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Making Fun of Mormonism [or not]
Religion Dispatches ^ | December 5, 2011 | MAX MUELLER

Posted on 12/31/2011 9:31:32 PM PST by delacoert

Sacred underwear, baptizing holocaust victims, gods of their own planets.

When some of America’s most celebrated pundits and public intellectuals talk about Mormons, these are the images that are summoned. Ironically in this “Mormon Moment”—signaled by a hit Broadway musical, polygamous housewives on TLC, and of course two Mormon presidential candidates—Mormons, long considered quintessential “outsiders” to mainstream American culture, today find themselves at the center of the American zeitgeist. Yet it is the Mormons’ supposed theological weirdness that is the centripetal attraction.

As Joanna Brooks has noted in these pages, the New York Times recently featured Harold Bloom’s musings on how a President Romney would govern a country, and a planet, from which he would in the afterlife depart, becoming the god of his celestial body. More planet talk happened just last week on the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Brainstorm Blog.” Michael Ruse, philosopher of biology, asserted that it is legitimate not to vote for a presidential candidate whose theology is “totally barmy. We can become gods with our own planets!… No coffee and tea is bad enough. But the underwear!” In October, in a column called “Anne Frank, a Mormon?” Maureen Dowd offered (via Bill Maher and Christopher Hitchens) the full rundown of Mormon “weirdness,” from Joseph Smith’s uneasy reputation to the “Jewish dust-up”: the posthumous baptism of Jews.

Casual assertions of knowledge about Mormon theology have dismayed longtime scholars of Mormonism. UNC’s Laurie Maffly-Kipp recently told me that “while seeming to archly critique the evangelical and atheist attacks on Mormonism,” Dowd’s column in particular represented “one pithy stroke of ignorance masquerading as informed opinion.”

A Desert of Belief

Critics like Dowd, Bloom, and Ruse would not reduce Catholicism to Popery, Hinduism to the worship of cows, or Islam to the promise of seventy virgins for jihadi martyrs. Why is Mormonism different?

There are two answers to this question.

The first is religious. It is the Mormons’ belief system, a system at odds with a ‘secular age’ when actual, as opposed to metaphorical, belief is no longer accepted as reasonable. At a talk last winter at the Harvard Law School, the don of Mormon letters, Richard Bushman, asserted that most Americans live in “a desert of belief.” The demands of secular rationalism have deforested the transcendent and supernatural even in the spiritual worlds of most religious Americans. Mormons on the other hand occupy “a jungle of belief.”

The audacity of the truth claims that Mormonism makes (angels delivering golden plates to a boy in early 19th-century upstate New York, modern-day prophets and everyday saints receiving revelations from Heavenly Father) requires that Mormon believers occupy a rich and imaginatively demanding spiritual world.

But even in this “jungle of belief,” Mormons don’t think on a daily basis about the theology behind their sacred underwear. They don’t pine for their own planets. Such obsession with what Mormons believe, even among America’s literati, belies the fact that Mormonism is foremost a belief system in action. Perhaps a concise summary of Mormon practical divinity comes from the late Church President, Spencer W. Kimball: “As God’s offspring, we have His attributes in us. We are gods in embryo, and thus have an unlimited potential for progress and attainment.” Still, at least according to the dictates of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ (LDS) current leadership, tapping into this unlimited potential takes a fairly workaday form: participating in time-consuming church service, forming heterosexual couples with the purpose of raising faithful Mormon children, and succeeding in the corporate world.

The second reason for the ongoing discussion of Mormons’ “weird” beliefs is political. Mormons are the last (or at least the latest) religious “other” to confront the heart of American politics, to deem themselves American enough to ascend to the presidency. Mormon scholar Newell Bringhurst told me recently that that the current public debates over Mormonism reminds him very much of the debate over Kennedy’s Catholicism in 1960. “Would Kennedy take orders from the Vatican?” many leaders from the American mainline churches anxiously asked. “No!”, assured Kennedy in his famous speech to a gathering of leading Protestant ministers in Dallas two months before the election. “I am not the Catholic candidate for president. I am the Democratic Party’s candidate for president, who happens also to be a Catholic. I do not speak for my church on public matters, and the church does not speak for me.”

