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Russia stops buying Kalashnikov
The Daily Telegraph ^ | 28 Sep 2011 | Andrew Osborn

Posted on 09/30/2011 4:32:57 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki

Russia stops buying Kalashnikov

The Russian army has said it will stop buying the country's famous Kalashnikov assault rifles until its designers come up with a genuinely new model.

By Andrew Osborn, Moscow

The current modification of the weapon – the AK-74 – was developed in the early 1970s and the defence ministry says its warehouses are "overflowing" with millions of the Soviet-era rifles, stocks of which are likely to last for a further twenty years.

"The guns being offered to us are hardly any different from those in the warehouses," a defence ministry source told the daily Izvestia newspaper.

"You don't buy three fridges for the kitchen or five TVs," the source added.

The gun's makers, Izhmash, said they were afraid of telling the weapon's legendary inventor Mikhail Kalashnikov, 91, that the army was no longer buying his guns for fear of upsetting him.

"We don't want to risk it and break such news to him. Maybe he wouldn't survive it."

Lieutenant General Mikhail Kalashnikov shot to fame in 1947 when he designed the AK-47 assault rifle or Kalash. It quickly became the Red Army's standard issue rifle and was revered for its reliability and its simplicity to build and use (it only had eight movable parts).

The robust weapon soon became ubiquitous in revolutions and guerrilla wars around the world with an estimated 100 million guns or close copies being churned out.

The AK-74, the gun the defence ministry says it does not want to buy any more, is a modification of t

(Excerpt) Read more at telegraph.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; Russia
KEYWORDS: ak47; banglist; kalashnikov; rifle; russia

1 posted on 09/30/2011 4:33:06 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki
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To: sukhoi-30mki
Well, they've cetrtainly picked up the trait of some American practices ... to wit;

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

... and of course we have a fair percentage of imbecils that really believe they can fix a perfectly operating utility.

Yo Ruskies ... I'll take all you have at $50 a pop

2 posted on 09/30/2011 4:43:39 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: sukhoi-30mki
There would be a lot more of them in the US absent all the import controls and fees that run up the cost of Aks in the US to many multiples of their price on the world markets.
3 posted on 09/30/2011 4:44:05 AM PDT by Truth29
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To: sukhoi-30mki

Yeah, you don’t want to give bad news to a guy that mass-produces assault rifles.


4 posted on 09/30/2011 4:44:53 AM PDT by Jonty30
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To: knarf

They have millions of new ones in overflowing warehouses, so why to they need to buy more now?


5 posted on 09/30/2011 4:47:16 AM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: SeaHawkFan

Stimulus.


6 posted on 09/30/2011 4:52:05 AM PDT by GOP_Party_Animal
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To: sukhoi-30mki

Revolutions have been much too peaceful in recent years.


7 posted on 09/30/2011 4:52:33 AM PDT by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (REPEAL WASHINGTON! -- Islam Delenda Est! -- I Want Constantinople Back. -- Rumble thee forth.)
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To: UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide
"Revolutions have been much too peaceful in recent years."

Yeah'n'it's about t'get a little noisy over here if things go bad in 2012.

8 posted on 09/30/2011 4:56:46 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: sukhoi-30mki
The factory (Izmash) used to be known as the Ishevsk arsenal. Before the AK, Mosin Nagant rifles were produced there. So there is a great deal of history there.

CC

9 posted on 09/30/2011 4:58:43 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (Wisdom comes from experience. Experience comes from a lack of wisdom.)
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To: sukhoi-30mki
The reason there's been little change in design is that the present design has worked so well....at least for the shooter, not the shootee.

What do they want? Carbon fibre and transformer parts?

10 posted on 09/30/2011 5:06:14 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

At least the former Soviet Union can stop spending on unnecessary things!


11 posted on 09/30/2011 5:27:46 AM PDT by Erik Latranyi (Cain for President - Because I Like The Content of His Character!)
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To: SeaHawkFan
One of the major problems the Russians have always had up until recently was: (1) their Army was so huge in terms of manpower that (2) production facilities couldn't keep up with demand for new weapons (and service and maintain those already issued to troops).

