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The American Dream of Home Ownership Has Become a Nightmare
US News ^ | September 23, 2010 | Mortimer B. Zuckerman

Posted on 09/23/2010 9:46:19 AM PDT by Kaslin

The disappearance of home equity value is a lead weight on the recovery

Why has housing been such a core element in the story of American civilization?

Culturally a decent house has been a symbol of middle-class family life. Practically, it has been a secure shelter for the children, along with access to a good free education. Financially it has been regarded as a safe store of value, a shield against the vagaries of the economy, and a long-term retirement asset. Indeed, for decades, a house has been the largest asset on the balance sheet of the average American family. In recent years, it provided boatloads of money to homeowners through recourse to cash-out refinancing, in effect an equity withdrawal from their once rapidly appreciating home values.

These days the American dream of home ownership has turned into a nightmare for millions of families. They wake every day to the reality of a horrible decline in the value of the home that has meant so much to them. The pressure to meet mortgage payments on homes that have lost value has been especially shocking—and unjust—for the millions of unemployed through no fault of their own. For the baby boomer generation, a home is now seen not as the cornerstone of advancement but a ball and chain, restricting their ability and their mobility to move and seek out a job at another location. They just cannot afford to abandon the equity they have in their homes—and they can't sell in this miserable market.

American homeowners have experienced an unprecedented decline in their equity net of mortgage debt. The seemingly never-ending fall in prices has brought an average decline of at least 30 percent. Furthermore, the country is now going through an unprecedented nationwide slide in sales, despite the fact that long-term mortgage interest rates nationwide plummeted recently to a record low of 4.3 percent before rising slightly. The result is that home occupancy costs for home purchases are now down to roughly 15 percent of family income, dramatically lower than the conventional, affordable figure of 25 percent of family income devoted to home occupancy costs. Yet new home sales, pending home sales, and mortgage applications are down to a 13-year low.

The economics of home ownership could hardly be more disastrously opposite to the expectations of generation after generation. Millions of homes have been foreclosed upon. About 11 million residential properties, or about 23 percent of such properties with mortgages, have mortgage balances that exceed the home's value. Given the total inventory, and the shadow inventory of empty homes, many experts expect prices to fall another 5 to 10 percent. That would bring the decline to 40 percent from peak-to-trough and expose an estimated 40 percent of homeowners to mortgages in excess of the value of their homes.

The growing risk of disappearing equity invites more strategic defaults on mortgages. Homeowners with negative equity are tempted simply to mail in their keys to their friendly lender even if they can afford the mortgage payment. Banks don't want to take the deflated properties onto their books because they will then have to declare a financial loss and still have to worry about maintaining the properties.

Little wonder foreclosure has not been enforced on a quarter of the people who haven't made a single mortgage payment in the last two years. A staggering 8 million home loans are in some state of delinquency, default, or foreclosure. Another 8 million homeowners are estimated to have mortgages representing 95 percent or more of the value of their homes, leaving them with 5 percent or less equity in their homes and thus vulnerable to further price declines. A huge percentage will never be able to catch up on their payment deficits.

The pace of foreclosures was briefly slowed by loan modifications brought on by government programs. Alas, the programs have not been working as hoped. Half of the borrowers have been redefaulting within 12 months, even after monthly payments were cut by as much as 50 percent. The foreclosure pipeline remains completely clogged. As it unclogs, a new wave of homes will come on the market and precipitate additional downward pressure on prices. The number of foreclosed homes put on the market by banks will be a more powerful influence on the further decline of home prices than either consumer demand or interest rates.

A well-balanced housing market has a supply of about five to six months. These days the supply is more than double that, as inventory backlog has surged to about a 12½ months' supply this summer, up from 8.3 months in May. This explains why average sale prices have been declining for so many, many months. The high end of the market, in particular, is under great pressure.