Sticks and Stones

Romney has tried to answer skeptics of his church, but without Kennedy’s success. Mormons are still on the outs with key segments of the electorate he will need to win both the nomination and the general election. But as Bringhurst’s new book, The Mormon Quest for the Presidency points out, Romney and Huntsman are not the first Mormons to run for president, and thus not the first Mormons forced to defend the LDS Church as acceptably American. In fact the founder of Mormonism, Joseph Smith, launched a presidential bid in 1844: a campaign that ended when the Prophet was killed by an anti-Mormon mob.

Romney and Huntsman have not had to face down mobs. The violence against their Church has been rhetorical. But whether anti-Mormonism takes the form of villagers armed with muskets or the repeated chanting of “underwear, planets, tablets,” a glance at recent poll numbers about Mormon electability suggests that rhetoric does in fact hurt.

Following on Robert Jeffress’ diatribe at the Values Voters Summit, the recent Pew Forum survey found that the number one word Americans associate with Mormonism is “cult.”

The caricaturing of Mormon weirdness, even by public thinkers who should know better, does have consequences. Yet Mormon scholars like Bringhurst believe that this is a natural, and even welcome, vetting process of both Mormons as American and a Mormon as the chief American. (In this vetting process, one belief that America will soon discover—and a belief that the Mormon candidates could make more of—is that the LDS Church counts the Constitution as divinely inspired. Thus the Mormon canon of sacred scriptures includes the central document of America’s political and moral self-construction.) Many Mormon scholars believe that, as is the case today with Kennedy’s (and now Newt Gingrich’s) Catholicism, in fifty years the idea of a Mormon in the White House won’t raise many eyebrows at all.

Yet what about the short term?

One solution is to stop talking about religion as part of a presidential candidate’s resumé altogether. In an op-ed on the Rachel Maddow Show, political scientist Melissa Harris-Perry insinuated this solution. She argued that there are many reasons for Republican primary voters not to vote for Mitt Romney—many secular reasons. But his Mormonism is not one of them. Harris-Perry wants to draw a clear line between evaluating a candidate and analyzing a candidate’s faith.

In a lecture at the Danforth Center this fall, E.J. Dionne proposed a different solution: limit discussions of candidate’s faith to how this faith might influence his or her political perspective and policies. This would not include sacred underwear, seventy virgins, or transubstantiation. It does however include (as Michael Ruse allowed in his CHE post) discussions of how a candidate’s theological views of the Holy Lands, for example, might affect American policies regarding the Middle East.

As a scholar of Mormonism, and not (as I hope is obvious) as a spokesperson for the LDS Church, I must stay continuously alert to the unique context my work inhabits.

I recently wrote for The New Republic about the LDS Church’s complicated, and often troubling, history with questions of race. I’ve studied this issue for years, and for the story reached out to many different LDS constituencies for comment—including the Church itself. Yet by discussing the Church’s historical sins, I ran the risk of contributing to the othering of Mormons. Though my intention was to tell a different story about the LDS Church’s racialized history than Laurence O’Donnell’s rant on the subject in 2007, in this politically-charged environment it is hard to separate nuance from vilification.

As one Church spokesman told me on background, with two Mormons running for president, no matter how fair Mormon scholars try to be, any discussion of Mormon peculiarities can and will be used to make the Mormons seem weird, un-American, and unelectable.

I take this fair bit of caution to heart. Even criticizing caricatures of Mormon theology in the media reactivates these caricatures.

So yes, religion does intersect with politics in this country, and we do need to find ways to talk about it. I’d like to suggest, though, that unless a set of Mormon underwear declares its candidacy for the presidency we would do well to leave it out of the conversation.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: backstabberromney; dowd; ejdionne; huntsman; laurenceodonnell; maddow; michaelruse; mormoncard; romney; romneysmormoncare; romneyunderskirts; valuesvoterssummit

Characterizing rhetoric as VIOLENCE?