The Russians put the AK-series of weapons into the hands of troops in 1947 and the weapon has been in continuous production since at the Izhmash plant in Izhevsk, Russia. Russians have also farmed out the production of the design to numerous friendly and allied countries. In 2011, total production of the Kalashnikov assault rifle by all producers is between 70 to 90 million rifles! The AK is the most encountered small arm on planet Earth.

The Russians have been huge marketers and exporters of military AKs for decades. If they're saying they may stop procurement of military sales for Russian forces, that means Izhmash will concentrate on overseas military sales and on its Saiga line of AK products. The Saiga product line has numerous applications of the Kalashnikov system applied to rifles, carbines, and shotguns.

Saiga semi-automatic shotguns, based on the Kalashnikov design, are some of the best in the world. They may appear as homely as a common hammer, but the do what the Kalashnikov design does best — they WORK under all environmental conditions — and that's something not all of your more expensive self-loading shotguns do well.

12 posted on 09/30/2011 5:30:18 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: sukhoi-30mki
The defence ministry says its warehouses are “overflowing” with millions of the Soviet-era rifles, stocks of which are likely to last for a further twenty years.

Maybe our Moonshine, Cigarettes and guns bureaucracy could walk a few of those for the Russkies.

13 posted on 09/30/2011 5:31:58 AM PDT by HammerT (The Obama Recession, you bone it you own it.)
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To: MasterGunner01

I LOVE the Saiga. Price point is around $650, as I’ve seen it. Nothing like a semi-auto 12 ga. shotty for CQB.

Glad I bought my SAR and WASR AKs a while back. I’ve got a handful of Izhevsk-marked 91/30s and some Finnish captures (one with an hexagonal receiver). The Ruskies know how to make functional weaponry!


14 posted on 09/30/2011 5:36:25 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: knarf

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Why do some people need to have something new, just for the sake of being new. New isn’t always better.


15 posted on 09/30/2011 5:46:24 AM PDT by Roklok
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To: rarestia

I bought a Vepr-K in 5.45x39 several years ago. It’s a little heavy but rock solid and handles very nice for me. I think I paid $425 new in the box. The ammo is still cheap too. About $150/1000 rounds for Russian surplus and about $220/1000 rounds for Wolf.


16 posted on 09/30/2011 5:53:01 AM PDT by Dutch Boy
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To: Dutch Boy

Got 2000 rds of loose surplus at a local ammo “dispensery” for $165 out the door. Granted, a lot of the ammo either stovepiped or hang-fired, but it was cheap and went bang in both AKs and my SKSes. I buy Wolf for the bug-out bag mags.


17 posted on 09/30/2011 6:04:11 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Dutch Boy

I had an SAR2 a while back (5.45x39) Lots of fun to shoot. Really loud though!! Sorry I sold it now. Still have quite a bit of ammo.


18 posted on 09/30/2011 6:21:52 AM PDT by refermech
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To: rarestia
Exactly right. The Russian stuff isn't stylish or finely finished (except where absolutely necessary), but it works and does its purpose.

Trivia: The Russians had an aircraft cannon — YVa, I think, in 20 or 23 mm — that used a helical feed rotor. The feed rotor was not heat treated for hardness. Instead, as the rotor got burred, the Soviet armorer dressed the burrs with a file and put the gun in service. If the rotor got deformed, it was thrown out and a new rotor was fitted. The idea behind not heat treating the part was ingeniously simple: (1) it was easier to make; (2) not heat treating meant more parts in less time; (3) burrs meant the part was approaching the end of its service life and would need replacing; (4) expensive inspection gages were eliminated.

19 posted on 09/30/2011 6:48:44 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

I had an 1960’s era Egyptian model AK for years. Light wood stock.

It broke down easily for cleaning.

Then it sat in my moist basement for a couple years and the bolt got stuck. Didn’t realize until I was at the range, but kicked it open with my boot, racked it a few times with some oil and shot up old TVs and toilets/sinks all afternoon.

Had to sell it for financial reasons. I sure miss it.


20 posted on 09/30/2011 6:50:44 AM PDT by fellowgeek (To geek or not to geek.)
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To: MasterGunner01

Aside from the loose surplus, I’ve never had Russian surplus not go bang. Out of three 1000 rd. case purchases, I’ve only had a half-dozen misfires, stovepipes, or hangfires. It usually always goes bang!


