how to get people to buy her long, boring, and poorly written books, though.

18 posted on 02/28/2009 10:38:00 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Publius
Rand’s State Science Institute, headquartered in New Hampshire, is a research and development facility; her model is the Department of Agriculture’s laboratory system.

Well, of course, I don't know what it looked like in 1957, but when I visited the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) in Gaithersberg, MD, sometime in the early 80s, it reminded me of the Physics Building at Rensselaer Poly where I went to school (in the mid 60s). I was doing some early robotics work (for a capitalist) and it turns out we had competitors at NBS so we went to see what they were doing. (And here I thought that the NBS was supposed to be the keeper of the golden ruler!) My guess is that NASA, which didn't exist in 1957 but did come about soon after, has multiple installations which would make the NBS building I visited look like an elementary school science lab. The government now, at least, is infested with government employees doing "research." I don't know anything about the Dept of Agriculture.

ML/NJ

19 posted on 02/28/2009 10:47:24 AM PST by ml/nj
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To: Moonman62
long, boring, and poorly written books

When something is as widely respected and referred to as ofter as Atlas Shrugged is, it pays to look in the mirror if you cannot find any virtue in it. There was a time when I might have applied the same adjectives as you have used to Wagner's opera and to The Ring in particular. I was smart enough to realize that the problem was not Wagner's but mine. I decided to work at liking and understanding these as best as I could, and now I am no longer an ignoramus.

ML/NJ

20 posted on 02/28/2009 10:56:56 AM PST by ml/nj
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To: Moonman62

Did you read the book?


21 posted on 02/28/2009 11:01:26 AM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Moonman62
long, boring, and poorly written

Well, I'll give you long. Boring, no way, unless you're not seeing the forest for the trees. And poorly written - well, how many books are still as intensely relevant and influential fifty years after being written? That's rare company and I don't know how else you can define the writing skill.

22 posted on 02/28/2009 11:12:14 AM PST by LikeLight (http://www.believersguidetolegalissues.com)
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To: ml/nj
When something is as widely respected and referred to as ofter as Atlas Shrugged is,

But it isn't widely respected. They've been trying to make a movie out of it for decades, but they can't, mainly because it's a stinker.

23 posted on 02/28/2009 11:13:18 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Moonman62

It’s not respected by the “chattering class”, because it points out their follies. Among people who have to deal with life’s realities, it is very well respected. In 2000 there was a poll of best books of the 20th century. Among the literati class, the #1 book was Ulysses. The readers poll ranked AS # 1. And we should be glad Hollywood hasn’t made a movie of it, as they would rip it to shreds.


24 posted on 02/28/2009 11:23:30 AM PST by gracie1
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To: Moonman62
"But it isn't widely respected. They've been trying to make a movie out of it for decades, but they can't, mainly because it's a stinker."

How many wonderful books have been made into a movie that actually doesn't suck? There is NO WAY to make a great movie out of this book without butchering it to death.

You are an imbecile, who's only motive is to create "trouble" on a thread. Atlas Shrugged is way too close as to what barry is doing now, in our time.Perhaps that is why you are so against it.

25 posted on 02/28/2009 11:40:18 AM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: gracie1
Among the literati class, the #1 book was Ulysses. The readers poll ranked AS # 1.

That readers poll was an internet poll wasn't it?

26 posted on 02/28/2009 11:46:49 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: NoGrayZone

Atlas Shrugged is Dianetics for selfish people.


27 posted on 02/28/2009 11:48:03 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Moonman62

I don’t know how they compiled the poll. It was done by Random House. You may peruse it here.<Phttp://www.randomhouse.com/modernlibrary/100bestnovels.html


28 posted on 02/28/2009 11:58:20 AM PST by gracie1
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To: Moonman62
"Atlas Shrugged is Dianetics for selfish people."

Don't you mean producers, you little mooch?

29 posted on 02/28/2009 12:02:52 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: NoGrayZone

When are you going on strike? Why do such smart, independent people need to cling to such a poorly written book like a security blanket, whining and crying about what the liberals are doing, yet doing nothing about it except bawking “Atlas Shrugged” all over the internet like a bunch of chickens?


30 posted on 02/28/2009 12:07:42 PM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Moonman62

Is it not selfishness to extoll the “virtue” of rewarding the indolent class, in an attempt to draw attention to your “self-sacrifice” and “public service”? That in effect is what Hanks mother is doing and many of our modern day philantropists and do-gooders are doing. Their foundations and non-profits exist to obtain grants for their “projects”. As long there are needy people, they have their cause for being. If anyone actually solves the problems they claim to defend, they will thus be out of work. So for the organization, the goal is to put on the appearance of doing a “good work”, while not really putting a dent in the root cause. I’m not saying all organizations are like this, but many are. I believe they are called “poverty pimps”. I don’t think we even need to go into government welfare.


31 posted on 02/28/2009 12:10:56 PM PST by gracie1
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To: Moonman62
On strike? I don't belong to a union, I work for a small company. Who is “clinging” to a book? The only things I cling to are my gun and Bible. Heck, even your "messiah" said so.

This is a FReeper book club. We read a book and discuss it.

The million dollar question is “why are YOU so opposed to this book”?