1 posted on 12/31/2011 9:31:38 PM PST by delacoert
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To: delacoert

P M


2 posted on 12/31/2011 9:33:39 PM PST by svcw (God's Grace - thank you!)
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To: delacoert
Sacred underwear, baptizing holocaust victims, gods of their own planets.

Don't forget: "pushing for amnesty for illegal aliens in violation of Mormon precepts and Christ's own teachings".

3 posted on 12/31/2011 9:36:02 PM PST by montag813
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To: delacoert

Joseph Smith was a false prophet, not a prophet. By capitalizing “prophet” the article smacks of being written by a Smith disciple.


4 posted on 12/31/2011 9:48:10 PM PST by F15Eagle (1 John 5:4-5, 4:15, 5:13; John 3:17-18, 6:69, 11:25, 14:6, 20:31; Rom10:8-11; 1 Tim 2:5; Titus 3:4-5)
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To: delacoert
As one Church spokesman told me on background, with two From the article: Mormons running for president, no matter how fair Mormon scholars try to be, any discussion of Mormon peculiarities can and will be used to make the Mormons seem weird, un-American, and unelectable. I take this fair bit of caution to heart. Even criticizing caricatures of Mormon theology in the media reactivates these caricatures.

Well, Mormonism is so weird & un-American (more Kolobian), who needs to caricature it? (It caricatures itself!)

5 posted on 12/31/2011 9:50:19 PM PST by Colofornian (Martyrs don't die in shootouts! Sacrificial lambs aren't armed! J. Smith fired 2 weapons as he died)
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Comment #6 Removed by Moderator

To: delacoert; All
From the article: Perhaps a concise summary of Mormon practical divinity comes from the late Church President, Spencer W. Kimball: “As God’s offspring, we have His attributes in us. We are gods in embryo, and thus have an unlimited potential for progress and attainment.”

Mormon supermen, eh? Gods? Divine peers of the one true God, eh? Utter blasphemy!

Look here from BYU: Teachings Concerning The Divine Potential of Man

See post #9 for most of Spencer W. Kimball's teachings on how Mormon men -- including Mitt and Jon Huntsman -- are supposedly "god in embryos":
Romney Insists He Is as Consistent as Humanly Possible

7 posted on 12/31/2011 9:56:46 PM PST by Colofornian (Martyrs don't die in shootouts! Sacrificial lambs aren't armed! J. Smith fired 2 weapons as he died)
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To: delacoert; All

Happy New to all FREEPERS!


8 posted on 12/31/2011 9:58:48 PM PST by Colofornian (Martyrs don't die in shootouts! Sacrificial lambs aren't armed! J. Smith fired 2 weapons as he died)
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To: delacoert

Bfl


9 posted on 12/31/2011 10:01:27 PM PST by llandres (Forget the "New America" - restore the original one!!)
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To: Religion Moderator

Yea, verily.

And the beat down goes on.


10 posted on 12/31/2011 10:06:32 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: F15Eagle
The sidebar biography of the author:

Also the author self-consciously refers to himself within the article:

Yeah, I'd say the article is written by a Smith disciple.

11 posted on 12/31/2011 10:08:06 PM PST by delacoert
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To: delacoert

Yep good note - amazing how dumbed -down America is these days. I had to explain some of this stuff to a seminary graduate, to blinking eyes.


12 posted on 12/31/2011 10:33:09 PM PST by F15Eagle (1 John 5:4-5, 4:15, 5:13; John 3:17-18, 6:69, 11:25, 14:6, 20:31; Rom10:8-11; 1 Tim 2:5; Titus 3:4-5)
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To: delacoert

Yep good note - amazing how dumbed -down America is these days. I had to explain some of this stuff to a seminary graduate, to blinking eyes.


13 posted on 12/31/2011 10:35:12 PM PST by F15Eagle (1 John 5:4-5, 4:15, 5:13; John 3:17-18, 6:69, 11:25, 14:6, 20:31; Rom10:8-11; 1 Tim 2:5; Titus 3:4-5)
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To: F15Eagle
The media's October (2012) Surprise.
14 posted on 12/31/2011 11:51:38 PM PST by CT
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To: CT

Could bed .......