21 posted on 09/30/2011 7:00:05 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

Russian ordnance WORKS! That is a fact — even their old corrosive primed stuff does.


22 posted on 09/30/2011 7:07:25 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01

Ugh! The Berdan primed stuff is bad. I usually carry a little spray bottle full of Windex in my range kit. Spray that down the barrel of a rifle firing Berdan primers after a long day at the range, and you should keep corrosion at bay until it can be cleaned.

There have been plenty of instances where I took more to shoot than I could clean later, and the Windex seems to work pretty well. Haven’t fouled out a barrel yet.


23 posted on 09/30/2011 7:57:39 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia
If you can find the old WW2-Korean War G.I. issue rifle bore cleaner, that stuff was designed to handle corrosive primers. Otherwise it's hot, soapy water, dry completely, and give a light coat of oil on the day you shoot and three days thereafter.
24 posted on 09/30/2011 8:55:19 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01
If you can find the old WW2-Korean War G.I. issue rifle bore cleaner, that stuff was designed to handle corrosive primers. Otherwise it's hot, soapy water, dry completely, and give a light coat of oil on the day you shoot and three days thereafter.

better:

If you can find the old WW2-Korean War G.I. issue rifle bore cleaner, that stuff was designed to handle corrosive primers. Otherwise it's hot, soapy water, dry completely, and give a light coat of oil on the day you shoot and every day for three days thereafter.

25 posted on 09/30/2011 9:34:41 AM PDT by archy (I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous!)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

This brings to my mind a comparison of the (also) marxist morons who want to reinvent the former U.S. Constitution. The arguments (except the inventory factor) are similar.


26 posted on 09/30/2011 2:16:27 PM PDT by SuperLuminal (Where is another agitator for republicanism like Sam Adams when we need him?)
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To: sukhoi-30mki; All

In fact this article is a bit misinterpreting.

That MoD really told is they don’t buy anymore because they already have enough ak-74s, let alone surplus ak-47s, akms to arm every household numerous times and they are waiting for an all-new design to replace ak as a standard rifle in a few years.
IMO it is a kind of upgraded AEK design from Kovrov manufactures once rejected in 1974 for 5.45 ak.
It was much superior to ak in terms of accuracy but military ditched it as too complicated for average conscript.
AFAIK ak makers are busy to adopt AEK technology right now to bid as well.


27 posted on 09/30/2011 5:13:51 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish; sukhoi-30mki
...they are waiting for an all-new design to replace ak as a standard rifle in a few years. IMO it is a kind of upgraded AEK design from Kovrov manufactures once rejected in 1974 for 5.45 ak. It was much superior to ak in terms of accuracy but military ditched it as too complicated for average conscript. AFAIK ak makers are busy to adopt AEK technology right now to bid as well.

I remember reading years ago that they were planning to adopt the Nikonov AN-94, but that it apparently proved to be too expensive for general production.

28 posted on 10/01/2011 3:59:50 PM PDT by Ocean Ranger ('unrestricted ocean operations')
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To: sukhoi-30mki

I read an article where the Russians are interested in “dual burst” technology. This is where two rounds are fired with a single trigger pull and a single recoil impulse.

Designers came up with an idea that used a pulley system. I can’t remember exactly how it was supposed to work, but it sounds like a failure waiting to happen.


29 posted on 10/01/2011 4:13:07 PM PDT by Nachoman (I HOPE we CHANGE presidents.)
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To: Ocean Ranger; Nachoman

IMO, An-94 ‘dual burst’ technology’s pros and cons are obvious and it’s balance leaves no chance for this thing as a standard issue rifle.

An-94 single advantage is a capability to fire super accurate two-bullets burst at a price of Ak’s simplicity and reliability.

It just not worth it for average soldier.

It is usable in a few tactical situations. For example storming a building or taking out hostage takers. Dual bursts just let you alter tactics replacing single fire with dual bursts to make sure if you hit something it won’t ever hit back (more lethality).

So they are used by police and KGB agents, army is barely interested.


30 posted on 10/01/2011 7:04:45 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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