32 posted on 02/28/2009 12:13:34 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: gracie1
"I’m not saying all organizations are like this,"

I am.

33 posted on 02/28/2009 12:14:59 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Publius
Since this group is oriented toward comparing AS to current events, I'd like to make an observation without getting into the details of the chapter just yet.

I decided that the evening of President Obamas speech would be wasteful of my time so I decided to sit down and read this chapter with no distractions. The next day, as I was listening to the reviews of the Presidents speech, I thought that they might as well be reviewing the chapter that I had read the previous night. The words weren't exact but the gist of the news was about the dystopian society presented in Atlas Shrugged.

How many times can it be said that a person was able to read about history as it is happening?

34 posted on 02/28/2009 12:15:28 PM PST by whodathunkit (Shrugging as I leave for the Gulch)
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To: CottonBall

went out and got a new copy today..gonna get caught up with my reading (to catch up to y’all) while reviewing the previous threads..

BTW, at Barnes and Noble today the checkout girl asked if I belonged to their book club..told her no..she said, you should join, from what you’re buying you appear to want some good information (little smile)..a closet conservative..LOL


35 posted on 02/28/2009 12:16:49 PM PST by GeorgiaDawg32 (A democrat will break your leg, then hand you a crutch and take credit for your being able to walk.)
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To: Publius

I have to admit quite a lot of emotional satisfaction in Hank throwing his Mom out of the office...His home life would be a lot better if he used the same techniques there.

Of course he would be living alone but that would be an improvement to the constant carping, the sly remarks and the assaults on his values.


36 posted on 02/28/2009 12:19:56 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: whodathunkit
"How many times can it be said that a person was able to read about history as it is happening?"

I had to put the book down many times because of just that.

I've actually started using a lot of the terms from that book in my "normal day" speak. It fits so well.

37 posted on 02/28/2009 12:20:18 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: GeorgiaDawg32

Last week, I went to our village bookstore, which also sells used books. I got an original! I love “old stuff”.


38 posted on 02/28/2009 12:22:06 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Savagemom

The discrediting of science in our own age began with Rachael Carson..

It has continued with the environmental movement, and now Global warming.

I was raised with science being the touch stone of truth. Now the looters of science have turned it into the fabrication of fiction.

Unforgivable.


39 posted on 02/28/2009 12:23:13 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: Publius
Have you ever held a job, usually in a union shop, where quality was discouraged because it showed everyone else up? How about a school where the students got that attitude from their fellows about not making everybody else look bad, and the principal and the teachers could not break through?

Absolutely! And women are especially subject to the social pressure not to be *too* smart.

So you're saying that the problem isn't just the parents and teachers trying to protect everyone's fragile self-esteem, but also the peers who punish those who DO try to excel. It's no wonder we're drifting toward mediocrity as a nation - and this new "let government take care of you" administration will do nothing to inspire achievement either.

40 posted on 02/28/2009 12:23:54 PM PST by Savagemom (Educational Maverick (at least while homeschooling is still legal))
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To: TASMANIANRED

Didn’t Solomon himself say it was better to live on the roof than with a contentious wife? <:)


41 posted on 02/28/2009 12:24:01 PM PST by gracie1
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To: TASMANIANRED
I think that is a struggle which a lot of us face now. Take for instance, a fight against the socialist/commie we have now, shoving this crap down our throats.

In order to fight against it, we must “break laws”. However, that goes against our every being. It seems to leave us in a “between rock and hard place”. The only solace I get is remembering Jesus fought against the same battle.

42 posted on 02/28/2009 12:26:48 PM PST by NoGrayZone (Who Is John Galt?)
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To: Publius

My Mom raised me with the attitude of doing anything without my best effort was shameful.

I always knew internally if I was putting out 100% or 80%.

Helped me to learn my limitations and the areas where I excelled.

If you don’t have it internally you will fold to peer pressure, If you do, it doesn’t matter how much they push , you will hold to your internal barometer.

Much of this novel is about character..Not the role that folks play in the book but what they are.


43 posted on 02/28/2009 12:30:17 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: Moonman62
She did know how to get people to buy her long, boring, and poorly written books, though.

Your comment is an insult to everyone investing the time to read this book, to this thread, and to this website.

Why are you even wasting your time here?

44 posted on 02/28/2009 12:32:58 PM PST by Lou L
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To: Moonman62

Hollywood doesn’t make movies about great things any more..They make movies out of comic books and old TV shows.


45 posted on 02/28/2009 12:39:16 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: NoGrayZone
The only things I cling to are my gun and Bible.

What did Rand have to say about your Bible?

46 posted on 02/28/2009 12:41:38 PM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Lou L

So only people who have something good to say about the book are allowed?


47 posted on 02/28/2009 12:42:20 PM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Publius

Thanks for this series Publius, I’ve been following it from the beginning even though I haven’t actively participated. Can you add me to your ping list?
Atlas Shrugged is becoming more relevant all the time.


48 posted on 02/28/2009 12:43:32 PM PST by Cymbaline (I repeat myself when under stress I repeat myself when under stress I repeat myself when under stres)
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To: gracie1

Might have been proverbs.


49 posted on 02/28/2009 12:44:25 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: NoGrayZone

I’ve been thinking a lot about the same thing.


50 posted on 02/28/2009 12:45:58 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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