15 posted on 01/01/2012 12:25:48 AM PST by F15Eagle (1 John 5:4-5, 4:15, 5:13; John 3:17-18, 6:69, 11:25, 14:6, 20:31; Rom10:8-11; 1 Tim 2:5; Titus 3:4-5)
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To: CT

Could bed .......


16 posted on 01/01/2012 12:28:46 AM PST by F15Eagle (1 John 5:4-5, 4:15, 5:13; John 3:17-18, 6:69, 11:25, 14:6, 20:31; Rom10:8-11; 1 Tim 2:5; Titus 3:4-5)
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To: delacoert

[even among America’s literati, belies the fact that Mormonism is foremost a belief system in action. Perhaps a concise summary of Mormon practical divinity comes from the late Church President, Spencer W. Kimball: “As God’s offspring, we have His attributes in us. We are gods in embryo, and thus have an unlimited potential for progress and attainment.”]

I’ve been screaming for years that Romneycare is a logical consequence of the Mormon need to do something, anything, in order to earn your planet. So you can’t separate religion from politics, But I was called a bigot.


17 posted on 01/01/2012 3:12:23 AM PST by FastCoyote (I am intolerant of the intolerable.)
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To: delacoert

[One solution is to stop talking about religion as part of a presidential candidate’s resumé altogether. In an op-ed on the Rachel Maddow Show, political scientist Melissa Harris-Perry insinuated this solution. She argued that there are many reasons for Republican primary voters not to vote for Mitt Romney—many secular reasons. But his Mormonism is not one of them. Harris-Perry wants to draw a clear line between evaluating a candidate and analyzing a candidate’s faith.

In a lecture at the Danforth Center this fall, E.J. Dionne proposed a different solution: limit discussions of candidate’s faith to how this faith might influence his or her political perspective and policies. This would not include sacred underwear, seventy virgins, or transubstantiation. It does however include (as Michael Ruse allowed in his CHE post) discussions of how a candidate’s theological views of the Holy Lands, for example, might affect American policies regarding the Middle East. ]

So if we just shut up, everything will be fine? I don’t think so, that is incredibly un-American.


18 posted on 01/01/2012 3:14:47 AM PST by FastCoyote (I am intolerant of the intolerable.)
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To: F15Eagle
Right, this writer pretends to be neutral but is in fact a LDS belief system Mormon apologist.
19 posted on 01/01/2012 3:50:15 AM PST by Syncro (Sarah Palin, the unofficial Tea Party candidate for president--Virtual Jerusalem)
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To: delacoert
Somebody's pubic relations department is working overtime.

Two days ago, Mona Charen wrote an articleNational Review in which she stated that the Mormons were "harried, persecuted, expelled, reviled, and chased across a continent" for its first seven decades. Starting from the Book of Mormon's publication in 1830 (with Joseph Smith initially listed as "author"), that would be until 1900 (there is no record of any public knowledge of Smith's claims to have had a vision around 1820, much less persecution).

For the last 50 years of Charen's period of persecution, expulsion, and chasing, the Mormons were living in Utah, where Brigham Young had established a theocracy (Charen may want to read on the Utah Wars - Utah vs. the United States - and decided whether that was persecution of Utah's insistence that it remain a theocracy).

If Mormons were persecuted in the last forty years of that seventy, it is that the U.S. required them to stop practicing polygamy, which was illegal in the U.S. territories (although the Mormon Church continued to practice polygamy after the 1890 manifesto).

It was during this period that the Mountain Meadows Massacre (September 11, 1857 - the largest religious killing of American citizens until the next September 11th attack), which she mentioned, occurred. Innocent gentile men, woman, and older children were slaughtered. Yes, the Mormons executed John Leee, but only years later, but only after pressure by the U.S. Government and in an agreement to keep the U.S. Government from pursuing justice against other Mormon leaders involved; very possibly Brigham Young.