The mortgage market doesn't help. It is virtually on life support from the government, which now guarantees about 95 percent of the mortgage market. The rare conventional lenders are now actually insisting on a substantial down payment and making other more stringent financial requirements. Household formation is also shrinking now, down to an annual rate of about 600,000, compared to net household formation during the bubble years, when it was in excess of a million annually. The most critical factor subduing the demand for housing is that home ownership is no longer seen as the great, long-term buildup in equity value it once was. So it is not too difficult to understand why demand for housing has declined and will not revive anytime soon.

This is a disturbing development for those who believe that housing is going to lead America to an economic recovery, as it did during the Great Depression and then through every recession since. Each time, residential construction preceded the recovery in the larger economy. This time, in the Great Recession, a lead weight on recovery has been the disappearance of some $6 trillion of home equity value, a loss that has had a devastating effect on consumer confidence, retirement savings, and current spending. Every further 1 percent decline in home prices today lowers household wealth by approximately $170 billion. For each dollar lost in housing wealth, the estimate is that consumption is lowered by 5 cents or 5 percent. Add to this the fact that we are building a million-plus fewer homes on an annual basis from the peak years of the housing boom. With five people or more working on each home, we have permanently lost over 5 million jobs in residential construction.

That is why housing was such an important generator of normal economic recoveries. To give this context, residential construction was 6.3 percent of GDP at its recent peak in 2005 and 2006. It has fallen to the level of 2.4 percent this year. This is significant if you recognize that a 3 percent top-to-bottom decline in real GDP constitutes a serious recession.

Government programs to stimulate housing sales have not helped. There have been eight of them. One, which expired most recently (in the spring), was an $8,000 tax credit for housing contracts. All of these have done little more than distort the pattern of housing demand and actually pulled forward hundreds of thousands of units at the expense of future growth.

There is no painless, quick fix for this catastrophe. The more the government tries to paper over the housing crisis, and prevent housing from seeking its own equilibrium value in real terms, the longer it will take to find out what is true market pricing and then be able to grow from there.

The sad fact is that housing problems never left the recession of the last several years and it doesn't look as if they are going to leave anytime soon. The ultimate solution remains the same as the solution to the country's broader economic crisis. That is, getting millions of people back to productive work. 



TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: cra; dodd; economy; fannie; foreclosures; frank; freddie; housing
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 09/23/2010 9:46:20 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin
The disappearance of home equity value is a lead weight on the recovery

The same thing happened during the Hoover/Roosevelt catastrophe in the 20's/30's/40's. Home prices/values cascaded to 1/3 of their former pre-crash values. Same scenario in play today on a much larger scale.

2 posted on 09/23/2010 9:51:46 AM PDT by Don Corleone ("Oil the gun..eat the cannolis. Take it to the Mattress.")
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To: Kaslin

For every moron that paid $500,000 for a $250,000 home there is some lucky bastid that walked away with that $250,000.

For every moron that maxed out his equity and is now upside down some $250,000 there are others who benefited from the foolishness of that moron.


3 posted on 09/23/2010 9:53:45 AM PDT by Responsibility2nd (Yes, as a matter of fact, what you do in your bedroom IS my business.)
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To: Kaslin

If you think of your house as a place you live and not as an investment there is no “crisis.”

The “crisis” resulted from people buying more house than they could afford and then hoping to flip it — and left holding the bag when the flip would result in a loss.

Unemployment is still around 10% so that means employment is around 90% so the “unemployed through no fault of their own” meme is generally inaccurate and, more importantly, innaplicable.


4 posted on 09/23/2010 9:54:07 AM PDT by freedumb2003 (The TOTUS-Reader: omnipotence at home, impotence abroad (Weekly Standard))
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To: Kaslin

Not if one lived within one’s means. Too bad Dave Ramsey wasn’t on the air in the 80’s and early 21st Century days!
Those of us like minded and conservative did not fall into the “I Want it all, and I want it now!” mindset.


5 posted on 09/23/2010 9:54:20 AM PDT by Paperdoll (On the cutting edge)
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To: Kaslin

Why Canada did not have a Housing Bubble

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/2441083/posts

“No Fannie Mae. No Freddie Mac. No Barney Frank. No Chris Dodd.”