As for Missouri, and New York, and Illinois, Charen has read no history books, including histories written in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, or other peer-reviewed religion or history journals. And nothing by the Mormon History Association. She's clearly not read about the Missouri Wars, as both sides fought. There's no mention of the Danites.

I noticed the reference to Missouri Governor Bogg's October 27, 1838, Extermination Order, a period of history that can be condemned. However, she fails to mention that Mormon Leader Sidney Rigdon first ralled the Mormon faithful and troops (and there were troops; Smith's Nauvoo legion had 1,500 armed men) on July 4, 1838 when he said:

"it shall be between us and them a war of extermination, for we will follow them till the last drop of blood is spilled, or else they will have to exterminate us; for we will carry the seat of war to their own houses and their own families, and one part or the other shall be utterly destroyed."

She fails to mention the failed assassination attempt on Governor Bogg's life by Porter Rockwell, the Mormon's Avenging Angel.

As for Smith's arrest and death, Charen fails to mention that the original kerfuffle arose because Smith ordered that a newspaper, the Nauvoo Expositor, be destroyed because it printed truths about him. Among these was the fact that the was committing polygamy, something that had been practiced by Smith and other Mormon leaders since the early 1830s but was publicly denied until 1852.

Smith also declared martial law and called out the Nauvoo legion, over which he served as general (he also was prophet of the church and has had himself crowned king of the of world in 1843 and 1844). Smith was in jail voluntarily on a charge of treason as a result of declaring martial law over the laws of the state. While there, LDS members smuggled two pistols into the Carthage Jail for Joseph. He gave one to his brother Hyrum.

Joseph was killed by a mob, but only after he first shot and murdered at least two men outside the door of the room with the cells (if shooting Smith was murder after he shot; the Smith shooting the other men was murder on his behalf, too).

I could continue, but history rarely is a piece of cloth with cleanly cut edges.

As for tarring and feathering? Ms. Charen will find out that Smith was lucky, A physician was with the group to castrate him as well; although history has been clouded, it appears from contemporaneous history that the group tarred and feathered Smith because Smith had made sexual overtures to a young sister of one of the men who formed the 'mob.' She did, after all, wind up as one of his polygamous wives. One of the wives that many Mormons insist never existed.

The cloth of history is never as cleanly cut as Charen portrays - particularly then she leaves out large parts of undisputed history to make a political point. It's a shameful piece, Ms. Charen.

20 posted on 01/01/2012 4:46:55 AM PST by Scoutmaster (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it)
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To: delacoert
Forget Meadow Mountain Massacre.
What about Romney's attacks on Gov Palin to THROW the election?

Team Romney EVEN went after the children
as he HIDES behind his religion.


"Peeking Out From the McCain Wreckage: Mitt Romney"

"Someone's got to say it: IS MITT ROMNEY RESPONSIBLE FOR OBAMA'S VICTORY?"

"Vanity: Team Romney Sabotaged Palin and Continuing to Do So?"

"Romney Supporters Trashing Palin"

"Romney advisors sniping at Palin?"


Poor sport spoiler Romney doing what he does best:

Novak: "Fred Thompson drop-out rumors traced to Romney campaign"

Said Novak: "The rumors were traced in part to Mitt Romney's campaign,
trying to stir up strife between McCain and Thompson
."

"Despite outspending his rivals by huge margins throughout the primaries,
(Mitt Romney, Carpetbagger UT,CA,MA,NH,Mexico) lost Iowa, South Carolina, Florida and California.
The only primaries he won were in Michigan, where Dad was governor; LDS states;
and a few states on Super Tuesday in which his California-obsessed rivals
couldn't spare the cash to advertise.
Only John Connolly in 1968 had a worse cash-to-delegates ratio.
And John McCain rightly did not like Romney's tactics during the primaries.
(W)hen (Romney's early leads) started slipping away, he resorted to unfair,
distorted, scorched-earth negative ads, betting that his opponents couldn't
afford to spend enough for the truth to catch up to his charges."

[Romney: A Mistake for McCain, 7/23/2008, Dick Morris]



21 posted on 01/01/2012 5:01:47 AM PST by Diogenesis ("Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. " Pres. Ronald Reagan)
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To: delacoert

Romney statement to ease Mormonism fears.

“If I am the Republican Party’s candidate for president, who happens also to be a Mormon. I do not speak for my church on public matters, and my underpants do not speak for me.”


22 posted on 01/01/2012 6:19:42 AM PST by faucetman ( Just the facts, ma'am, Just the facts)
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To: delacoert

Ex-Mormon testimony:

http://www.faithfacts.org/world-religions-and-theology/ex-mormon-testimony


23 posted on 01/01/2012 8:13:58 AM PST by grumpa
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To: delacoert
"Violence" can hacve a range of meanings: immoral aggression (a violent crime), natural force (a violent storm), vehement artistic expression (a violent percussion riff), jarring (a violent shade of red).

Violet rhetoric might fit several of these definitions, but not all of them.

24 posted on 01/01/2012 8:21:22 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (The Violent Bear It Away.)
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To: delacoert

But not a violent violet. Typo.


25 posted on 01/01/2012 8:22:06 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (The Violent Bear It Away.)
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To: F15Eagle

It was written by a Smith disciple. The author is a member of the LDS.


26 posted on 01/01/2012 8:23:31 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (The Violent Bear It Away.)
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To: Mrs. Don-o
The rhetoric highlighted in this article is of a specific type not recognizable as violence.

The rhetoric provides caricatures of weirdness - not restricted to theology alone, but weirdness encompassing the behavior and aspirations of the Mormon priesthoods afforded ALL Mormon men.

Phrases such as sacred underwear, baptizing holocaust victims, and gods of their own planets lampoon Mormons and it embarrasses them.

If it is violence (which it is not), then every politician lampooned by David Letterman, Jay Leno, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Bill Maher, Conan O'Brien is a victim of violence and the comics deserve the death penalty.

Growing up in public isn't easy on anyone.

27 posted on 01/01/2012 12:44:44 PM PST by delacoert
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To: Colofornian
Martyrs don't die in shootouts! Sacrificial lambs aren't armed! J. Smith fired 2 weapons as he died
Please cite your source because that is not mentioned in D&C 135. In History of the Church, it is stated that Joseph discharged his six-shooter (single weapon) into the hallway, some barrels of which misfired. As he was not alone, his older brother Hyrum already killed by two balls, Elder Taylor hit by four balls, but alive, and Dr. Richards escaped unharmed. Obviously the Prophet was fighting to protect himself AND others in the room, two of whom were visitors and not under arrest. BTW, legally, mobs don't go around storming jails and executing innocent prisoners. That happens in Islamic countries.
28 posted on 01/01/2012 1:07:04 PM PST by Christopher Dion (Mountain Dew and doughnuts... because breakfast is the most important meal of the day.)
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To: Christopher Dion
Please cite your source...

Well, you caused me to review my sources. And I do need to correct one thing -- which I changed in the tagline. Smith indeed had two weapons; but only fired one of the two. (Apparently, the mob didn't give him time)

Here's the source: John Hay Atlantic Monthly article December 1869 671-678

Hay wrote:

Smith had TWO loaded six-barrelled revolvers in his room. How a man on trial for capital offences came to be supplied with such luxuries is a mystery that perhaps only one man could fully have solved; and as General Deming, the Jack-Mormon sheriff, died soon after, and left no explanation of the matter, investigation is effectually baffled. But the four shots which I have chronicled, and two which had no billet, exhausted one pistol, and the enemy gave Smith no time to use the other. Severely wounded as he was, he ran to the window, which was open to receive the fresh June air, and half leaped, half fell, into the jail yard below. With his last dying energies he gathered himself up, and leaned in a sitting posture against the rude stone well-curb. His stricken condition, his vague wandering glances, excited no pity in the mob thirsting for his life. They had not seen the handsome fight he had made in the jail; there was no appeal to the border chivalry (there is chivalry on the borders, as in all semi-barbarous regions). A squad of Missourians who were standing by the fence levelled their pieces at him, and, before they could see him again for the smoke they made, Joe Smith was dead.