15 posted on Saturday, January 30, 2010 8:00:37 PM by Brilliant


6 posted on 09/23/2010 9:54:45 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB ( "I don't want the majority if we don't stand for something"- Jim Demint)
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To: Kaslin

oops! 90’s


7 posted on 09/23/2010 9:55:55 AM PDT by Paperdoll (On the cutting edge)
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To: Kaslin
Sadly, it is not just the home ownership aspect of the American dream that is being destroyed. "The Destruction of the Great American Dream".

A quick rediscovery of and return to the Founders' Principles is what Thomas Jefferson recommended in his First Inaugural Address:

"These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation. The wisdom of our sages and the blood of our heroes have been devoted to their attainment. They should be the creed of our political faith, the text of civic instruction, the touchstone by which to try the services of those we trust; and should we wander from them in moments of error or of alarm, let us hasten to retrace our steps and to regain the road which alone leads to peace, liberty, and safety."

For too long, our public discourse has been based on "issues" and short-term political goals, with not enough emphasis placed on how this or that question relates to a principle absolutely essential to our very liberty as a nation. We must return to the "road" described by Jefferson as he took office if liberty is to survive the assaults by both major Parties over the past 100 years.

8 posted on 09/23/2010 9:56:00 AM PDT by loveliberty2
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To: Don Corleone
Photobucket BE SURE TO TAKE OUT THE TRASH ON 11/2!

9 posted on 09/23/2010 9:57:31 AM PDT by Dick Bachert (The upcoming election is the most important in our lifetimes!!! BE THERE!!!!!!!)
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To: Kaslin

“However, 40 percent of households do not have a mortgage on their home,...”

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/homeequity.htm

It’s the life’s work of the Progressives in America to trash private ownership.


10 posted on 09/23/2010 10:02:25 AM PDT by OpusatFR
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To: Paperdoll

One could be very frugal and responsible and still be 100k underwater on their house in these times. If you painfully sacrificed and saved to put a 20% down payment on a house in 05 or 06, you could easily be in this situation. It would have taken a lot of economic awareness and market smarts to have been wise enough to hold off buying. And even if you were that wise, the temptation to then buy after prices went signficantly down, thinking they had bottomed out, would have been overwhelming.....and you would have gotten stuck anyway, though for less.


11 posted on 09/23/2010 10:04:26 AM PDT by HerrBlucher (In the White House the mighty White House the Liar sleeps tonight.............)
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To: freedumb2003

There was a tragic incident in Durham, North Carolina yesterday. A father snapped and killed his four year old son and attempted to kill his other two children who managed to escape. He then attempted suicide. As it turns out, the father fell apart after several years of financial problems related to their 3500 square foot home in a plantation community. The mixed race couple by all appearances were very devoted, friendly, and participated in community activities. The father was an unemployed EMT and the mother sold Avon products. He was apparently distraught after finally realizing he was going to lose the home. They did not belong in that house. I think part of the problem is HGTV which promotes luxurious offerings like granite countertops and stainless appliances and a bathroom for every bedroom. These young people need to be taught about starter homes or rentals. Thank you Barney Frank for making banks give loans to people who cant afford them!


12 posted on 09/23/2010 10:05:57 AM PDT by crymeariver (Good news...in a way)
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To: Kaslin

When the Democrats managed to force bad home loans by the tens of millions on the U. S. lending industry, it nearly destroyed this nation. It nearly destroyed a number of nations. It was an insidious plan.

You cause an undue burden on these lending institutions. They pass off the bad paper to other entities, spreading the exposure and immenent failure far and wide. The damage wasn’t limited to the United States either. The Western World was destabilized.

Then ours and other governments stepped in to rescue their nations, spending us all into oblivion in a matter of months.

When the loans defaulted, massive property vacancy rates caused home values to plummet. In some areas the cities are actually bull-dozing properties.

Then you get the media to trump up the failure of the Bush (A CONSERVATIVE’S) administration. “Look what he (THEY) brought upon us.”

We are trillions in debt. We have lost trillions in equity. Homes are devalued. Business vacancies are plentiful, those properties devalued.

You really have to hand it to the people who want to destroy this nation and the Western world. This one initiative was as brilliant as it could be. The best part for them, nobody who contributed to this mess has been taken to task for it. No, they’re hastily fixing it with still more ideas that will come back to haunt us in short order.

Nobody who saw it coming and didn’t do diddly squat to prevent it was seriously taken to task for it either.

Now they’re free to move on to bigger and better things, as if something bigger and better by this standard were possible. Well, handing off power to the United Nations would qualify, so I shouldn’t be too hasty.


13 posted on 09/23/2010 10:06:57 AM PDT by DoughtyOne (All hail Prince Skid-mark, Barack Hussein Obama, constantly soiling himself and our nation.)
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To: freedumb2003
If you think of your house as a place you live and not as an investment there is no “crisis.”

No crisis here. I bought my home about 20 years ago with a 15 year mortgage, which I paid off in about 11 years. I know what I paid for it but have no idea what its market value is today nor do I care, it's my home, not an investment..

My home is owned by my wife, me and the tax assessor.

And as for this, from the article:

secure shelter for the children, along with access to a good free education.

What a ridiculous statement, about 90% of my real estate taxes pay for that "free" education.

14 posted on 09/23/2010 10:14:16 AM PDT by Graybeard58 (Nobody reads tag lines.)
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To: Kaslin
A lot of the "value" in residential construction has no value at all: permits, interest costs due to regulatory delay, inspections, and needless requirements to please local vendors locked into building codes add nothing to the basic needs, yet in our market, they can add to over $100,000 per house. This is money that must be borrowed and is multiplied by interest costs and taxes yet again.

When one adds the regulatory liabilities of ownership such as taxes on rainwater runoff, protection of "endangered species" such as wolves and mountain lions, or the threat of eminent domain, it is little wonder why the demand for housing becomes increasingly inelastic. The only value it had beyond shelter was as an inflation hedge or tax shelter. The former is gone, and the latter greatly diminished.

15 posted on 09/23/2010 10:14:42 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (The RINOcrat Party is still in charge. There has never been a conservative American government.)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

bttt


16 posted on 09/23/2010 10:15:43 AM PDT by petercooper (Imam Obama)
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To: freedumb2003

That is so true. I couldn’t believe when I heard in 1967my neighbor talk about selling the house that they had just bought a couple of weeks before. The house was built 6 month after ours. As a matter of fact, when we moved into ours there was just an empty lot with some trees on it.


17 posted on 09/23/2010 10:15:43 AM PDT by Kaslin (Acronym for OBAMA: One Big Ass Mistake America)
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To: Kaslin; All

Nothing that can’t be remedied with a bulldozer.


18 posted on 09/23/2010 10:15:49 AM PDT by j.argese (Liberal thought process = oxymoron)
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To: crymeariver

Good points. Especially with young people today, they seem to feel entitled to a McMansion. We have friends of the family whose have kids who bought a few McMansions. Each one was custom built. They lived in each house for a few years, built up some equity, then moved on to another custom built house. I can’t imagine being 30 years old and expecting to live in a custom home with granite counter tops and all that. But for the “yuppies” out there, they can’t imagine living in a house similar to the house they grew up in. They prefer a McMansion instead.

And it’s funny to see McMansions with so many bedrooms occupied by a childless couple. Young couples with no intention of having children want that McMansion anyway.


19 posted on 09/23/2010 10:18:35 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego
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To: Responsibility2nd
For every moron that paid $500,000 for a $250,000 home there is some lucky bastid that walked away with that $250,000.

The problem is that most of those "lucky bastids" took their $250k profit and used it as a down payment on a million dollar house that's now worth $500k.

20 posted on 09/23/2010 10:21:25 AM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: Kaslin

Where to start...

I was able to pull up stakes and move to Kentucky specifically because I rented. I gave my landlord 3 weeks notice and I was done.

And the median income in an area is reduced by a high percentage of citizens owning their homes. The reason is simple: People who own their own home generally limit their search for work to their local economy - even in good times. A person who rents has much more freedom to look anywhere and just move to where the good jobs exist.