In History of the Church, it is stated that Joseph discharged his six-shooter (single weapon) into the hallway, some barrels of which misfired. As he was not alone, his older brother Hyrum already killed by two balls, Elder Taylor hit by four balls, but alive, and Dr. Richards escaped unharmed. (Christopher Dion)

Well, note what one faithful Latter-Day Saint said:

"Of the three barrels discharged by Joseph, it is believed he hit three men: an Irishman named Wells-who was in the mob from his love of a brawl-in the arm; Voorhees-an oversized kid from Bear Creek known for his lack of good sense-in the shoulder; and a man named Gallagher-a Southerner from the Mississippi Bottom-in the face." "Two other men were known to get hit in the hall, one a man named Townsend from Fort Madison, Iowa Territory, who died nine months later from the arm wound that wouldn't heal, and another named Mills, who was shot in the arm." - Elder Reed Blake, 24 Hours to Martyrdom, p. 129

You said some "barrels" (plural) of Smith's gun "misfired." If at least two barrels misfired from a six-shooter, how did Smith shoot five people?

Some sources chronicle four of the six shots by Smith.

Please also note: While Hyrum Smith was indeed shot in the face from the front by one of the mob shooters...a lingering Q still isn't explained: Who shot Hyrum Smith in the back?

From a Mormon author: "...it was found that the wound that killed Hyrum was sustained in his face while he was apparently holding the door against the mobbers. This was verified by one of the survivors, Willard Richards. Also discovered, however, was a wound in his lower back. The mystery of that wound is hard to explain if he was shot in the face and, falling backward, never moved as the survivors later testified. One report state he was shot in the back by a rifleman outside the window, but this is not a credible report since the...room is on the second floor and the door is some distance from the window. Other wounds found on his body were in front, sustained as he lay on the floor. But that back wound, after 160 years, is still a mystery." (Lds author George W. Givens, 500 More Little-Known Facts in Mormon History, Bonneville Books, 2004, p. 46)

I surmise that one of those supposed "misfires" from Joseph Smith actually hit his brother in the back about the same time -- Hyrum was fired on front from the front.

I've seen Web links of pictures of the scene... There’s no way somebody could have shot Hyrum Smith in the back as he was near the door on the second floor. The only person who had a weapon within range was his brother, Joseph. And they were receiving shots from just outside the door, where Joseph Smith may have wanted to return a volley. Only perhaps he hit brother Hyrum instead.

John Taylor, who was in the room, later recounted: "I shall never forget the deep feeling of sympathy and regard manifested in the countenance of Brother Joseph as he drew nigh to Hyrum, and, leaning over him, exclaimed, 'Oh! my poor, dear brother Hyrum!' He, however, instantly arose, and with a firm, quick step, and a determined expression of countenance, approached the door…

Taylor then says Smith “discharged” three barrels through a cracked door,, snapping the pistol six times. But what if he miscounted or simply assumed Smith was firing all that he had? And what if all he had was 5 shots/5 barrels left – because he had already shot his brother?

29 posted on 01/01/2012 3:06:41 PM PST by Colofornian (Martyrs don't die in shootouts Sacrificial lambs aren't armed J. Smith fired 1 of 2 guns as he died)
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To: delacoert
"The rhetoric highlighted in this article is of a specific type not recognizable as violence. "

Yes, you're right about that: the specific examples were not what I'd call violent. So I accept your point.

However I have seen stuff that the organized LGBT's, especially, have put against the Mormons, which was eye-blisteringly obscene, offensive, and thrteatening, up to and including the targeting of their businesses and homes, retaliation against their employers and their professional standing, and vicious organized harrassment. This was because of the Mormons' major financial and on-the-ground support for Proposition 8.

I am grateful to the Mormons for opposing the Gay Brown Shirts, and yes, I think there have been plenty of violent verbal attacks on Mormons. Sadly, when that happens they often can't depend on solidarity and defense from other religious and social conservatives.

30 posted on 01/01/2012 5:24:39 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o ("You can observe a lot just by watchin' " . --- Yogi Berra)
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