Oh, and I paid $1600 a month rent on a home valued at $525k. And to really drill it in, when I left the house it was valued at about $360k. But all it cost me for four years was $1600 a month. A relative pittance.


21 posted on 09/23/2010 10:27:46 AM PDT by RobRoy (The US Today: Revelation 18:4)
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To: Kaslin

Who can even own a home?? maybe a so called native American! The rest just rent from the Marxist government.


22 posted on 09/23/2010 10:28:39 AM PDT by Cheetahcat (Zero the Wright kind of Racist! We are in a state of War with Democrats)
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To: crymeariver

You are right abut the starter homes.My Mom sold real estate for over 30 years.Starting in about the mid 90’s the young couples started to want the home they grew up in and not starter homes anymore.It seems the younger generation has never been taught about waiting for things and earning them?


23 posted on 09/23/2010 10:29:50 AM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: Kaslin
The pressure to meet mortgage payments on homes that have lost value has been especially shocking—and unjust—for the millions of unemployed through no fault of their own.

Huh? It's unjust to have to honor your mortgage contract? I stopped reading right there.

24 posted on 09/23/2010 10:37:09 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: pabianice

>>It’s unjust to have to honor your mortgage contract?<<

Mailing in the keys IS honoring your contract.

But I agree about the poor use of the word “unjust”.


25 posted on 09/23/2010 10:48:48 AM PDT by RobRoy (The US Today: Revelation 18:4)
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To: HerrBlucher

I am very sorry for those who find themselves in this predicament. I guess too many people have no valid common sense. I warned my daughter that 2006 was not the time to buy because I knew what was surely coming, having been a real estate broker for over 30 years, retired. Even she did not heed my warning, and her husband took out an interest only loan!!! I about lost it when I found that out! Bright as they are, they have no sense when it comes to money.


26 posted on 09/23/2010 10:52:20 AM PDT by Paperdoll (On the cutting edge)
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To: Kaslin
along with access to a good free education.

Zuckerman you idiot, it ain't 'free'.

27 posted on 09/23/2010 10:54:07 AM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Kaslin
About 11 million residential properties, or about 23 percent of such properties with mortgages, have mortgage balances that exceed the home's value.

Well, I guess we are lucky. Our home is worth almost twice what we paid for it in 1990, and paid it off almost two years ago. We did NOT buy more than we could afford as a single earner household.

28 posted on 09/23/2010 10:59:16 AM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (Remember in November. Clean the house on Nov. 2. / Progressive is a PC word for liberal democrat.)
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To: Kaslin

“”The pressure to meet mortgage payments on homes that have lost value has been especially shocking—and unjust—for the millions of unemployed..”

Meeting a contractual obligation is Unjust? Who Knew?


29 posted on 09/23/2010 10:59:57 AM PDT by Pessimist
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To: WOBBLY BOB
““No Fannie Mae. No Freddie Mac. No Barney Frank. No Chris Dodd.””

Fannie and Freddie were just fine (and served a very useful and boring function) until the social engineers got ahold of them

30 posted on 09/23/2010 11:01:53 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Coexist; (when possible.) At all other times, have superior firepower.)
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To: Kaslin
the american delusion is what the housing market was for the last 20 years.

All mirages must vanish.

31 posted on 09/23/2010 11:09:58 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand
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To: HerrBlucher

“One could be very frugal and responsible and still be 100k underwater on their house in these times. If you painfully sacrificed and saved to put a 20% down payment on a house in 05 or 06, you could easily be in this situation. It would have taken a lot of economic awareness and market smarts to have been wise enough to hold off buying.”

Really? I don’t consider myself particularly wise or prescient (although apparently a lot more so than many people) and I could see this coming at that time. When homes had appreciated by 50% to 100% in just a few years, all the signs of a bubble with a correction to come were there for anyone with a functioning brain and a realistic outlook to see. I understand the desire of many people to get into a house of their own, and to take advantage of what seemed like an ever-rising market - but those were emotional reasons to buy, and when it comes to money there’s no substitute for a rational approach.


32 posted on 09/23/2010 11:14:59 AM PDT by -YYZ- (Strong like bull, smart like ox.)
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To: HerrBlucher
One could be very frugal and responsible and still be 100k underwater on their house in these times.

Case in point, I am going through a nasty divorce and I now have to refinance the house we built 6 years ago. We are ~$23K upside down on it based on the current appraisal, but I don't have much choice as it is on acreage that I owned and paid for before the marriage that is actually increasing in value due to the location and I am determined not to sell that property. Plus the central air went up in smoke the week after he left and I ended up replacing it which cost me a bundle and of course, I am having to eat that cost in the divorce settlement. The only upside is I was able to negotiate to bring the interest rate down and therefore the payments, so that it will fit easily within my budget without his income.

Fortunately, I was responsible enough to never let our budget exceed my income as I was concerned about things like him losing his job, which he conveniently did. The worst part is after he abandoned me physically and financially the day after I got home from hip replacement surgery (fortunately I also had disability insurance at work), moved in with his girlfriend and is admittedly staying on unemployment so he can claim "poverty" in the divorce, he is now bragging to everyone that he is "giving" me the house...ummm no, I don't think so.

33 posted on 09/23/2010 11:27:26 AM PDT by ravingnutter
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To: Paperdoll

Ouch!...a financial pain made worse by knowing that mom was right.


34 posted on 09/23/2010 11:31:31 AM PDT by HerrBlucher (In the White House the mighty White House the Liar sleeps tonight.............)
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To: crymeariver
"I think part of the problem is HGTV which promotes luxurious offerings like granite countertops and stainless appliances and a bathroom for every bedroom."

NO, that's NOT part of the problem. It's nowhere near the problem - I mean, how many people watch HGTV? C'mon. Plus, HGTV shows other types of homes as well; regular homes, apts., condos, duplex, etc. So, HGTV has nothing to do with this problem. Just my opinion.

35 posted on 09/23/2010 11:38:50 AM PDT by jackibutterfly
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To: HerrBlucher
It would have taken a lot of economic awareness and market smarts

Nonsense. Here's my former house on Zillow. The dollar sign is where I sold it.

House Zillow 8-2010

And I am NO financial genius, if you saw the rest of my portfolio you'd be convinced of that.

When I saw people with $75K incomes buying houses in my neighborhood for close to half a mil, I knew it was time to head for the door.

No rational person could have thought that the housing boom of 2002-05 was permanent. There were a lot of crooks that kept saying it was though, and a lot of fools who listened to them.

36 posted on 09/23/2010 11:39:50 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: freedumb2003

Right. I hear you. Unemployment is our fault. Gee thanks.

I can’t hire myself, can I? Where on earth do you work that you can make such statements?


37 posted on 09/23/2010 11:43:32 AM PDT by BenKenobi ("Henceforth I will call nothing else fair unless it be her gift to me")
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To: RobRoy
"Mailing in the keys IS honoring your contract. But I agree about the poor use of the word “unjust”." Yes, and yes. Corporations who own large chunks of commercial and residential properties don't hesitate to let them go back to the lenders if it's clear that's what is best for their shareholders.

Individuals should make the same clearheaded decision, provided that they don't try to have their cake and eat it too by staying in the property after they stop making payments.

38 posted on 09/23/2010 11:45:05 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: Dilbert San Diego

Sounds like my young neighbors. In their early 20s, custom built home with 3 bedrooms, three baths only it’s a tiny home but has all the nice stuff you’d imagine.

She had to get a job just to buy groceries.

No one told them how to plan for a house, how to pay for a house or how to most importantly, SAVE for a house.

3 different loans on the house, can barely feed themselves. But they have a brand new home !

We shake our head. They talk of selling in 5 years.

Seriously, they cannot afford that house.


39 posted on 09/23/2010 11:45:36 AM PDT by Jacktown
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To: WOBBLY BOB
Home Ownership and President Bush
40 posted on 09/23/2010 11:48:43 AM PDT by Leisler ("Over time they create a legal system that plunders and a moral code that glorifies it." F. Bastiat)
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To: chris_bdba

Yep. We grew up in a Chicago bungalow, Mom, Dad and two kids in 1100 square feet with one bathroom. Never felt poor, either.


41 posted on 09/23/2010 11:48:56 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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My opinion is not based on the outside looking in. They freely tell us their business without us asking.

It’s shocking how they live and what they think they should live like.

It’s really sad.


42 posted on 09/23/2010 11:49:10 AM PDT by Jacktown
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To: Notary Sojac

The fact that you even thought about where the market was and where it was heading, that you even looked at a graph of the housing market, that you even considered at all anything but your desire and need for a house, puts you ahead of most home buyers, especially first time buyers. Most people were riding on the age old idea that real estate always gains in value over the long run. That idea has been blown to smithereens now and the housing market will never be the same.


43 posted on 09/23/2010 11:49:50 AM PDT by HerrBlucher (In the White House the mighty White House the Liar sleeps tonight.............)
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To: HerrBlucher
That idea has been blown to smithereens

I sure hope so.

44 posted on 09/23/2010 11:51:28 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: chris_bdba

The house my father built, and I grew up in, is illegal now. Too low ceilings, too small a lot, septic system instead of a Title 5., too narrow rafters and floor joists....I could go on. ( They were fine houses and are still standing and looking good. )


45 posted on 09/23/2010 11:55:31 AM PDT by Leisler ("Over time they create a legal system that plunders and a moral code that glorifies it." F. Bastiat)
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To: Pessimist

Just and unjust prices is a Marxist view. Capitalism has no ‘just’ price. Price is what ever a buy and seller agree on and has no set price. This non ability to set/force/command/plann prices is the reason Socialist planners can never plan their ideal society. Prices change.

Of course most of us grew up in, have been maleducated into, and can not understand that there is no set price for anything.


46 posted on 09/23/2010 12:02:12 PM PDT by Leisler ("Over time they create a legal system that plunders and a moral code that glorifies it." F. Bastiat)
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To: HerrBlucher

Historically houses, in general, have never gained in value. Fixed for inflation.

A thirty year house, should no more be more valuable then a thirty year old car.


47 posted on 09/23/2010 12:07:46 PM PDT by Leisler ("Over time they create a legal system that plunders and a moral code that glorifies it." F. Bastiat)
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To: HerrBlucher

I bought my second house in 2000 (a modest, 1800 sq ft colonial), with about 10% down and have been paying a little extra on it for 10 years. I’m still easily $50000 underwater. Prices are down up to 70% in our area. Smart or stupid had nothing to do with it.


48 posted on 09/23/2010 12:21:50 PM PDT by JTHomes
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To: Leisler
Home Ownership and President Bush

I remember that speech - Man was I ticked off at Bush for that. After working 2 jobs to scrape up 15% down on my first home, a $37,500 2-bedroom flat condo, and after paying mortgage insurance for 3 years, and after paying "through-the-nose" 13.25% interest rates for 3 years, he decided that it was wise to give all these deadbeats a free ride. I EARNED my first home - and he was going to take my hard-EARNED money and give it away.

If the democrats weren't exponentially worse, I would have considered voting "D" in 2004.

49 posted on 09/23/2010 12:27:23 PM PDT by meyer (Tax the productive to carry the freeloaders - What is it with democrats and slavery?)
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To: Kaslin
I can't for the life of me understand why some of these morons would buy a home and go into debt up to their eye balls. I mean really...becoming a literal slave to one’s house is shear stupidity! Personally, I believe in living well within one’s means. Buy what one can actually afford; the hell with the “bling” and trying to keep up with the “Jones’” - Drowning in house debt is not living a life of pleasure to me. Oh well, if that's what their idea of “success” is, being measured by a “pretty” house with lots of “bling” then you deserve every bit of the high mortgage that comes with it and the heart ache as well.
50 posted on 09/23/2010 12:37:01 PM PDT by Jim Shoe
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